Credit Card Rewards – Are They Really Worth It?

These last few weeks I’ve been thinking a lot about our credit cards, and whether or not we should just close the rest of our credit accounts. My philosophy is becoming more and more anti-debt, and the idea of going credit card free is appealing, albeit a bit scary. It’s becoming less scary as we get closer to having a fully funded emergency fund.

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Other rewards cards may have good terms, but charge an annual fee. This makes it unlikely that the consumer will come out ahead if they don’t spend a large amount of money on their card.

Still other rewards cards may be generous with their rewards, but they have an annual cap or limit which means you can’t fully realize the benefit of having the card.

Another problem is that a good percentage of people who have rewards credit cards don’t even bother to use their rewards that they’ve earned. From CNNMoney:

More than 41 percent of reward cardholders either rarely or never even bother to use their rewards, said a 2006 survey by GMAC Mortgage and Harris Interactive.

That seems like an awfully large number of people who sign up to get rewards, but then never even bother to use them. What a waste! Could it be just another indicator that our culture just doesn’t value saving as much as it does spending?

Avoid The Pitfalls Of Rewards Cards

To avoid the pitfalls and get the most back from your card, Consumer Reports offers these tips:

  • Consider where you shop. Get rewards cards that fit your lifestyle and shopping patterns. In other words, if you don’t travel very often, don’t sign up for a travel rewards card. You might be better off using one that gives you cash back for gas, groceries and home purchases.
  • Project your spending. Figure out how much you think you’ll spend in a given year, and then find out how much you’ll gain for every dollar you spend. Subtract any annual fees or penalties and find out if the card is worth your time. If not, move on and find another one.
  • Favor cash back. Points vs. Cash back. Consumer reports found that cash back cards tend to offer better rewards. On top of that the cards that give points, often the points end up going un-used. Get a cash-back card to optimize your returns.
  • Skip credit if you carry a balance. If you don’t pay your bills of in full, you may want to pass on the rewards cards altogether. Because rewards cards often have higher interest rates, you may end up paying much more in interest than you reap in rewards. I know my wife and I only use the credit card when we know we can pay it off within a week or two.
  • Do the math on do-good programs. Some people are tempted to get a rewards card so that they can have the rewards sent directly to a charity of their choice. When doing this make sure you look into how much is being given because you’ll often find you can give more to the charity if you just get a cash back card and send the money to the charity yourself.
  • Use airline miles fast. If you use an airline miles card, make sure to use your points as soon as you can. Airlines will often change redemption rules, and sometimes you’ll even lose your points if you haven’t used them in time.
  • Avoid temptation. Don’t justify spending on your credit card just because you want to get that “reward” of a new Ipod or digital camera. You’ll usually find that you end up spending more than you would have in the first place – enough that you could have just gone out and bought your own reward.

Conclusion – Be Careful

When it comes down to it I think it is clear – if you already have credit card debt and you’re trying to find your way out, DON’T use your credit card. Period. Lock it up and throw away the key.

But if you are debt free and are able to pay off your card every month without any problem, go ahead and take advantage of the rewards programs. But be careful which one you choose. Find one that fits your needs and spending patterns. Also, be careful that you’re not getting caught in the “spend to earn” trap. Studies have shown that people will often spend more just because they’re getting rewards. Don’t be a sucker, buy only what you need and what you would have bought anyway.

Do you have a rewards card? Do YOU think it’s worth it? Let us know in the comments.

Source: biblemoneymatters.com

Idea to Steal: A Corner Office

Do you ever have problems finishing things? Taking a project over that last 10 percent to consider it complete? Yeah, me too. Hence, why instead of finishing off my master bedroom and bath design (that still continue to languish more than a year after renovations), I’m distracted by other little problem spots in the house that have been bugging me. Like wanting to redo my home office. Again. Since I’m usually chained to it ought to be pretty dang good, don’t you think??

My current inspiration – the wrap around desk.

There are three reasons I really love this look. First, it’s beautifully minimal and when done right (yes, there are plenty of really wrong examples), a well-made wrap around desk can serve as a beautiful focal point of space – rather than just a utilitarian, functional thing taking up space in the corner.

Secondly, I strongly believe that not having drawers makes you keep less stuff. Easier said, than actually put into practice of course, but that lack of storage certainly gives you the incentive.

Finally, the corner desk gives you much more surface area. I realize that kinda subverts the less stuff goal, but if you’re constantly editing images on a massive desktop, or are constantly surrounded by books, magazines and other sourcing material as I typically am, then a place to spread out can be rather helpful. I’ve also come to realize I no longer need a fancy acrylic stapler or that cute little bowl of paperclips. And if you float your corner desk you can actually give the appearance of taking up less space.

There are few other key components necessary to complete this look. A stellar desk chair (I will be prepared for the comments about the lack of ergonomics, I’m ok with that), a scatter of your favorite ceramics, a really good task light and some framed art for that must-have visual inspiration.

I’m lucky that I have the perfect little corner for this type of set up in my office. Now let’s see if I actually see this idea to the finish line.

Would you like to see that??

for the Idea to Steal archive, CLICK HERE.

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Source: apartment34.com

How To Pay Off Your Mortgage Early

September 28, 2018 Posted By: growth-rapidly Tag: Buying a house

Are you looking to pay off mortgage early? Or as early as in 5 years? If so, then follow these tips. Your monthly mortgage payment might your biggest monthly expense in your budget right now. So the sooner and quicker you can pay off your mortgage, the sooner you can start experiencing true financial independence.  Follow the following six steps to learn how to pay off your mortgage faster.

Wondering how paying off your mortgage early can affect your overall financial plan? Talk to a local financial advisor.

1. Refinance your mortgage.

One of the steps you can take to pay off your mortgage faster is to refinance your mortgage loan. In the simplest term, refinancing your mortgage means that you get a new loan to replace your current mortgage loan. Refinancing can help you pay off mortgage early in two ways.

The first way is that you can get a mortgage loan for a shorter term and make higher payments and thus reduce the number of years it would take you originally to pay off your mortgage. Second, when you refinance your mortgage, you can get a loan with a way better and lower interest rate, provided that you have a good credit score.

So if you’re looking to refinance your mortgage loan to get a lower interest rate, it might be worth looking into learning how to improve your credit score.

A mortgage, like any debt, is something that you have to pay. So, in addition to making your monthly mortgage payments on time, make extra payments whenever possible. Making extra mortgage payments is one of the easiest ways to pay off mortgage early.

When you make extra payments on your mortgage loan, not only will you get rid of your debt faster, you will also save tons in interest payments. The logic behind it is this: the more money you owe, the more interest you’ll pay.

If you don’t make extra payments, the interest in your mortgage loan will build up and you will end up paying interest on interest. By making extra mortgage payments, you will be able to pay off your mortgage early. 

One word of caution though, before you start making extra payments, check with your loan to see if you’re allowed to do so without incurring any extra fees. You may not be allowed to make extra payments on a mortgage loan with fixed rates.

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3. Set a pay off mortgage early date.

Use an online mortgage calculator to have an idea when you can pay off your mortgage loan. The mortgage calculator will tell you when you can expect to pay off your mortgage and how much you need to pay every month to reach that goal.

Your paycheck from your current job may not be enough to consider making extra repayments on your mortgage.  With your monthly expenses, you may not have any money left at the end of the month.

So making extra money by doing side hustles or completing surveys can help pay off mortgage early. Here are some ways to make some extra cash.

5. Watch your spending habits.

Start watching your spending habits, including avoiding impulse buying. See if you can cut back on unnecessary expenses like monthly cable bills, subscription magazines, stop eating out and buying new things. That extra money can go towards your mortgage payments.

6. Make a lump sum payment.

If you receive a bonus at work, or a tax refund, use some or all that cash towards your mortgage. 

In conclusion, paying off your mortgage early can save you thousands. So it’s a good idea to work on it.

Click here to compare mortgage rates through LendingTree. It’s completely FREE

Working With The Right Financial Advisor.

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

Source: growthrapidly.com

5 Financial Reasons You Should Never Buy A Home

September 7, 2018 Posted By: growth-rapidly Tag: Buying a house

5 Financial Reasons You Should Never Buy A Home. Thinking about buying a home for the first time?

Many people think that at a certain age or because they are married and start a family, they have to buy a house. They believe that it’s what they are expected to do or it’s the next step. But that can be a financial mistake. Even if you can afford a mortgage, there’s more to owning a home.

For example, after you buy a home, you will also need extra cash to account for repairs, property taxes, insurance. You also have to make sure you can keep a job in order to make the mortgage payments. So before you buy a home, make sure you are ready to do so. In this article, we will provide some of the common financial reasons you should never buy a home.

If you are interested in comparing the best mortgage rates through LendingTree click here. It’s completely free.

Related Articles on Buying A House

5 Financial Reasons You Should Never Buy A Home

1. Homes are very expensive.

Homes are costly to buy. The average sale price for a home in the United States in 2018 is $394,300. That means that you will have to come up with a large down payment (usually 20 percent of the home purchase price) plus closing costs and fees.

In addition, you have to make sure you can cover the monthly mortgage payments once you buy the house. There’s also property insurance, taxes, homeowner associations fees (if you own a condo), water bill, electricity bills you have to think about.

If you feel you have enough money saved for a down payment on a house and you have a stable job, then buying a home might be a good option for you than renting.

You know you can afford a mortgage? Start shopping today for a mortgage.

2. You’re not handy.

When you own a home, you also have to keep up with the place, including painting, cleaning, making repairs, mowing the lawn, etc.. If you’re not a handy person, you will have to pay for professionals to do these things. And the cost of home maintenance can eat up your savings. So if you’re not a handy person and don’t have the money for these maintenance costs, you’re better off renting a home rather than buying a home.

Shop today for the best mortgage deal.

3. You’re too busy.

Similar to reason number 2, you should not buy a home if you’re too busy in your day-to-day job and paying for someone to do the yard work for you can be costly.

4. You don’t have a stable job or a stable source of income.

If you don’t have a stable job or stable source of income, you may not be able to make on time payment. And late mortgage payments can have serious consequences. The great thing about renting rather owning a home is that you don’t have any real obligation, besides the lease. If you can’t make your monthly rental payments, the worst thing that can happen to you is eviction from the property. But with owning a home, if you make late mortgage payments, the bank can foreclose on your property.

5.  You’re planning on moving.

If you know you’re planning on moving to another state or country, or that your job might transfer you to another location, you are better off renting a home than buying a home. The rule of thumb is that you buy a home if you are going to live in it for at least 5 years.

In conclusion, although there are some great benefits in buying a home, a lot of times it just doesn’t make sense. If any of these financial reasons above apply to you, you may be better off putting off buying a home.

Click here to compare mortgage rates through LendingTree. It’s completely FREE.

Related Articles on Buying A House

Work with the Right Financial Advisor

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your saving goals Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

Source: growthrapidly.com

3 Things No One Ever Tells You About FHA Loan

August 19, 2018 Posted By: growth-rapidly Tag: Buying a house

Buying a home, especially as a first time home buyer, can be stressful. From coming up with a 20 percent down payment on the house to choosing the best mortgage lenders for the best rates, the home-buying process itself can be frustrating.

However, little do you know an FHA loan can make the process less frustrating and less stressful. For example, buying a home with an FHA loan does not require the traditional 20 percent down.

Related: Get Pre-Approved for a Mortgage through LendingTree.

1. The down payment is super low

The down payment using an FHA loan for buying a home is 3.5 percent. This is super low comparing to the conventional 20% down payment. While there are several advantages of putting 20 percent down on the house, it’s not always necessary.

For example, when you put more money on the house, you save more on interest payment and you will pay your mortgage earlier. However, not everyone can come up with 20% down payment on a house.

Related Resources

  • Get Pre-qualified for a Mortgage Online Now
  • Compare Mortgage Rates All in One Place
  • Check Your Credit Score For Free

2. Your credit score does not need to be perfect

Usually, you would need an excellent credit score to get qualified for a loan to finance your first home. However, with an FHA loan, your credit score needs to be at least 580. Before you apply for an FHA loan, make sure your credit score is at least 580.

We recommend using Credit Sesame . It’s completely free and it monitors your credit score and gets you updates on your credit score.

It’s important to have at least 580 credit score in order to qualify for an FHA loan. If you have less than that, work on improving your credit score.

Check Today’s Low FHA Mortgage Rates

3. Pre-approval for a loan is very easy

Getting pre-approved for buying a home with an FHA loan is quite easy. First, you will need to work with mortgage lenders who offer FHA loans.

Second, you want to make sure you have a copy of the following for the lenders: 1. your tax return. 2. Your 2 most recent pay stubs 3. A bank statement showing the funds for the 3.5% down payment.

Third, make sure your credit score is at least 580. This needs to be repeated and emphasized. If it’s less than that, you might still be qualified but you will need to come up with a larger down payment, like a 10 percent down.

Once you’re approved for the FHA loan, your pre-approval letter will show how much you’re qualified for so you can start

In conclusion, buying a home for the first time can be frustrating. But it does not have to be. With an FHA loan, you can buy your dream home.

These are some of the things you need to know about FHA loans before buying a home. 

If you are interested in comparing the best mortgage rates through LendingTree click here. It’s completely free.

Up Next: 5 Signs You’re Not Ready to Buy a House.

Related Resources

  • Get Pre-qualified for a Mortgage Online Now
  • Compare Mortgage Rates All in One Place
  • Check Your Credit Score For Free

Buy a home with the Right Financial Advisor

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you save 100k (whether you need it to pay off debt, to invest, to buy a house, or plan for retirement, saving, etc). Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

Source: growthrapidly.com

How To Save For A House

September 2, 2018 Posted By: growth-rapidly Tag: Buying a house

How to save for a house! For many people, saving to buy a house can be hard. This is because they don’t know how to save money or they’re not willing to limit their spending. This article will provide you with tips for saving for a house.



Determine how much money you need.

Before you decide to save for a house, you need to determine first how much money you’ll need to get started.

Typically, you need to come up with 20 percent of the property’s purchase price as a down payment and borrow the 80 percent from lenders.

In some cases, especially if you’re a first time home buyer, you can come up with way less money down as low as 3.5% thanks through FHA loans, but your interest rate might be higher. And you might be required to pay private mortgage insurance.

If you are interested in comparing the best mortgage rates through LendingTree click here. It’s completely free.

Related:

In addition to the down payment, closing costs and fees are also factors to consider in determining how much money you need to save for a house.

For example, let’s say you’re looking to buy a house for $250,000. You will need to come up with 20 percent of that price, i.e. $50,000, as the down payment. And 5 percent for closing costs, i.e., $12,500.

So in order to buy a house for $250,000, you will need to come up with $62,000.

To learn how much house you can afford, use LendingTree for the best mortgage loan rates and quotes for free. Here are some tips on how to save for a house:

Click here to compare mortgage rates through LendingTree. It’s completely FREE.

1. Increase your income.

If your monthly paycheck is not enough to save money because of monthly bills, debts, and personal expenses, then the best way to save for $62,000 is to boost your income. There are several ways to boost your income.

One is to work more by working over time at work. Another way is to have a side hustle to make extra cash on the side. A third way to boost your income is to take a part-time job.

Tip: If you want to make extra cash, I suggest that you take surveys online. I recommend, Pinecone Research (earn minimum $3 per survey), Swagbucks ($5 sign up bonus + get paid to take surveys), InboxDollars ($5 sign up bonus + get paid to take surveys), Ebates (earn up to $40 cash back), YouGov US Males ($2 bonus + $8 – $10 per hour), MySurvey ($2 sign up bonus + 5 per survey). See this blog post for a complete list. 

2. Reduce your spending.

One of the best ways to save money fast for a house is to reduce your spending. You can substantially increase your savings by living below your means.

To do so, figure out how much you spend a month on food, clothing, grooming, transportation and entertainment. See where you can cut back a little. See if there is a much cheaper alternative. Can you eat out less? Can you take public transportation rather driving your car?

Are there things that you pay for on a monthly basis that you can cut? For example, cable TV, magazine subscriptions, a gym membership that you barely use. Indeed, there are several ways to reduce your spending.

3. Pay off your debt. 

Paying off debt, such as credit card debts, is another way to save for a house. Credit card debts are high interest debts. Once you get rid of these debts, you will have more money left to save. Also, paying down your credit card debts helps your credit score.

In conclusion, if you’re in the market to buy a house, you need to come up with the down payment including the closing fee. This can be a big chunk of money that you may not have. So it’s important to follow the above tips to save money for your dream home.

Get pre-approved for with a mortgage lender to figure out how much house you can afford.

Related:

Working With The Right Financial Advisor.

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

Source: growthrapidly.com

7 Signs You’re Ready to Buy a House

For most of you, it is the American dream to own your home. But buying a home is a major financial decision, and therefore it is not something to be taken lightly.

From coming up with a sizable down payment to getting qualified for a low rate mortgage, buying a home has its challenges. Here are 8 signs that you’re ready to buy a house:

Buying a house? Estimate how much you may be able to borrow. Get pre-qualified.

 1. You have a good credit score.

If you have a good credit score, say 730 or above, congratulations! It is one of the signs that you’re ready to buy a house.

A good credit score of 730 means that not only will you able to get qualified for mortgage loan, it also means you’ll get qualified for a better interest rate.

And being able to get a better interest rate means that you will have lower monthly mortgage payments. This, in turn, means that you’ll save thousands of dollars on interests.

Click here to check your credit score with CreditSesame. It’s completely FREE.

2. You have eliminated most if not all your debt.

If you’re no longer paying off outstanding credit card debts or car loans, that extra cash can be used toward expenses that are associated with home ownership, such as property tax, insurance, repairs, maintenance, etc.

Related Resources

  • Get Pre-qualified for a Mortgage Online Now
  • Compare Mortgage Rates All in One Place
  • Check Your Credit Score For Free

3. You have a stable job.

If you have been employed for the same employer for at least 2 years, that’s a good sign you’re ready to buy a house.

The longer you are with an employer or the number of years you have been as a business owner, the more likely your job will be seen as stable.

In fact, lenders, before they extend you a mortgage loan, looks at the length of your employment to determine whether you’re able to make the payments. 

Click here to compare mortgage rates through LendingTree. It’s completely FREE.

4.  You have a good emergency fund.

On top of your mortgage payments and regular monthly expenses, there are a lot of ongoing costs you’ll have to manage when owning a home.

They include home insurance, property tax, potential renovation costs, etc…

You also have to consider life unexpected expenses, such as car repairs, medical bills, or you need to get a new washing machine. 

An emergency fund is the amount of money you have set aside to help cover the cost of these unexpected and urgent expenses.

The rule of thumb is to have at least 6 months of living expenses in that fund. So if you have that amount of cash in that fund, it gives you piece of mind that you are ready to buy a house.

If you are interested in comparing the best mortgage rates through LendingTree click here. It’s completely free.

5. You can put at least 10 percent down payment.

If you have at least 10 percent down payment for a house saved, besides your regular savings and emergency fund, then buying a home is more of a reality than a dream.

If you have 20 percent down payment saved up, that’s even better.

With a 20% down payment, not only will you avoid paying mortgage insurance, you will also have a lower interest rate and lower monthly mortgage payment. That also means you will be able to save up a lot in interests.

Read: How to Save For a Down Payment Fast

6. You don’t plan on moving in the next few years.

Buying a house is a huge, long term investment. People don’t typically buy a house in the hope to move out within 2 or 3 years unless of course it’s an investment property.

That’s what renting is for. So if you see yourself staying in the home for at least five years, then buying might be for you.

At least by staying longer, you’re able to make or regain what you paid in transaction costs and you can actually make a profit when and if you decide to sell.

7. You have done your research.

Buying a home is a major life decision that takes into consideration careful planning, budgeting and research. If you’ve done your research thoroughly, you might be ready to buy a house.

Your research might include finding out how much house you can afford and how to find the best mortgage rates.

Your might have also considered the costs in buying a home such as down payment, closing costs, inspection costs, legal fees, etc.

If you have done all of these, then it means that you know what you want and you’re comfortable with the process. 

In conclusion, if you decide to buy, you’ll want to check out LendingTree to figure out how much home you can afford.

Don’t miss: 5 Signs You’re Not Ready to Buy a Home.

Related: Apply for a Mortgage Loan Today

Work With The Right Financial Advisor.

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

Related Resources

  • Get Pre-qualified for a Mortgage Online Now
  • Compare Mortgage Rates All in One Place
  • Check Your Credit Score For Free

Source: growthrapidly.com

3 Simple Mortgage Tricks Can Save You Over $5000/year

July 8, 2019 Posted By: growth-rapidly Tag: Buying a house

If you’re ready to refinance your mortgage loan, and speed up the process of being debt free, then you’ve come to the right place. The following mortgage tricks can save you several thousands of dollars.

As a homeowner, it’s probably been a while since you last checked and compared home loan rates to see if if your current loan rate is still a good deal. If you haven’t done so in a while, then you’re making a big mistake. Indeed, this mistake could be costing you a lot of money in interest every year, given that there are relatively low home loan rates out there.

3 Simple Mortgage Tricks Can Save You Over $5000/year:

These 3 simple mortgage tricks can help you get rid of your debt sooner, save on interest, and allow you to live in a house that is actually and really your own without worrying about monthly mortgage payment ever again. Who wouldn’t want that!?


LendingTree: A Better Way to Find A Mortgage

LendingTree.com is making getting a mortgage loan simpler, faster, and more accessible. Compare the best mortgage rates from multiple mortgage lenders all in one place and at the same time. >> (opens in a new tab)”>LEARN MORE ON LENDINGTREE.COM >>>

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1. Compare mortgage rates.

Even if you think your home loan was a pretty good deal, you still need to compare home loans to see what rates are available.

LendingTree mortgage loans comparison can help you find the best mortgage loan rates for your needs and situation. With LendingTree, you can compare several mortgage lenders for home loan rates and fees side by side at one place and at the same time. It’s easy, fast, and free.

Head over to LendingTree now to compare low rate home loans.

2. Establish your credit score.

Before you can get the best home loan, you will need to establish and maintain a good credit score. In fact, a good credit score is one of the most important factors to determine whether you will get a good rate.

The first step then is to get a copy of your credit report for free online. Check for any mistakes and address them immediately. And if you find any red flags, contact the three credit bureaus (Equifax, Transunion, Experian). If your credit score is below 730, take steps to raise it.

One of the ways to raise your credit score is to pay your bill on time. In fact, payment history accounts for 35% of your total credit score. Another way to improve your credit score is keep your credit card utilization rate below 30 percent of your total balance. For more information, check out: How To Raise Your Credit Score To 850.

3. Refinance your mortgage.

After comparing home loans, you need to refinance it with a lender. Refinancing your loan simply means that you take a new loan to replace the one you currently have, in the hope that you get a lower interest rate, so you can same money on interest. Or that you get a shorter term on your mortgage.

Refinancing can save you over $5000 a year in interest and fees.

Want to compare home loans? Check out the latest mortgage rates through LendingTree. It’s completely FREE.

Not only that, it will allow you to pay your mortgage sooner. Let’s take an example. Let’s say you have a 30 year, $400,000 mortgage with an interest rate of 4.04%. If you were to refinance the loan with a rate of 3.34%, you’d be able to pay off the loan 4 years earlier.

So, if you’d like to pay off your loan sooner, check out some current rates now.

Related Articles

3 Signs You’re Not Ready To Refinance Your 30-year Mortgage

How To Pay Off Your Mortgage Early

Related Resources

Not All Mortgage Lenders Are Created Equally

When it comes to getting a mortgage, rates and fees vary. LendingTree allows you to view and compare multiple mortgage rates from multiple mortgage lenders all in one place and at the same time, so you can choose the best rates for your needs. LendingTree makes getting a loan faster, simpler, and better. >> (opens in a new tab)”>Get started today >>>

Source: growthrapidly.com