Can You Take a Home Office Tax Deduction Due to COVID-19? A Reality Check

2020 was the year of WFH: Working from home became a reality for countless Americans, as company offices closed down to curb the spread of COVID-19. And, as the time nears to file your 2020 taxes, you might be wondering: Does your home office add up to any tax deductions for you?

It’s a logical question: Since most WFH warriors shell out of their own pocket for internet, printer ink, and equipment upgrades if their laptop poops out, it’s understandable to hope you can recoup some of these expenses by claiming the home office tax deduction on your taxes.

But beware: The home office deduction has changed a lot over the years, so whether you can claim it will depend greatly on your circumstances. Here’s more on exactly who can claim a home office tax deduction—and who can’t—as well as how much certain people can save. For people who can’t claim this deduction, we’ve found some clever tax deductions to bring up with your boss that could still save you money—for now, and going forward as long as your WFH life continues.

Who can claim a home office tax deduction?

Even though the name of this tax deduction has the phrase “home office,” this doesn’t mean everyone who works from home can claim it, explains Paul Sundin, a CPA and a tax strategist at Emparion.

In a nutshell, the home office tax deduction can be claimed only by self-employed individuals—meaning freelancers, small-business owners, and anyone who works for themselves. That said, these workers still must meet certain conditions. (Read our next section for more details.)

What qualifies as a home office?

There are very strict rules on what constitutes a dedicated home office. To claim this deduction, you must use part of your home exclusively for business. That means an office that doubles as your bedroom or an occasional guest room does not qualify.

That said, an open area with a desk that’s used only for work qualifies just fine. So if your desk is in an open floor plan, simply measure the space you use for your office. And if you have an entire room dedicated only to work, measure the size of the room.

How to take a home office deduction

The easiest way to claim the deduction is to deduct $5 per square foot, up to 300 square feet, of office space, which amounts to a maximum deduction of $1,500.

If you think your deduction is worth more than $1,500, you can also try the more complicated method of tracking all the costs of your home office. Then allocate those expenses based on the percentage of the home you use solely as a home office. So if your office occupies 10% of your home’s total square footage, you can deduct 10% of what you pay to keep it running.

Here’s how that breaks down, according to Ben Reynolds, CEO and founder of Sure Dividend:

  • Business equipment: The IRS considers tangible equipment such as furniture, computers, electronic devices, and office machines as eligible.
  • Internet: You can deduct the amount used for business purposes. If you use your internet 20% of the time for work, you can deduct that percentage of your total internet bill.
  • Home expenses: These include rent, mortgage interest, real estate taxes, homeowners insurance, home repairs, electricity, and gas. If your home office takes up 10% of your home’s total square footage, you can deduct 10% of these expenses.
  • Depreciation: Computers and most office equipment can be depreciated over five years, while office furniture can depreciate for seven years. You have the option to deduct the full amount of the depreciation or gradually subtract the a portion of the total value each year.

Can W-2 employees claim a home office tax deduction?

If you are a W-2 employee, you cannot claim a home office tax deduction.

Why not? While in the past employees could claim a deduction for employment expenses over a certain percentage of their income, the 2018 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act eliminated these deductions from 2018 to 2025. The act now prevents full-time, W-2 employees from deducting home office expenses on their 2020 taxes even when they worked from home more than they did in the office, says Reynolds.

There is one small exception to keep in mind: If you’re a W-2 employee with a side hustle, you can deduct eligible home office expenses for that particular side gig.

Are there any home office tax deductions W-2 workers can claim?

Unfortunately, most employees working from home can’t claim any federal tax deductions connected to being a remote worker during the coronavirus pandemic, says Sundin.

However, full-time remote employees who live in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Hawaii, Minnesota, New York, and Pennsylvania have a unique option for their state tax returns.

“W-2 workers living in these states can deduct business expenses their employer didn’t reimburse them for,” says Reynolds. These can include a portion of your rent, mortgage interest, internet/utility bills, a new computer monitor, desk, or even an ergonomic office chair. Just be aware the deduction may not cover all of your 2020 work expenses 100%.

The exact rules vary from state to state, so check in with a local tax professional. You can also find your state’s government website complete with links to tax information explained in greater depth at the IRS.

WFH tax deductions companies can take—then reimburse you

Even if you’re a W-2 employee who can’t reap any tax benefits from a home office directly, there are still some ways you can save money—by asking your employer to take some tax breaks on your behalf, then reimbursing you.

“There is something called Section 139 where the employer can reimburse pandemic costs for employees, at their discretion, tax-free,” says Jackie Meyer, CPA and founder of The Concierge CPA and TaxPlanIQ. “You can ask for reimbursements or special stipends directly from your employer.”

Section 139 defines those expenses as “reasonable and necessary” costs incurred by employees due to the pandemic. This can include everything from costs associated with establishing a home office (buying a desk) to maintaining a home office (upgrading to a faster internet). These payments are fully deductible for companies, offering a win-win situation for both employer and employee.

You can also ask if your company would consider an “accountable plan” for the 2021 tax year. Here’s how an accountable plan works: Instead of being paid $50,000, your employer could pay you $45,000 in wages plus a $5,000 home office expense reimbursement, making your salary the same—while saving you on taxes.

Finally, business meals from restaurants (including takeout) may now be deductible under the Consolidated Appropriations Act 2021, signed into law on Dec. 27, 2020. While still subject to clarification by the Treasury and IRS, it seems that food and beverages provided by an employer for virtual or business meetings will be 100% deductible. An employer could also deduct food provided for employee virtual happy hours.

So this might be a way to get your employer to start covering more of your WFH food if you order in, says Meyer. Simply point out to your employer working meals are a great tax deduction for them, and ask them to put delivered meals on their tab.

For more smart financial news and advice, head over to MarketWatch.

Source: realtor.com

Manhattan Couple Ditch Apartment, Buy RV. Was It Worth It?>

When Jess Glazer and her husband Mike DeRose traded their Manhattan apartment for a 40-foot motor home last fall, they imagined crisscrossing the U.S., camping by peaceful lakes and mountain streams. Last week, via Zoom, Ms. Glazer showed me the Arizona RV park where they’ve been stationed since the start of the year.

“It looks like a parking lot,” she said, surveying the vast expanse of gravel crowded with hundreds of motor homes. “Well, it is a parking lot.”

Like many young professionals, Ms. Glazer and Mr. DeRose fled Manhattan during the pandemic for greener pastures. Only in their case, the new location can change weekly or daily. After leaving last October, the self-described “digital nomads” motored down the East Coast before heading west through Alabama, Texas and Arizona. And life on the road is nothing like what they envisioned.

Mike DeRose, in Texas en route to Arizona.

Photo: Jess Glazer

RV life has many advantages over Manhattan life, they say. It’s cheaper, for one. They were renting a 1,100 square-foot two-bedroom in Hell’s Kitchen for $5,800 a month. Now, they’re paying $2,000 a month on a loan for their $412,000 Tiffin Phaeton. Even factoring in insurance, fuel and site fees of about $700 a month, their expenses are roughly half what they were in New York City. “We’re saving a lot of money,” Mr. DeRose says.

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While the motor home is about 450 square feet, they’ve shared small apartments in Manhattan before, so it doesn’t feel like a squeeze, they say. Plus, the RV includes features their city digs never had—a washer and dryer, heated floors, a central vacuum, and four built-in televisions. “It’s so silly!” says Ms. Glazer. “We don’t even watch TV.”

They enjoy their revolving cast of new neighbors. Living in Manhattan, they didn’t know who lived down the hall. But RV folks are friendly and chatty, they say, and it’s easy to strike up a conversation about someone’s license plate.

What they most enjoy, of course, is the freedom to travel and explore. They’ve taken their Jeep, which they hitch to their RV, off-roading on the beach and in the mountains. They’ve explored obscure Texas hamlets, national forests and Arizona ghost towns. “Now my hiking shoes are my favorite shoes that I have. It’s so funny—I was little Miss Stiletto,” Ms. Glazer says.

The couple never expected to join the nation’s RV herd. This time last year, Ms. Glazer, who is 36 years old, was happily working at home, building her fast-growing business-coaching service. Mr. DeRose, 37, loved his job managing a territory of financial centers for Bank of America.

They enjoyed long weekend walks exploring the city. On Saturday nights, they’d typically meet friends for dinner, drinks at a rooftop bar and dancing.

Jess Glazer and Mike DeRose hiking outside of Austin, Texas, in November.

Photo: Jess Glazer

Then the pandemic hit. Suddenly, everything they loved about Manhattan—the restaurants, the theaters, the crowds—vanished. “It lost its sparkle and uniqueness,” Mr. DeRose says.

They hit on the RV idea last summer on a networking Zoom call for entrepreneurs. The host, who lived in California, recently bought an RV, and his tale was inspiring. Within two weeks, Mr. DeRose and Ms. Glazer purchased their motor home. Mr. DeRose gave several months notice to his employer so he could join his wife’s company as its CFO and COO after they hit the highway.

But even getting on the road was a challenge. You can’t just drive an RV into Manhattan and load up your things. They had to rent an RV-size parking spot near Princeton, N.J., and hire a moving van to transport their belongings, stowing the majority in a self-storage unit they’re renting for $150 a month.

They also were surprised to learn that a lot of people had the same pandemic plan. According to the RV Industry Association, RV shipments rose 34% in the second half of 2020, to 254,000.

Many RV parks were totally booked months in advance. Mr. DeRose took to putting parks on speed dial, making call after call until he got through.

And they’ve discovered they’re not welcome at the many parks reserved for guests 55-plus. Which explains why they’ve spent the last six weeks at a site that has a nice clubhouse and pool, but looks like a giant parking lot.

The couple traded their Manhattan apartment for a 40-foot motor home last fall. ‘Now my hiking shoes are my favorite shoes that I have. It’s so funny-I was little Miss Stiletto,’ Jess Glazer says.

Photo: Jess Glazer

Life on the road is more chill than life in the city where everyone’s hustling, they agree. But this presents the opposite problem: It’s hard to clock your usual 10-hour workday when most of the people around you are retired or on vacation.

And it’s even harder to work when the Wi-Fi crashes—a reality that has led to several meltdowns. Ms. Glazer typically schedules back-to-back Zoom calls for her business, which employs a team of 11. But she’s found that some RV parks advertising Wi-Fi have spotty service at best. They’ve had to subscribe to and install a bewildering array of services and backup devices to compensate.

They miss New York—walking to Central Park, Friday night Thai delivery and Sunday grocery delivery. Now, every errand and expedition requires a drive. “And we’ve been to a lot of Thai places along our journey. It’s not Thai food!” Ms. Glazer laments.

After venturing north through Utah and Wyoming this spring, they plan to return to the East Coast in the fall to settle down and start a family.

Will they return to the city? Probably not. “Our Manhattan time has passed,” Mr. DeRose says.

“But who knows?” says Ms. Glazer of their plans. “Because if you told me a year ago we’d be living in an RV, I’d tell you you were crazy.”

Write to Anne Kadet at Anne.Kadet@wsj.com

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Source: wsj.com

Most Affordable (and Warm) Places to WFH This Winter

Remember that warm-weather place you cherished as a winter getaway back in those hazy, crazy, pre-pandemic days of, say, 2019? What would it be like to live there year-round?

For more Americans, this alluring fantasy has become a reality, especially during this particularly bleak COVID-19 winter. As office and home, work and play blend together in this pandemic age, areas that once served as sunny vacation respites from chillier climes are emerging as desirable long-term locations for remote workers—and that’s been a game changer for real estate markets across the country.

“Traditionally, winter is a season when many residents of northern, colder states move south to enjoy the warmer weather in states nearer the Gulf Coast,” says George Ratiu, senior economist for realtor.com®. “This year, the migration is compounded by the COVID pandemic, leading lots of residents from the Northeast and Midwest to seek not only a seasonal escape but a permanent home.”

One driving force: These are often much cheaper places to buy a home, in an era when working remotely is becoming a viable long-term option. While expensive cities have long held a monopoly on great jobs, it now turns out that you don’t actually have to pay for an overpriced, undersized urban apartment to make a great salary. And housing data shows that house hunters from snowy states have been bidding on homes in warmer and more affordable markets in Southern markets for a change of lifestyle, weather, and cost of living.

To find the most affordable warm-weather destinations where folks can ride out the rest of the pandemic—and well beyond—the realtor.com data team scoured the United States for counties with high median temperatures for January and February, lower cost of living with median home prices below $350,000, actual inventory, access to cultural and outdoor amenities, and high-speed internet so it’s possible to get work done. We also factored in the number of vacation rentals in each county just in case there’s a need to rent the place out.

So why not escape that tiny, overpriced apartment amid the polar vortex gales to somewhere you can actually thaw out this winter—and possibly every winter? Spring and summer, too!  Let’s take a tour of your potential new WFH headquarters.

Infographic: Warm-weather escapes
Infographic: Warm-weather escapes

Tony Frenzel for realtor.com

Median home price: $275,000

Tampa Bay residents are still celebrating their Super Bowl win, but the area has a lot more going for it than Tom Brady. The metro boasts 246 days of sunshine per year, average February temperatures in the 70s, and some of the softest sand in the continental U.S. along the Gulf Coast beaches in Pinellas County.

The county, which sits along the Gulf of Mexico, across the bay from Tampa, has seen an influx of home buyers from colder, more expensive places like Illinois, Minnesota, and even New York, who have been snatching up real estate.

“We are having New Yorkers come to the Gulf Coast,” says Terry Tillung, real estate agent with Coldwell Banker Realty. “There used to be separation where East Coast people would come to the east coast of Florida and Midwesterners would come here. We’re seeing a shift now.”

Those Northeasterners and others from cold climes have been trading out their cramped apartments for homes near the water, including this two-bedroom condo with killer views of Clearwater Beach listed for $250,000 and this two-bedroom house in St. Petersburg Beach on the market for $245,000.

Median listing price: $339,900

The Intracoastal Waterway as it bisects a residential neighborhood in the Pompano Beach area of South Florida just north of Fort Lauderdale.
The Intracoastal Waterway as it bisects a residential neighborhood in the Pompano Beach area of South Florida just north of Fort Lauderdale.

Getty Images

As winter approached, remote workers from New York City, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Chicago, and pricey California began flocking to Broward County’s beaches in droves. The area, home to Fort Lauderdale, is just north of Miami-Dade and all of its world-class cultural offerings, but boasts a more chill vibe.

Its beachfront strip, once infamous for spring break shenanigans, now boasts high-end restaurants. Walkable and sophisticated Las Olas Boulevard attracts visitors from across the region who want to eat, shop, and drink.

Plus, the area boasts a wide range of housing at a wide range of prices. For just $269,000, buyers can get into this two-bedroom condo right next to one of the nicest beaches in Fort Lauderdale. And those who want newer homes with more space and better public schools can drive 20 minutes west to find places like this three-bedroom townhouse in desirable Cooper City listed at $299,900. But these days, buyers need to move fast.

“It’s been a complete frenzy,” says Samantha DeBianchi, estate agent for DeBianchi Real Estate. “If I put a home on the market and it’s priced right, I’ll get five calls within the first 30 minutes.”

Median listing price: $225,000

According to the San Diego Audubon Society, Corpus Christi is “America’s birdiest place.” The large, shallow bay on which it lies attracts diverse flocks of water birds, songbirds, and raptors that bring in avian aficionados from across the U.S. But it’s not just amateur ornithologists who have been migrating here.

The family-friendly metro is protected from the Gulf of Mexico by the gorgeous Padre and Mustang islands, which offer outdoor activities ranging from beach combing and watching sea turtles hatch to camping and paddling trails—along with plenty of tourists looking to rent vacation homes during season.

Those homes are a steal. Starting in the mid-$100,000 range, buyers can get into condos with a view, including this two-bedroom on the water listed at $144,500 or a single-family nearby for a couple of hundred thousand more, including this three-bedroom house listed for $279,900.

Median listing price: $175,000

Pelicans on Padre Island National Seashore
Pelicans on Padre Island National Seashore

iStock

One county south of Nueces, Cameron County, home to Padre Island National Seashore and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, has the same warm winter weather (average highs are in the 60s) with even more nature access and cheaper real estate. For $159,000, house hunters can get into this three-bedroom home in Laguna Vista, right near the waterfront and the wildlife refuge. Folks seeking a beach lifestyle can find a two-bedroom condo in the hub of South Padre Island for $172,500.

Median listing price: $179,800

Subdivision in Yuma, AZ
Subdivision in Yuma, AZ

iStock

There’s a reason Yuma County is called “America’s salad bowl.” The border region produces much of the lettuce, broccoli, and other leafy greens that Americans eat during the winter months. That’s because with highs in the mid-70s come February, plants can get all the sun they need to thrive when much of the rest of the country is frozen over.

The idyllic weather is reason enough to pack your bags and head south, but the landscape is just as impressive. It’s home to Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, a 665,400-acre preserve with one of the largest herds of desert bighorn sheep in the Southwest, deer, foxes, and a wide variety of plants, some found only in this small slice of the Grand Canyon state.

Yuma County has plenty of affordable options for those seeking to thaw out through the winter, from relaxing retreats in the desert, such as this two-bedroom on an acre of land in Wellton for $139,900, to nice spreads in town with a pool, like this three-bedroom listed at $174,900.

Median listing price: $179,000

Terrebonne Parish is known as a paradise for outdoor activities, where locals spend their free time hiking through nature preserves and hunting and fishing in the freshwater bayous and the Gulf of Mexico. Because everyone is outside so much anyway, the pandemic hasn’t changed that much in terms of everyday life.

“My house is on the water, so COVID times did not even affect me,” says Melanie Rogers Bruce, real estate agent with Keller Williams Bayou Partners. “I sit out on my little dock, and any stress I have goes away.”

While the area does boast multimillion-dollar waterfront homes, the $250,000 to $400,000 range gets the most action. At that price, buyers can get their own little “camp,” a waterfront house raised on stilts with a dock, including this cute three-bedroom with a boat lift for $259,900.

Median listing price: $175,000

One parish over from Terrebonne and just a hop, skip, and a jump from all the action and music of New Orleans, Lafourche Parish offers a similarly outdoorsy lifestyle to its outlying neighbor with the same mild winter climate. But the area also gives Nueces County (see above) a run for its money in birding.

From fall through spring, a diverse array of migratory birds including herons, egrets, and hummingbirds spends time in the county’s idyllic pockets of salt marsh, shallow bays, grassy meadows, and shady live oak forests.

“It is one of the biggest bird-watching communities in the nation, and there’s monarch butterfly migration,” says Rogers Bruce. “Really it’s great for any kind of outdoor animal watching.”

Nature lovers can get into their own base near Grand Isle at prices starting around $200,000, including this $225,000 four-bedroom.

Median listing price: $254,900

Savannah, GA
Savannah, GA

iStock

Savannah’s oak-covered squares and historic homes have been drawing new residents seeking a calmer (and warmer) pace of life for the past decade or so, but the city has offered yet another carrot to lure remote workers since COVID-19 roiled big tech centers: a $2,000 reimbursement for relocaters.

With its great restaurants, quaint streets, and gorgeous nearby beaches, it’s no surprise that this year has seen a massive influx of Northerners.

Buyers who want to be right near the historic core—and take advantage of the city’s moving incentive—can find small houses with compact yards starting in the $200,000s, including this two-bedroom cottage listed for $239,000.

Median listing price: $260,000

Tucson and greater Pima County have been growing steadily over the past decade. This Sun Belt city’s population has grown by a healthy 6.8% in the past decade, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Even more people have been coming in since COVID-19 hit. Remote workers from California, Nevada, and beyond have been snatching up fully contained spreads with room for entertaining (outdoors, obviously) and private pools, including this $260,000 four-bedroom and this $260,000 three-bedroom on an acre just outside Tucson Mountain Park.

“Everyone wants amenities now,” says Jen Anderson of the Jen Anderson Team, Long Realty.

Median listing price: $177,900

Biloxi beach in Harrison County, MS
Biloxi beach in Harrison County, MS

iStock

Want to know where you can buy a single-family house just steps from the beach for less than $200,000? Look to Mississippi, specifically Harrison County. The popular second-home and retirement area offers mild winter temperatures (highs in the 60s), a plethora of outdoor activities, frequent events (in normal times), and incredibly affordable housing, including this four-bedroom ranch right near the sand in Pass Christian listed for $185,000.

Mississippi’s beaches, which have been dubbed the Secret Coast, traditionally haven’t drawn as much attention as Florida, Alabama, and other coastal states, but that’s started to change as more buyers from cold places like Michigan and Colorado have been buying up homes and land.

“Many people don’t realize what a gem we have here, but I think the word is getting out,” says Wendy Hope Boyd, a Realtor with Coldwell Banker Alfonso Realty.

Source: realtor.com

How Much Nurses Get Paid in Every State

Health care worker in a mask and face shield
DC Studio / Shutterstock.com

Nurses serve on the front lines of health care. Their work is tough, but fortunately it’s well-compensated. And if you are considering a career as a nurse, the good news is that the industry is growing and the pay tends to be good.

The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates there are more than 2.9 million registered nurses across the country, pulling down an average annual wage of $77,460. Additionally, there are some 200,000 nurse practitioners, earning an average of $111,840, and some 697,000 licensed practical and vocational nurses, earning an average of $48,500.

But the pay varies greatly depending on where the nurse practices.

Following are the average annual wages for multiple types of nurses in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, according to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics data, which is for 2019. The states are ranked based on pay for RNs.

51. South Dakota

Sanford USD Medical Center
Ken Wolter / Shutterstock.com

South Dakota is one of several states predicted to have a shortage of registered nurses (RNs) by 2030, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that the state will be short 1,900 RNs by 2030.

South Dakota is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $59,540

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $102,230

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $38,760

50. Mississippi

Nurse
insta_photos / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively low average wages in Mississippi. The state ranks dead last for its average annual wages for elementary-school teachers, for police officers and sheriff’s deputies and even for cashiers, as we have reported.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $59,750

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,740

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $39,020

49. Alabama

Prattville Baptist Hospital
JNix / Shutterstock.com

In Alabama and nationally, nurse practitioners earn more money than multiple other types of nurses, on average. To become an NP, you must first be a registered nurse and also pursue specialized graduate education, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $60,230

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $99,570

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $39,310

48. Iowa

Hospital nurse in mask and gloves
Rawpixel.com / Shutterstock.com

Different types of nurses are most likely to work in different types of health care settings, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. RNs most commonly work in hospitals, and NPs in physicians’ offices. Meanwhile, licensed practical and vocational nurses most often work in nursing care facilities, also referred to as skilled nursing facilities.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $60,590

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,910

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,220

47. Arkansas

Nurse with elderly patient
Alexander Raths / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $61,330

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,840

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $40,760

46. Kansas

University of Kansas Hospital
APN Photography / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $62,450

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $100,550

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,260

45. Tennessee

Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital
Travel_with_me / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $62,570

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $96,510

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $41,270

44. West Virginia

nurse
Syda Productions / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $63,220

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $103,170

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $37,500

43. Kentucky

Nurse with patient
michaeljung / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $63,750

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $99,560

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,740

42. Missouri

Jon Rehg / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,160

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,050

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $43,410

41. Oklahoma

Man in the hospital coughing
wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,800

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $113,200

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,090

40. South Carolina

home health nurse taking a senior's blood pressure
Dmytro Zinkevych / Shutterstock.com

South Carolina is one of seven states projected to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to the report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts the Palmetto State will be short 10,400 RNs by that year.

South Carolina is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,840

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $100,680

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,190

39. Louisiana

Home health aide
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Louisiana is home to more than 19,000 licensed practical nurses and licensed vocational nurses, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Consequently, Louisiana has a higher concentration of this type of nursing job than any other state in the nation.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $65,850

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $40,300

38. North Dakota

Hospital staff
Spotmatik Ltd / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,290

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,760

37. North Carolina

Thank you sign for health and essential workers
Darwin Brandis / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,440

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,890

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,880

36. Indiana

Floyd Memorial Hospital in Albany, Indiana.
Thomas Kelley / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,560

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,380

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,050

35. Nebraska

Essential worker
G-Stock Studio / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,640

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,450

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,450

34. Florida

Boca Raton Regional Hospital
Mike Kuhlman / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $67,610

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $101,510

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,580

33. Utah

nurse
Cryptographer / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $67,970

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,660

32. Ohio

Cleveland Clinic
Duttagupta M K / Shutterstock.com

Ohio is home to the Cleveland Clinic — which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the nation’s No. 2 hospital overall, and the No. 1 specialty hospital for cardiology and heart surgery, as we report in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $68,220

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $103,780

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,020

31. Wyoming

senior receiving long-term care
Photographee.eu / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $68,690

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $118,110

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,980

30. Montana

Young female medical student working at a hospital
Stokkete / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,340

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,120

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,730

29. Idaho

Idaho state capital building
Charles Knowles / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,480

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,860

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,430

28. Georgia

Mark Winfrey / Shutterstock.com

Georgia is one of several states predicted to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that the Peach State will be short 2,200 RNs by that time.

Georgia is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the analysis found. The state is projected to be short 10,500 LPNs by that year.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,590

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,670

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,570

27. Maine

nurse
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,760

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,960

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,930

26. Vermont

University of Vermont Medical Center
Bob LoCicero / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $70,240

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,840

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $50,210

25. Pennsylvania

hospital
Ilze_Lucero / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $71,410

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $101,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,200

24. Virginia

UVA health care heroes banner
Kim Kelley-Wagner / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $71,870

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,110

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,070

23. Wisconsin

Senior man with nurse
Nejron Photo / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $72,610

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $112,130

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,550

22. Michigan

University of Michigan Hospitals
Susan Montgomery / Shutterstock.com

University of Michigan Hospitals-Michigan Medicine ranks among the top 20 hospitals in the United States. Like the University of Michigan itself, the hospital is located in the city of Ann Arbor.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,200

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $108,660

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $50,300

21. New Mexico

Home health care worker
Rob Marmion / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,300

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,930

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $48,330

20. Illinois

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Chicago is home to two of the top 20 hospitals in the United States — Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Rush University Medical Center — according to the rankings of U.S. News & World Report.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,510

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $107,860

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,290

19. New Hampshire

Manchester, New Hampshire
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,880

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,680

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,220

18. Delaware

nurse
wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $74,100

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $112,430

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,520

17. Texas

MD Anderson Cancer Center
JHVEPhoto / Shutterstock.com

Texas is one of several states facing a serious shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It’s also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030.

Additionally, Texas has a larger share of uninsured residents than any other state, as we detail in “16 States With the Worst Rates of Health Insurance.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $74,540

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,440

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $47,370

16. Colorado

Denver, Colorado
f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $76,230

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,760

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,180

15. Maryland

Johns Hopkins Hospital
Richard Thornton / Shutterstock.com

Baltimore is home to the Johns Hopkins Hospital, which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the top hospital in the country for multiple specialties — from ear, nose and throat care to psychiatry — as we report in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.” The publication also ranks Johns Hopkins Hospital the No. 3 hospital in the country overall.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $77,910

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,800

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $55,020

14. Arizona

hospital
vewfinder / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $78,330

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,480

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,290

13. Minnesota

Mayo Clinic Hospital
Leigh Trail / Shutterstock.com

The city of Rochester, Minnesota, is home to the Mayo Clinic — which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the No. 1 hospital in the nation, as we detail in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.” The Mayo Clinic also is ranked No. 1 for multiple types of specialty care, from diabetes and endocrinology to pulmonology and lung surgery.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $80,130

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,850

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $48,460

12. Rhode Island

nurses
Spotmatik Ltd / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $82,310

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,310

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $59,860

11. Connecticut

Candlewood Lake
By tmphoto98 / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $83,440

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,140

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,380

10. New Jersey

Amy Lutz / Shutterstock.com

New Jersey is one of seven states expected to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency predicts that the state will be short a whopping 11,400 RNs in about a decade.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $84,280

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $123,810

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,510

9. Washington

Bellevue, Washington
mandritoiu / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $86,170

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $126,920

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,940

8. New York

lev radin / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively high average wages in New York. The state ranks No. 1 for its wages for grade-school teachers, as we report in “Here’s How Much Teachers Are Paid in Every State.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $87,840

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,550

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,860

7. Nevada

Nurse
GagliardiImages / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $88,380

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,970

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $58,470

6. Alaska

Anchorage, Alaska
Rex Lisman / Shutterstock.com

Alaska is one of seven states facing a shortage of registered nurses in the near future, according to the report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that by 2030, the state will be short 5,400 registered nurses.

Alaska is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $90,500

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,890

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $63,850

5. Oregon

nurse pushing a patient in a wheelchair
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $92,960

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $113,430

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,740

4. Massachusetts

Worcester, Massachusetts
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

Massachusetts has a larger share of insured residents than any other state in the country, as we detail in “15 States Where the Most People Have Health Insurance.” A mere 3% of Massachusetts’ population is without insurance.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $93,160

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $60,340

3. District of Columbia

Washington D.C.
f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively high average wages in Washington, D.C. The nation’s capital ranks No. 1 — beating out all 50 states — based on its pay for the heroes behind cash registers, as we report in “How Much Cashiers Earn in Every State.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $94,820

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,220

2. Hawaii

Honolulu, Hawaii
MNStudio / Shutterstock.com

U.S. News & World Report named Hawaii the No. 1 state for health care in general. In the analysis, Hawaii leads the nation in health care quality, is third for health care access and fourth for public health.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $104,060

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $124,000

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $51,010

1. California

Keck Hospital of USC
Kit Leong / Shutterstock.com

California may pay its nurses well, but it is one of seven states forecast to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency predicts that the state will be short 44,500 full-time RN jobs — far more than any other state — by that year.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $113,240

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $138,660

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $60,240

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Assurance Financial Review: So Fast You Can Apply During Halftime

Posted on February 11th, 2021

Today we’ll check out a mortgage lender based in the south by the name “Assurance Financial,” which is headquartered in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Aside from being fans of LSU, they also say you can apply for a mortgage during halftime, which is handy if you’re a sports fan.

They’re able to get things done quickly because they’ve employed the latest cutting-edge technology, and they do everything in-house. Let’s learn more.

Assurance Financial Fast Facts

  • Direct mortgage lender that operates online
  • Offers home purchase financing, refinances, and construction loans
  • Founded in 2001, headquartered in Baton Rouge, LA
  • Licensed in 43 states and the District of Columbia
  • Funded more than $1 billion in home loans last year
  • Does most of their business in home state of Louisiana

Assurance Financial is an independent, direct-to-consumer full-service residential mortgage banker that offers home purchase financing, mortgage refinances, and construction loans.

This means you can apply for a home loan directly from their website so you don’t need to leave your couch.

But while the company mostly operates online, they do have physical branches in eight states nationwide to serve customers locally.

They’ve been around since the turn of the century, which is a lifetime in the mortgage biz, and funded more than $1 billion in home loans last year.

At present, they’re licensed in 43 states and the District of Columbia, but not currently available in Arizona, Hawaii, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, or Utah.

Much of their business came from their home state of Louisiana, along with Alabama, Georgia, Texas, and Virginia.

About 70% of total volume comes from home purchase loans, with the remainder mostly refinances and some HELOCs.

How to Apply for a Mortgage with Assurance Financial

abby

  • You can call them, have them call you, get in touch with a loan officer, or use their digital assistant Abby
  • Their digital mortgage offering is powered by leading fintech company Blend
  • It allows you to complete most of the process electronically from any device
  • They handle the entire loan process from start to finish in-house to ensure turn times are quick

One great thing about Assurance Financial is the ability to apply for a home loan from any device using the latest technology.

They’ve turned to Blend to get that done, and go a step further in simplifying things by bringing in their digital assistant Abby.

The character is actually based on their “very real” Post Closing Manager Abby Widmer.

You can apply with “Abby” in as little as 15 minutes and get helpful tips and guidance along the way so you know what you’re getting into and what to expect.

But if you want a real human to help you right off the bat, you’re also able to peruse the online loan officer directory on their website.

There you can enter your location to see which loan officers are licensed in your state, then get access to their contact information if you want to discuss pricing and loan options first.

Regardless of how you apply, a licensed loan officer will step in at some point to get you approved and help you fund your loan.

Either way, it’ll be super simple because you can complete the app online and link your financial accounts and tax returns using your credentials instead of having to scan or fax paperwork.

Additionally, you can eSign all those pesky disclosures and manage your loan from their online portal 24/7. You’ll also get status updates and a to-do list to stay on track.

As mentioned, they also have branches in eight states if you prefer to do business in-person, including Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

Loan Programs Offered by Assurance Financial

  • Home purchase loans
  • Refinance loans: rate and term and cash out
  • Construction loans (one and two-time close options)
  • Conforming loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
  • FHA loans
  • VA loans
  • USDA loans
  • Jumbo loans
  • Non-QM loans
  • Down payment assistance programs
  • Manufactured home loans
  • HELOCs
  • Fixed-rate and adjustable-rate options available

Assurance Financial has a very wide range of loan programs available, and lends on all property types, including single-family homes, condos/townhomes, and even manufactured homes.

You can get financing for a primary residence, vacation home, 1-4 investment property, or even a new build if you’re constructing your dream home.

If you’re an existing homeowner, you can take advantage of a rate and term refinance or a cash out refinance if you want to take advantage of a lower rate and/or your accrued equity.

With regard to loan types, you can get a conforming loan backed by Fannie/Freddie, a government-backed loan such as an FHA or VA loan, or even a jumbo loan.

They say they also offer non-QM options and down payment assistance programs for first-time home buyers, along with home equity lines of credit (HELOCs).

Both fixed-rate and adjustable-rate mortgage options are available in a variety of loan terms.

Assurance Financial Mortgage Rates

One drawback to Assurance Financial is the fact that they don’t list their mortgage rates online or elsewhere.

As such, it’s unclear where they stand in the loan pricing department. It is recommended that you speak to a loan officer to get pricing first before diving into an application.

That way you can be assured that they’re competitively priced relative to other lenders out there so you don’t waste your time.

Also be sure to inquire about any lender fees they may charge, such as an application fee or loan origination fee.

Once you know these things, which together make up the mortgage APR, you can accurately shop your home loan with other lenders to ensure they’re good on price.

Assurance Financial Reviews

They seem to really excel when it comes to customer service, so much so that someone living far away from their corporate headquarters might be tempted to use them.

On SocialSurvey, they have a 4.94-star rating out of 5 from nearly 15,000 customer reviews, which is impressive for both the rating and sheer volume.

Similarly, they’ve got a 5-star rating out of 5 from more than 7,000 reviews on LendingTree, with a 100% recommended score.

They are rated excellent in every category, including interest rates, closing costs, responsiveness, and customer service.

On Zillow, it’s the same deal, a 4.99-star rating out of a possible 5 from almost 100 reviews, which while a smaller sample size is on point with their other ratings.

Lastly, they are a Better Business Bureau accredited company (since 2003) and currently hold an ‘A+’ rating based on customer complaint history.

In summary, Assurance Financial has incredible customer satisfaction ratings, the latest technology, an excellent website, and tons of loan programs to choose from.

Assuming they also offer great pricing, they could be an excellent choice for your home loan needs, whether you’re a first-time buyer or an existing homeowner.

Assurance Financial Pros and Cons

The Pros

  • Can apply for a home loan directly from their website
  • Offer a digital mortgage application powered by Blend
  • Also have a digital assistant to help you along the way
  • Their website is very modern and easy to navigate
  • Lots of programs to choose from including jumbos and non-QMs
  • Excellent customer reviews from past customers
  • A+ BBB rating, accredited company
  • Physical branches in some states
  • Free mortgage calculators and mortgage guides online

The Cons

  • Not licensed in all states
  • Do not list mortgage rates or lender fees on their website

(photo: Stuart Seeger)

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

21 Pharmacy Chains Ready to Give COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID vaccination
Prostock-studio / Shutterstock.com

After a miserable year in the dark night of a pandemic, a new day is about to dawn.

Millions of Americans have received the vaccine against COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. And the rest of us will have our opportunity soon.

If you can’t wait to get the shot — and to return to normal life — you’ll want to bookmark this story. Following is a list of pharmacies participating in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program for COVID-19 Vaccination.

The program is a collaboration that includes the federal government, states and territories, and 21 national pharmacy partners and independent pharmacy networks.

Right now, the program is slowly rolling out to select pharmacy locations that are vaccinating eligible individuals. Eventually, more than 40,000 pharmacies will administer the vaccine to everyone who wants it.

Walmart and Sam’s Club

QualityHD / Shutterstock.com

Both the retail giant and its affiliated warehouse club are ready to begin vaccinating Americans.

On Feb. 2, Walmart said select pharmacies at retailer locations in 22 states would begin administering the vaccine once doses are available late next week. According to Walmart:

“Once our locations have received the vaccines, eligible customers and members can reserve a convenient vaccine appointment directly via a scheduling tool on the Walmart and Sam’s Club websites, while allocation lasts. In addition to appointments, the scheduler will provide a digital reminder when it’s time to return for the second dose of the vaccine in order for the vaccine to be fully effective.”

Walmart already is vaccinating patients in states where it has agreements with local governments.

The states in which Walmart will be a federal pharmacy partner are Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and Wyoming.

For more information: Visit Walmart’s COVID-19 vaccine page.

Walgreens

Ken Wolter / Shutterstock.com

Walgreens will begin its vaccination efforts as part of the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program for COVID-19 Vaccination on Feb. 12.

Initially, 15 states and jurisdictions will participate: Chicago, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, New York City, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, Vermont, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

The pharmacy chain already has been vaccinating people in states where it has reached agreements with local governments.

For more information: Visit Walgreens’ COVID-19 vaccine page.

CVS

CVS
Jonathan Weiss / Shutterstock.com

On Feb. 11, certain CVS locations in 11 states will begin giving the vaccine to eligible populations. CVS expects the initial supply to be about 250,000 total doses. According to CVS:

“More than 90,000 health care professionals including pharmacists, licensed pharmacy technicians, and nurses will participate in the vaccination effort, giving CVS Pharmacy the capacity to administer 20-25 million shots per month.”

States where CVS will roll out its vaccination efforts are California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.

CVS is also working directly with Indiana and Ohio to provide some vaccinations.

For more information: Visit CVS’ COVID-19 resource center.

Kroger and related pharmacies

Ralphs
Ken Wolter / Shutterstock.com

The Kroger Co. announced in late December that it would partner with federal and state governments to offer the COVID-19 vaccine across its 2,200 pharmacies and 220 clinics. (The company’s other chains include Fred Meyer, Harris Teeter and Ralphs, among others.)

In January, Kroger said pharmacies at its Ralphs grocery stores had begun giving the vaccine to health care personnel in Southern California.

As of Feb. 3, pharmacies that are part of the Kroger family had received “a limited supply of the COVID-19 vaccine in select areas,” Kroger said, and the company will update its “COVID-19 Vaccine Availability” webpage regularly.

For more information: Visit Kroger’s COVID-19 vaccinations page.

Publix

Boofoto / Shutterstock.com

Publix already has rolled out vaccinations in locations in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. There is no word yet on when or how Publix plans to expand its vaccination efforts in the near future.

For more information: Visit Publix’s COVID-19 vaccine page.

Costco

Costco Wholesale exterior
Jonathan Weiss / Shutterstock.com

The warehouse club giant issued an announcement in late January that simply says it will begin offering the vaccine at its pharmacies “as soon as they are available, in accordance with CDC and state guidelines.”

Costco urges you not to contact your local Costco pharmacy, as such locations will not be able to schedule an appointment at this time.

For more information: Costco’s announcement directs people to visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website or their state department of health website to learn more about vaccine availability in their area and their eligibility for the vaccine.

Others

Senior woman getting vaccine
Image Point Fr / Shutterstock.com

Many other pharmacies — from Rite Aid to much smaller pharmacy chains — are participating in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program for COVID-19 Vaccination. There are 21 chains in all. For a full list, visit the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com