Queen Frontman Adam Lambert Sells Hollywood Hills Home for $2.92 Million

Adam Lambert, American Idol alum and current lead singer for legendary rock band Queen, has long been looking to part ways with his Hollywood Hills digs.

The singer recently re-listed his three-bedroom, 3,049-square-foot home nestled above the Sunset Strip for $3.35 million, after a failed previous attempt at selling the contemporary home. The house was first listed for sale back in 2017 for $3.995 million, with different representation.

But it wasn’t until The Agency’s Emil Hartoonian and Nicholas Siegfried took charge of the listing that the right buyer came in sight and Adam Lambert’s house finally sold for $2.92 million.

Granted, that’s $430,000 less than Lambert was asking — and $75k shy of what he paid for the home six years ago — but it’s worth noting that the artist has long moved on (he bough a $6.5 million house in a neighboring area back in 2018). But that doesn’t mean we won’t take a moment to soak in his former home’s beauty, and bid it a proper farewell.

adam lambert's house in hollywood hills
Adam Lambert’s house in Hollywood Hills. Image credit: The Agency

From the outside, Lambert’s house oozes rock star coolness. The architecture of the Los Angeles home is reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright’s clean-cut lines and geometric details. Most of the living spaces inside offer views of the outdoor swimming pool, and light flows in through massive, floor-to-ceiling windows throughout the house. 

The 1947-built house looks fresh and modern, but it also has a timeless vibe. The main level houses a light-filled, spacious living room, perfect for entertaining guests, and it features a sliding glass wall connecting it to the outdoor pool area. 

inside adam lambert's house in hollywood hills
Adam Lambert’s house in Hollywood Hills. Image credit: The Agency

The lower level also houses a fab designer kitchen featuring a massive kitchen island, marble finishes, high-end appliances, and an intimate breakfast setting. The kitchen also offers views of the poolside area. 

adam lambert's house in hollywood hills
Adam Lambert’s house in Hollywood Hills. Image credit: The Agency
adam lambert's house in hollywood hills
Adam Lambert’s house in Hollywood Hills. Image credit: The Agency

Upstairs, the master bedroom offers stunning views of the city lights and the glamorous Hollywood Hills. The suite also incorporates a gorgeous walk-in closet, a master spa, as well as a private terrace overlooking the pool. 

Adam Lambert’s former home also includes an additional suite that comes with its own private entrance. This room could be used as a private studio, a home office, a gym or even a home theater. 

adam lambert's house in hollywood hills
Adam Lambert’s house in Hollywood Hills. Image credit: The Agency

The private gated estate is also perfect for entertaining guests or just relaxing after a long day. The poolside lounge area offers complete privacy, right in the heart of Los Angeles, incorporating comfy couches and offering views of the house and the Hollywood Hills. 

Adam Lambert’s house in Hollywood Hills. Image credit: The Agency

According to the Los Angeles Times, Lambert won’t be moving far, as he paid $6.5 million back in 2018 for a bigger home just a mile away, in Hollywood Hills West.

Adam Lambert first rose to fame in 2009 after finishing as runner-up on the eighth season of American Idol. Since then, he has sold over 3 million albums and 5 million singles worldwide, with his second studio album, Trespassing, released in 2012, premiering at number one on the U.S. Billboard 200 — making Lambert the first openly gay artist to top the charts. He followed that success with the release of his third album, The Original High, in 2015.

On top of his successful solo career, Lambert has been collaborating — and going on several worldwide tours — with legendary rock band Queen as lead vocalist for Queen + Adam Lambert. A recent Netflix documentary called The Show Must Go On: the Queen + Adam Lambert story chronicled how Adam Lambert took over from the legendary Freddie Mercury as the frontman for the rock group.

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Source: fancypantshomes.com

The Fair Housing Act now applies to LGBTQ renters and home buyers. Here’s what changed

HUD is expanding the Fair Housing Act

Trans and other members of the LGBTQ community are now protected under the Fair Housing Act, according to an announcement from the Department of Housing and Urban Development late last week.

The agency will now investigate complaints of housing discrimination relating to sexual orientation and gender identity — two classes not previously protected under the law. 

This is a critical change; HUD has recognized the history of housing discrimination against LGBTQ individuals and is offering legal protection to those affected for the first time.

Verify your home buying eligibility (Feb 16th, 2021)

LGBTQ housing discrimination: An “urgent” issue

“Housing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity demands urgent enforcement action,” said Jeanine M. Worden, the acting assistant secretary of HUD’s Fair Housing office.

“That is why HUD, under the Biden Administration, will fully enforce the Fair Housing Act to prohibit discrimination on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation.”

Worden continues, “Every person should be able to secure a roof over their head free from discrimination, and the action we are taking today will move us closer to that goal.”

This change is in line with the Biden Administration’s goals to reduce discrimination in housing, and to make renting and home buying more accessible and affordable.

What are Fair Housing protections?

The Fair Housing Act — technically Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 — protects Americans from discrimination when:

  • Renting or buying a property
  • Applying for a mortgage
  • Seeking housing assistance
  • Participating in any other housing-related activity

Seven classes are explicitly protected in the Act, including race, color, national origin, religion, familial status, disability and sex. 

Prior to HUD’s latest announcement, “sex” had meant biological sex.

Now, under the new expansions, the Fair Housing Act also protects against discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation as well.

How this change helps LGBTQ renters and homebuyers

Thanks to the changes, LGBTQ Americans can now file complaints with HUD if they feel they’re discriminated against at any point while seeking housing.

This could include discrimination by a real estate agent, mortgage professional, rental property owner, apartment manager, or anyone else involved in the housing process.

HUD offers two examples of what LGBTQ housing discrimination might look like:

  • “A transgender woman is asked by the owner of her apartment building not to dress in women’s clothing in the common areas of the property.”
  • “A gay man is evicted because his landlord believes he will infect other tenants with HIV/AIDS.”

If you’ve experienced these or any other types of housing discrimination because of your gender identity or sexual orientation, file a complaint at HUD.gov/FairHousing.

Complaints dating back to January 20, 2020, will be investigated.

Why the Fair Housing Act is being expanded

There are three reasons HUD has expanded Fair Housing protections to trans and other LTBTQ Americans.

First, there’s President Biden’s Day 1 executive order, which calls on government agencies to “prevent and combat discrimination on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation.”

According to agency spokespeople, HUD is the first department to comply with this executive order.

A new interpretation of the law

The recent Supreme Court case Bostock v. Clayton County also plays a role. In the 2019 case, the court found that a transgender worker’s firing was a direct violation of the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and that “sex” protections did indeed apply. 

“Homosexuality and transgender status are inextricably bound up with sex,” Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote.

“Not because homosexuality or transgender status are related to sex in some vague sense or because discrimination on these bases has some disparate impact on one sex or another, but because to discriminate on these grounds requires an employer to intentionally treat individual employees differently because of their sex.”

According to HUD, the ruling clarified how the Civil Rights Act — including its Fair Housing provisions — should be interpreted moving forward.

“Enforcing the Fair Housing Act to combat housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity isn’t just the right thing to do-it’s the correct reading of the law after Bostock,” said Damon Y. Smith, HUD’s principal deputy general counsel.

“We are simply saying that the same discrimination that the Supreme Court has said is illegal in the workplace is also illegal in the housing market.”

A history of housing discrimination

HUD also cited numerous studies surrounding housing discrimination and the LGBTQ community in its decision to expand Fair Housing protections.

One study, for example, found that same-sex male couples were significantly less likely to receive responses when seeking a rental property. Another found discrimination against transgender women in homeless shelters.

With the expansion of the Fair Housing Act, there’s now a legal path to recourse for individuals who have been barred from housing or discriminated against in this manner.

Source: themortgagereports.com

How President Biden Plans To End LGBTQ Housing Discrimination

President Joe Biden‘s first days in office have been pretty hectic, so it would be easy to miss that one of the Democrat’s top priorities is ending discrimination based on sexual orientation or transgender identity.

One of the executive orders that Biden issued on Day 1 of his presidency will ban most discrimination at the federal level against members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community. In terms of housing, this means it would be illegal for landlords, real estate agents, home sellers, or mortgage lenders to refuse to rent to, sell to, or work with LGBTQ people. Those who break the law could wind up in court and face hefty fines.

“This is a significant step, the likes of which we’ve never seen, to address discrimination against the LGBT community,” says Luis Vasquez, a legal scholar at the Williams Institute, which operates out of the law school at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Discrimination against LGBT people is persistent. It’s something that’s definitely still prevalent here in 2021.”

Although same-sex marriage was legalized across the U.S. in 2015, people who identify as LGBTQ are not protected under the Fair Housing Act. Just 23 states, Washington, DC, and certain cities protect gay couples seeking homes. Only 21 states ban housing discrimination against transgender people.

“People should be able to access healthcare and secure a roof over their heads without being subjected to sex discrimination,” states the order. “All persons should receive equal treatment under the law, no matter their gender identity or sexual orientation.”

The order clarifies that sexual orientation and gender identity fall under the federal government’s definition of “sex.” Historically, sex typically referred to someone being male or female (as identified at birth), although previous lawsuits had challenged this. But in a ruling last summer, the U.S. Supreme Court confirmed that the definition includes sexuality and gender identity.

Biden is now requiring federal agencies to do a deep dive into their policies, programs, regulations, guidance, and past executive orders, and basically clean house. The agencies are to consider suspensions or revisions to ensure that anything that includes “sex” uses the Supreme Court’s definition covering the LGBTQ community. Anything biased is expected to be thrown out.

The new president also issued an executive order this week to eliminate racially biased housing and lending policies. This is a big change from the previous four years.

“During the course of the Trump administration there was a significant rollback of a number of civil rights protections,” says Claudia Aranda, senior research associate at the Urban Institute, a nonpartisan research group based in Washington, DC.

Currently, only seven groups are protected under the Fair Housing Act of 1968. The original act made it illegal to deny housing or discriminate against folks based only on race, color, religion, and national origin. Six years later, sex was added to the list, and in 1988 it was expanded to include disability and familial status (such as having young children).

The executive order will likely lead to homeless transgender people being placed in shelters according to the gender they identify with, rather than being forced into one based on the sex assigned to them at birth. If such a situation occurs, they would have legal recourse.

“It’s important that these activities be illegal because they do, in fact, cause harm,” says Aaron Tax, director of advocacy for SAGE, a national advocacy group for LGBTQ seniors. “It sends a message to LGBT [people] across the country … that they have a right as much as anyone else to find housing. If they do face discrimination, the federal government has their back.”

While the federal protections are a huge step, individual state and city laws are still important as well.

It’s often cheaper and faster to take a fair housing complaint before a state court, says Sarah Warbelow, legal director for Human Rights Campaign, a national LGBTQ advocacy organization.

A local law may provide more coverage than the federal one, as well. For example, the federal law doesn’t pertain to landlords who rent out fewer than four units in a property where they also live. Some city and state ordinances may include those renters, allowing them to bring lawsuits.

Even after federal agencies update their regulations and policies, change isn’t expected to happen overnight. But it will go a long way to ensuring a more equitable environment, says Jeff Berger, president of the National Association of Gay and Lesbian Real Estate Professionals.

“Since same-sex marriage passed in the Supreme Court, this may be one of the most important [actions] that affects the LGBT community,” says Berger. “People who don’t experience [the inequity] really don’t believe it would happen in today’s era. … [But] we’re living in a polarized time. Not everyone in the country feels the LGBT community should have equal rights.”

Source: realtor.com