Gift Aid vs Self Help Aid For College

College tuition can be costly whether you are seeking an undergraduate and graduate degree, attending an out-of-state public university, or taking classes at a private university.

If you do not have adequate savings to pay for classes, room and board, food, travel and other necessities, then you may be considering how to pay for college.

The costs of attending college continue to rise each year for both public and private colleges and universities. The average tuition and fees at a public in-state college was $9,687 and at or private schools it $35,087 for the 2020-21 school year. Obtaining financial aid is one way students can afford to attend college.

One common type of financial aid is called gift aid and typically comes in the form of federal and state grants and a wide range of scholarships that are given by private donors, foundations, non-profit organizations and even the universities themselves.

These grants and scholarships do not have to be paid back, which is helpful for students who are on a tight budget or are considering obtaining a graduate degree.

Another type of aid is called self help aid and usually comes in a form of work study programs and student loans. Some work study programs are sponsored by the federal government and they provide part-time jobs for students who need help paying their tuition. These jobs can be either on the campus of the college or university or off campus nearby.

Self help aid also includes federal student loans which have to be paid back after a student graduates.

There are advantages and disadvantages of both gift aid and self help aid. Undergraduate and graduate students may only qualify for one type of aid, depending on their financial circumstances, where they are obtaining their college degree or other factors.

What Are The Pros and Cons of Gift Aid?

Grants and scholarships are considered gift aid. One common form of grants are called Pell grants. These are grants provided by the federal government and Pell grants are given to undergraduate students who have demonstrated financial need.

The maximum federal Pell grant award is $6,345 for the 2020–21 award year (July 1, 2020, to June 30, 2021), but amounts can change annually.

The main drawback of gift aid is that you may not know what amount you will receive and you may need to supplement paying for college by seeking more scholarships and grants or getting a part-time job.

Federal work study programs are available for both undergraduate and graduate students to help them pay for tuition and other educational costs. The program’s jobs are related to the student’s course of study and also include community service work.

Both full-time or part-time students may qualify for part-time employment while they are enrolled at their university or college and it is available to undergraduate and graduate and professional students who demonstrate financial aid.

The work study programs are operated by a college and university financial aid office and you will receive at least the federal minimum wage. These jobs are available both on-campus and off-campus which can be beneficial for students who do not have other means of transportation.

Students who work off campus typically work for a nonprofit organization or a public agency and the goal of the job is geared to be in the public interest. The number of jobs is limited, so students should apply early to ensure that they have a position for the following academic year.

Federal and Private Student Loans

Another type of self-help aid are federal and private student loans. Federal student loans are based upon the financial need of a student and their family. They are either subsidized or unsubsidized direct loans and may offer lower interest rates than private loans. One drawback is that the federal government will limit how much money you can borrow.

Undergraduate students may qualify for subsidized loans that are given based on their financial need. One benefit is that the federal government will pay the interest on these loans while you are attending school or at least taking classes half-time, during your grace period or when you have deferred the loan.

Both undergraduate and graduate students may qualify for unsubsidized loans and they are not based on financial need. These loans accrue interest while students are taking classes, during the loan’s grace period, or when you have deferred the loan.

Private student loans can be used to help make up the gap in what is needed to pay the remainder of tuition or living expenses. While both federal and private student loans may help students pay for their tuition; they must be repaid once a student graduates.

If you do not complete your course study and do not receive a degree, the student loans still have to be repaid.

Federal student loans have protections that private student loans do not offer. Students who have received federal student loans can seek several options after graduation to repay their loans including income-driven repayment programs.

Federal student loans also offer borrowers’ the ability to put loans in forbearance or deferment, allowing them to temporarily pause payments in certain situations.

Some borrowers will choose to refinance their federal student loans into new private student loans. But this option means that you lose the protection of the federal repayment plans. Private student loans have both fixed and variable interest rates.

Fixed interest rates are beneficial for people who want to know the exact amount of their loans each month helping them to budget more easily. The interest rate on variable student loans are sometimes lower than fixed rates but that means your payment amounts can fluctuate from month to month.

Shopping around can help you find the best private student loan that fits your financial needs and the amount that you can repay each month.

Qualifying For Gift Aid or Self Help Aid?

Qualifying for either gift aid or self help aid might depend on your financial circumstances. Students may want to apply early for grants, scholarships, work-study programs and student loans.

completing a FAFSA®, or Free Application for Federal Student Aid. This application must be completed every year.

Some states and colleges may have their own FAFSA deadlines , so double check to avoid missing any. Missing a deadline can mean forgoing some financial aid.

While some gift aid such as scholarships are given to students based on merit, grades or other accomplishments, grants, work study programs and student loans are typically based on your financial needs and the cost of tuition at your university.

Some universities use data from the FAFSA to determine gift aid like scholarships too. Students can also apply for scholarships and grants that aren’t associated with the FAFSA®.

Private Student Loans with SoFi

In some cases gift aid and federal aid aren’t enough to help students pay for their tuition. In that case, some students may consider private student loans.

SoFi offers private student loans with no late fees or origination fees with flexible repayment options. There are also interest rate discounts for eligible SoFi members.

Interested applicants can find out what rate and terms they could pre-qualify for in just a few minutes. Learn more.



SoFi Student Loan Refinance
IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO REFINANCE FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS PLEASE BE AWARE OF RECENT LEGISLATIVE CHANGES THAT HAVE SUSPENDED ALL FEDERAL STUDENT LOAN PAYMENTS AND WAIVED INTEREST CHARGES ON FEDERALLY HELD LOANS UNTIL THE END OF SEPTEMBER DUE TO COVID-19. PLEASE CAREFULLY CONSIDER THESE CHANGES BEFORE REFINANCING FEDERALLY HELD LOANS WITH SOFI, SINCE IN DOING SO YOU WILL NO LONGER QUALIFY FOR THE FEDERAL LOAN PAYMENT SUSPENSION, INTEREST WAIVER, OR ANY OTHER CURRENT OR FUTURE BENEFITS APPLICABLE TO FEDERAL LOANS. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Notice: SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers such as Income-Driven Repayment plans, including Income-Contingent Repayment or PAYE. SoFi always recommends that you consult a qualified financial advisor to discuss what is best for your unique situation.

SoFi Private Student Loans
Please borrow responsibly. SoFi Private Student Loans are not a substitute for federal loans, grants, and work-study programs. You should exhaust all your federal student aid options before you consider any private loans, including ours. Read our FAQs.
SoFi Private Student Loans are subject to program terms and restrictions, and applicants must meet SoFi’s eligibility and underwriting requirements. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information. To view payment examples, click here. SoFi reserves the right to modify eligibility criteria at any time. This information is subject to change.

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp (dba SoFi), a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law, license # 6054612; NMLS # 1121636 . For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
Third Party Brand Mentions: No brands or products mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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Source: sofi.com

Mint Success: Transitioning from College Kid to Young Professional

Photo Credit: Lawrence Peart

“Mint is so crucial to my personal finance I honestly have no idea where I would be without it.” That’s what Austin, TX photography consultant Lawrence Peart says when reflecting about his transition from college student to young pro, financially speaking. His experience so far shows that it is possible to graduate from college without debt, and to adjust to the higher cost of living as a young professional, while also saving money for your future.

But Peart stands out from the crowd. We looked at Minters’ numbers to see how college students and recent graduates use their money or handle debt, and found that there’s a big shift in many categories from ages 18 to 25 – incomes increase, spending categories fluctuate, and debt repayment – well, you know how that goes. Student loan payback time for many!

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College Grads Make More Money…

Depending on the field that graduates enter, incomes can be across the board, but a majority of our Mint users in that age range earn between $25K and $50K annually.

Student ChartGraduate Chart

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…and Spend More Money!

The newfound earnings may seem like a lot of money to a recent grad but, when faced with the sticker shock of life outside school, the typical Mint user experiences an accompanying increase in spending on rent, entertainment, and education related expenses – mostly student loan repayment. That bill averages about $300 per month.

Most grads continue to use credit cards after graduation. In fact, their card charges increase from $1,200 to $1,900 on average. But most of them don’t pay finance charges, which means these savvy Mint users are the ones who pay their balances by the end of the month. This explains why Mint’s young users have an average credit score of 690, considerably higher than the national average of 630 for the same age group*.

Good work, Minters! But while you’re paying off your college debt and adjusting to life on the outside, don’t forget to save for your future. Only 2% of college students have significant long-term savings, and that number only goes up to 7% among college graduates 25 and under. It might seem daunting to set aside those crucial dollars, but that money will grow over time and make your older self thank your younger self.

Moving Forward

Peart is in that 7% – he follows the mantra “Save, invest early and often, reap the benefits later.” With a goal to live debt-free and retire in his 20’s (he just turned 26), Lawrence uses Mint to budget and find extra money to sock away for the future. While his income falls in the same range as the majority of recently graduated Mint users, his experience both during school and in the few years since graduation defies many of the statistics, so naturally we asked him all about it.

What kind of shift in spending did you experience between college and post-college life?

I think it might surprise most people to hear that I spend far less money now than I did in college. Once you start earning an actual income and developing a clearer sense of your relationship to money it becomes much easier to save, and feels more rewarding to do so. While in school I never had much cash, so in a way it had less value and I spent it more freely. You expect to be broke in college, which becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, and unless you’re careful that can then extend past your college years into your working life. I even had a little saying for it: the closer I am to zero, the less I have to lose.

The average college graduate spends about $300 per month on student loan repayment. What’s your bill?

$0. My experience paying for college was a mixture of some good fortune, a little bit of privilege, and tons of hard work. I chose a public school in a reasonably cheap city, I received decent grants, I applied for every scholarship available to me every semester (and made sure I had the grades to qualify) and for all but my sophomore year I worked at least part-time to have a source of income. I graduated broke, sure, and maybe missed out on some fun things here and there, but at least I didn’t owe anything.

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What was the most shocking financial realization you experienced once you left college?

That you can save quite a bit of money not doing the stuff everyone seems to think you have to be doing. If you don’t buy fancy clothes, go out for drinks every day, feel the need to keep up with the newest phone every 6 months etc., all of that extra cash starts to add up.

What are your thoughts about retirement savings, and what do you practice?

I half-seriously tell myself that I want to retire in my 20’s. I don’t mean “retire” in the way most people would think of retirement, I always want to be creating and applying myself to something, but I’d like to have the ability to not work for long periods of time. To be able to wake up one day in the near future and say “I am comfortable not working the rest of the month, time do something creative” and not feel guilty about it. That’s the goal.

I set up a Roth IRA almost immediately upon getting sustained income and contribute the full amount each year into basic low-cost index funds. I admire my parents in a lot of ways and don’t question their decisions and what life events influenced them, but while they are both doing fine in retirement age they are doing so without any long-term retirement account holdings. It might be hard to imagine 40 years down the line, but the math regarding investing when you’re young is compelling.

How does Mint help you stay on track?

I worked for about nine months before I came across Mint, and even though I thought I was being good with my money, you truly have no idea until you see it categorized and laid out in front of you. Those little purchases each day, the subscriptions, the monthly payments, it all adds up fast. You might think you’re saving money, but you’re not. It really does take hard work. Mint makes it easy, and I’ll tell everyone who listens: it’s even made paying bills fun. The first week of each new month is like Christmas. I get paid, I pay off my recurring expenses and then allocate how much I want to save that month before organizing more flexible costs like groceries, entertainment, etc. I follow one maxim above all else: you don’t save what is left after spending, you spend what is left after saving.

You can be like Lawrence

Does the idea of watching the savings pile up get you excited? Try setting up a goal with your Mint account and making that progress bar move!Don't save what you don't spend - spend what you don't save
We would like to hear your story! Contact us at Editor_Mint@intuit.com with “Mint User Story” in the subject.

Kim Tracy Prince is a Los Angeles-based writer who is pretty jealous of Lawrence’s early progress. It took her many years to pay off her student loans. She celebrated by finally framing her diploma.

*Source: https://www.creditkarma.com/trends/age
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Source: mint.intuit.com