Check your credit more often with access to free weekly reports – The Points Guy

Check your credit more often with access to free weekly reports – The Points Guy


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Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

How I earned more than 20,000 British Airways Avios in a year

How I earned more than 20,000 British Airways Avios in a year


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

Coronavirus Travel Restrictions, Airline & Hotel Cancellation Policies

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is wreaking havoc on the global travel industry, upending millions of travelers’ lives, and threatening countless livelihoods in the process.

It’s likely the pandemic will affect many travelers, either directly or indirectly. Because this is a fluid situation that changes by the day, bookmark this list to refer to frequently so you can get new information as it becomes available. The list includes:

  • A running tally of countries and regions with coronavirus travel restrictions
  • Guidelines for determining when to cancel planned travel and how to get a refund or credit if you do
  • A list of cancellation and change policies for major airlines, hotels, and cruise operators.

Countries & Regions With Coronavirus Travel Restrictions

Due to the fast-moving nature of this situation, this summary does not necessarily reflect all current restrictions. Before booking international travel, refer to your destination countries’ English-language government websites for up-to-the-minute details and check the U.S. Department of State’s list of country-specific travel advisories.

Entry Restrictions for U.S. Travelers

Many countries remain closed to U.S. citizens and nationals who don’t meet certain narrow exceptions, such as holding dual citizenship, having close family members in-country, or traveling on qualifying “essential business.”

The good news is that most countries and territories that continue to permit entry to U.S. travelers lie on this side of the Atlantic, within a few hours of the mainland United States by air. They include Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and most Caribbean island nations and territories, though some Caribbean nations impose arrival restrictions that can impede free movement. Farther-flung countries that remain totally open to U.S. travelers include Turkey, Maldives, and several Balkans nations.

The United Kingdom and Cambodia, among a few other popular tourist destinations, allow U.S. citizens to enter but generally require some combination of quarantine upon arrival, confirmed negative COVID-19 test result, ongoing health monitoring and check-ins for up to 14 days after arrival, and a sometimes hefty financial deposit to ensure compliance.

CNN has an up-to-date list of countries that allow Americans to enter and what restrictions or entry requirements, if any, American travelers face. The U.S. Department of State (State Department) maintains a more comprehensive and technical list of country-specific restrictions and requirements.

Because the situation remains fluid, neither this list nor CNN’s or the State Department’s should not be considered comprehensive. Refer to both before booking and commencing international travel but also check with local immigration authorities to determine whether you’ll even be permitted to complete your journey or required to quarantine on arrival for it renders travel impractical.

U.S. Department of State Travel Advisories

The State Department is closely watching the COVID-19 situations in other countries with an eye to keeping U.S. national travelers and expats safe abroad. Four travel advisory levels denote the relative danger of travel to each country and subcountry region:

  • Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions. These are low-risk countries.
  • Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution. These areas often present an elevated risk of property crime or exposure to novel illnesses not common in the U.S.
  • Level 3: Reconsider Travel. Travel to these areas is unusually risky due to political instability, widespread violence, disease outbreaks, and other dangerous conditions.
  • Level 4: Do Not Travel. The State Department does not advise travel to these areas, and U.S. persons already in Level-4 areas should leave as soon as possible. The State Department has little or no effective presence in some Level-4 countries.

On March 31, 2020, the State Department issued a global Level-4 travel advisory for the entire world outside the United States, effectively discouraging any international travel for the foreseeable future.

The State Department’s global advisory expired in early August 2020, but certain countries remain at Level-4 due to severe coronavirus outbreaks or other potential health risks. Again, because many international jurisdictions effectively prohibit entry by Americans and others require lengthy quarantines upon arrival, planning nonessential international travel remains difficult at best.

Depending on your home base, you might have trouble completing internal U.S. travel plans as well. Some states have (or had and may reimpose) strict quarantine-on-arrival or pre-arrival testing requirements. For example, New York State requires travelers from noncontiguous states and countries where COVID-19 is widespread to quarantine for up to 10 days, promptly take a COVID-19 test, or both upon arrival.

Check with your destination state’s tourism and health authorities for up-to-date information before making nonrefundable bookings.


Cancellation & Change Policies for Major Airlines & Hospitality Companies

This running list of coronavirus cancellation and change policies includes major airlines and hospitality companies, many of which are waiving change fees and dispensing credit for rebookings many months into the future. Refer to each company’s website for more details and cancellation or rebooking information specific to your destination.

Airline Cancellation Policies

All major U.S. airlines and budget carriers have coronavirus-related cancellation and change policies. Unless otherwise noted, rebooked flyers must pay the fare difference between the original and new fares, if any. If you’re flying with a smaller carrier, check their website for details.

Also, be aware of any airline-imposed hygiene requirements, as most major airlines now require passengers to wear masks or face coverings on flights and in boarding areas.

American Airlines

American Airlines’ policy waives change fees for passengers booked before Sept. 8, 2020, for travel between March 10, 2020, and March 31, 2021, to rebook and complete travel by Dec. 31, 2021. The policy applies to all airports served by American and allows changes to destination and connecting cities.

Separately, American Airlines now waives change and standby fees for all domestic and short-haul international flights (primarily within North America, Central America, and the Caribbean) booked after Oct. 1, 2020. This policy applies to paid and award fares in all fare classes.

United Airlines

United Airlines’ policy waived change fees for all international passengers booked before March 2, 2020, for travel between March 9 and Dec. 31, 2020. The rebooked itinerary must begin within 24 months of the original ticket date. This policy applies to all airports served by United.

Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, change fees may still apply to international itineraries originating and terminating in non-U.S. territories.

For domestic U.S. passengers traveling from a U.S. airport (including Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) to any domestic or international destination, United no longer charges change fees on most new economy and premium cabin bookings. Per United, this change complements several other passenger-friendly updates to the airline’s ticketing policy. However, the policy may not apply to Basic Economy fares.

Separately, all electronic travel certificates issued for flight cancellations are now valid for 24 months from the booking date. United has not specified an end date for this policy. United also waives change fees on all new bookings for 12 months from the booking date, though this waiver will likely end at some point.

Delta Airlines

Delta has permanently eliminated change fees and award redeposit fees for most fare classes on flights from North America to anywhere in the world. This policy may not apply to Basic Economy fares.

Delta also waives change fees for all other flights booked after March 1, 2020, for travel through March 31, 2021. Affected travelers have at least until Dec. 30, 2022, to complete travel.

Alaska Airlines

Alaska Airlines’ policy waives change fees for all flights to and from all airports booked on or before Feb. 26, 2020, for travel through Dec. 31, 2020. The airline also waives change fees for all flights booked from Feb. 27, 2020, to March 31, 2021, for travel through February 28, 2022.

In both cases, rebooked travel must commence one year from the original travel dates.

Southwest Airlines

Southwest never charges change fees for rebooked travel. Under normal circumstances, travelers who cancel flights at least 10 minutes before scheduled departure receive credit equal to the fare for rebooked travel within a year of the original reservation date.

However, Southwest has made two important but temporary exceptions to this policy:

  • Beginning Sept. 8, 2020, any accumulated fare credits expire on Sept. 7, 2022.
  • Through Dec. 15, 2020, Southwest Rapid Rewards members can request to convert fare credits set to expire on Sept. 7, 2022, into Rapid Rewards points, which never expire.

JetBlue Airways

JetBlue has permanently eliminated change fees on most fares, beginning on April 1, 2021. Changes to Blue Basic fares may still incur change fees as high as $100 per ticket, however.

JetBlue’s existing temporary change fee waiver continues to apply on all flights booked through March 31, 2021, for travel at any time. Rebooked travel may commence at any time (provided JetBlue has scheduled flights far enough out). Canceled flights produce a travel credit good for 24 months from the original travel date equal to the original fare.

Spirit Airlines

Spirit allows passengers who change their travel plans due to coronavirus to make one free fare modification (to change the destination city or travel dates, for instance) for travel at any point in the future.

Passengers who choose to cancel rather than change their flights receive travel credit equal to the original fare for use within six months of the original travel date or a full refund of the fare.

Frontier Airlines

Frontier Airlines’ policy waives change fees for any booking, provided the change is made at least 60 days before the first date of travel. Later itinerary changes cost up to $119 per change.

Hawaiian Airlines

Hawaiian Airlines offers fee-free changes for all flights to all markets. The waiver applies to all flight dates. Tickets purchased through Dec. 31, 2020, for travel at any time, are valid for two years from the ticket purchase date. Tickets purchased through March 31, 2021, are valid for one year from the ticket purchase date.

Check with Hawaiian health and travel authorities before booking or commencing travel, as Hawaii has had stricter arrival restrictions than most other states.

Hotel & Resort Cancellation Policies

These major hospitality operators have coronavirus-related cancellation and change policies. If you’re staying at an independent property or with a smaller chain, refer to the operator’s website for more details.

Hilton

Hilton no longer has a coronavirus cancellation or change policy in place. However, the chain has made some important modifications to its loyalty program:

  • Extended 2020 Hilton Honors members’ status through March 31, 2022
  • Extended expiration on all unexpired Weekend Night Rewards issued until Aug. 30, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2021
  • Paused Hilton Honors point expiration through Dec. 31, 2021
  • Rolled over all status-eligible nights earned on stays through Dec. 31, 2020, into the 2021 calendar year, keeping them eligible for 2021-2023 tier status

Marriott

Marriott waived cancellation fees for all bookings worldwide (refundable and nonrefundable) through June 30, 2020. This policy was not extended past June 30, 2020, and it’s unclear whether it continues to apply on a case-by-case basis. Check with your destination hotel or Marriott’s customer service hotline for more information.

Separately, Marriott has extended 2019 elite status awards through February 1, 2022, for all Bonvoy loyalty program members, according to an October 2020 release from the company. In February 2021, Bonvoy members who earned elite status in 2020 were eligible for a one-time bonus equal to 50% of their 2020 tier’s annual Elite Night Credit requirement.

Hyatt

Hyatt is waiving change or cancellation fees for all bookings worldwide (refundable and nonrefundable) through July 31, 2021. Limited exceptions apply for certain Hyatt brands, including MGM Resorts.

Additionally, Hyatt is suspending loyalty point forfeiture through at least June 30, 2021. In other words, you won’t lose loyalty points or status due to canceled or deferred travel or because you simply didn’t travel as often as usual during the pandemic, as would normally be the case.

Other loyalty program changes include extending program members’ status tiers as of March 31, 2020, through Feb. 28, 2022, without requiring any additional stays or other qualifying activities.

InterContinental Hotels Group

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) has relaxed its reservation change and cancellation policies indefinitely. IHG also instituted a new rate class (“Book Now, Pay Later”) that allows guests to change or cancel reservations up to 24 hours before arrival, with limited exceptions.

Choice Hotels

Choice Hotels offered fee-free cancellations to travelers booked worldwide (refundable and nonrefundable) until Sept. 30, 2020, after which local market policies resumed.

Additionally, Choice Hotels has paused points expiration for Choice Privileges members through at least Dec. 31, 2020. Further loyalty program changes may be on the horizon as well.

Airbnb

Airbnb is broadening its extenuating circumstances policy, which provides compensation when guests need to cancel for extraordinary reasons, to all markets it serves through Oct. 31, 2020. Qualifying bookings must have been made prior to March 14, 2020.

Bookings made after March 14, 2020, are subject to the host’s normal cancellation policy unless the guest or host is sick with COVID-19 on the scheduled check-in date.

Vrbo

Vrbo doesn’t have a global coronavirus cancellation policy, other than a promise to refund its Traveler Service Fee on successful cancellations. The platform encourages guests and hosts to heed travel and health warnings from the World Health Organization and work together to reach a solution when guests must cancel. Vrbo always encourages guests to purchase travel insurance.


When & How to Cancel Planned Travel for a Refund or Credit

Use these guidelines to determine whether to cancel planned travel to affected areas and how to get your money back (or credit toward future travel) if you do.

If you’re still not sure whether the pandemic impacts current travel plans or if you’re not sure you’re eligible to cancel for a credit or refund, check with your carriers, hotels, or tour operators.

When to Cancel Planned Travel Due to the Coronavirus Pandemic

Seriously consider canceling planned travel due to the coronavirus pandemic if you’re a member of a high-risk group, taking high-risk travel methods, or traveling to a high-risk region. Other considerations also apply.

  • You’re Planning International Travel. As the State Department’s global Level 4 warning suggests, international travel is extremely high risk and vulnerable to disruption in a pandemic environment, even when the destinations involved don’t appear to be hotspots. Moreover, the risk works both ways. Even if you’re healthy and relatively unlikely to become seriously ill from COVID-19, you could become a carrier and spread the disease to higher-risk people. Remember, due to the high incidence of COVID-19 in much of the U.S., many international markets require U.S. travelers to quarantine on arrival or prohibit them entirely.
  • You’re a Member of a High-Risk Group Who Has Not Yet Received a COVID-19 Vaccine. That includes people over age 60 and those with underlying health conditions, such as immune system disorders, diabetes, and hypertension. The risk of serious or fatal complications of COVID-19 is much higher for these groups.
  • Your Trip Includes a Cruise. If you’re booked on a cruise anytime soon, you should closely monitor developments and seriously consider rebooking at a much later date, especially if you’re a member of a high-risk group. Communicable diseases spread quickly on cruise ships and many cruise lines have yet to resume normal operations.
  • You Can Get a Refund for Any Reason. If you’re not going to be out money for canceling your planned trip, the calculus is a lot more straightforward. You can cancel altogether or rebook for a later date.
  • You Have “Cancel for Any Reason” Travel Insurance Coverage. Standard travel insurance policies don’t cover cancellations due to concerns about becoming sick. They only apply if you’re actually ill. More generous policies with “cancel for any reason” riders are a bit more expensive but allow you to cancel without penalty no matter what. If you were fortunate enough to purchase such a rider, now is the time to use it.
  • Your Destination or Transit Countries Are Considering Travel Restrictions. You don’t want to get stranded in a foreign country due to sudden travel restrictions. Check reputable local news sources in your destination and refer to English-language government websites for signs of pending restrictions.
  • Your Trip Is Not Essential. Canceling a trip abroad to visit an elderly relative you haven’t seen in years is much more difficult than canceling a destination bachelor party that’s easy to reschedule for after the wedding.

How to Cancel Planned Travel for a Refund or Credit

To get a refund or credit toward future travel if you need to cancel due to the coronavirus pandemic, you must likely rebook your flight, hotel, or tour within a period designated by its operator. Other steps could be necessary as well, including:

  • Checking the Operator’s Coronavirus Rebooking Policies. Check the list of cancellation and change policies in the preceding section and contact each operator for information specific to your booking or destination. When operators allow fee-free changes and rebookings, you could end up paying nothing out of pocket to reschedule.
  • Determining Whether You Can Cancel Without Penalty. If you prefer to cancel without rebooking, read each pertinent travel company’s cancellation policy. Unless you purchased a nonrefundable booking to get a lower rate, there’s a good chance your hotel or resort will allow you to cancel without penalty up to a week before your arrival (and sometimes even closer). If you’ve booked a short-term homestay through Airbnb or another rental platform, your host’s cancellation policy usually determines how much of your booking you can recoup, with options ranging from a full refund to total forfeiture. However, Airbnb has broadened its extenuating circumstances policy, which makes exceptions to host cancellation policies in times of crisis, for the countries hardest hit by the pandemic. Most airline bookings are nonrefundable after 24 hours, though you can pay more for a refundable fare if you’ve yet to book. Without a protection policy, which adds to the cost of the voyage, cruise fares generally aren’t refundable — but many cruise lines are making exceptions during the pandemic.
  • Buying Travel Insurance. If you booked less than three weeks ago, you could still be eligible to purchase “Cancel for Any Reason” insurance that’s valid for your trip. Policies vary by insurance carrier, but it’s worth a shot. You’ll be out the one-time insurance premium but not the full cost of your nonrefundable travel.
  • Calling Customer Service to Ask for a Refund. Expect to sit on hold for longer than usual, but the effort could be worth it. Even if your booking is nonrefundable, extenuating circumstances could curry favor with the rep you speak with (or their manager). For instance, if you’re flying with an elderly relative at high risk for COVID-19 complications, your decision to travel could literally have life-or-death implications.
  • Rebooking Within the Allotted Time Frame. If you can’t cancel your reservation for a cash refund, learn how long your rebooking credit remains in effect. Most airlines allow fee-free rebookings (less the difference in fare, if any) due to COVID-19 well into 2021, and a growing number of airlines now entirely waive change fees on most or all fares.

Final Word

The coronavirus pandemic is the most serious public health challenge caused by a communicable respiratory disease in living memory. Although the final toll is not yet known, this ordeal could well come to rival or exceed the Spanish flu crisis of 1918 to 1919 — the benchmark by which we judge all other modern pandemics — in its toll.

Until everyone who wants a COVID-19 vaccine can get one, we all need to do our part to slow the spread of the virus and protect the most vulnerable among us. If that means canceling the international vacation you’ve been looking forward to for years, so be it.

Source: moneycrashers.com

Credit.Com’s Picks for Best Travel Rewards Credit Cards

Editorial disclosure: Reviews are as determined solely by Credit.com staff. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the reviewers and aren’t reviewed or approved by any advertiser. Information presented is accurate as of the date of the review, including information on card rates, rewards and fees. Check the issuer’s website for the most current information on each card listed.

Advertiser disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this website are from credit card companies that Credit.com receives compensation from. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). The site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers.

Figuring out which is the best travel rewards credit card can be a challenge. There are a lot of cards to choose from. Adding to the number of options is that most travel credit cards offer decent rewards. Fierce completion between banks in the credit card industry is to thank for that.

With so many travel rewards credit card options and so many good programs, there isn’t one “best” card for everyone. You simply want to choose the card that’s “best” for your travel needs and spending habits. Some cards work great for frequent travelers. Other cards work better for those who don’t travel as often. All cards have their perks and quirks. To make it a bit easier, here are a few of the favorite travel rewards credit cards of the Credit.com team to help you figure out which one is the right card for you.

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

  • Earn 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That’s $750 when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. Plus earn up to $50 in statement credits towards grocery store purchases.
  • 2X points on dining at restaurants including eligible delivery services, takeout and dining out and travel & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. For example, 60,000 points are worth $750 toward travel.
  • With Pay Yourself Back℠, your points are worth 25% more during the current offer when you redeem them for statement credits against existing purchases in select, rotating categories.
  • Get unlimited deliveries with a $0 delivery fee and reduced service fees on eligible orders over $12 for a minimum of one year with DashPass, DoorDash’s subscription service. Activate by 12/31/21.
  • Earn 2x total points on up to $1,000 in grocery store purchases per month from November 1, 2020 to April 30, 2021. Includes eligible pick-up and delivery services.

First on the Credit.com staff list of best travel rewards credit cards is the Chase Sapphire Preferred card. What makes the Sapphire Preferred card our top choice is that it has one of the highest bonuses available for any card. If you spend $4,000 within the first three months of opening your account, you earn 50,000 bonus points. That’s the equivalent of $625 that you can put towards travel when you redeem your points through Chase Ultimate rewards.

It didn’t hurt for us that Kiplinger’s Personal Finance named this card its “Best Credit Card for Flexible Travel Redemption” in June 2018, either.

Earning points with the Chase Sapphire Preferred is good too. You earn double points (2X) on travel expenses and at restaurants worldwide. And you earn one point on every dollar you spend on every other purchase.

This card let you use your points for airfare, accommodations, renting a car or taking a cruise. And when you redeem your points on Chase Ultimate Rewards, you get 25% more value for your points and have no blackout dates or other travel restrictions. You can even transfer your points to many other airline and hotel loyalty programs.

With no annual fee for the first year, you keep all your earnings for yourself. After the first year, your fee will be $95, which is one of the downsides of the card, but if you use your card a lot, you’ll quickly recoup that fee.

Our take: If you use your card a lot and you want rewards to use for travel, you can’t go wrong with this card in your wallet.

This card competes virtually equally with the Chase Sapphire Preferred card. It offers 50,000 miles with $3,000 in purchases made in three months of opening the account. While the dollar value of those miles is less than with the Chase Sapphire Preferred card—$500 rather than $625—you get that bonus with a $1,000 less expense.

This card was named “The Best Travel Card” by CNBC in 2018. Unlike the Chase Sapphire Preferred card, it pays double miles (2X) on all purchases, not just those for travel and eating out. It also pays 10X miles for accommodations at thousands of hotels. And for global travelers, the Capital One Venture Rewards card can save cardholders up to $100 on Global Entry and TSA Pre✓® application fees.

You can use your points to fly on any airline and stay at any hotel with no restrictions or blackout dates. And you can transfer your miles to more than 12 leading travel loyalty programs. Miles are also good as long as you have your card account.

The Capital One Venture Rewards card has no annual fee the first year and a $95 annual fee after that.

All that said, this card is so close to the Chase Sapphire Preferred card, it wasn’t easy to dub it “runner-up.” In fact, we had to do some arm wrestling between a few staffers to make our final decision. For you, this card could easily be your best card depending on what matters most to you. With either card, you can’t really go wrong.

The Final Verdict Is Yours

The Credit.com staff choices listed here offer solid value and cover a range of travel needs. If you’re looking for your absolute best travel or flight rewards card, check them out on Credit.com. You’ll also find other options listed there as well as each card’s APR.

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Source: credit.com

Earn Southwest elite status by spending on a credit card – The Points Guy

Earn Southwest elite status by spending on a credit card – The Points Guy


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

No, the Amex Gold Card is not the same as the authorized-user Gold Card from Platinum account

No, the Amex Gold Card is not the same as the authorized-user Gold Card from Platinum account


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

How to Reach Southwest Airlines Customer Service

No matter which airline brands you choose to support and do business with, it’s essential to be able to get a hold of the company’s customer service team during a time of need. Even if the brand provides excellent customer service, there may come a time when something goes wrong — whether you need to make contact for help with reservations, baggage issues or have a question that needs to be answered.

If you fly with Southwest Airlines, you’ll be happy to know that they have several customer service options. This makes it more convenient for you to get help when you need it. Here’s what you need to know about how to utilize Southwest Airlines customer service.

Ways to contact Southwest Airlines customer service

Phone

You can call the Southwest Airlines customer service phone line 24/7. To reach a representative, call this telephone number: 1-800-I-FLY-SWA or 1-800-435-9792. Since help is available 24 hours a day, you can call when it’s most convenient for you. For customers who need to call while outside of the United States, additional customer service phone numbers are available.

Nerd tip: Southwest Airlines has a flexible cancellation policy. As long as you call at least 10 minutes before a flight’s scheduled departure, you can cancel your flight and get travel credits for a new flight. In this kind of situation, calling customer service is probably best if you don’t have immediate access to your Southwest app or online account.

Email

Southwest also offers an email customer service option. Customers can go to the email section and choose whether they have a complaint, a question or a compliment. They will then be able to type up a message and include any relevant attachments. Requests may take up to 48 hours to be answered.

Twitter or Facebook

If you prefer to contact Southwest Airlines customer service through social media channels, you have options. Customers can contact the airline through Twitter by sending a direct message to @SouthwestAir.

Southwest Airlines also has a Facebook page. You can reach out to the customer service team via Facebook messenger.

Send a letter

For anyone who prefers a more old-school approach to contacting the Southwest Airlines customer service team, letters can be mailed to the following address:

P.O. Box 36647-1CR,

Dallas, Texas 75235.

Visit the Southwest Airlines Community

Finally, Southwest has an excellent online community. Within this web portal, customers can check the knowledge base for answers to common customer service questions. This is a great place to check before sending a message or making a call, especially if the problem isn’t specific to a reservation. If you’re unable to find an answer, you might try calling or sending a direct message on social media.

The Southwest Airlines Community also provides a discussion board and blog. This is a good place to learn more about the brand and see what other travelers are saying about it. You can communicate with other travelers and read about important brand news and updates.

Southwest credit card customer service

Southwest customer service won’t be able to assist with questions or issues related to a Southwest credit card. Instead, you’ll want to contact Chase, the bank that issues the co-branded Southwest credit cards.

Here’s a list of Southwest credit cards that you can call 1-800-792-0001 for customer support:

The bottom line

There are many ways to contact the Southwest Airlines customer service team. Whether you’re social media savvy, prefer to call or like to send mail the old-fashioned way, there is no shortage of ways to reach a customer service representative when you need assistance.

How to Maximize Your Rewards

You want a travel credit card that prioritizes what’s important to you. Here are our picks for the best travel credit cards of 2021, including those best for:

Source: nerdwallet.com

Is the Orbitz Rewards Visa Card Worth It?

For individuals comparing no-fee travel rewards credit cards, some may be wondering, “Is the Orbitz Rewards® Visa® Card worth it?” There are many cards out there without annual fees, but they’re not created equally, and they don’t all carry a lot of value or the same perks. The Orbitz Rewards® Visa® Card can be a worthwhile option as long as the cardmember fully understands its benefits.

Here’s what you need to know about the card to decide if it’s the right fit for your needs.

Valuable perks of the Orbitz Rewards® Visa® Card

Compared to other no-fee travel credit cards, the Orbitz Rewards® Visa® Card offers potentially more value, especially for individuals who frequently book hotel stays through Orbitz.

Here are some of the top perks of this card:

  • A $0 annual fee and no foreign transaction fees.

  • Earn Orbucks on all purchases made through Orbitz.

  • As an Orbitz Rewards Program member, earn up to 9% on hotel stays booked through the Orbitz mobile app.

  • Included $3,000 lost and stolen baggage coverage when booking with this card.

  • Included accident coverage for death and dismemberment.

  • Get a replacement card or emergency cash advance if your card is lost or stolen.

  • Complimentary Orbitz Rewards Gold status.

The more you use your card to book Orbitz hotel stays, the more Orbucks you’ll earn, and the more you can redeem your collected Orbucks. The redeeming ratio is 1 Orbuck = $1 off a future hotel stay.

A note on the welcome bonus

It’s important to highlight that this card doesn’t offer an impressive sign-up bonus: Receive a $100 statement credit when you spend $1,500 with your Orbitz Rewards® Visa® in the first 90 days of account opening. That low bonus amount is normal for a no-fee card with such a low minimum spend requirement.

Take these steps to get even more value

Using your Orbitz Rewards® Visa® Card strategically by taking steps like these will allow you to maximize its value.

Join the Orbitz Rewards program

If you’re not already a member, join the Orbitz Rewards Program. As you spend and earn Orbucks, you’ll simultaneously be pursuing the next level of elite status, Platinum. It only takes stays for 12 nights in a year to reach this tier. At the Platinum level, you’ll have access to perks like $50 Orbucks reimbursement on expenses like seat upgrades or bag fees, the ability to apply for TSA Precheck for free, and free room upgrades and early check-in (when available) at VIP Access properties.

Use the app

Always book your stays through the Orbitz app instead of the website to get a higher rate back. As an Orbitz Rewards Program member, you’ll earn 9% back in Orbucks by booking through the app, versus 8% when booked on orbitz.com. That difference can add up, especially on expensive stays.

Spend primarily on hotel stays and activities

Focus on using your card for hotel stays and activities booked through the Orbitz app to get the 9% back. While you will earn Orbucks for flight bookings and travel packages, you’ll earn only 7% on these purchases.

You can also use the Orbitz Rewards® Visa® Card for everyday spending. Using your card to pay for daily expenses rather than using cash or a debit card can earn you 2% back in Orbucks. Spending categories include restaurants, groceries, services and more.

Nerd tip: Consider using other cards in your wallet to cover everyday expenses if they get more points per dollar spent in certain spending categories.

Don’t let your Orbucks expire

Make sure that you use your card for a purchase at least once every 12 months. If you do this, your Orbucks will never expire.

The bottom line: Who is a good candidate for this card?

This card’s earning potential is significant if you’re already used to booking through Orbitz — especially when booking hotels through the app.

It’s a good option for individuals who want a card with earning potential, but don’t want to commit to one with an expensive annual fee. Further, if you’re not loyal to a particular hotel brand/chain and prefer staying in hotels to home rentals, having the Orbitz Rewards® Visa® Card can make sense. Use it to book your hotel stays through the mobile app to get rewarded even more for your hotel purchases.

If you’re looking for a travel rewards card with more perks or value or one that doesn’t require you to book through Orbitz, this may not be the card for you.

How to Maximize Your Rewards

You want a travel credit card that prioritizes what’s important to you. Here are our picks for the best travel credit cards of 2021, including those best for:

Source: nerdwallet.com

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Source: thepointsguy.com