66 Questions to Ask When Buying a House

As a first-time homebuyer, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed even before you begin your homebuying journey. After all, this is a new process for you and, simply put, you don’t know what you don’t know. First off, there are no silly questions you can ask during any stage of the homebuying process. So always feel free to ask a question, no matter how trivial you think it might be. You owe it to yourself – and your family – to find out everything you can about a home, especially since it will most likely be the largest investment you’ll ever make. To help you get started, we’ve created a list of 66 questions to ask when buying a house, broken down into each stage of the homebuying process to help keep you informed.

11 questions to ask before you go house hunting

As you well know, buying a house is a significant investment. Before you start house hunting, think through your goals for homeownership. Why do you want to buy a house? 

  1. Do you want to earn equity and build wealth by owning a house? 
  2. Do you expect you might need more space for a future family? 
  3. Do you have a pet or see one in your future and you want a backyard? 
  4. Do you want to live in a quiet, established area or somewhere more lively? 
  5. Do you enjoy yard work, gardening? How much backyard space do you require?
  6. Have you considered the local schools and neighborhoods? 
  7. Have you looked at crime rates around the neighborhoods you’re interested in? 
  8. Is it essential for you to live close to your work? Or, is a commute ok? 
  9. Have you narrowed down a range of purchase prices you can afford?
  10. How much money do you need for a downpayment? 
  11. Are you pre-approved for a mortgage

When you’re wrapped up in the excitement of house hunting, you may forget which questions to ask when buying a house.. If you are a pet owner looking at condos, you’ll have to be sure the homeowners’ association allows pets. Or, let’s say you want to live in a popular downtown neighborhood, but plan to have children in a few years – will this neighborhood still suit your needs? It’s always worth giving some thought to the type of home and area to help focus your search. 

Also, be aware that being approved for a home loan saves time for everyone by ensuring that you, as the buyer, can actually afford the home and be able to follow through an offer. 

7 questions to ask when you interview agents

Contacting the agent listed on the for-sale sign of a house you’re interested in may not be the best way to protect your interest as a buyer. When you work with your own agent, that agent’s job is to represent your interests. They help research the house, find answers to all of your questions, and serve as your professional intermediary for communicating with the seller’s agent and homeowner.

Naturally, you will want to choose a great real estate agent that you are comfortable with and feel like they have your best interests in mind. Most real estate experts recommend that you interview at least three agents identified by recommendations from friends and family who have bought or sold a house recently. Here are some questions to ask potential agents to see if they are the right agent for you.

  1. How long have you been a real estate agent? 
  2. What kind of experience do you have in this specific market area?
  3. Do you usually work with buyers or sellers? 
  4. How do you usually communicate with clients? What should I expect for response time? 
  5. How will you help me search for homes? 
  6. What days and times are you typically available for showings? 
  7. How will you ensure transparency about any issues you see with a house? 

When you set your expectations for communication, home tours, and other information you count on your agent to provide, you have a good chance to establish a productive relationship from the start – which will help you through your homebuying journey.

stylish living room

stylish living room

37 questions to ask when touring homes

This is an extensive list, and not every question applies to every situation. For example, if your goal is to purchase a single-family home, questions relating to condominiums don’t apply. However, this list of questions to ask when touring a house should give you an excellent start in making well-informed decisions when buying your first home. 

  1. What’s the reason for the sale? How long have the sellers lived there?
  2. How long has the house been on the market? 
  3. What is the neighborhood like?
  4. When was the house built? 
  5. What are the property taxes?
  6. Are there any upcoming condo or homeowners association fees?
  7. What are the average utility costs? 
  8. Have there been any major repairs to the property? If so, do you know if they provided a warranty?
  9. Are there any boundary disputes with neighbors?
  10. Are there any shared driveways or communal spaces?
  11. Are there any public rights of way passing through – or near – the property? 
  12. How old are the major appliances and systems?
  13. Are the appliances included in the sale?
  14. What is the sales history of this house, and how would it affect my offer?
  15. Is there enough storage space? Room to grow? 
  16. Is there any evidence of water problems? Can you see damp drywall, basement floors, or open leaks? Can you smell mildew? Or is there a smell of fresh paint that might be intended to cover up a water issue?
  17. Are the walls structurally sound? Look for cracks and look for evidence of cracks covered over by wallpaper that doesn’t look right or paint applied over filler.
  18. Is the chimney in good condition?
  19. Are the windows sound? Will any of the glazing need to be replaced?
  20. Do the ground floor windows have working latches to lock the windows? 
  21. Is the attic insulated? If so, when was the insulation installed?
  22. Is there any soundproofing in the house? (Try viewing the home at different times to hear road noise or neighbors.)
  23. Are there working smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms?
  24. Is there adequate cell phone reception indoors? How’s the broadband service in the area?
  25. What type of system is used to heat and cool the house? 
  26. Ask to see the circuit box – does the wiring look up to date?
  27. How is the condition of electrical outlets and switches? (You can bring something to plug into try outlets.) 
  28. Do all of the lights work? If not, why not?
  29. Does the property have any lead pipes? Do you see any issues with pipes in need of repair?
  30. What kind of drainage system does the property have? Is it on the city sewer, or is there a septic tank? 
  31. Is there any asbestos in the property, or has there ever been an asbestos survey completed?
  32. What kind of roof does the property have? When was it last replaced, and what is its current condition? 
  33. Do you see any gutter leaks? Are the gutters cleaned out, or do they need work? 
  34. Are there any trees growing within 15 feet of the property? Can you discern if roots are likely to be a problem? 
  35. Which way does the yard face, and is there any part of the yard that doesn’t receive sunlight throughout the day? 
  36. Would the real estate agent buy this house? If not, why not?
  37. What’s the lowest price you think we could offer for this house and still close the transaction?

You can ask these questions when buying a house – and others as applicable – to understand your likely overall costs to own this home. When you understand all of your costs, you’ll confidently be able to make an offer you can afford

open concept new kitchen

open concept new kitchen

11 questions to ask when making an offer and closing on a home

Real estate agents make offers on homes every day. Their job is to help you make the best offer while protecting you against potential risks with the transaction. 

  1. How does the offer work? Do we communicate with the seller or seller’s agent? 
  2. What contingencies do you recommend including in the offer? 
  3. How much earnest money should we put in the offer? 
  4. When do we need to provide earnest money? 
  5. When should we expect to hear back from the seller? 
  6. If we receive a counter-offer, when do we need to reply? 
  7. How can we sign the paperwork? Digital? In-person? 
  8. If the offer is accepted, what are the next steps? 
  9. How far out is the potential closing date from an accepted offer? 
  10. What are our next steps once the offer is accepted?
  11. What do we do at closing? 

Your real estate agent wants to make the home buying transaction as smooth as possible. If they do not provide this information upfront, be sure to ask. 

You should prepare a list of your own questions to ask when buying a house. It can include any given here, or others that represent your own interests and concerns. Answers to these questions will ease your mind and help you understand what you can expect during each stage of the homebuying process. Completing your research is perfectly acceptable, but don’t skip asking questions of your mortgage broker, real estate agent, and title company. When you gather enough information, you can make the best decision buying your first home. 

Source: redfin.com

Using a Personal Cash Flow Statement

If you’re often surprised when you open up your credit card and bank statements and see how much money you spent, or you worry that your cash outflow may be exceeding your cash inflow, there could be a simple solution: A personal cash flow statement.

Creating a personal cash flow statement can give you a clear picture of your monthly cash inflow (money you earn) and your monthly cash outflow (money you spend) to determine if you have a positive or negative net cash flow.

And while it may sound intimidating, creating a personal cash flow statement is relatively simple. All you need to get started is to gather up your bank statements and bills for one month (or more). Then, it’s a matter of some basic calculations.

Once you have your personal financial statement, you’ll know where you currently stand. You’ll also be able to use your personal financial statement to help you create a budget and goals for increasing your net worth.

Here’s how to start getting your financial life back into balance.

What Is a Personal Cash Flow Statement?

“Cash flow” is a term commonly used by businesses to detail the amount of money flowing in and out of a company.

Companies can use cash flow statements to determine how well the company is generating cash to pay its debts and operating expenses.

Just like the ones used by companies, tracking your own cash flow can provide you with a snapshot of your financial condition.

You might learn, for example, that you have less leftover at the end of each month than you thought, or that you are indeed going backwards.

Once you have the numbers down in black and white, you can then make any needed changes, such as reducing costs and expenditures, increasing income, and making sure that your spending is in line with your goals.

So, how do you set up a personal finance cash flow statement?

It might seem overwhelming to get started, but these steps can simplify the process.

Listing all Your Sources of Income

A good first step when creating a personal cash flow statement is to get out all of your pay stubs, bank statements, credit card statements, and bills.

Next, you’ll want to start listing any and all sources of income–the inflow.

Cash inflows generally include: salaries, anything you make from side hustles, interest from savings accounts, income from a rental property, dividends from investments, and capital gains from the sale of financial securities like stocks and bonds.

Since a cash flow statement is designed to give a snapshot into the overall flow of where your money is coming from and where it is going, you might want to avoid listing money in accounts that aren’t available for spending.

For example, you may not want to list dividends and capital gains from investment accounts if they are being automatically reinvested, or are part of a retirement account from which you aren’t actively taking withdrawals.

Since income can vary from one month to the next, you might choose to tally inflow for the last three or six in order to come up with an average.

Once you’ve collected and listed all of your income for the month, you can then calculate the total inflow.

Listing all of Your Expenses

Now that you know how much money is coming in each month, you’ll want to use those same statements and bills, as well as any statements for any debts (such as mortgage, auto loan, or student loans) to list how much was spent during the month.

Again, if your spending tends to fluctuate quite a bit from month to month you may want to track it for several months and come up with an average.

To create a complete picture of how much of your money is flowing out each month, you’ll want to include necessities like food and gas, and also discretionary expenses, such as trips to the nail salon or your monthly streaming services.

Small expenses can add up quickly, so it’s wise to be precise.

Once you’ve compiled all of your expenses, you can calculate the total and come up with your total outflow for the month.

Determining Your Net Cash Flow

To calculate your net cash flow, all you need to do is subtract your monthly outflow from your monthly inflow. The result is your net cash flow.

A positive number means you have a surplus, while a negative means you have a deficit in your budget.

A positive cash flow is desirable, of course, since it can provide more flexibility, and can allow you to decide how to best use the surplus.

There are a variety of options. You could choose to save for an upcoming expense, make additional contributions to your retirement fund, create or add to an emergency fund, or, if your savings are in good shape, consider a splurging on something fun.

A negative cash flow can signal that you are living a more expensive life than your income can support. In the future, maintaining this habit could lead to additional debt.

It’s also possible to have net neutral cash flow (all money coming in and going out is fairly equal).

In that case, you may still want to jigger things around if you are not already putting the annual maximum into your retirement fund and/or you don’t have a comfortable emergency cushion.

The Difference Between a Personal Cash Flow Statement and a Budget

A personal cash flow statement provides a comprehensive look at what is currently coming in and going out of your bank accounts each month.

A cash flow statement tells you where you are.

A personal budget, on the other hand, helps you to get where you want to go by giving you a spending plan that is based on your income.

A budget can provide you with some general spending guidelines, such as how much you should spend on groceries, entertainment and clothing each month so that you don’t exceed your income–and end up with a negative net flow.

Creating a budget can also be a good opportunity to check in with your financial goals.

For example, are you on track for saving for retirement? Do you want to amp up your emergency fund?

Are you interested in tackling the credit card debt that has been spiraling due to high interest rates?

Perhaps you want to work toward paying off your student loans.

Whatever your goal, a well-crafted budget could serve as a roadmap to help you get there.

Using Your Personal Financial Statement to Create a Simple Budget

Because a cash flow statement provides a comprehensive look at your overall spending habits, it can be a great jumping off point to set up a simple budget.

When you’re ready to create a budget, there are a variety of resources online, from apps, like SoFi Relay®, to spreadsheet templates and printable worksheets .

A good first step in creating a budget is to organize all of your monthly expenses into categories.

Spending categories typically include necessities, such as rent or mortgage, transportation (like car expenses or public transportation costs), food, cell phone, healthcare/insurance, life insurance, childcare, and any debts (credit cards/ loans).

You’ll also need to list nonessential spending, such as cable television, streaming services, concert and movie tickets, restaurants, clothing, etc.

You may also want to include monthly contributions to a retirement plan and personal savings into the expense category as well.

And, if you don’t have emergency savings in place that could cover at least three to six months of living expenses, consider putting that on the spending list as well, so you can start putting some money towards it each month.

Once you have a sense of your monthly earnings and spending, you may want to see how your numbers line up with general budgeting guidelines. Financial counselors sometimes recommend the 50/30/20 model, which looks like this:

•  50% of money goes towards necessities such as a home, car, cell phone, or utility bills.
•  30% goes towards your wants, such as entertainment and dining out.
•  20% goes towards your savings goals, such as a retirement plan, a downpayment on a home, emergency fund, or investments.

Improving Your Net Cash Flow

If your net cash flow is not where you want it or, worse, dipping into negative territory, a budget can help bring these numbers into balance.

The key is to look closely at each one of your spending categories and see if you can find some ways to trim back.

The easiest way to change your spending habits is to trim some of your nonessential expenditures. If you’re paying for cable but mostly watch streaming services, for example, you could score some real savings by getting rid of that cable bill.

Not taking as many trips to the mall or cooking (instead of getting takeout) more often could start adding up to a big difference.

Living on a budget may also require looking at the bigger picture and finding places for more significant savings.

For example, maybe rent eats up 50% of your income and it’d be better to move to a less costly apartment. Or, you might want to consider trading in an expensive car lease for a less pricey or pre-owned model.

There may also be opportunities to lower some of your recurring expenses by finding a better deal or negotiating with your service providers.

You may also want to look into any ways you might be able to change the other side of the equation–the inflow.

Some options might include asking for a raise, or finding an additional income stream through some sort of side hustle.

The Takeaway

One of the most important steps towards achieving financial wellness is cash flow management–i.e., making sure that your cash outflow is not exceeding your cash inflow.

Creating a simple cash flow statement for yourself can be an extremely useful tool.

For one reason, it can show you exactly where you stand. For another, a personal cash flow statement can help you create a budget that can bring the inflow and outflow of money into a healthier balance.

Creating–and sticking with–a budget that creates a positive net cash flow, and also allows for monthly saving (for retirement, a future purchase, or a rainy day) can help you build financial security and future wealth.

If you need help with tracking your spending, a SoFi Money® cash management account may be a good option for you.

With SoFi Money, you can see your weekly spending on your dashboard, which can help you stay on top of your spending and make sure you are on track with your budget.

Check out everything a SoFi Money cash management account has to offer today!



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Source: sofi.com

66 Questions to Ask When Buying a House – Redfin

As a first-time homebuyer, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed even before you begin your homebuying journey. After all, this is a new process for you and, simply put, you don’t know what you don’t know. First off, there are no silly questions you can ask during any stage of the homebuying process. So always feel free to ask a question, no matter how trivial you think it might be. You owe it to yourself – and your family – to find out everything you can about a home, especially since it will most likely be the largest investment you’ll ever make. To help you get started, we’ve created a list of 66 questions to ask when buying a house, broken down into each stage of the homebuying process to help keep you informed.

11 questions to ask before you go house hunting

As you well know, buying a house is a significant investment. Before you start house hunting, think through your goals for homeownership. Why do you want to buy a house? 

  1. Do you want to earn equity and build wealth by owning a house? 
  2. Do you expect you might need more space for a future family? 
  3. Do you have a pet or see one in your future and you want a backyard? 
  4. Do you want to live in a quiet, established area or somewhere more lively? 
  5. Do you enjoy yard work, gardening? How much backyard space do you require?
  6. Have you considered the local schools and neighborhoods? 
  7. Have you looked at crime rates around the neighborhoods you’re interested in? 
  8. Is it essential for you to live close to your work? Or, is a commute ok? 
  9. Have you narrowed down a range of purchase prices you can afford?
  10. How much money do you need for a downpayment? 
  11. Are you pre-approved for a mortgage

When you’re wrapped up in the excitement of house hunting, you may forget which questions to ask when buying a house.. If you are a pet owner looking at condos, you’ll have to be sure the homeowners’ association allows pets. Or, let’s say you want to live in a popular downtown neighborhood, but plan to have children in a few years – will this neighborhood still suit your needs? It’s always worth giving some thought to the type of home and area to help focus your search. 

Also, be aware that being approved for a home loan saves time for everyone by ensuring that you, as the buyer, can actually afford the home and be able to follow through an offer. 

7 questions to ask when you interview agents

Contacting the agent listed on the for-sale sign of a house you’re interested in may not be the best way to protect your interest as a buyer. When you work with your own agent, that agent’s job is to represent your interests. They help research the house, find answers to all of your questions, and serve as your professional intermediary for communicating with the seller’s agent and homeowner.

Naturally, you will want to choose a great real estate agent that you are comfortable with and feel like they have your best interests in mind. Most real estate experts recommend that you interview at least three agents identified by recommendations from friends and family who have bought or sold a house recently. Here are some questions to ask potential agents to see if they are the right agent for you.

  1. How long have you been a real estate agent? 
  2. What kind of experience do you have in this specific market area?
  3. Do you usually work with buyers or sellers? 
  4. How do you usually communicate with clients? What should I expect for response time? 
  5. How will you help me search for homes? 
  6. What days and times are you typically available for showings? 
  7. How will you ensure transparency about any issues you see with a house? 

When you set your expectations for communication, home tours, and other information you count on your agent to provide, you have a good chance to establish a productive relationship from the start – which will help you through your homebuying journey.

stylish living room

stylish living room

37 questions to ask when touring homes

This is an extensive list, and not every question applies to every situation. For example, if your goal is to purchase a single-family home, questions relating to condominiums don’t apply. However, this list of questions to ask when touring a house should give you an excellent start in making well-informed decisions when buying your first home. 

  1. What’s the reason for the sale? How long have the sellers lived there?
  2. How long has the house been on the market? 
  3. What is the neighborhood like?
  4. When was the house built? 
  5. What are the property taxes?
  6. Are there any upcoming condo or homeowners association fees?
  7. What are the average utility costs? 
  8. Have there been any major repairs to the property? If so, do you know if they provided a warranty?
  9. Are there any boundary disputes with neighbors?
  10. Are there any shared driveways or communal spaces?
  11. Are there any public rights of way passing through – or near – the property? 
  12. How old are the major appliances and systems?
  13. Are the appliances included in the sale?
  14. What is the sales history of this house, and how would it affect my offer?
  15. Is there enough storage space? Room to grow? 
  16. Is there any evidence of water problems? Can you see damp drywall, basement floors, or open leaks? Can you smell mildew? Or is there a smell of fresh paint that might be intended to cover up a water issue?
  17. Are the walls structurally sound? Look for cracks and look for evidence of cracks covered over by wallpaper that doesn’t look right or paint applied over filler.
  18. Is the chimney in good condition?
  19. Are the windows sound? Will any of the glazing need to be replaced?
  20. Do the ground floor windows have working latches to lock the windows? 
  21. Is the attic insulated? If so, when was the insulation installed?
  22. Is there any soundproofing in the house? (Try viewing the home at different times to hear road noise or neighbors.)
  23. Are there working smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms?
  24. Is there adequate cell phone reception indoors? How’s the broadband service in the area?
  25. What type of system is used to heat and cool the house? 
  26. Ask to see the circuit box – does the wiring look up to date?
  27. How is the condition of electrical outlets and switches? (You can bring something to plug into try outlets.) 
  28. Do all of the lights work? If not, why not?
  29. Does the property have any lead pipes? Do you see any issues with pipes in need of repair?
  30. What kind of drainage system does the property have? Is it on the city sewer, or is there a septic tank? 
  31. Is there any asbestos in the property, or has there ever been an asbestos survey completed?
  32. What kind of roof does the property have? When was it last replaced, and what is its current condition? 
  33. Do you see any gutter leaks? Are the gutters cleaned out, or do they need work? 
  34. Are there any trees growing within 15 feet of the property? Can you discern if roots are likely to be a problem? 
  35. Which way does the yard face, and is there any part of the yard that doesn’t receive sunlight throughout the day? 
  36. Would the real estate agent buy this house? If not, why not?
  37. What’s the lowest price you think we could offer for this house and still close the transaction?

You can ask these questions when buying a house – and others as applicable – to understand your likely overall costs to own this home. When you understand all of your costs, you’ll confidently be able to make an offer you can afford

open concept new kitchen

open concept new kitchen

11 questions to ask when making an offer and closing on a home

Real estate agents make offers on homes every day. Their job is to help you make the best offer while protecting you against potential risks with the transaction. 

  1. How does the offer work? Do we communicate with the seller or seller’s agent? 
  2. What contingencies do you recommend including in the offer? 
  3. How much earnest money should we put in the offer? 
  4. When do we need to provide earnest money? 
  5. When should we expect to hear back from the seller? 
  6. If we receive a counter-offer, when do we need to reply? 
  7. How can we sign the paperwork? Digital? In-person? 
  8. If the offer is accepted, what are the next steps? 
  9. How far out is the potential closing date from an accepted offer? 
  10. What are our next steps once the offer is accepted?
  11. What do we do at closing? 

Your real estate agent wants to make the home buying transaction as smooth as possible. If they do not provide this information upfront, be sure to ask. 

You should prepare a list of your own questions to ask when buying a house. It can include any given here, or others that represent your own interests and concerns. Answers to these questions will ease your mind and help you understand what you can expect during each stage of the homebuying process. Completing your research is perfectly acceptable, but don’t skip asking questions of your mortgage broker, real estate agent, and title company. When you gather enough information, you can make the best decision buying your first home. 

Source: redfin.com

Buying Land to Build a House

Buying Land to Build a House

So many people imagine building their dream home in an ideal location. Finding that location and buying land to build a house is the first step in fulfilling this dream. 

Paying for this lot with cash is the ideal scenario but with lot prices climbing into the hundreds of thousands of dollars range, most buyers will need a loan to purchase a lot. 

The loan you use for buying land to build a house on is very different than the traditional home mortgage loan. Land loans differ because there are generally no improvements like a house on the property. On a traditional mortgage, the home is used to secure the loan. In a land scenario, there are no improvements to use in order to secure the loan. 

This makes the land loan a risky loan for the bank. Because of this, these loans have more stringent requirements than traditional mortgages. You’ll need more money down 20% to 30% depending on your credit score.

Yes, these loans can be difficult to obtain because of the requirements but at the end of the day, it’s worth the hassle because you’ll enjoy plenty of benefits when you do so. Before you even start thinking about them all, you need to do a lot of research. Don’t worry! We’ve done it for you!

Here’s everything you need to know about purchasing land before building your house.

Reasons to Look for Land to Build on

Privacy: Living in an urban or even a suburban neighborhood usually means a lack of privacy. You see and hear your neighbors constantly, and while they may be great people, you want your privacy.

When you buy land to build a house, you have the flexibility of choosing a place the lends itself to seclusion and privacy. Additionally, you have the option of situating your home on the lot in order to maximize your privacy. 

While custom home lots are more extensive than subdivided lots, they also tend to be much larger. This means you’ll have more space surrounding your home, hopefully giving you peace, privacy, and quiet.

Convenience: One of the advantages of buying land is choosing where you’re going to be. That means you can be closer to work, family, or whatever your lifestyle priorities are. 

If convenience is your priority, you may need to be flexible when it comes to designing and building your home. Since communities located close to amenities and other conveniences tend to have more restrictions than more rural communities, you may have to adhere to building restrictions and requirements. This may force you to compromise on the actual type and style of home you end up building.

Style: One of the biggest benefits of building your own home is that you get to choose the style of the home. If you want to build something truly unique, building your own home is the right decision. When you shop for your lot, it’s important that you do your homework in order to make sure you can build what you want. Many communities have architectural guidelines and restrictions that will dictate what you can and cannot build.

When you build your house, you are supposed to get everything that you want. Make sure you buy your lot in an area that has no restrictions or at least restrictions you can live with.

Flexibility: Tract or production builders do a great job of building an attractive product that appeals to a wide range of homebuyers. Unfortunately, not everyone has the same needs and wants. Have you always dreamt about a larger garage, a dedicated workshop, or a cottage? Since you’re in charge of designing the house, you can do it!. You can choose to be practical, extravagant, or something in-between. It’s up to you.

It’s important that you make sure you will have the ability to do the things you want when you choose your building site. You need to make sure the building envelope large enough to accommodate your plans. Also, check to make sure there are no environmental issues that would keep you from executing your plans. We often see large pieces of land that are either too steep or have unbuildable areas because of drainage or some other issue.

The time to find out about these types of conditions is before you close on your lot, not after.

How to Find Land to Build on

Realtor: Your Realtor is a great place to start when looking for land. Realtors often have access to pocket listings, these are lots that are not yet on the market but the owner might be looking to sell.

It’s important to note that realtors tend to specialize in different aspects of the market. A Realtor that specializes in luxury condos in an urban area is probably not a great resource for a custom home lot in a rural or suburban setting. Ask around in order to find realtors that specialize in the type of land you are looking for.

MLS: A Multiple Listing Service (or MLS) is like a realtor’s database, where multiple real estate agents offer both homes and land for sale to each other. Unlike the pocket listing, a property offered on the MLS is there because the owner wants to sell.

Your realtor can set up a search for you on the MLS system. This search will send you notifications when a listing that meets your criteria hits the market. One of the most valuable aspects of this type of search is that the agent can change the search criteria if you aren’t seeing the types of properties you are interested in.

Tax records: If you have a very specific area or neighborhood that you want to live in, this is a great way to search for a lot. Looking at the county tax assessor’s website to locate unimproved properties is how the professionals do it. Builders will often scour the tax records looking for unimproved land. The goal is to find a vacant lot that has been owned for a while, if the owner is out of the area, it’s even better.

Builders will reach out to the owners to see if they have any interest in selling the property. These lots are often owned free and clear, so the only expense to the owner is the property tax. These property owners often don’t even consider selling until someone asks.

This method requires a little detective work and a little bit of hustle but the results can be very rewarding.

Landwatch: Realtors, MLS, and tax records are old-school ways of looking for land. Nowadays, we can take advantage of the internet. And www.landwatch.com is the perfect place to look for land online.

On this website, you’ll find countless land listings from huge agricultural tracts to small parcels. These listings come with descriptions, pictures, pricing, and more. If you like what you see, you can contact the owner and buy it.

Subdivisions: The developers of large subdivisions tend to sell directly to home builders. This is a very efficient method for these developers because the builders buy in bulk and have the financing in place. It’s rare to find a subdivision that sells directly to homeowners, but they do exist. 

Subdivisions that sell directly to private individuals tend to be custom home subdivisions. If you are looking for this type of opportunity, you’ll need to stay on top of the market. Talk to builders and Realtors about where these subdivisions are. If you have already chosen your home builder, they can be a great asset in this search as well.

Important considerations

Rural or Suburban: You probably know the difference between a rural and a suburban setting. When you decide to buy land to build a house, this is a crucial factor.

View: Do you want a view? Or, perhaps, are you willing to sacrifice that in favor of other things? You have to figure out what you want – and to picture how things will look from your finished house, both in and out.

Exposure to the sun: Enough sun exposure will heat your house – but too much of it will overheat your place. In colder areas, too little or too much sun can be the difference between snow and ice on your driveway.

Utilities: Water, electricity, and gas are all a given for most people. Not for those who are building their own house, though. Does your lot have access to utilities? Are the utilities at the property line or will you need to bring them in? Do you have access to a municipal water system, or are you going to need a well? Are you able to tap into a sewer system or will your home need a dedicated septic system?

Access: Can you get to your future house from public-access roads? Sometimes, a plot of land is only accessible from other people’s property; if that’s the case, you need an easement to access your house through private land. That could turn into a legal hassle.

Zoning: Zoning laws and a major consideration when building and proper zoning could be the difference between building your dream house and having a plot of land you no longer want. You need to check and double-check your land’s zoning rules and regulations to make sure you can build what you want.

Survey: No matter if someone surveyed the land not too long ago, you need to survey the lot you want to buy. That’s the only way to know where you can build and where your property ends.

Soils and perc tests: Believe it or not, certain soils like clay and rock can be problematic for building houses. You need to perform a soil test before you build. Savvy buyers will do these tests as a part of the due diligence portion of the sales process. This way you don’t end up with a lot you can’t build on.

How to pay

Cash: Cash is king. Always was and always will be. And this is even truer when you’re buying land to build a house.

Sure, you can take a loan to buy land (although they are more expensive than your average mortgage), but if that’s the case, you’ll have to pay back the loan and invest in building your house at the same time.
On the other hand, if you buy the land using cash, you can then use your new property as equity to finance construction.

Land Loan: As we’ve discussed, land loans are different from mortgages. They have higher interest rates, are not that simple to obtain. These loans have much shorter terms and require a good credit score as well as a 20% to 30% downpayment.

Usually, land loan interest rates are much higher than the average mortgage interest rate. And you have to pay it back in 3 to 5 years; that’s almost ten times less than your average 30-year mortgage.

USDA: Not all land loans are equal, though. If you wish to buy land in a rural area, you might qualify for a loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) – and almost 97% of all Americans are eligible for it.
These loans have few requirements, don’t need a down payment, and feature a fixed interest rate.
The USDA loans are for people who want to build their primary residence, not for any other purpose. And you’ll have to meet specific criteria to ask for one.

Owner Carry: If you don’t have the cash right now and don’t qualify for any loan, it’s not over yet. You can arrange a loan-like scenario with the land’s owner.
Because financing a land purchase can be difficult, property sellers will agree to act as the bank and carry the loan for the sale. The buyer makes payments directly to the property owner. In these scenarios, the buyer will often be asked to make a balloon payment after a number of years. In most cases, the landowner is paid off once the purchaser obtains construction financing.

The relationship between lot cost and total building cost

One final thought when it comes to building your home and the purchase of the lot. Cost and value are two very important factors. It is important from an investment standpoint that you keep the relationship between lot cost and home value in the proper relationship.

The lot price is traditionally 25% of the total cost of the entire home building project. Failing to observe this metric can cause problems further down the road when it’s time to sell the home. After construction, the lot price becomes a part of the home price. If you pay too much for the lot, it increases the price per square foot of the home.

When it’s time to sell, your home is compared to other homes on the market. If your value is in the lot, it’s usually difficult to recover those costs when it’s time to sell.

The bank is also going to be concerned with this when it’s time to get your construction financing. There are requirements you’ll have to meet for this type of loan. Such as showing detailed specs, providing proof of income, and having a good credit score. They vary depending on the loan you’re after.

In Conclusion

Finding an ideal spot to build your dream home can be a difficult task but at the end of the day, it’s worth the journey. In a world where there are very few truly special homes, this is your opportunity to get exactly what you want and make it special. There is a special pride you see in people that have built their dream homes that you almost never see in those that settled for a tract home in a cookie-cutter subdivision.

So, if you are up for the task the rewards are worth it but make sure to use the advice of professionals and experts in the field. Mistakes in this type of project can have serious consequences.

Source: realtybiznews.com

What is Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) and Do You Need to Pay it?

If you’re a first-time homebuyer you’ve surely been putting pencil to paper to estimate what your future mortgage payment, taxes, insurance, and maintenance will be on a new home. However, before finalizing your list of new homeowner expenses, one of the often-forgotten costs to consider adding is private mortgage insurance (PMI). But what is PMI and how does it work?

What is PMI insurance? It's an extra cost that protects a lender when buying a home like this.

What is PMI insurance? It's an extra cost that protects a lender when buying a home like this. 

What is PMI? 

When you apply for a mortgage, your lender may ask if you’re going to put up 20% of the home’s sale price as a down payment. Depending on your local housing market, this can be a significant amount that not every homebuyer can afford. If a 20% down payment is too much for you to swing, your lender can look for other loan products that work with a smaller down payment. 

However, if your down payment is less than 20%, private mortgage insurance (PMI) most likely will come into play. PMI is insurance you pay that protects the lender in case you default on your mortgage payments. PMI will cost between 0.5% and 1% of your annual mortgage and is added to your monthly payment. The money you put towards PMI does not go against your home loan and is considered an extra cost.

What PMI is not

To clarify, while you pay for PMI, it does not protect you as the homeowner. It’s a standard requirement to mitigate the additional risk a lender takes when extending a loan with a smaller down payment. 

Do you need to pay PMI? 

If your down payment is less than 20%, PMI is non-negotiable for most loan types. The good news is that you can discontinue this payment when you have paid off 20% of the loan’s principal amount – the equivalent of that 20% down payment. At that point, you can ask the lender to remove the PMI from your mortgage payments. 

How to calculate PMI

The amount of your downpayment is the most significant factor in determining how much PMI you’ll pay. As you might expect, your PMI payment will be higher if your down payment is smaller. 

If you’ve built a strong credit history that shows you responsibly pay your bills on time, you may qualify for a lower PMI premium. Your loan type can also affect PMI requirements. For example, a fixed-rate mortgage carries less risk than an adjustable-rate mortgage and usually has a lower PMI premium. 

If your PMI comes in at a rate of 1%, here’s how you’d calculate for a mortgage of $300,000:

          $300,000 x 1% = $3,000 per year

          $3,000 ÷ 12 monthly payments = $250 per month 

This amount you pay in PMI would be added to your regular monthly mortgage payment.

How to avoid paying PMI

The first (and easiest) way to avoid paying PMI is to make a downpayment of at least 20%. If that’s not an option, consider whether any of these six strategies could work for you:

1) Look for a lender who doesn’t require PMI

Some credit unions or lending institutions may not insist on PMI for individual applicants. For example, they may waive the PMI requirement if the borrower moves all savings and checking accounts to the lender’s institution. A lender may also waive PMI if the borrower has a stellar credit profile.

Other lenders offer portfolio loans – a direct private loan issued in-house, rather than sold to a third party lender, like Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. Terms for this type of loan may involve smaller down payments (10-15%) with no PMI requirement.

2) Piggyback the loan

In this scenario, you’d take out a separate small loan for the 20% down payment and proceed with a conventional mortgage. The downside is that the smaller loan will typically have a higher interest rate than the mortgage loan. On the upside, you can deduct the interest on your tax return. 

3) Apply for the Affordable Loan Solution

This loan partnership between Self-Help Ventures Fund and Freddie Mac makes loans available to low- to moderate-income homebuyers and allows for a 3% down payment with no PMI. 

4) Pursue a VA loan if you qualify

Qualified veterans can finance 100% of their home purchase with no PMI requirement. However, it’s good to note there may be additional upfront fees involved.

5) If you are a physician, you may qualify for a particular physician loan

Some lenders offer specific loans to physicians with new practices and no extensive work history. These borrowers often carry large student debts, which skew their debt-to-income ratio. These loans don’t require PMI, even with a downpayment of less than 20%. 

6) Look into first-time homebuying programs in your area

Take advantage of first-time homebuyer programs that vary by state, territory, county, and city. These programs assist first-time homebuyers with down payment assistance and closing costs that can in turn help them avoid paying PMI.

It’s worth shopping around with different lenders and homebuying programs that will work with your financial situation and hopefully not require you to pay for PMI.

Source: redfin.com

What is PMI and Do You Need to Pay it?

If you’re a first-time homebuyer you’ve surely been putting pencil to paper to estimate what your future mortgage payment, taxes, insurance, and maintenance will be on a new home. However, before finalizing your list of new homeowner expenses, one of the often-forgotten costs to consider adding is private mortgage insurance (PMI). But what is PMI and how does it work?

What is PMI insurance? It's an extra cost that protects a lender when buying a home like this.

What is PMI insurance? It's an extra cost that protects a lender when buying a home like this. 

What is PMI? 

When you apply for a mortgage, your lender may ask if you’re going to put up 20% of the home’s sale price as a down payment. Depending on your local housing market, this can be a significant amount that not every homebuyer can afford. If a 20% down payment is too much for you to swing, your lender can look for other loan products that work with a smaller down payment. 

However, if your down payment is less than 20%, private mortgage insurance (PMI) most likely will come into play. PMI is insurance you pay that protects the lender in case you default on your mortgage payments. PMI will cost between 0.5% and 1% of your annual mortgage and is added to your monthly payment. The money you put towards PMI does not go against your home loan and is considered an extra cost.

What PMI is not

To clarify, while you pay for PMI, it does not protect you as the homeowner. It’s a standard requirement to mitigate the additional risk a lender takes when extending a loan with a smaller down payment. 

Do you need to pay PMI? 

If your down payment is less than 20%, PMI is non-negotiable for most loan types. The good news is that you can discontinue this payment when you have paid off 20% of the loan’s principal amount – the equivalent of that 20% down payment. At that point, you can ask the lender to remove the PMI from your mortgage payments. 

How to calculate PMI

The amount of your downpayment is the most significant factor in determining how much PMI you’ll pay. As you might expect, your PMI payment will be higher if your down payment is smaller. 

If you’ve built a strong credit history that shows you responsibly pay your bills on time, you may qualify for a lower PMI premium. Your loan type can also affect PMI requirements. For example, a fixed-rate mortgage carries less risk than an adjustable-rate mortgage and usually has a lower PMI premium. 

If your PMI comes in at a rate of 1%, here’s how you’d calculate for a mortgage of $300,000:

          $300,000 x 1% = $3,000 per year

          $3,000 ÷ 12 monthly payments = $250 per month 

This amount you pay in PMI would be added to your regular monthly mortgage payment.

How to avoid paying PMI

The first (and easiest) way to avoid paying PMI is to make a downpayment of at least 20%. If that’s not an option, consider whether any of these six strategies could work for you:

1) Look for a lender who doesn’t require PMI

Some credit unions or lending institutions may not insist on PMI for individual applicants. For example, they may waive the PMI requirement if the borrower moves all savings and checking accounts to the lender’s institution. A lender may also waive PMI if the borrower has a stellar credit profile.

Other lenders offer portfolio loans – a direct private loan issued in-house, rather than sold to a third party lender, like Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. Terms for this type of loan may involve smaller down payments (10-15%) with no PMI requirement.

2) Piggyback the loan

In this scenario, you’d take out a separate small loan for the 20% down payment and proceed with a conventional mortgage. The downside is that the smaller loan will typically have a higher interest rate than the mortgage loan. On the upside, you can deduct the interest on your tax return. 

3) Apply for the Affordable Loan Solution

This loan partnership between Self-Help Ventures Fund and Freddie Mac makes loans available to low- to moderate-income homebuyers and allows for a 3% down payment with no PMI. 

4) Pursue a VA loan if you qualify

Qualified veterans can finance 100% of their home purchase with no PMI requirement. However, it’s good to note there may be additional upfront fees involved.

5) If you are a physician, you may qualify for a particular physician loan

Some lenders offer specific loans to physicians with new practices and no extensive work history. These borrowers often carry large student debts, which skew their debt-to-income ratio. These loans don’t require PMI, even with a downpayment of less than 20%. 

6) Look into first-time homebuying programs in your area

Take advantage of first-time homebuyer programs that vary by state, territory, county, and city. These programs assist first-time homebuyers with down payment assistance and closing costs that can in turn help them avoid paying PMI.

It’s worth shopping around with different lenders and homebuying programs that will work with your financial situation and hopefully not require you to pay for PMI.

Source: redfin.com

Am I Ready to Buy a House? 8 Questions to Help You Decide – Redfin

So lately you’ve found yourself asking, “am I ready to buy a house?” Homeownership is a major milestone that many people dream of reaching one day. However, there are a variety of factors to consider when making one of the biggest financial decisions of your life. 

So, if you’ve been thinking about becoming a homeowner, but aren’t sure if you’re prepared, you’ve come to the right place. We’ve laid out 8 questions to help you decide if you’re finally ready to buy a house. See how many you can answer yes to and if now is the right time for you to begin your homebuying journey.

am I ready to buy a house

am I ready to buy a house

1. Do you have money for a down payment?

Although the common perception is that first-time homebuyers need to have a 20% down payment to purchase a home, that’s simply not the case. Typically you’ll need a minimum down payment of 3.5% to 10% for an FHA home loan, and a minimum of 3% to 5% for a conventional loan. 

For example, let’s assume you’d like to purchase a home that costs $300,000. Your lender will require a downpayment of at least 3% of the sale price of the home, depending on the type of loan you choose and qualify for. In this example, 3% of $300,000 equals a $9,000 down payment.

It’s important to remember that the larger your down payment, however, the lower your monthly payments will be and the less interest you will pay during the life of your loan. Another drawback to a low down payment is that you’ll have to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI), which protects your lender in case you can’t pay your mortgage. If you put down less than 20%, you’ll probably have to pay for PMI, which is added to your monthly mortgage payment.

2. Do you have a solid savings and emergency fund?

While you may have saved enough for your down payment, don’t forget to account for closing costs which include legal fees, lender fees, taxes, etc., and usually total 2% to 5% of the home’s purchase price. Also, during the home inspection, you may find a few home maintenance items that you’ll want to take care of sooner rather than later, such as a leaking septic tank or cracks in the walls or ceilings. This is when additional savings will come in handy.

You should also make sure you have some emergency funds set aside. When you’re renting, you have the wonderful luxury of calling up a landlord whenever there are issues with the property. So when the heater stops working in the middle of winter, you don’t have to spend thousands of dollars to fix it. Or, when your washing machine breaks during a cycle, you won’t be responsible for calling a repairman to take a look. But once you become a homeowner, all of that responsibility falls on you. So, if you’re going to burn through your savings on a down payment, hold off on buying a house until you have a larger safety net. 

3. Is your credit score in pretty good shape?

Many potential homebuyers worry that they won’t be able to buy because of a low credit score. However, you actually don’t need perfect credit to buy a home and there are many loans and first-time homebuyer programs available for buyers without perfect credit. That being said, a higher score will help you qualify for a lower mortgage rate, saving you money in the long run.

One of the most common questions first-time buyers ask is, “what credit score is needed to buy a house?” While there’s no hard-and-fast rule for this, you’ll likely need a minimum credit score of 600 for approval. To qualify for the most favorable rate, however, work on improving your credit score and wait until you have a score of 700 or higher.

4. Do you have a handle on your debt?

Don’t panic – you don’t have to be completely debt-free to buy a home. Between student loans, car payments, and other bills, most mortgage companies know that it is unrealistic to expect borrowers to be totally debt-free these days. They primarily want to know that you’ll be able to afford your mortgage payment based on how much money you have coming in versus what you need to pay out to other debts. 

To figure this out, lenders will look at your debt-to-income ratio, which is an estimation of how much of your monthly income goes towards debt payments. To find your current ratio, you can use a debt-to-income ratio calculator. So long as your debt ratio is at least 43% you can still qualify for a mortgage.

facts about va loans

5. Have you crunched the numbers to make sure you can afford the monthly expenses?

To figure out if you can afford the monthly expenses, you’ll first need to calculate your mortgage payment. An online mortgage calculator can estimate this for you, however, affording a home is so much more than just the mortgage payment. Other financial aspects of homeownership may include:

  • Property taxes and insurance
  • Home Owner Association (HOA) fees, if applicable
  • Home expenses (sewage, garbage, internet, etc)
  • Utilities (water, electricity, etc.)

Before you decide to make the transition from renting to buying a house, make sure you’ve done the math and can afford all of the monthly expenses that come with being a homeowner.

6. Do you have a steady job?

Stable employment and income show lenders how much house you can afford and are important indicators for qualifying for any mortgage. But even if you can demonstrate financial stability on paper, you should only buy a house if you think your income will remain steady for the foreseeable future. 

A nightmare scenario for most homebuyers is losing their job just after they close or move into a new home. So if there’s any uncertainty about your income or employment, wait until things settle down before buying a house.

7. Do you need more space?

While money is obviously an important consideration, there are many other factors to think about when asking, “am I ready to buy a house?” One of which is the thing we all seem to need more of currently – space. 

With so many of us spending most of our time at home, maybe you desperately need a designated home office or an extra room for a home gym? You may want a larger backyard or an area for a garden. Do you have kids or are you expecting a baby soon and you need more room? If this sounds like you, then now may be the time to consider buying a home.

8. Are you planning on staying put for a while?

There’s no rule barring you from moving shortly after buying a home. But as a homeowner, you’ll have a chance to build equity. The longer you own your home, the more equity you build, and the more money you’re likely to make when you sell it. Ideally, you should live in a house long enough to make a profit. So, if you can’t commit to an area, continue renting until you’re ready to put down roots.

Figuring out if you are ready to buy a house is a personal decision and one that means taking a hard look at different aspects of your life: finances, lifestyle, job situation, and long-term goals. But if you’ve answered yes to all of the above, you might just have an answer to the big question, “am I ready to buy a house?”  If you’re still unsure or you have specific questions relating to your situation, reach out to a mortgage lender or real estate agent who can give you professional advice. 

Source: redfin.com

Am I Ready to Buy a House? 8 Questions to Help You Decide

So lately you’ve found yourself asking, “am I ready to buy a house?” Homeownership is a major milestone that many people dream of reaching one day. However, there are a variety of factors to consider when making one of the biggest financial decisions of your life. 

So, if you’ve been thinking about becoming a homeowner, but aren’t sure if you’re prepared, you’ve come to the right place. We’ve laid out 8 questions to help you decide if you’re finally ready to buy a house. See how many you can answer yes to and if now is the right time for you to begin your homebuying journey.

am I ready to buy a house

am I ready to buy a house

1. Do you have money for a down payment?

Although the common perception is that first-time homebuyers need to have a 20% down payment to purchase a home, that’s simply not the case. Typically you’ll need a minimum down payment of 3.5% to 10% for an FHA home loan, and a minimum of 3% to 5% for a conventional loan. 

For example, let’s assume you’d like to purchase a home that costs $300,000. Your lender will require a downpayment of at least 3% of the sale price of the home, depending on the type of loan you choose and qualify for. In this example, 3% of $300,000 equals a $9,000 down payment.

It’s important to remember that the larger your down payment, however, the lower your monthly payments will be and the less interest you will pay during the life of your loan. Another drawback to a low down payment is that you’ll have to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI), which protects your lender in case you can’t pay your mortgage. If you put down less than 20%, you’ll probably have to pay for PMI, which is added to your monthly mortgage payment.

2. Do you have a solid savings and emergency fund?

While you may have saved enough for your down payment, don’t forget to account for closing costs which include legal fees, lender fees, taxes, etc., and usually total 2% to 5% of the home’s purchase price. Also, during the home inspection, you may find a few home maintenance items that you’ll want to take care of sooner rather than later, such as a leaking septic tank or cracks in the walls or ceilings. This is when additional savings will come in handy.

You should also make sure you have some emergency funds set aside. When you’re renting, you have the wonderful luxury of calling up a landlord whenever there are issues with the property. So when the heater stops working in the middle of winter, you don’t have to spend thousands of dollars to fix it. Or, when your washing machine breaks during a cycle, you won’t be responsible for calling a repairman to take a look. But once you become a homeowner, all of that responsibility falls on you. So, if you’re going to burn through your savings on a down payment, hold off on buying a house until you have a larger safety net. 

3. Is your credit score in pretty good shape?

Many potential homebuyers worry that they won’t be able to buy because of a low credit score. However, you actually don’t need perfect credit to buy a home and there are many loans and first-time homebuyer programs available for buyers without perfect credit. That being said, a higher score will help you qualify for a lower mortgage rate, saving you money in the long run.

One of the most common questions first-time buyers ask is, “what credit score is needed to buy a house?” While there’s no hard-and-fast rule for this, you’ll likely need a minimum credit score of 600 for approval. To qualify for the most favorable rate, however, work on improving your credit score and wait until you have a score of 700 or higher.

4. Do you have a handle on your debt?

Don’t panic – you don’t have to be completely debt-free to buy a home. Between student loans, car payments, and other bills, most mortgage companies know that it is unrealistic to expect borrowers to be totally debt-free these days. They primarily want to know that you’ll be able to afford your mortgage payment based on how much money you have coming in versus what you need to pay out to other debts. 

To figure this out, lenders will look at your debt-to-income ratio, which is an estimation of how much of your monthly income goes towards debt payments. To find your current ratio, you can use a debt-to-income ratio calculator. So long as your debt ratio is at least 43% you can still qualify for a mortgage.

facts about va loans

5. Have you crunched the numbers to make sure you can afford the monthly expenses?

To figure out if you can afford the monthly expenses, you’ll first need to calculate your mortgage payment. An online mortgage calculator can estimate this for you, however, affording a home is so much more than just the mortgage payment. Other financial aspects of homeownership may include:

  • Property taxes and insurance
  • Home Owner Association (HOA) fees, if applicable
  • Home expenses (sewage, garbage, internet, etc)
  • Utilities (water, electricity, etc.)

Before you decide to make the transition from renting to buying a house, make sure you’ve done the math and can afford all of the monthly expenses that come with being a homeowner.

6. Do you have a steady job?

Stable employment and income show lenders how much house you can afford and are important indicators for qualifying for any mortgage. But even if you can demonstrate financial stability on paper, you should only buy a house if you think your income will remain steady for the foreseeable future. 

A nightmare scenario for most homebuyers is losing their job just after they close or move into a new home. So if there’s any uncertainty about your income or employment, wait until things settle down before buying a house.

7. Do you need more space?

While money is obviously an important consideration, there are many other factors to think about when asking, “am I ready to buy a house?” One of which is the thing we all seem to need more of currently – space. 

With so many of us spending most of our time at home, maybe you desperately need a designated home office or an extra room for a home gym? You may want a larger backyard or an area for a garden. Do you have kids or are you expecting a baby soon and you need more room? If this sounds like you, then now may be the time to consider buying a home.

8. Are you planning on staying put for a while?

There’s no rule barring you from moving shortly after buying a home. But as a homeowner, you’ll have a chance to build equity. The longer you own your home, the more equity you build, and the more money you’re likely to make when you sell it. Ideally, you should live in a house long enough to make a profit. So, if you can’t commit to an area, continue renting until you’re ready to put down roots.

Figuring out if you are ready to buy a house is a personal decision and one that means taking a hard look at different aspects of your life: finances, lifestyle, job situation, and long-term goals. But if you’ve answered yes to all of the above, you might just have an answer to the big question, “am I ready to buy a house?”  If you’re still unsure or you have specific questions relating to your situation, reach out to a mortgage lender or real estate agent who can give you professional advice. 

Source: redfin.com