Will a title loan negatively affect your credit score?

When you’re in a position where you need cash fast, title and cash loans can seem like a light at the end of the tunnel. After all, receiving all the money you need in hand is difficult to turn down and you’re sure that you can pay back the balance by your next paycheck. Even with this certainty, you may be wondering: what effect do title loans have on your credit score? Like most financial-related questions, the answer isn’t written in black in white.

What is a Title Loan?

Before we talk about the effect that title loans have on your credit, let’s explore what a title loan is and how it works. Title loans involve using the title of your car as collateral for a loan. So if you fail to pay your loan within the set agreement, you will essentially lose your vehicle.

Financial experts often consider title loans as a poor financing choice because of their high annual percentage rates, but if you know that you will have the cash to pay back the loan before the loan is due, it can be a viable solution in an urgent situation. To avoid losing your vehicle, it’s essential that you make your payments in full and early if possible.

Car Title LoansCar Title Loans

Understanding Secured & Unsecured Loans

Title loans are treated differently than traditional bank loans because they are secured. A secured loan means that you have provided your lender with collateral. In the case that you cannot manage your loan, this provides the creditor protection against their investment. These types of agreements are common with paycheck loans, pawn shop loans, car title loans, and any other loan types that require collateral.

Conversely, unsecured loans do not require any collateral. These types of loans are more traditional and provided by larger banking institutions. Instead, unsecured loans approvals are based solely on creditworthiness and trust. All unsecured loans require a credit check.

How Toes a Title Loan Affect My Credit?

Title loans don’t have a significant effect on your credit. Some title loan lenders don’t even require a credit check before they grant you an approval. This type of financing is often a solution for individuals with low credit who need money fast.

While making payments on time will generally help improve your credit, this isn’t the case with title loans. On the other side of things, occasionally missing a title loan payment will not automatically lower your score either- as long as your loan specialist does not repossess your vehicle.

The only time a lender may report your car title loan to the credit bureaus is under the circumstance of vehicle repossession. Losing your car is not only damaging to your life, but can affect your credit negatively for years.

What are my options if I can’t meet my title loan requirements?

If you find yourself in a hardship where you cannot pay your title loan it may be tempting to walk away – they don’t count against your credit score, right? Besides losing your car, failing to meet your loan agreements can negatively impact your credit and your finances.

The consequences of walking away from your title loan will ultimately depend on your agreement with your lender. In many cases, if you offer up your car for repossession voluntarily, the lender will not report the failed agreement on your credit score. However, many lenders don’t actually want your vehicle. Auctioning off your car may be less profitable than forcing you to make the payments. If this is how your lender prefers to operate, you may find difficulty in getting out of your title loan.

Before you sign any contracts, it’s important to understand the terms of your loan entirely. Your agreement should detail whether or not your lender has the right to refuse your collateral in exchange for payment. While this type of arrangement won’t necessarily affect your credit, failing to understand the terms of your agreement and communicate with your lender could have a negative impact on your finances.

Source: creditabsolute.com

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The Perfect Storm for Retirees

Today’s retirees are unlike any other retirees in history: They’re living longer, and many of them want to spend more in retirement than previous generations. At the same time, the fear of running out of money is incredibly common, and for good reason.

The bargain made decades ago in the transition from defined benefit pension plans to the modern 401(k) gave workers control over their savings but also transferred longevity risk from the employer to the worker. As such, these days few retirees can rely on a significant pension and must make their savings last for decades. This may be even more difficult considering that we could see persistently low interest rates, higher inflation and market volatility in the coming years.

The result? Today’s retirees could face a perfect storm, and they may have to use different financial planning strategies than retirees of the past.

Low Interest Rates

The Federal Reserve recently announced that it would maintain the target federal funds rate (the benchmark for most interest rates) at a range of 0% to 0.25%. The Fed cut rates down to this level in March of last year in hopes of combating the crippling economic effects of the pandemic, and it may not raise them for years. Interest rates are expected to stay where they are until 2023. Even when they rise, they could stay relatively low for some time.

As the U.S. government borrowings increase dramatically, the motivation for holding rates down increases. This combination works in favor of immense government borrowing, but for retirees it creates an intrinsic tax in the form of persistently low rates paid on savings. Borrowers love low rates as much as savers detest them. This truth is very much in play today. This poses a problem to retirees who want to earn a reasonable rate of return while minimizing their investment risk.

The Potential for Inflation

Coupled with persistently low interest rates, retirees could face increased inflation in the coming years. Government spending increased significantly due to COVID, with the CARES Act costing $2.2 trillion and the American Rescue Plan Act costing $1.9 trillion alone. The Federal Reserve has said that there is potential for “transient” inflation in the coming months and that it would allow inflation to rise above 2% for some time. While most experts don’t think it’s likely that we’ll return to the high inflation rates of the 1970s, even a normal inflation rate is cause for concern among those nearing and in retirement. Over the course of a long retirement, inflation can eat away at savings significantly.

Consider this: After 20 years with a 2% inflation rate (the Fed’s “target” interest rate), $1 million would only have the buying power of $672,971.

The combination of low interest rates and higher inflation may drive many retirees to take on more market risk than they normally would to account for that.

Market Risk

Those nearing retirement and recently retired can expose themselves to sequence-of-returns risk if they take on too much market risk. This is when a portfolio experiences a significant drop in value while the owner is withdrawing funds, owing to nothing more than unlucky timing. This risk is actuated by the timing of the age of the individual retiree and when they plan to retire, not something anyone usually times around market levels or investment performance but rather around lifestyle or even health factors. As a result, often the portfolio cannot fully recover as the market bounces back, due to the burden of regular withdrawals, and may be left significantly reduced.

Today’s retirees live in an uncertain world with an uncertain market. No one could have predicted the pandemic or its economic effects, and similarly, no one can predict where the market will be next year, in five years or in 10 years. While younger investors can ride out periods of volatility, retirees who are relying on their investments for income may have significantly lower risk tolerance and need to rethink their retirement investment strategy.

Is There a Solution?

This leaves many retirees in a perfect storm. They need to make their savings last longer than any previous generation, but with interest rates at historic lows, they may feel pressured to subject their savings to too much market risk in hopes of earning a reasonable rate of return. The most fundamental step to take is committing to regularized, frequent reviews with your financial adviser. Depending on portfolio size and complexity, this is most often quarterly, but should be no less frequent than every six months. This time investment keeps retirees attuned to shifts in the portfolio that will sustain them for decades to come.

Finally, consider the breadth of options available to your adviser, or on the retail platform you use if you are self-managed. Sometimes having the right tool is everything in getting the job done.  Often advisers have a greater breadth of options available that can more than offset their cost. Remember there are options beyond equities. The best advisers have access to guaranteed income insurance products, market linked certificates of deposits and other “structured assets.” This basket of solutions can provide downside protection ranging from a buffer of say 10%-20% all the way to being fully guaranteed by the issuing insurer or commercial bank. Even within the markets themselves, there are asset managers who create stock and bond portfolios that focus on a specific downside target first, emphasizing downside protection above growth right from the start.

Although market risk remains, it’s true that by focusing on acceptable downside first, those portfolios are likely to weather downturns better even if they do surrender some upside as an offset. And while none of these approaches is perfect, they can work as a component to offset a portion of the market risk retirees probably need to endure for decades to come.

The article and opinions in this publication are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. We suggest that you consult your accountant, tax, or legal advisor with regard to your individual situation. Securities offered through Kalos Capital Inc. and Investment Advisory Services offered through Kalos Management Inc., both at 11525 Park Woods Circle, Alpharetta GA 30005, (678) 356-1100. SouthPark Capital is not an affiliate or subsidiary of Kalos Capital or Kalos Management.

CEO, SouthPark Capital

George Terlizzi has worked in business for more than 25 years as an entrepreneur, consultant, dealmaker and executive for early and mid-stage companies. He has substantial concentrations in finance, technology, consulting and numerous forms of transaction work. Today George advises wealth clients individually and sets the strategic vision for SouthPark Capital. George’s insatiable curiosity, action-oriented approach, and broad-ranging interests are invaluable to those he advises.

Source: kiplinger.com

The Best Parks and Green Spaces in Philadelphia

From the moment William Penn, founder of the Colony of Pennsylvania, set aside Philadelphia’s Five Great Public Squares as part of his “Greene Countrie Towne” city plan, Philadelphia has been recognized for its amazing public green spaces and parks, large and small, urban and woodsy. Nearly every neighborhood contains an inviting, safe, inspiring public space. But what are some of the best?

Fairmount Park

Fairmount Park PhiladelphiaFairmount Park Philadelphia
Fairmount Park

Every discussion of Philadelphia parks must start with Fairmount Park, the largest space within the world’s largest urban park system.

Stretching from the Strawberry Mansion to the Spring Garden neighborhoods, the East Park half of Fairmount Park lies on the Schuylkill River’s east bank. This side features scenic running and biking trails that wind past historic sites such as The Philadelphia Museum of Art and Boathouse Row, with its famous light display, large plateaus near Brewerytown, which include the Sedgley Woods Disc Golf Course and Strawberry Green Driving Range and the vast Fairmount Park Athletic Field, where you can hop into a pickup hoops game or join an organized sports league. For a quieter outing, the recently renovated East Park Reservoir is one of the best bird-watching enclaves in the city.

Across the river, though still in Fairmount Park, the West Park runs from the Wynnefield neighborhood down to Mantua. Here you can take the kids to the first-in-the-nation Philadelphia Zoo, the Please Touch Museum or the John B. Kelly Pool right next door.

For a more adult excursion, take in a concert and an amazing view at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts or fling a Frisbee at the Edgely Ultimate Fields. In the winter, Philadelphians of all ages take to Belmont Plateau for the city’s best sledding hills.

Wooded parks

Wissahickon Valley ParkWissahickon Valley Park
Wissahickon Valley Park

For everything Fairmount Park has to offer, other city parks boast their own perks. The expansive Wissahickon Valley Park extends from Chestnut Hill through East Falls in North Philly. There you’ll find people on mountain bikes and on foot traveling the winding gravel paths of forested Forbidden Drive, youngsters learning while having fun at the Wissahickon Environmental Center Tree House and anglers casting into the trout-stocked Wissahickon Creek.

Running from Bustleton to the Delaware River in Northeast Philly’s Holmesburg section, Pennypack Park is a 1,300-acre wooded creekside hiking and biking oasis that provides nature programs at Pennypack Environmental Center, a full working farmstead with cattle, sheep, pigs and chickens at Friends of Fox Chase Farm, and King’s Highway Bridge, the oldest in-use stone bridge in America.

In extreme South Philly, you’ll find Franklin Delano Roosevelt Park, adjacent to the professional sports complex, which contains a full 18-hole golf course, a nationally-celebrated skateboard park and the Meadow Lake Gazebo, long a popular spot for wedding photos.

The John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum, a little farther south in Eastwick next to the Philadelphia International Airport, is a top hiking, canoeing and fishing spot within a stunning environmentally-protected tidal marsh.

Urban parks

Spruce Street Harbor ParkSpruce Street Harbor Park
Spruce Street Harbor Park
Photo courtesy of Anastasia Navickas

If you prefer parks that feel part of the city rather than those that feel like you left the city, Philadelphia won’t disappoint.

Atop the Circa Centre South Garage in University City is Cira Green, a new rooftop greenspace boasting seasonal coffee carts, summer movies and some of the best views of downtown.

Named by Jetsetter Magazine as one of the “World’s Best Urban Beaches,” Spruce Street Harbor Park at Penn’s Landing is an eclectic recreational sanctuary along the Delaware River with seasonal food and beer trucks, a riverside boardwalk and a cluster of more than 50 cozy hammocks, which hang under spectacular LED lights strung amongst the trees.

From biking to basketball to bird-watching, Philadelphia’s city parks and green spaces offer unlimited means of escape from the bustle of urban life.

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Do I Qualify for the National Mortgage Settlement?

Last updated on February 10th, 2012

In case you haven’t heard by now, the so-called “National Mortgage Settlement” was finalized today.

It’s the largest multi-state settlement since the Tobacco Settlement back in 1998, related to robosigning allegations that took place over the past several years.

Essentially, some of the nation’s largest loan servicers routinely signed off on foreclosure documents without doing their due diligence, and/or without the presence of a notary.

It will provide more than $25 billion in assistance to homeowners, participating states and the federal government.

For the record, all 50 states participated except for lonely old Oklahoma.

The offending parties in the National Mortgage Settlement include:

– Ally/GMAC
– Bank of America
– Citi
– JPMorgan Chase
– Wells Fargo

These are the nation’s five largest mortgage loan servicers.

Benefits will be provided to both borrowers whose loans are owned by the settling banks as well as to borrowers whose loans they service.

In other words, your mortgage may have been originated by another company and sold to one of these companies to be serviced. So be sure to check your loan documents if you think you may be eligible.

Where the Settlement Money Will Go

The bulk of the money, at least $10 billion, will go toward principal balance reductions. In other words, those who hold underwater mortgages will see their balances drop to get them above water.

But the assistance will only be directed toward those who are either delinquent or at imminent risk of default as of the date of the settlement.

The principal reduction will likely be facilitated via a loan modification, so borrowers will ideally end up with a smaller loan balance and a lower mortgage rate, which will certainly make mortgage payments much more affordable.

State attorneys general believe principal reductions will prove beneficial, and as a result, will be employed by other mortgage lenders not involved in the settlement.

Another $7 billion or more will be used for short sales and transitional services, forbearance of principal for unemployed borrowers, anti-blight programs, and benefits for service members forced to sell their homes at a loss as a result of a “Permanent Change in Station” order.

Loan servicers will also have at least another $3 billion at their fingertips to provide refinancing to borrowers who are current, but underwater on their mortgages.

These homeowners will be able to take advantage of the record low mortgage rates that were previously out of reach due to loan-to-value ratio restraints.

Additionally, $1.5 billion will be distributed to roughly 750,000 borrowers who have already lost their homes to foreclosure.

The states involved will also receive immediate payments of roughly $3.5 billion to help fund consumer protection and state foreclosure protection programs.

How and When Can You Get Help?

If you think you qualify for assistance, you can contact the offending mortgage servicer directly, although they should be contacting you…

For borrowers who lost their homes between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2011, a claim form should be sent to you for one of those shiny checks.

You can also contact your individual Attorney General’s office to check eligibility, or to provide a current address assuming you moved and/or have been foreclosed on.

Unfortunately, relief won’t be immediate under the settlement. Over the next 30-60 days, settlement negotiators will be selecting an administrator to oversee the program.

And over the next six to nine months, this administrator will work with attorneys general and loan servicers to identify relief recipients.

It is expected to take three years to execute the entire settlement, so patience is a virtue here.

Who is Left Out of the National Mortgage Settlement?

Borrowers with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac owned mortgages. And those with FHA loans.

This is more than half of the homeowners with mortgages in the United States.

So quite a few borrowers are missing out. But they can still get assistance via HARP 2.0, even if they are severely underwater. Or via the Broad Based Refinancing Plan currently in the works.

Additionally, those that have positive home equity likely won’t see any relief from this settlement.

Essentially, those that paid down their mortgages, or came up with a reasonable down payment, won’t qualify for assistance under this settlement.

While it seems like they’re losing out, they aren’t. This settlement is about shoddy foreclosure practices, so those that weren’t affected obviously wouldn’t receive any benefit.

However, they may receive the indirect benefit of a healthier housing market and higher home prices if the settlement works as it should.

It’s worth noting that the banks involved are still accountable for claims that may arise out of any other wrongdoings committed during the lead up to the mortgage crisis.

About the Author: Colin Robertson

Before creating this blog, Colin worked as an account executive for a wholesale mortgage lender in Los Angeles. He has been writing passionately about mortgages for 15 years.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com