New Refinance Program Probably Won’t Mean Much

Last updated on January 9th, 2018

refinance

During President Obama’s speech to the nation last week, he mentioned that the White House would be working with the federal housing agencies to help more homeowners refinance their mortgages at today’s low rates.

And on Friday, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) released a statement, noting that it “has been reevaluating an existing program, the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP), to determine if there are ways to extend the benefits of this refinance product to more borrowers.”

Currently, in order to be eligible for a HARP refinance, a borrower must have a mortgage owned or guaranteed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, be current on mortgage payments, and have a first mortgage that does not exceed 125 percent loan-to-value.

That last bit seems to be the issue at hand, as there are scores of borrowers who meet the first two guidelines, but not the third.

To give you an idea, 85 percent of the Miami and Orlando MSAs were underwater as of last year, with average LTV’s of 150% and 140%, respectively.

In Riverside, California, the average LTV was around 164 percent last year, and has probably worsened since then.

So pretty much all of the hardest-hit borrowers haven’t been eligible for HARP.

LTV Ceiling Lifted?

Under the new refinancing plan, the LTV ceiling would be lifted or possibly removed, allowing these types of borrowers to refinance to take advantage of the record low mortgage rates currently available.

But it’s very likely that you would still need to be current on mortgage payments to qualify.

And while the new proposal sounds decent in theory, many of these borrowers have been grappling with a lack of home equity for years now.

So if they were going to walk away, they probably would have by now. Or they would have at least missed a payment or two.

If payments are lowered for the select few who have stuck it through, but are deeply underwater, they’re still left holding onto a house worth much less than the mortgage.

How much better off will someone be paying $200 less per month on a $300,000 mortgage worth just $150,000?

Even if it does make a big difference, the program still banks on mortgage rates remaining low and home prices reversing course in a major way, as it doesn’t address principal forgiveness.

Targeting the Wrong Group?

Then there are the homeowners with mortgages not backed by Fannie and Freddie, which while far fewer in number, account for a huge chunk of the problem loans.

A few years back, former FHFA director James B. Lockhart noted that these private-label securities accounted for 62 percent of all seriously delinquent mortgages, and thus, were the root of the problem.

These have yet to be addressed on a large scale, and probably won’t be, aside from on a case-by-case basis.

And so there may be some economic stimulus associated with this program (more money in some pockets), but it certainly won’t be a silver bullet.

Perhaps only time will sort things out, as impatient as we are.

Concrete details of the program should emerge later this month…

Read more: Can I refinance with negative equity?

About the Author: Colin Robertson

Before creating this blog, Colin worked as an account executive for a wholesale mortgage lender in Los Angeles. He has been writing passionately about mortgages for 15 years.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

The Perfect Storm for Retirees

Today’s retirees are unlike any other retirees in history: They’re living longer, and many of them want to spend more in retirement than previous generations. At the same time, the fear of running out of money is incredibly common, and for good reason.

The bargain made decades ago in the transition from defined benefit pension plans to the modern 401(k) gave workers control over their savings but also transferred longevity risk from the employer to the worker. As such, these days few retirees can rely on a significant pension and must make their savings last for decades. This may be even more difficult considering that we could see persistently low interest rates, higher inflation and market volatility in the coming years.

The result? Today’s retirees could face a perfect storm, and they may have to use different financial planning strategies than retirees of the past.

Low Interest Rates

The Federal Reserve recently announced that it would maintain the target federal funds rate (the benchmark for most interest rates) at a range of 0% to 0.25%. The Fed cut rates down to this level in March of last year in hopes of combating the crippling economic effects of the pandemic, and it may not raise them for years. Interest rates are expected to stay where they are until 2023. Even when they rise, they could stay relatively low for some time.

As the U.S. government borrowings increase dramatically, the motivation for holding rates down increases. This combination works in favor of immense government borrowing, but for retirees it creates an intrinsic tax in the form of persistently low rates paid on savings. Borrowers love low rates as much as savers detest them. This truth is very much in play today. This poses a problem to retirees who want to earn a reasonable rate of return while minimizing their investment risk.

The Potential for Inflation

Coupled with persistently low interest rates, retirees could face increased inflation in the coming years. Government spending increased significantly due to COVID, with the CARES Act costing $2.2 trillion and the American Rescue Plan Act costing $1.9 trillion alone. The Federal Reserve has said that there is potential for “transient” inflation in the coming months and that it would allow inflation to rise above 2% for some time. While most experts don’t think it’s likely that we’ll return to the high inflation rates of the 1970s, even a normal inflation rate is cause for concern among those nearing and in retirement. Over the course of a long retirement, inflation can eat away at savings significantly.

Consider this: After 20 years with a 2% inflation rate (the Fed’s “target” interest rate), $1 million would only have the buying power of $672,971.

The combination of low interest rates and higher inflation may drive many retirees to take on more market risk than they normally would to account for that.

Market Risk

Those nearing retirement and recently retired can expose themselves to sequence-of-returns risk if they take on too much market risk. This is when a portfolio experiences a significant drop in value while the owner is withdrawing funds, owing to nothing more than unlucky timing. This risk is actuated by the timing of the age of the individual retiree and when they plan to retire, not something anyone usually times around market levels or investment performance but rather around lifestyle or even health factors. As a result, often the portfolio cannot fully recover as the market bounces back, due to the burden of regular withdrawals, and may be left significantly reduced.

Today’s retirees live in an uncertain world with an uncertain market. No one could have predicted the pandemic or its economic effects, and similarly, no one can predict where the market will be next year, in five years or in 10 years. While younger investors can ride out periods of volatility, retirees who are relying on their investments for income may have significantly lower risk tolerance and need to rethink their retirement investment strategy.

Is There a Solution?

This leaves many retirees in a perfect storm. They need to make their savings last longer than any previous generation, but with interest rates at historic lows, they may feel pressured to subject their savings to too much market risk in hopes of earning a reasonable rate of return. The most fundamental step to take is committing to regularized, frequent reviews with your financial adviser. Depending on portfolio size and complexity, this is most often quarterly, but should be no less frequent than every six months. This time investment keeps retirees attuned to shifts in the portfolio that will sustain them for decades to come.

Finally, consider the breadth of options available to your adviser, or on the retail platform you use if you are self-managed. Sometimes having the right tool is everything in getting the job done.  Often advisers have a greater breadth of options available that can more than offset their cost. Remember there are options beyond equities. The best advisers have access to guaranteed income insurance products, market linked certificates of deposits and other “structured assets.” This basket of solutions can provide downside protection ranging from a buffer of say 10%-20% all the way to being fully guaranteed by the issuing insurer or commercial bank. Even within the markets themselves, there are asset managers who create stock and bond portfolios that focus on a specific downside target first, emphasizing downside protection above growth right from the start.

Although market risk remains, it’s true that by focusing on acceptable downside first, those portfolios are likely to weather downturns better even if they do surrender some upside as an offset. And while none of these approaches is perfect, they can work as a component to offset a portion of the market risk retirees probably need to endure for decades to come.

The article and opinions in this publication are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. We suggest that you consult your accountant, tax, or legal advisor with regard to your individual situation. Securities offered through Kalos Capital Inc. and Investment Advisory Services offered through Kalos Management Inc., both at 11525 Park Woods Circle, Alpharetta GA 30005, (678) 356-1100. SouthPark Capital is not an affiliate or subsidiary of Kalos Capital or Kalos Management.

CEO, SouthPark Capital

George Terlizzi has worked in business for more than 25 years as an entrepreneur, consultant, dealmaker and executive for early and mid-stage companies. He has substantial concentrations in finance, technology, consulting and numerous forms of transaction work. Today George advises wealth clients individually and sets the strategic vision for SouthPark Capital. George’s insatiable curiosity, action-oriented approach, and broad-ranging interests are invaluable to those he advises.

Source: kiplinger.com

How do annuities work?

A mother and her daughter play together.

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Many people know about 401(k)s and IRAs, but there are many other options for retirement planning and wealth-building. Find out more about annuities and whether this option might be right for you.

What is an annuity?

Annuities are a type of insurance product, but instead of insuring yourself or your property against potential future losses, annuities let you insure income. Specifically, they help ensure that you will receive an agreed-upon amount of money periodically at some point in the future, which makes them a popular vehicle for retirement planning.

Annuities are a type of income insurance product that helps ensure that you will receive an agreed-upon amount of money periodically in the future, which makes them a popular vehicle for retirement planning.

How annuities work

The basic concept behind annuities is that you purchase a product now. You pay for it either in a lump sum or via agreed-upon payments—sometimes in the form of insurance premiums over a period of years.

In exchange, at some point in the future, you begin to receive payments on your annuity. Those payments typically come periodically, such as monthly, quarterly or annually. Depending on the annuity product you purchase, you can receive those payments for a certain period of time or for the rest of your life once the annuity payout begins.

You can generally expect to get back more in annuity payments than you pay into the product. That’s why they’re considered an investment. The reason for this is that your annuity purchase price or premium payments are put into a pot with all the other payments being made by annuity customers for that product or provider. Those funds are invested, and the earnings over time result in a profit for you and the insurance provider.

The main types of annuities

How much you can earn, when and how it pays out and the risk associated with your investment all depend on what type of annuity you buy. The types of annuities are summarized below to help you determine if any might be a good choice for you.

Deferred annuities versus immediate annuities

The first major decision to make when purchasing an annuity is whether you want a deferred or immediate annuity. Deferred annuities begin paying out at some agreed-upon point in the future, making them potential vehicles for retirement planning. Immediate annuities start paying out immediately, which might make them a better option if you’re close to retirement or want to ensure a certain level of income in the near future.

Three categories of annuities

Once you decide when you want your payouts to begin, you’ll need to pick a more specific type of annuity to invest in. Both immediate and deferred annuities have three major categories which are outlined below.

3 types of annuities

1. Fixed annuities

Fixed annuities are those that pay out an agreed-upon, guaranteed amount each time you receive income. This can be a good option if you want a stable income you can count on. The downside of fixed annuities is that the lower risk comes with lower potential reward from a returns perspective.

2. Fixed indexed annuities

Fixed indexed annuities guarantee at least a minimum amount paid out, so they can help provide stability for your budget. But part of your returns is tied to the performance of a market index. Market indexes include options such as the Dow Jones or S&P 500. If you have a fixed indexed annuity, then you might earn more payout than the minimum if the market performs well in a given period.

3. Variable annuities

Variable annuities are tied to a group of mutual funds. The amount of your annuity payouts depends on the performance of those funds. That can mean greater long-term reward, but it also comes with more risk than either of the other two categories of annuities.

Can you withdraw your money early?

You may be able to withdraw money from an annuity early if you find that you need your investment back or can’t wait until payouts are scheduled to begin. But this can be a costly move.

First, if you take money out of a retirement account, including some annuities, before reaching retirement age, the IRS may levy a 10% penalty. You’ll also have to pay any applicable taxes on the income.

For the purposes of annuities, penalties and taxes are only paid on the amount you earned on the investment. You’re not taxed on the amount you paid into the annuity because you were already taxed on that amount when you earned it the first time.

In some cases, the IRS waives the 10% penalty. Such cases include the total disability of the annuity owner or the annuity owner taking early withdrawals to pay for qualified education expenses.

How are annuities taxed?

Taxes on annuities can be complex, so it’s important to consult a tax professional to understand what your tax burden might be. Typically, payments you make toward an annuity are not made with pre-tax dollars. That means the money you pay into an annuity is already taxed, and you won’t pay income tax on it again in the future.

But you might owe taxes on any earnings you make from the investment. That means when you begin to receive payouts, you will have to report the income and calculate how much of it is taxable.

Is an annuity right for you?

Deciding whether any investment is right for you is an individual matter. You must look at your current financial state, your goals for the future and the level of risk you’re comfortable with. Since annuities are based on contracts, they’re typically considered less risky than stock market investments, but no investment is 100% guaranteed. Consider talking to a financial adviser to understand what investment and retirement planning options might be right for you.


Reviewed by Kenton Arbon, an Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Kenton Arbon is an Associate Attorney in the Arizona office. Mr. Arbon was born in Bakersfield, California, and grew up in the Northwest. He earned his B.A. in Business Administration, Human Resources Management, while working as an Oregon State Trooper. His interest in the law lead him to relocate to Arizona, attend law school, and graduate from Arizona State College of Law in 2017. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Arbon has worked in multiple compliance domains including anti-money laundering, Medicare Part D, contracts, and debt negotiation. Mr. Arbon is licensed to practice law in Arizona. He is located in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

American Express: Three Months Of Yahoo Finance Plus For Free

The Offer

Direct link to offer

  • American Express is offering three months of Yahoo Finance Plus for free and 50% off the next three months

The Fine Print

  • This offer is available only to US American Express Card Members and for a limited-time only, ending 10/1/2021.
  • Trials are only available to new Yahoo Finance Plus Essential subscribers.
  • For the complimentary 3 Month Trial and 50% off the immediately following 3 Months to the Yahoo Finance Plus Essential subscription service, you will be charged 50% off the $35.00 plus tax monthly rate ($17.50 plus tax) for three Months after your complimentary 3 Month Trial ends.
  • You will be charged the full monthly amount of $35.00 plus tax after your first 6 Months and charges will continue monthly at the current rates unless you cancel your subscription.

Our Verdict

Make sure you cancel membership if you don’t want it long term as this enrolls you in auto billing. Probably not that useful.

View more Amex offers here & if you have any questions abut American Express offers then read this post.

Source: doctorofcredit.com

4 Ways to Keep Your Taxes Down If You Are Self-Employed

Self-employment has its perks, but being your own boss can lead to headaches come tax season. In addition to the income tax, you’ll need to pay self-employment taxes that support the Social Security and Medicare programs.

But there are ways to reduce the amount you owe.

At the start of the new year, you may receive a 1099-NEC tax form or 1099-K tax form. You also may have received other income in the form of cash or checks for work performed in the previous year from being self-employed.

One of the best ways to lower your taxes paid on self-employed income is to increase your business expenses. As a self-employed taxpayer, you can write off expenses and take certain deductions against that income to help reduce your tax liability.

However, it is very important to hold on to all receipts for any business expenses related to purchases or professional services received and to keep accurate, up-to-date records of your business’s activity.  

Here are four easy ways to keep your taxes down if you are self-employed.

1. Driving expenses

If your self-employed income is from operating a ride-hailing or delivery business through platforms such as Uber or Lyft, you will be able to take a vehicle expense deduction. This allows you to recover some costs associated with wear and tear on your vehicle to operate your business.

Be sure to keep track of your business miles, personal miles and commuting miles as you will need to provide this information to take the deduction.

2. Home office expenses

Home office expenses is another deduction that you can take advantage of if you utilize part of your home as your office space to conduct business. A home office deduction can be calculated using the simplified deduction method, which is a prescribed rate of $5 per square foot of your home that is used for business up to 300 square feet.

Or you can use the actual expense deduction method, which allows you to write off a percentage of expenses related to rent, utilities, mortgage interest, property taxes and repairs and maintenance.

Other common deductible expenses related to your home office include website services, computer software, merchant fees, electronics and other supplies needed to run your business. 

You also can deduct communication expenses, such as a portion of your internet and cellphone bill, as long as those costs are directly related to your business. For example, if 20% of your time on the phone is spent on business, you could deduct 20% of your phone bill.

3. Depreciation deductions

If you purchase equipment, such as a laptop or a leaf blower for your business, you can categorize it as an asset and take a depreciation deduction — which allows you to spread the expense over the useful life of your asset.

For example, let’s say you purchased a new ergonomic office chair at the beginning of the year for $400. You will be able to classify this as an asset and take a $57.14 depreciation expense deduction each year over a useful life of seven years, which is standard for office furniture.

You can also take a Section 179 election to fully expense and deduct the asset in the current year — instead of depreciating it — to further reduce your tax liability. This is an annual income tax deduction taken by filling Form 4562 with your tax return.

4. S Corp election

Another way to keep your taxes down is by changing your business structure into an S Corp election with the IRS. You can make the S Corp election for your corporation or limited liability company.

For example, when operating your business as an S Corp, if your business income is $100,000 per year and you pay yourself a reasonable salary of $60,000, all income that exceeds your salary — $40,000 in this case — is not subject to self-employment taxes. Only the salary of $60,000 is subject to self-employment taxes. However, if operating your business as a sole proprietor, self-employment tax is due on the entire amount of $100,000 business income.

Financial Reviewer, RetireGuide.com

Ebony J. Howard is a certified public accountant and financial reviewer for RetireGuide.com. Her background is in accounting, personal finance and income tax planning and preparation. Ebony holds a dual degree bachelor’s and master’s in accounting from Clark Atlanta University. She is passionate about making an impact in the community, sharing her knowledge in financial literacy and empowering people to achieve greater financial freedom.

Source: kiplinger.com

Bank of America Has a Waiting List to Refinance

Last updated on February 2nd, 2018

If you’re interested in refinancing your mortgage with Bank of America, you may be in for a big surprise.

Per Bloomberg, the mega bank has been unable to keep up with demand, thanks in part to HARP Phase II, which is beginning to roll out.

The program, which allows pretty much anyone to refinance, regardless of how deeply underwater they are, has led to everyone and their mother inquiring about a possible refi.

And we all know that the biggest names in the finance world will experience the biggest windfall.

Unfortunately, Bank of America has been making steady moves to get out of the mortgage world in recent times.

In fact, their share of the mortgage market has dwindled to little more than five percent, which is less than it held before it acquired Countrywide.

This is largely because they exited both the wholesale and correspondent mortgage businesses to focus on building relationships at the retail level.

90-Day Wait to Refinance

I hope you’re patient, because Bank of America is telling some customers who call during high volume periods of the day to make a reservation.

And once they do that, it could take anywhere from 60 to 90 days just to hear back. Even then, it’s unclear how much longer it will take to apply for a refinance, get the loan underwritten, and finally get it funded.

By then mortgage rates could rise, though that’s probably not too much of a concern. But in the mean time you’d still be stuck making higher monthly mortgage payments, which is clearly no good.

[Are mortgage rates going to stay low?]

If you do manage to “get in the door,” note that Bank of America also stopped offering cash out refinances last month.

So if you’re looking to tap your home equity, you’ll either have to try a HELOC or go elsewhere.

BofA Customers Don’t Need to Wait

That said, one of Bloomberg’s sources said those with Bank of America checking accounts, along with those who go to the bank in person, do not need to wait.

Still, you have to wonder about the bank’s urgency in getting your refinance application to the closing department.

If they’re overloaded, the turn times will surely be extremely high, which could put your time-sensitive mortgage application in danger.

This is all the more reason to shop around for your mortgage, as opposed to just going with the bank you know and “trust.”

If you’re only getting one mortgage quote, you’re doing yourself an injustice.

Be sure to contact several banks, along with a few mortgage brokers, to see what kind of mortgage rate you can get your hands on.

And don’t forget to compare fees and closing costs to ensure you receive the best deal on your refinance.

Tip: How to find the best mortgage rates.

About the Author: Colin Robertson

Before creating this blog, Colin worked as an account executive for a wholesale mortgage lender in Los Angeles. He has been writing passionately about mortgages for 15 years.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

Mint Success: Transitioning from College Kid to Young Professional

Photo Credit: Lawrence Peart

“Mint is so crucial to my personal finance I honestly have no idea where I would be without it.” That’s what Austin, TX photography consultant Lawrence Peart says when reflecting about his transition from college student to young pro, financially speaking. His experience so far shows that it is possible to graduate from college without debt, and to adjust to the higher cost of living as a young professional, while also saving money for your future.

But Peart stands out from the crowd. We looked at Minters’ numbers to see how college students and recent graduates use their money or handle debt, and found that there’s a big shift in many categories from ages 18 to 25 – incomes increase, spending categories fluctuate, and debt repayment – well, you know how that goes. Student loan payback time for many!

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College Grads Make More Money…

Depending on the field that graduates enter, incomes can be across the board, but a majority of our Mint users in that age range earn between $25K and $50K annually.

Student ChartGraduate Chart

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…and Spend More Money!

The newfound earnings may seem like a lot of money to a recent grad but, when faced with the sticker shock of life outside school, the typical Mint user experiences an accompanying increase in spending on rent, entertainment, and education related expenses – mostly student loan repayment. That bill averages about $300 per month.

Most grads continue to use credit cards after graduation. In fact, their card charges increase from $1,200 to $1,900 on average. But most of them don’t pay finance charges, which means these savvy Mint users are the ones who pay their balances by the end of the month. This explains why Mint’s young users have an average credit score of 690, considerably higher than the national average of 630 for the same age group*.

Good work, Minters! But while you’re paying off your college debt and adjusting to life on the outside, don’t forget to save for your future. Only 2% of college students have significant long-term savings, and that number only goes up to 7% among college graduates 25 and under. It might seem daunting to set aside those crucial dollars, but that money will grow over time and make your older self thank your younger self.

Moving Forward

Peart is in that 7% – he follows the mantra “Save, invest early and often, reap the benefits later.” With a goal to live debt-free and retire in his 20’s (he just turned 26), Lawrence uses Mint to budget and find extra money to sock away for the future. While his income falls in the same range as the majority of recently graduated Mint users, his experience both during school and in the few years since graduation defies many of the statistics, so naturally we asked him all about it.

What kind of shift in spending did you experience between college and post-college life?

I think it might surprise most people to hear that I spend far less money now than I did in college. Once you start earning an actual income and developing a clearer sense of your relationship to money it becomes much easier to save, and feels more rewarding to do so. While in school I never had much cash, so in a way it had less value and I spent it more freely. You expect to be broke in college, which becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, and unless you’re careful that can then extend past your college years into your working life. I even had a little saying for it: the closer I am to zero, the less I have to lose.

The average college graduate spends about $300 per month on student loan repayment. What’s your bill?

$0. My experience paying for college was a mixture of some good fortune, a little bit of privilege, and tons of hard work. I chose a public school in a reasonably cheap city, I received decent grants, I applied for every scholarship available to me every semester (and made sure I had the grades to qualify) and for all but my sophomore year I worked at least part-time to have a source of income. I graduated broke, sure, and maybe missed out on some fun things here and there, but at least I didn’t owe anything.

 Invest Young

What was the most shocking financial realization you experienced once you left college?

That you can save quite a bit of money not doing the stuff everyone seems to think you have to be doing. If you don’t buy fancy clothes, go out for drinks every day, feel the need to keep up with the newest phone every 6 months etc., all of that extra cash starts to add up.

What are your thoughts about retirement savings, and what do you practice?

I half-seriously tell myself that I want to retire in my 20’s. I don’t mean “retire” in the way most people would think of retirement, I always want to be creating and applying myself to something, but I’d like to have the ability to not work for long periods of time. To be able to wake up one day in the near future and say “I am comfortable not working the rest of the month, time do something creative” and not feel guilty about it. That’s the goal.

I set up a Roth IRA almost immediately upon getting sustained income and contribute the full amount each year into basic low-cost index funds. I admire my parents in a lot of ways and don’t question their decisions and what life events influenced them, but while they are both doing fine in retirement age they are doing so without any long-term retirement account holdings. It might be hard to imagine 40 years down the line, but the math regarding investing when you’re young is compelling.

How does Mint help you stay on track?

I worked for about nine months before I came across Mint, and even though I thought I was being good with my money, you truly have no idea until you see it categorized and laid out in front of you. Those little purchases each day, the subscriptions, the monthly payments, it all adds up fast. You might think you’re saving money, but you’re not. It really does take hard work. Mint makes it easy, and I’ll tell everyone who listens: it’s even made paying bills fun. The first week of each new month is like Christmas. I get paid, I pay off my recurring expenses and then allocate how much I want to save that month before organizing more flexible costs like groceries, entertainment, etc. I follow one maxim above all else: you don’t save what is left after spending, you spend what is left after saving.

You can be like Lawrence

Does the idea of watching the savings pile up get you excited? Try setting up a goal with your Mint account and making that progress bar move!Don't save what you don't spend - spend what you don't save
We would like to hear your story! Contact us at Editor_Mint@intuit.com with “Mint User Story” in the subject.

Kim Tracy Prince is a Los Angeles-based writer who is pretty jealous of Lawrence’s early progress. It took her many years to pay off her student loans. She celebrated by finally framing her diploma.

*Source: https://www.creditkarma.com/trends/age
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Source: mint.intuit.com