How minimum monthly credit card payments affect your credit – Lexington Law

credit card monthly payment

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Many people don’t hesitate to pay just the minimum payment on their credit card. This is especially true if the total balance is high or the cardholder is confused about the credit card lending terms and doesn’t understand the impact of paying the minimum balance. But, making just the minimum payment can have a greater impact on your credit score than most people realize.

Learn how lenders calculate the minimum payment, what it means for your debt and how making a minimum payment affects your credit.

What are credit card minimum payments?

Your credit card minimum payment is the least amount of money your lender will accept toward your credit card balance each month. You need to pay the minimum payment by its due date to avoid late penalties and other fees and to keep a consistent payment history. The minimum payment amount is displayed on your credit card bill and often ranges from one to three percent of your total credit card bill. 

How is a minimum payment calculated?

Your lender calculates the minimum payment based on your total balance and any outstanding interest charges. 

Each credit card lender has a different method for calculating its minimum monthly payment. The two primary methods are formula and percentage.

Formula

Many of the major credit card lenders use a formula to calculate your minimum payment. The formula picks an amount and adds one to two percent of your monthly balance. For example, let’s say your lender picked $35 as the minimum payment amount, plus two percent interest, and you spent $500 in new charges for the month. In this scenario, your minimum payment would be $35 plus $10 ($500 x 2%) for a total of $45.

If your total balance is less than the minimum payment, then your whole balance is due. Following the previous example, if your lender charges $35 plus two percent interest but your credit card balance is $20, you will owe $20 for that month, plus any fees and interest from the previous month.

Percentage

Other lenders—typically credit unions and financial institutions—use a simpler, percentage formula to calculate the minimum monthly payment. This method is most common for high-risk borrowers with poor credit. The percentage can range from four to six percent.

For example, if you had a $1,000 credit card balance with a lender that charges six percent, you would owe a minimum payment of $60 plus any additional fees ($1,000 x 6%). 

Some lenders will include any past-due fees in the minimum payment. 

What happens if you make only the minimum payment on your credit card?

Making the minimum payment on your credit card is better than paying nothing at all. As long as you always make the minimum payment, you should not receive negative items on your credit report, as it relates to your payment history. 

However, making only the minimum payment means you may see greater charges for interest, resulting in you paying more over time.

Take a look at this example: Let’s say you have $5,000 in credit card debt and your lender offers an 18 percent interest rate with a minimum payment of two percent of the balance. In this scenario, your minimum payment is $100 per month, which can look very tempting. But, it will take you almost eight years to pay off your balance and you will pay a total of $4,311 in interest—almost doubling what you originally owed. 

Your minimum payment is generally a small portion of your total debt, and most of that payment goes to interest. As a result, you are slowly progressing toward paying off your principal amount, and you could end up paying minimum payments for many years.

Additionally, your credit card utilization may be high if you make only minimum payments. Credit utilization is the amount of credit extended to you by the lender versus the amount you owe. If you maintain a high credit card balance while only paying the minimum payment, you are at risk of having high credit utilization month after month. 

Several factors determine your credit score, but credit utilization accounts for 30 percent of your overall score. So, maintaining a high utilization ratio can negatively impact your credit score. 

Finally, when you maintain a high credit card balance and a routine of only paying the minimum payment, you may fall behind on payments. When you make late payments or miss the payment entirely, having a negative payment history can also lower your overall credit score. 

What should you do if you can’t afford to pay in full?

If you can’t pay your credit card in full, don’t panic. Approximately 47 percent of Americans have credit card debt, so it’s quite common—but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t pay off credit card debt. Follow the steps below to tackle your debt efficiently and in a way that works for you. 

Pay as much as you can

As mentioned before, it’s essential to always make at least the minimum payment on time. This will help you avoid negative items on your credit report for late or missed payments. However, whenever possible, try to make more than the minimum payment. This will help you pay down your principal debt faster and pay less interest over time. 

Come up with a repayment strategy

If you have multiple credit cards with debt or various types of debt, it’s crucial to have a repayment strategy. 

There are two popular debt repayment strategies: the avalanche and the snowball. The snowball method recommends you pay off your debt from smallest to largest (like a growing snowball). This method is meant to give people positive reinforcement because they feel motivated as they knock out several of their small debts quickly before moving on to the larger debts. 

The avalanche method is a more systematic approach—you list all your debts and their interest rates and pay the one with the highest interest rate first. This method aims to save you money in the long run by getting of higher-interest debt first. 

Decide which approach fits your style. Both of these methods are highly effective in their own way. 

Budget

A budget is the first step to taking control of your financial health. Without a budget, you may not know where your money is going or where you can save. Often, a budget can highlight unnecessary spending. There are plenty of free apps, such as Mint, that allow you to have an automated look at all your spending and build a budget. 

Talk to your credit card issuer

You can reach out to your credit card issuer if you’re going through financial hardship to see what they can do for you. Some credit lenders will offer to lower your interest rates, which will help you tackle your principal debt much faster. Some financial hardships can include the loss of a job, an injury or a medical incident. Ultimately it will be your lender that decides if your situation merits help. 

Consider a balance transfer

There are a lot of credit card options out there. If your credit card has a high-interest rate, you may consider a balance transfer. Some credit card lenders offer a low-interest promotional rate when you transfer a credit balance to them. During this time, you can make a significant dent in your debt. However, you should know that some balance transfers come with a one-time fee, so make sure to consider this as well. 

Care for your credit

Your credit is your door to many financial opportunities. A healthy credit score can help your chances for approval for auto leases, mortgages, personal loans and more. It can also help you get a much lower interest rate and better borrowing terms when you receive financial products.

Improving your credit takes work. While focusing on your credit card’s impact on your credit score, make sure your overall credit profile is accurate. Errors and inaccuracies can greatly hurt your credit score and put a dent in your debt-relief goals. Professional credit repair companies can help you navigate the challenges of credit reporting inaccuracies.

The first step toward establishing a healthy credit history is making sure all items are listed fairly and accurately—professional credit repair is an easy, effective way to get your credit score back on track.


Reviewed by Shana Dawson Fish, Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Shana Dawson Fish is an Arizona native whose family migrated from Guyana. Shana graduated from Arizona State University in 2008 with her Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice & Criminology, and in 2012 she graduated from Arizona Summit Law School earning her Juris Doctor. During law school, Shana was a Judicial Intern at the United States District Court for the District of Arizona and the Maricopa County Superior Court. In 2016, Shana was awarded a legal defense contract and represented clients as a Trial Attorney in juvenile proceedings. Shana has experience in litigating numerous trials and diligently pursuing the rights of her clients. As a Trial Attorney, Shana identified the needs of her clients and also represented debtors in bankruptcy proceedings. Shana is licensed to practice in Arizona and is an Associate Attorney in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

How minimum monthly credit card payments affect your credit

credit card monthly payment

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Many people don’t hesitate to pay just the minimum payment on their credit card. This is especially true if the total balance is high or the cardholder is confused about the credit card lending terms and doesn’t understand the impact of paying the minimum balance. But, making just the minimum payment can have a greater impact on your credit score than most people realize.

Learn how lenders calculate the minimum payment, what it means for your debt and how making a minimum payment affects your credit.

What are credit card minimum payments?

Your credit card minimum payment is the least amount of money your lender will accept toward your credit card balance each month. You need to pay the minimum payment by its due date to avoid late penalties and other fees and to keep a consistent payment history. The minimum payment amount is displayed on your credit card bill and often ranges from one to three percent of your total credit card bill. 

How is a minimum payment calculated?

Your lender calculates the minimum payment based on your total balance and any outstanding interest charges. 

Each credit card lender has a different method for calculating its minimum monthly payment. The two primary methods are formula and percentage.

Formula

Many of the major credit card lenders use a formula to calculate your minimum payment. The formula picks an amount and adds one to two percent of your monthly balance. For example, let’s say your lender picked $35 as the minimum payment amount, plus two percent interest, and you spent $500 in new charges for the month. In this scenario, your minimum payment would be $35 plus $10 ($500 x 2%) for a total of $45.

If your total balance is less than the minimum payment, then your whole balance is due. Following the previous example, if your lender charges $35 plus two percent interest but your credit card balance is $20, you will owe $20 for that month, plus any fees and interest from the previous month.

Percentage

Other lenders—typically credit unions and financial institutions—use a simpler, percentage formula to calculate the minimum monthly payment. This method is most common for high-risk borrowers with poor credit. The percentage can range from four to six percent.

For example, if you had a $1,000 credit card balance with a lender that charges six percent, you would owe a minimum payment of $60 plus any additional fees ($1,000 x 6%). 

Some lenders will include any past-due fees in the minimum payment. 

What happens if you make only the minimum payment on your credit card?

Making the minimum payment on your credit card is better than paying nothing at all. As long as you always make the minimum payment, you should not receive negative items on your credit report, as it relates to your payment history. 

However, making only the minimum payment means you may see greater charges for interest, resulting in you paying more over time.

Take a look at this example: Let’s say you have $5,000 in credit card debt and your lender offers an 18 percent interest rate with a minimum payment of two percent of the balance. In this scenario, your minimum payment is $100 per month, which can look very tempting. But, it will take you almost eight years to pay off your balance and you will pay a total of $4,311 in interest—almost doubling what you originally owed. 

Your minimum payment is generally a small portion of your total debt, and most of that payment goes to interest. As a result, you are slowly progressing toward paying off your principal amount, and you could end up paying minimum payments for many years.

Additionally, your credit card utilization may be high if you make only minimum payments. Credit utilization is the amount of credit extended to you by the lender versus the amount you owe. If you maintain a high credit card balance while only paying the minimum payment, you are at risk of having high credit utilization month after month. 

Several factors determine your credit score, but credit utilization accounts for 30 percent of your overall score. So, maintaining a high utilization ratio can negatively impact your credit score. 

Finally, when you maintain a high credit card balance and a routine of only paying the minimum payment, you may fall behind on payments. When you make late payments or miss the payment entirely, having a negative payment history can also lower your overall credit score. 

What should you do if you can’t afford to pay in full?

If you can’t pay your credit card in full, don’t panic. Approximately 47 percent of Americans have credit card debt, so it’s quite common—but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t pay off credit card debt. Follow the steps below to tackle your debt efficiently and in a way that works for you. 

Pay as much as you can

As mentioned before, it’s essential to always make at least the minimum payment on time. This will help you avoid negative items on your credit report for late or missed payments. However, whenever possible, try to make more than the minimum payment. This will help you pay down your principal debt faster and pay less interest over time. 

Come up with a repayment strategy

If you have multiple credit cards with debt or various types of debt, it’s crucial to have a repayment strategy. 

There are two popular debt repayment strategies: the avalanche and the snowball. The snowball method recommends you pay off your debt from smallest to largest (like a growing snowball). This method is meant to give people positive reinforcement because they feel motivated as they knock out several of their small debts quickly before moving on to the larger debts. 

The avalanche method is a more systematic approach—you list all your debts and their interest rates and pay the one with the highest interest rate first. This method aims to save you money in the long run by getting of higher-interest debt first. 

Decide which approach fits your style. Both of these methods are highly effective in their own way. 

Budget

A budget is the first step to taking control of your financial health. Without a budget, you may not know where your money is going or where you can save. Often, a budget can highlight unnecessary spending. There are plenty of free apps, such as Mint, that allow you to have an automated look at all your spending and build a budget. 

Talk to your credit card issuer

You can reach out to your credit card issuer if you’re going through financial hardship to see what they can do for you. Some credit lenders will offer to lower your interest rates, which will help you tackle your principal debt much faster. Some financial hardships can include the loss of a job, an injury or a medical incident. Ultimately it will be your lender that decides if your situation merits help. 

Consider a balance transfer

There are a lot of credit card options out there. If your credit card has a high-interest rate, you may consider a balance transfer. Some credit card lenders offer a low-interest promotional rate when you transfer a credit balance to them. During this time, you can make a significant dent in your debt. However, you should know that some balance transfers come with a one-time fee, so make sure to consider this as well. 

Care for your credit

Your credit is your door to many financial opportunities. A healthy credit score can help your chances for approval for auto leases, mortgages, personal loans and more. It can also help you get a much lower interest rate and better borrowing terms when you receive financial products.

Improving your credit takes work. While focusing on your credit card’s impact on your credit score, make sure your overall credit profile is accurate. Errors and inaccuracies can greatly hurt your credit score and put a dent in your debt-relief goals. Professional credit repair companies can help you navigate the challenges of credit reporting inaccuracies.

The first step toward establishing a healthy credit history is making sure all items are listed fairly and accurately—professional credit repair is an easy, effective way to get your credit score back on track.


Reviewed by Shana Dawson Fish, Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Shana Dawson Fish is an Arizona native whose family migrated from Guyana. Shana graduated from Arizona State University in 2008 with her Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice & Criminology, and in 2012 she graduated from Arizona Summit Law School earning her Juris Doctor. During law school, Shana was a Judicial Intern at the United States District Court for the District of Arizona and the Maricopa County Superior Court. In 2016, Shana was awarded a legal defense contract and represented clients as a Trial Attorney in juvenile proceedings. Shana has experience in litigating numerous trials and diligently pursuing the rights of her clients. As a Trial Attorney, Shana identified the needs of her clients and also represented debtors in bankruptcy proceedings. Shana is licensed to practice in Arizona and is an Associate Attorney in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

7 Signs it’s Time for a Mortgage Refinance

Maybe you’ve considered refinancing your mortgage, but you’ve only dipped your toe in the exploratory waters. Is now the right time? Will rates stay low? Could they go lower?

It can be hard to know when to take the plunge.

Whether you purchased a home recently or bought a home years ago, you probably noticed that average mortgage rates continued to hover near historic lows in early 2021.

But as with any financial rate or data point, it is hard—if not impossible—to time the market or predict the future.

Homeowners often look to refinance when it could benefit them in some way, like with a lower monthly payment. Refinancing is the process of paying off a mortgage loan with new financing, ideally at a lower rate or with some other, more favorable, set of terms.

Here are seven signs that locking in a lower mortgage rate now could be the right move.

1. You Can Break Even Fairly Quickly

Refinancing a mortgage costs money—generally 2% to 5% of the principal amount. So if you are refinancing to save money, you’ll likely want to run numbers to be sure the math checks out.

To calculate the break-even point on a mortgage refinance—when savings exceed costs—do this:

1. Determine your monthly savings by subtracting your projected new monthly mortgage payment from your current monthly payment.
2. Find your tax rate (e.g., 22%) and subtract it from 1 for your after-tax rate.
3. Multiply monthly savings by the after-tax rate. This is your after-tax savings.
4. Take the total fees and closing costs of the new mortgage loan and divide that number by your monthly after-tax savings. This yields the number of months it will take to recover the costs of refinancing—or the break-even point.

For example, if you’re refinancing a $300,000, 30-year mortgage that has a fixed 6% rate to a new 4% rate, refinancing will reduce your original monthly payment from $1,799 to $1,432—a monthly savings of $367. Assuming a tax rate of 22%, the after-tax rate would be 0.78, which results in an after-tax savings of $286.26. If you have $12,000 in refinancing costs, it will take nearly 42 months to recoup the costs of refinancing ($12,000 / $286.26 = 41.9).

The length of time you intend to own the home can affect whether refinancing is worth the expense. You’ll want to run the calculations to make sure that you can break even on a timeline that works for you.

The rate and fees usually work in tandem. The lower the rate, the higher the cost. (“Buying down the rate” means paying an extra fee in the form of discount points. One point costs 1% of the mortgage amount.)

If you’re shopping, each mortgage lender you apply with is required to give you a loan estimate within three days of your application so you can compare terms and annual percentage rates. The APR, which includes the interest rate, points, and lender fees, reflects the true cost of borrowing.

2. You Can Reduce the Rate by at Least 0.5%

You may have heard conflicting ideas about when you should consider refinancing. The reason is that there is no one-size-fits-all answer; individual loan scenarios and goals differ.

One commonly espoused rule of thumb is that the home refinance rate should be a minimum of two percentage points lower than an existing mortgage’s rate. What may work for each individual depends on things like loan amount, interest rate, fees, and more.

However, the combination of larger mortgages and lenders offering lower closing cost options has changed that. For a large mortgage, even a change of 0.5% could result in significant savings, especially if the homeowner can avoid or minimize lender fees.

Maybe rates are low enough that you choose to take a higher rate with a no closing cost refi.

3. You Can Afford to Refinance to a 15-Year Mortgage

When you refinance a loan, you are getting an entirely new loan with new terms. Depending on your eligibility, it is possible to adjust aspects of your loan beyond the interest rate, such as the loan’s term or the type of loan (fixed vs. adjustable).

If you’re looking to save major money over the duration of your mortgage loan, you may want to consider a shorter term, such as 15 years. Shortening the term of your mortgage from 30 years to 15 years will likely cost you more monthly, but it could save thousands in interest over the life of the loan.

For example, a 30-year $1 million loan at a 7.5% interest rate would carry a monthly payment of approximately $6,992 and a total cost of around $1,517,172 over the life of the loan.

Refinancing to a 15-year mortgage with a 5.5% rate would result in a higher monthly payment, about $8,171, but the shorter maturity would result in total loan interest of around $470,750—an interest savings over the life of the loan of about $1,046,422 vs. the 30-year term.

One more perk: Lenders often charge a lower interest rate for a 15-year mortgage than for a 30-year home loan.

4. You’re Interested in Securing a Fixed Rate

Borrowers may take out an adjustable-rate mortgage because they may get a lower rate (at least initially) than on a fixed-rate mortgage for the same property. But just as the name states, the rate will adjust with market fluctuations.

Typically, ARMs for second mortgages such as home equity lines of credit are “pegged” to the prime rate, which generally moves in lockstep with the federal funds rate. First mortgage ARM rates are tied more closely to mortgage-backed securities or the 10-year Treasury note.

Even though ARM loans come with yearly and lifetime interest rate caps, if you believe that interest rates will move higher in the future and you plan to keep your loan for a while, you may want to consider a more stable fixed rate.

Refinancing to a fixed mortgage can protect your loan against rate increases in the future and provide the security of knowing how much you’ll be paying on your mortgage each month—no matter what the markets do.

5. You’re Considering an ARM

You may also be considering a move in the other direction—switching from a fixed-rate mortgage to an adjustable-rate mortgage. This could potentially make sense for someone with a 30-year fixed loan but who plans to leave their home much sooner.

For example, you could get a 7/1 ARM with a potential lower interest rate for the first seven years, and then the rate may change once a year, when up for review, as the market changes. If you plan to move on before higher rate changes, you could potentially save money.

It’s best to know exactly when the rate and payment will adjust, and how high. And it’s important to understand the loan’s margin, index, yearly and lifetime rate caps, and payments.

6. You’re Considering a Strategic Cash-Out Refi

In addition to updating the rate and terms of a mortgage loan, it may be possible to do a cash-out refinance, when you take out a new loan at a higher loan amount by tapping into available equity.

The lender will provide you with cash and in exchange will increase your loan amount, which will likely result in a higher monthly payment.

If you go this route, realize that you’re taking on more debt and using the equity you have built up in your home. Market value changes may result in a loss of home value and equity. Also, a mortgage loan is secured by your home, which means that the lender can seize the property if you are unable to make mortgage payments.

A cash-out refi may make sense if you use it as a tool to pay less interest on your overall debt load. Using the cash from the refinance to pay off debts carrying higher rates, like credit cards, could be a good move.

Depending on loan terms and other factors, a lower rate may allow for overall faster repayment of your other debts.

7. Your Financial Situation Has Improved

When putting together an offer for a mortgage, a lender will often take multiple aspects into consideration. One of those is prevailing interest rates. Another is your financial situation, like your credit history, credit score, income, and debt-to-income ratio.

The better your personal financial situation in the eyes of the lender, the more creditworthy you are—and the better the terms your loan offer could be.

Therefore, it may be possible to refinance your mortgage loan into better terms if your financial situation has improved since you took out the original loan, especially when paired with relatively low market rates.

The Takeaway

Is it time to refinance? Is the prospect of a lower interest rate or different loan term exciting? Locking in a lower rate now could help you achieve your long-term goals by freeing up cash for other stuff, like retirement or a big vacation.

Sometimes folks spend so much time sweating the small purchases (like the dang lattes) when really, it’s the big money moves—like refinancing—that can make the biggest difference over time.

If you’re interested in refinancing, you may want to look for a lender that’s offering competitive rates and great customer service.

That’s SoFi.

SoFi offers a regular mortgage refinance and a cash-out refinance.

Check your rate in two minutes.



SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp (dba SoFi), a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law, license # 6054612; NMLS # 1121636 . For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal.

SoFi Home Loans
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. SoFi Home Loans are not available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Source: sofi.com

Engagement Ring Cost – How Much of Your Salary Should You Spend?

So, you’ve decided to take the big step and propose to your sweetheart. Congratulations! It’s an exciting moment, but it’s also a nerve-wracking one.

Right now, your mind is probably teeming with questions: What’s the most romantic way to propose? Should you present a ring when you pop the question or hide it for your honey to find? And crucially, how much should you spend on it?

It isn’t just a problem for guys. In 2018, Brides magazine reported that record numbers of women are searching for ways to propose to their significant others — both male and female — and some of those proposals include a ring. But even for women expecting to receive a ring rather than give one, cost is an issue.

Getting married doesn’t just mean joining your lives. For most couples, it also usually means combining your finances. That means whatever sum your partner spends on your engagement ring is coming out of the money you’ll both have to live on in the future. It’s a decision that affects both of you.

The 2 Months’ Salary “Rule”

If you consult bridal magazines and other wedding-related resources, you’ll probably see many references to the “rule” that an engagement ring should cost one, two, or even three months’ worth of the bridegroom’s salary.

But did you ever wonder where this “tradition” came from? It was actually made up by De Beers, a cartel that controls most of the world’s diamond market.

According to the BBC, at the beginning of the 20th century, most engagement rings didn’t even contain diamonds. Beginning in the 1930s, De Beers ran an incredibly successful ad campaign to promote diamond engagement rings, which popularized the idea a ring should cost one month’s salary.

The campaign did so well De Beers pushed the concept even further in the 1980s, raising the suggested ring price for American consumers to two months’ salary. In Japan, it upped the ante still more, proposing three months’ salary as the benchmark price.

Clearly, this “tradition” doesn’t have a lot of history behind it. And yet, in less than 100 years, it’s become overwhelmingly pervasive. Not only do most engagement rings today contain diamonds, but according to The Knot, the amount the average American spent on one was $5,900 in 2019.

The average income for a single American that year was around $49,000, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, so the average ring price was between one and two months’ salary.

There’s one big problem with this formula: Most Americans don’t have this much cash to spare. According to a 2018 Bankrate survey, fewer than 30% of Americans even have the six months’ worth of living expenses experts recommend keeping in an emergency fund, let alone an extra one to two months’ salary to spend on a ring. And for single Americans, savings figures are even lower.

That means that to spend two or even one month’s salary on an engagement ring, most Americans must either drain their emergency savings or, worse still, start their married lives with debt. For many couples, that gets piled onto additional wedding debt and other debts they accumulated before their marriage, such as student loans.

This shared debt burden weighs on your finances throughout your married life. It hampers your credit scores, making it harder to buy your first home together. It could even affect your decisions about parenthood by putting the cost of having a baby out of their financial reach. Finally, based on a 2020 Fidelity study, it dramatically increases the chances you will fight about money.

In short, the De Beers ad’s message — that buying an expensive ring is the best way to get your marriage off to a happy start — has no basis in fact. In fact, according to a 2014 study at Emory University, the opposite is true. It found that men who spent $2,000 to $4,000 on their partners’ engagement rings were 1.3 times more likely to end up divorced than those who chose more modest rings priced between $500 and $2,000 — that’s an increased risk of 30%.


Setting Your Own Guidelines

As you can see, the two months’ salary rule is neither truly traditional nor particularly helpful. There’s no one-size-fits-all rule for how much to spend on an engagement ring. You have to figure it out based on your situation, factoring in both your finances and your partner’s expectations.

Learn What Your Partner Expects

Before you can even think about shopping for a ring, you need to know what kind of ring your partner wants. If you know them well — and you certainly should if you’re preparing to spend your lives together — you most likely have some idea what kind of jewelry they like.

But an engagement ring isn’t just any piece of jewelry. It’s a symbol of your love and commitment to each other. It’s something your partner is going to wear every day. You want it to be something they feel thrilled about and comfortable with.

Based on the DeBeers ads, it might seem like you can’t go wrong simply choosing the biggest diamond you can afford. However, that’s a vast oversimplification.

There are many differences among diamond rings, including the size and shape of the stone, the design, and the band metal. If your partner wants a gold ring with an emerald-cut solitaire diamond, presenting a platinum ring with a round diamond flanked by sapphires won’t be a pleasant surprise.

In fact, your partner might not want a diamond ring at all. Before the 1930s, most engagement rings didn’t contain diamonds. Maybe they’d prefer an old-fashioned ring with a different type of stone. Also, if they’re the socially conscious type, they may prefer to avoid diamonds because of all the environmental and human rights abuses associated with diamond mining.

It’s also not safe to assume your partner would prefer to have the largest ring possible. For one thing, it’s not the size or price of the ring that makes it meaningful. You could make a much better impression with a ring you had custom-designed to fit your partner’s taste than with a much bigger ring you simply picked out of a display case.

In a 2015 Brilliant Earth survey, nearly half of women and 30% of men said what mattered to them most about an engagement ring was its design, while only 6% of women and 8% of men said the size of the diamond mattered most.

Additionally, a frugal partner might actively hate the idea of spending thousands on a ring when you could put that money to more practical use. In a 2014 ERA Real Estate survey, 50% of women said they would rather skip the large engagement ring and put that money toward the down payment on a house — and 17% said they had already done so.

There are even some people who would prefer not to wear an engagement ring at all. When I got engaged to my husband, I told him I didn’t want a ring because I disliked the idea of wearing a ring when he wasn’t — as if I were spoken for, but he was still a free man until the wedding day.

Instead, we opted for the Elizabethan custom of wearing our wedding bands on our right hands until the ceremony, then switching them over — which also happened to be cheaper.

The easiest way to find out what your partner wants in an engagement ring is simply to ask. If you don’t want to spoil the surprise of the proposal, try strolling past a jewelry store while out on a walk and casually asking which rings in the window they like best. You can also try asking their friends or family if they’ve ever talked about what they want in an engagement ring.

Finally, pay attention to anything they mention on the subject in conversation. Even if you’re trying to keep your proposal plans a secret, there’s a good chance they have an inkling about your intentions. If so, they may be dropping a few hints to help guide your shopping.

Evaluate Your Finances

What kind of ring your partner wants is only half the equation. You also have to figure out how much you can afford to pay for it. That depends on both your financial situation and that of your partner. You’re going to be sharing a home and expenses once you’re married, so the money you spend on this ring is really coming from both of you.

That doesn’t mean you necessarily have to ask outright how much they think you should spend — unless you know your partner would appreciate that kind of upfront approach. But it’s essential the two of you discuss your finances before getting married, and that discussion can give you a better idea of how much you can reasonably afford to spend.

Talking about money may seem unromantic, but it’s something you need to be able to do as a married couple. If you’re ready to make a lifelong commitment to each other, you should be prepared to talk openly about your financial situation. Topics to discuss include:

  • Your Income. The more you make as a couple, both now and in the future, the more you can reasonably afford to spend on a ring. If you have to draw down your savings to buy it, you’ll be able to replenish it quickly. Talk with your partner about how much you each make now and about expectations for future earnings.
  • Your Expenses. You can’t use your earnings to pay for the ring if they’re already committed to other expenses. Talk about how much each of you currently spends on living expenses and how much you’ll spend as a married couple. Then consider how much of your income that will leave to contribute to savings.
  • Your Current Savings. It’s obviously important to know how much you both have right now. If you don’t have enough saved to pay for the ring with cash, you have to go into debt for it, which isn’t the best way to kick your marriage off on sound financial footing.
  • Your Debts. Going into debt for a ring is an even bigger problem if you or your partner already have other debts, such as student loans or credit card debt. Be candid with each other about your current debts and how much they cost each month. This information matters when you’re deciding what type of ring you can afford.
  • Your Financial Goals. Finally, consider what other financial goals you and your partner want to save for. Possibilities include your wedding, paying off debts, buying a home, starting a family, and putting your kids through college. When you list all your goals and consider how much they matter to you, suddenly, a big ring might not seem like such a high priority.

Final Word

If your partner’s preferences are pretty much in line with what you can afford, you have no problem. However, if the ring of your partner’s dreams is simply beyond your means right now, you’ll need to find some way to compromise.

That could mean settling for a smaller ring, waiting longer while you save up for a big one, or looking for ways to make that fancy ring more affordable.

However, don’t lose sight of the fact that the ring isn’t the most crucial part of the proposal. What matters most is the person doing the proposing.

If your partner really wants to be with you, it will be the proposal that makes them happiest — not the ring that accompanies it. Presenting a smaller or simpler ring isn’t going to be a deal breaker. And by choosing a ring that fits your budget, you can leave yourself and your partner more money to live happily ever after on.

While you’re at it, you can protect your future finances by looking for ways to save on your other wedding expenses. Check out our marriage archives for tons of ideas.

Source: moneycrashers.com

What are derogatory marks and how can you fix them?

Derogatory Marks Header Image

Having a few items on your credit report dragging down your score can be incredibly frustrating, especially if you have a good financial record.

A derogatory mark is a negative item on your credit report that can be fixed by removing it or building positive credit activity. Because derogatory marks can stay on your credit report typically for seven to ten years, it’s important to know how to fix them.

Derogatory marks can affect your credit score, your ability to be approved for credit and the interest rates a lender offers you. Some derogatory marks are due to poor credit activity, such as a late payment. Or it could be an error that shouldn’t be on your report at all.

Types of negative items include late payments (30, 60, and 90 days), charge-offs, collections, foreclosures, repossessions, judgments, liens, and bankruptcies. We’ll cover what each one of these means, and how they can impact your credit reports.

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How do derogatory marks impact my credit score?

The amount that derogatory marks lower your credit score depends on the mark’s severity and how high your credit score was before the mark. For instance, bankruptcy has a greater impact on your credit score than a missed payment or debt settlement. And, unfortunately, having a derogatory mark impacts a high credit score more than it does a low credit score.

According to CreditCards.com and CNNMoney, even a single negative on your credit could cost you over 100 points. Negative items on your credit could cost you thousands of dollars in higher interest rates, or you could be denied altogether.

negative item score decrease stats

How long a derogatory mark stays on your credit report depends on the type of mark.

How long do derogatory marks stay on my credit report?

Derogatory marks usually stay on your credit report for around seven to ten years, depending on the type. After that period passes, the mark will roll off your report and you should start seeing a change in your credit score.

Here’s how long each derogatory mark stays on your credit report:

Type of derogatory mark What is it? How long does this stay on a credit report?
Late payment Late payments are payments made 30 days or more after the payment due date. Typically, this can remain on your report for seven years from the date you made a late payment.
An account in collections or a charge-off Creditors send your account to collections or charge them off if there’s been no payment for 180 days. Typically, this can remain on your report for seven years from the date you made a late payment.
Tax lien A tax lien is when the government claims you’ve neglected or failed to pay taxes on your property or financial assets. Unpaid tax lien: Can remain on your report indefinitely.

Paid tax lien: Can remain on your report seven years from the date the lien was filed.

Civil judgment Civil judgments are a debt you owe through the court, such as if your landlord sued you over missed rent payments. Unpaid civil judgment: Can remain on your report for seven years from when the judgment was filed, but can be renewed if left unpaid.

Paid civil judgment: Can remain on your report for seven years from when the judgment was filed.

Debt settlement Debt settlement is when you and your creditor agree that you will pay less than the full amount owed. A typical time period is seven years, starting from when the debt was settled or the date of the first delinquent payment if there were missed payments.
Foreclosure Foreclosure is when you fail to pay your mortgage and you forfeit the right to the property. Typically, seven years from the foreclosure filing date.
Bankruptcy Bankruptcy is a court proceeding to discharge your debt and sell your assets. Can remain on your report for seven years for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Chapter 7 bankruptcy can remain on your report for 10 years.
Repossession A repossession is when your assets are seized, such as a vehicle that was used as collateral. Can remain on your report for seven years from the first date of the missed payment.

Types of derogatory marks

Late payments

Late payments occur when you’ve been 30, 60, or 90 days late paying an account. Although you don’t want late payments on your credit reports, an occasional 30 or 60-day late payment isn’t too severe. But you don’t want frequent late payments and you don’t want late payments on every single account. One recent late payment on a single account can lower a score by 15 to 40 points, and missing one payment cycle for all accounts in the same month can cause a score to tank by 150 points or more.

Payments 90 days late or more start to factor more heavily into your credit score, and consecutive late payments are even more harmful to your score, as each subsequent late payment is weighted more heavily. Sometimes, creditors will report payments as late as 120 days, which can be almost as severe as charge-offs and collections. Late payments can be reported to the credit bureaus once you have been more than 30 days late on an account and these late payments can stay on your credit reports for up to seven years.

Charge offs

A charge off is when a creditor writes off your unpaid debt. Typically, this occurs when you have been 180 days late on an account. Charge offs have a severely negative impact on your credit, and like most other negative items can stay on your credit reports for seven years. When an account is charged off, your creditor can sell it to collection agencies, which is even worse news for your credit.

Creditors see a charge off as a glaring indication that you have not been responsible with your finances in the past and cannot be counted on to fulfill your financial obligations in the future. When creditors see a charge off on your credit reports, they are more likely to deny any new applications for loans or lines of credit because they see you as a financial risk. If you do qualify, this can mean higher interest rates. Current creditors can respond by raising your interest rates on your existing balances.

Tax liens

In most cases, liens are the result of unpaid taxes – whether it’s at the state or the federal level. For a federal tax lien, the IRS can place a lien against your property to cover the cost of unpaid taxes. Tax liens can make it difficult to get approved for new lines of credit or loans because the government has claimed to your property. What this means is that if you default on any other accounts, your creditors have to stand in line behind the IRS to collect.

Unpaid liens can stay indefinitely on your credit reports. Once they have been paid, however, they can stay on your reports for up to seven years. Like judgments though, the credit bureaus are strictly regulated on how they can report liens because they are also public records.

Civil judgments

Judgments are public records that are also referred to as civil claims. A judgment can be taken out against a debtor for an unpaid balance. A creditor or collection agency can file a suit in court. If the court rules in favor of the creditor, a judgment is taken out against the debtor and put on their credit reports. This, like many other negative items, has a severely negative impact, and like most other negative items can be reported for seven years.

Judgments are also another indication that a person won’t pay their debts. Lawsuits are time-consuming and costly, so they are something that creditors potentially want to avoid. When a judgment is filed though, it can impact more than credit. The judge may allow the creditor to garnish a debtor’s wages, which can heavily impact finances.

Collections

Collections are the most common types of accounts on credit reports. About one-third of Americans with credit reports have at least one collection account. Over half of these accounts are due to medical bills, but other accounts like unpaid credit cards and loans, utilities, and parking tickets can be sold to collections.

Collections arise from debts that are sold to third parties by the original creditor if a bill goes unpaid for too long. They have a severe negative impact on your credit and can stay on your reports for up to seven years. When potential creditors see collections on your credit reports, it can raise flags and cause them to think that you won’t pay your debts.

Foreclosures

A foreclosure is a legal proceeding that is initiated by a mortgage lender when a homeowner has been unable to make payments. Usually, a lender will file a foreclosure when a homeowner has been three months late or more on mortgage payments.

When a lender decides to foreclose, they begin by filing a Notice of Default with the County Recorder’s Office, which begins the legal proceedings. If a foreclosure goes through and a homeowner can’t catch up on payments, then they are evicted from their home, and the foreclosure is reported to the credit bureaus.

Bankruptcies

Bankruptcy is extremely damaging to credit. Individuals who file for bankruptcy are those who have too much debt, and not enough money to pay it. They likely have had overdue accounts for a long period of time and in some cases loss of income that prevents them from being able to pay any of their bills. Bankruptcies can also arise from huge medical debt.

Whether or not file for bankruptcy is a difficult decision, and doing so can impact your credit from seven to ten years, depending on the type of bankruptcy you file. When a bankruptcy is filed, debts are discharged and the individuals filing are released from most of their previously incurred debts (there are some exceptions). This option can give people a “clean slate” from debt, but creditors don’t like to see it on credit reports because it can imply that an individual won’t pay their debts.

Repossessions

A repossession is a loss of property on a secured loan. Secured loans are where you have collateral, like a car or a house, and the loss occurs when the lender takes back the property because of the inability to pay. Usually, when this occurs, the lender will auction off the collateral to make up for the remaining balance, although it doesn’t usually cover the remaining balance.

When there is a remaining balance, the creditor may choose to sell it off to collections. A repossession has a severe negative impact on credit because it shows a debtor’s inability to pay back a loan. Usually, a repossession follows a long line of late payments and can knock a lot of points off a credit score.

How can I improve my credit score with derogatory marks on my credit report?

If you have derogatory marks, you can improve your credit score by working to rebuild your credit. By boosting your credit score, you’re more likely to get approved for loans and credit cards.

Here’s how to improve your credit score based on the type of derogatory mark:

Derogatory mark What to do to improve your credit score
Late payments Pay off the full debt as soon as possible. If there are late fees, ask the creditor to drop the fee (they often do if it’s your first time being late).
Stay on top of your payments with other lenders to show that you’re responsible, reducing the impact of a late payment.
An account in collections or a charge-off Pay off the debt or negotiate a settlement where you pay less than the full amount owed. Making a payment doesn’t remove the negative mark from your report, but prevents you from being sued over the debt.
Tax lien Pay the taxes you owe in full as soon as possible. Continue to make timely payments with any creditors and lenders.
Civil judgment Pay off the judgment amount, ideally before it gets to court. Make other payments on time to limit the impact of the civil judgment on your credit score.
Debt settlement Pay the full settled amount to prevent your account from going to collections or being charged off.
Foreclosure Keep other credit and loans open and make timely payments to build up positive credit activity.
Bankruptcy Rebuild your credit after bankruptcy with credit cards that cater to lower credit and credit builder loans. Make timely payments to reestablish that you’re a responsible borrower.
Repossessions Continue to pay other bills on time and pay off any further debt to the creditor.

You can also remove derogatory marks if they’re inaccurate or unfairly reported. By requesting your free credit report, you can look for mistakes and inaccuracies.

For example, check to see if a missed payment was inaccurately reported or if someone else’s account got mixed up with yours. You can remove these mistakes, giving your credit score a boost. 

How do I remove derogatory marks from my credit report?

You can remove derogatory marks from your credit report by disputing inaccuracies with the credit bureaus. Here’s how:

1. Request and review your credit report

TransUnion, Equifax and Experian provide one free credit report each year. Request your credit report and review it closely for errors.

Look through both “closed” and “open” derogatory marks. Check to see if your personal information is correct and if the creditor reported payments and dates appropriately. Take note of any discrepancies.

2. Dispute derogatory marks

If you notice incorrect items, payments or dates you need to file a dispute with that credit bureau (and any bureau that lists the item on your report).

You can file a dispute through the credit bureau or have a professional assist you. It’s best to make disputes as soon as you notice them, ideally within 30 days of the incident. The credit bureaus must respond to you within 30-45 days. 

3. Follow up on the dispute

You may have to provide more information or proof to refute something on your credit report. Be sure to respond to any inquiries by the specified time. Check your credit report afterward to make sure that the error is removed.

Removing a derogatory mark from your credit report helps to repair your credit. You’ll also want to improve your credit by doing things like lowering your credit utilization rate, upping the average age of your credit and making timely payments.

If you’re unable to remove a derogatory mark from your credit report, you’ll need to wait until it rolls off of your report, usually within seven to 10 years. In the meantime, work to rebuild your credit and improve your creditworthiness.

steps to remove derogatory marks from credit report

How can I get help with derogatory marks?

You can remove derogatory marks from your credit report by yourself. However, getting help from a credit repair company can make the process easier and improve your chances of getting the negative mark removed.

Many consumers appreciate professional help as it saves time, energy and resources. Contact us for a free credit report consultation. We’ll talk about your unique situation and the ways that we can help you.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

How Bankruptcy Works & When it’s a Good Idea

Bankruptcy offers a way out of debt by either eliminating it or repaying part of it. The decision on whether or not to file for bankruptcy is however not an easy one. You may end up losing most of your assets or none at all. At the same time some debts are not covered by bankruptcy. To help you in making the right decision let’s look at how bankruptcy works and when it’s a good idea to file for one.

Which Debts are Discharged by Bankruptcy?

Filing for BankruptcyFiling for BankruptcyBefore filing you have to decide on the type of personal bankruptcy that is unique to you financial situation. The process covers consumer debts such as credit cards, personal loans, mortgages and medical debts. Non consumer debts cannot be forgiven through personal bankruptcy. These include alimony, taxes, child support, and criminal restitutions.

It’s advisable to have a bankruptcy attorney go through your finances to ascertain which debts qualify as consumer debts and which ones do not. For example, a student loan can be either depending on how it was used.

Types of Personal Bankruptcies

In the United States a person can file for either one of the following personal bankruptcies;

Chapter 7 is also known as liquidation bankruptcy. It involves sale of assets that are not protected by bankruptcy and the distributions of the proceeds to creditors. The proceeds can cover your debts in as little as 3 months. Chapter 7 bankruptcy will be ideal if you don’t have a lot of assets that need protection.

Chapter 13 is also referred to as a debt repayment or reorganization. It’s ideal for debtors who have many or valuable assets and don’t want to lose them. Basically the debtor tables a proposal that shows how he/she plans to clear amounts owed within a given time frame. One gets the chance to clear all debts either partially or in full. You can also have others dismissed entirely.

Your attorney does a “means test” to determine which bankruptcy you are eligible for. In a nutshell, you may not be eligible for Chapter 7 if it’s evident that your income can settle debts under Chapter 13. Similarly, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be denied if your debts are too high in comparison to your income.

When is Bankruptcy a Good Idea

When is Bankruptcy a Good IdeaWhen is Bankruptcy a Good IdeaBeing eligible for bankruptcy doesn’t necessarily mean that you need to file for one. It could be that all you need is a little professional advice on how to manage your finances.

You also have to contend with the fact that bankruptcy stays on your credit report for seven to ten years. That said, there are some circumstances that call for bankruptcy;

#1 When debt management programs don’t work

Credit counseling is a service offered by most financial advisors and organizations. You may be advised on how to reduce personal expenses in order to free more of your income to clear debts. Other measures include renegotiating terms with credit companies or other creditors.

When debt management fails, whether it’s due to non commitment on your part or refusal by creditors, then bankruptcy could be your only way out.

#2 When you are being sued

A lawsuit filed by creditors can be tricky when you have no means of repaying and remaining liquid. The judgment could lead to sale of assets or foreclosure on your properties. When faced with such eventualities, filing for bankruptcy could be the only way for you to remain afloat. The process offers you the chance to retain some of your property that would otherwise be auctioned.

#3 When faced with overwhelming medical bills

Most financial woes result from making wrong decisions on investments and credit lines. You may however find yourself faced with bills that are not of your own making. Such include medical bills that are not covered by insurance and are beyond your financial reach. In such circumstances, filing for bankruptcy is advisable; the bill will be discharged without over-tasking your income or your family’s finances.

#4 Insolvency Due to Industry Crisis

More often than not you will find yourself contemplating mortgage as an investment. When the industry is in a boom, then you are all set to make a profit on resale in the foreseeable future; that is however not always the case. Upward adjustments on mortgage repayments can leave you deep in debt. Filing for bankruptcy could be the only way of salvaging your property from mortgage lenders.

The take away

Bankruptcy is a federal court-protected financial tool that gives you a “fresh start” from debt burden. The process becomes part of your credit report for 7-10 years. It can also lead to loss of assets hence should be done as a final result. If you are facing foreclosure, hefty medical bills or a creditor’s lawsuit then filing for bankruptcy could be your only way out. The above information gives you an overview on how to go about it.

Related Article: Life After Bankruptcy

Source: creditabsolute.com

What are derogatory marks and how can you fix them? – Lexington Law

Derogatory Marks Header Image

Having a few items on your credit report dragging down your score can be incredibly frustrating, especially if you have a good financial record.

A derogatory mark is a negative item on your credit report that can be fixed by removing it or building positive credit activity. Because derogatory marks can stay on your credit report typically for seven to ten years, it’s important to know how to fix them.

Derogatory marks can affect your credit score, your ability to be approved for credit and the interest rates a lender offers you. Some derogatory marks are due to poor credit activity, such as a late payment. Or it could be an error that shouldn’t be on your report at all.

Types of negative items include late payments (30, 60, and 90 days), charge-offs, collections, foreclosures, repossessions, judgments, liens, and bankruptcies. We’ll cover what each one of these means, and how they can impact your credit reports.

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How do derogatory marks impact my credit score?

The amount that derogatory marks lower your credit score depends on the mark’s severity and how high your credit score was before the mark. For instance, bankruptcy has a greater impact on your credit score than a missed payment or debt settlement. And, unfortunately, having a derogatory mark impacts a high credit score more than it does a low credit score.

According to CreditCards.com and CNNMoney, even a single negative on your credit could cost you over 100 points. Negative items on your credit could cost you thousands of dollars in higher interest rates, or you could be denied altogether.

negative item score decrease stats

How long a derogatory mark stays on your credit report depends on the type of mark.

How long do derogatory marks stay on my credit report?

Derogatory marks usually stay on your credit report for around seven to ten years, depending on the type. After that period passes, the mark will roll off your report and you should start seeing a change in your credit score.

Here’s how long each derogatory mark stays on your credit report:

Type of derogatory mark What is it? How long does this stay on a credit report?
Late payment Late payments are payments made 30 days or more after the payment due date. Typically, this can remain on your report for seven years from the date you made a late payment.
An account in collections or a charge-off Creditors send your account to collections or charge them off if there’s been no payment for 180 days. Typically, this can remain on your report for seven years from the date you made a late payment.
Tax lien A tax lien is when the government claims you’ve neglected or failed to pay taxes on your property or financial assets. Unpaid tax lien: Can remain on your report indefinitely.

Paid tax lien: Can remain on your report seven years from the date the lien was filed.

Civil judgment Civil judgments are a debt you owe through the court, such as if your landlord sued you over missed rent payments. Unpaid civil judgment: Can remain on your report for seven years from when the judgment was filed, but can be renewed if left unpaid.

Paid civil judgment: Can remain on your report for seven years from when the judgment was filed.

Debt settlement Debt settlement is when you and your creditor agree that you will pay less than the full amount owed. A typical time period is seven years, starting from when the debt was settled or the date of the first delinquent payment if there were missed payments.
Foreclosure Foreclosure is when you fail to pay your mortgage and you forfeit the right to the property. Typically, seven years from the foreclosure filing date.
Bankruptcy Bankruptcy is a court proceeding to discharge your debt and sell your assets. Can remain on your report for seven years for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Chapter 7 bankruptcy can remain on your report for 10 years.
Repossession A repossession is when your assets are seized, such as a vehicle that was used as collateral. Can remain on your report for seven years from the first date of the missed payment.

Types of derogatory marks

Late payments

Late payments occur when you’ve been 30, 60, or 90 days late paying an account. Although you don’t want late payments on your credit reports, an occasional 30 or 60-day late payment isn’t too severe. But you don’t want frequent late payments and you don’t want late payments on every single account. One recent late payment on a single account can lower a score by 15 to 40 points, and missing one payment cycle for all accounts in the same month can cause a score to tank by 150 points or more.

Payments 90 days late or more start to factor more heavily into your credit score, and consecutive late payments are even more harmful to your score, as each subsequent late payment is weighted more heavily. Sometimes, creditors will report payments as late as 120 days, which can be almost as severe as charge-offs and collections. Late payments can be reported to the credit bureaus once you have been more than 30 days late on an account and these late payments can stay on your credit reports for up to seven years.

Charge offs

A charge off is when a creditor writes off your unpaid debt. Typically, this occurs when you have been 180 days late on an account. Charge offs have a severely negative impact on your credit, and like most other negative items can stay on your credit reports for seven years. When an account is charged off, your creditor can sell it to collection agencies, which is even worse news for your credit.

Creditors see a charge off as a glaring indication that you have not been responsible with your finances in the past and cannot be counted on to fulfill your financial obligations in the future. When creditors see a charge off on your credit reports, they are more likely to deny any new applications for loans or lines of credit because they see you as a financial risk. If you do qualify, this can mean higher interest rates. Current creditors can respond by raising your interest rates on your existing balances.

Tax liens

In most cases, liens are the result of unpaid taxes – whether it’s at the state or the federal level. For a federal tax lien, the IRS can place a lien against your property to cover the cost of unpaid taxes. Tax liens can make it difficult to get approved for new lines of credit or loans because the government has claimed to your property. What this means is that if you default on any other accounts, your creditors have to stand in line behind the IRS to collect.

Unpaid liens can stay indefinitely on your credit reports. Once they have been paid, however, they can stay on your reports for up to seven years. Like judgments though, the credit bureaus are strictly regulated on how they can report liens because they are also public records.

Civil judgments

Judgments are public records that are also referred to as civil claims. A judgment can be taken out against a debtor for an unpaid balance. A creditor or collection agency can file a suit in court. If the court rules in favor of the creditor, a judgment is taken out against the debtor and put on their credit reports. This, like many other negative items, has a severely negative impact, and like most other negative items can be reported for seven years.

Judgments are also another indication that a person won’t pay their debts. Lawsuits are time-consuming and costly, so they are something that creditors potentially want to avoid. When a judgment is filed though, it can impact more than credit. The judge may allow the creditor to garnish a debtor’s wages, which can heavily impact finances.

Collections

Collections are the most common types of accounts on credit reports. About one-third of Americans with credit reports have at least one collection account. Over half of these accounts are due to medical bills, but other accounts like unpaid credit cards and loans, utilities, and parking tickets can be sold to collections.

Collections arise from debts that are sold to third parties by the original creditor if a bill goes unpaid for too long. They have a severe negative impact on your credit and can stay on your reports for up to seven years. When potential creditors see collections on your credit reports, it can raise flags and cause them to think that you won’t pay your debts.

Foreclosures

A foreclosure is a legal proceeding that is initiated by a mortgage lender when a homeowner has been unable to make payments. Usually, a lender will file a foreclosure when a homeowner has been three months late or more on mortgage payments.

When a lender decides to foreclose, they begin by filing a Notice of Default with the County Recorder’s Office, which begins the legal proceedings. If a foreclosure goes through and a homeowner can’t catch up on payments, then they are evicted from their home, and the foreclosure is reported to the credit bureaus.

Bankruptcies

Bankruptcy is extremely damaging to credit. Individuals who file for bankruptcy are those who have too much debt, and not enough money to pay it. They likely have had overdue accounts for a long period of time and in some cases loss of income that prevents them from being able to pay any of their bills. Bankruptcies can also arise from huge medical debt.

Whether or not file for bankruptcy is a difficult decision, and doing so can impact your credit from seven to ten years, depending on the type of bankruptcy you file. When a bankruptcy is filed, debts are discharged and the individuals filing are released from most of their previously incurred debts (there are some exceptions). This option can give people a “clean slate” from debt, but creditors don’t like to see it on credit reports because it can imply that an individual won’t pay their debts.

Repossessions

A repossession is a loss of property on a secured loan. Secured loans are where you have collateral, like a car or a house, and the loss occurs when the lender takes back the property because of the inability to pay. Usually, when this occurs, the lender will auction off the collateral to make up for the remaining balance, although it doesn’t usually cover the remaining balance.

When there is a remaining balance, the creditor may choose to sell it off to collections. A repossession has a severe negative impact on credit because it shows a debtor’s inability to pay back a loan. Usually, a repossession follows a long line of late payments and can knock a lot of points off a credit score.

How can I improve my credit score with derogatory marks on my credit report?

If you have derogatory marks, you can improve your credit score by working to rebuild your credit. By boosting your credit score, you’re more likely to get approved for loans and credit cards.

Here’s how to improve your credit score based on the type of derogatory mark:

Derogatory mark What to do to improve your credit score
Late payments Pay off the full debt as soon as possible. If there are late fees, ask the creditor to drop the fee (they often do if it’s your first time being late).
Stay on top of your payments with other lenders to show that you’re responsible, reducing the impact of a late payment.
An account in collections or a charge-off Pay off the debt or negotiate a settlement where you pay less than the full amount owed. Making a payment doesn’t remove the negative mark from your report, but prevents you from being sued over the debt.
Tax lien Pay the taxes you owe in full as soon as possible. Continue to make timely payments with any creditors and lenders.
Civil judgment Pay off the judgment amount, ideally before it gets to court. Make other payments on time to limit the impact of the civil judgment on your credit score.
Debt settlement Pay the full settled amount to prevent your account from going to collections or being charged off.
Foreclosure Keep other credit and loans open and make timely payments to build up positive credit activity.
Bankruptcy Rebuild your credit after bankruptcy with credit cards that cater to lower credit and credit builder loans. Make timely payments to reestablish that you’re a responsible borrower.
Repossessions Continue to pay other bills on time and pay off any further debt to the creditor.

You can also remove derogatory marks if they’re inaccurate or unfairly reported. By requesting your free credit report, you can look for mistakes and inaccuracies.

For example, check to see if a missed payment was inaccurately reported or if someone else’s account got mixed up with yours. You can remove these mistakes, giving your credit score a boost. 

How do I remove derogatory marks from my credit report?

You can remove derogatory marks from your credit report by disputing inaccuracies with the credit bureaus. Here’s how:

1. Request and review your credit report

TransUnion, Equifax and Experian provide one free credit report each year. Request your credit report and review it closely for errors.

Look through both “closed” and “open” derogatory marks. Check to see if your personal information is correct and if the creditor reported payments and dates appropriately. Take note of any discrepancies.

2. Dispute derogatory marks

If you notice incorrect items, payments or dates you need to file a dispute with that credit bureau (and any bureau that lists the item on your report).

You can file a dispute through the credit bureau or have a professional assist you. It’s best to make disputes as soon as you notice them, ideally within 30 days of the incident. The credit bureaus must respond to you within 30-45 days. 

3. Follow up on the dispute

You may have to provide more information or proof to refute something on your credit report. Be sure to respond to any inquiries by the specified time. Check your credit report afterward to make sure that the error is removed.

Removing a derogatory mark from your credit report helps to repair your credit. You’ll also want to improve your credit by doing things like lowering your credit utilization rate, upping the average age of your credit and making timely payments.

If you’re unable to remove a derogatory mark from your credit report, you’ll need to wait until it rolls off of your report, usually within seven to 10 years. In the meantime, work to rebuild your credit and improve your creditworthiness.

steps to remove derogatory marks from credit report

How can I get help with derogatory marks?

You can remove derogatory marks from your credit report by yourself. However, getting help from a credit repair company can make the process easier and improve your chances of getting the negative mark removed.

Many consumers appreciate professional help as it saves time, energy and resources. Contact us for a free credit report consultation. We’ll talk about your unique situation and the ways that we can help you.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com