Actors Andy Favreau and Molly McQueen unload WeHo bungalow

Husband-and-wife actors Andy Favreau and Molly McQueen made quick work of their West Hollywood home sale, selling the Spanish-style bungalow for $2.15 million and finding a buyer just four days after listing.

McQueen, granddaughter of the late Oscar-nominated movie star Steve McQueen, paid about $1.075 million for the property a decade ago, records show.

Remodeled during their stay, the leafy retreat is tucked between Melrose Avenue and Beverly Boulevard. It was built in the 1920s, but the recent changes brought updated style such as modern fixtures and clean lines throughout the cozy 1,120-square-foot interior.

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An exterior of white stucco and clay tile enters to an open floor plan with two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a sky-lit living room and marble kitchen. French doors lead to the backyard, where olive and lemon trees surround a terracotta tile patio with a fire pit. Off to the side, the two-car garage has been converted into a gym.

Over the last few years, Favreau has starred in sitcoms such as “Single Parents,” “Champions” and “The Mick,” as well as the drama series “Little Fires Everywhere” and “Animal Kingdom.”

McQueen’s credits include “Community” and “Reasons I Don’t Have a Boyfriend.”

Elizabeth Puro of Douglas Elliman held the listing. Patrick Fogarty of Hilton & Hyland represented the buyer.

Source: latimes.com

Trevor Noah drops $27.5 million on Bel-Air showplace

Trevor Noah will spend 2021 in style. The day before New Year’s Eve, “The Daily Show” host shelled out $27.5 million for a contemporary mansion in Bel-Air, The Times has confirmed.

The comedian must have a thing for architectural showplaces. In 2019, he dropped $20.5 million on a similarly dramatic mansion also found in Bel-Air, but ended up selling it last summer for $21.7 million.

Noah bought this one from Mark Rios, an L.A. architect who built the 11,000-square-foot home for himself. Inspired by Japanese aesthetics, he told Architectural Digest that he went through 50 plans before settling on the final design and employed dark timbers based on a room he saw in Kyoto and extra-thick walls to protect against the noise of the city below.

From the street, the home appears as a series of cubes stacked together. Aerial photos from the back reveal that the estate sprawls across its hillside lot with a series of open spaces that adjoin or overlook a scenic backyard with a lawn and infinity-edge pool.

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Stone, wood, bronze and glass combine in the common spaces including a spacious dining room and a lounge with custom wall coverings. Spread across three stories are six bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, an office, library, elevator, gym, spa, steam room and game room.

Up top, a movie theater leads to a rooftop terrace. A cabana with a bar and sun deck adjoins the pool out back.

Linda May and Drew Fenton of Hilton & Hyland held the listing. Jonah Wilson, also with Hilton & Hyland, represented the buyer.

A native of South Africa, Noah has found success in comedy and television. After joining “The Daily Show” as a correspondent in 2014, the 36-year-old succeeded Jon Stewart as host the following year and inked a five-year extension in 2017 — the same year he won a Primetime Emmy.

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Source: latimes.com

World of Hyatt Card vs. Hilton Surpass Card: Which is better?

World of Hyatt Card vs. Hilton Surpass Card: Which is better?


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Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

TPG reader question: When can a bank change my credit card benefits?

TPG reader question: When can a bank change my credit card benefits?


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

Delayed statement credits from Amex Offers — The Points Guy

Delayed statement credits from Amex Offers — The Points Guy



Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

Barclays 60,000 Hawaiian Airlines Bonus – Annual Fee Waived First Year

Update 2/16/21: Deal is available again, better than the 60k deal we posted a few days ago without the annual fee waived.

The Offer

Direct link to offer

  • Receive 60,000 Hawaiian Airline miles after $2,000 in purchases within the first 90 days of account opening on the Barclaycard Hawaiian Airlines credit card

Card Benefits & Details

  • Annual fee of $99 is waived the first year
  • Card earns at the following rate:
    • 3x miles on all Hawaiian Airlines purchase
    • 2x Hawaiiamiles on gas, dining and grocery store purchases
    • 1x miles on all other purchases
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • ShareMiles, ability to share miles with friends & family HawaiianAirlines.com
  • Discounted Award Travel
  • Get $100 companion discount off one coach companion ticket for roundtrip travel between Hawaii and North America on Hawaiian Airlines on each account anniversary upon payment of annual fee
  • Free first checked bag

Our Verdict

60,000 miles is frequently available, but normally the annual fee is not waived first year. In this case it is waived first year, making this offer particularly attractive. In terms of what to do with the miles:

  • You can get flights for 35,000 miles round trip with the card from mainland USA to Hawaii, but there isn’t a lot of space available.
  • Intra island flights are 7,500 miles one way
  • You can also transfer the miles to Hilton at a rate of 1:1.5 (although I’d say this is a bad use of points) Not currently available
  • They also sell sunglasses (I forget the brand and amount, but seems to be a popular redemption)

As always if you have any questions about Barclays credit cards, read this post first. Keep in mind getting approved for Barclays cards can be extremely difficult (6/24 rule). I will be adding this to our list of the best credit card bonuses.

Hat tip to DDG

Post history:

  • Update 2/23/20: CPGFL reports that this offer is available on a Hawaiian in-flight application with no spend requirement, just a single purchase. Also comes with 50% off companion pass. Unclear if the annual fee is waived on the in-flight offer.
  • Update 1/8/2020: Bonus is available again. Hat tip to reader Jeff L
  • Update 9/5/19: Bonus still available
  • Update 9/3/19: Deal ends tomorrow.
  • Update 8/17/19: Looks like the end date is actually 9/4. Hat tip to reader @MrP3rson
  • Update 8/7/19: An e-mail has been sent out stating that this offer will end soon, but no end date given. Reposting in case anybody is interested in getting this card. Hat tip to reader Casey

Source: doctorofcredit.com

From family resorts to private islands: Where to stay in the Seychelles on points

How to Use Hotel Points to Visit the Seychelles – The Points Guy


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Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

Tips for purchasing the best wine when using your Amex Offer

Tips for purchasing the best wine when using your Amex Offer


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

A Points Collector’s Guide to Air France-KLM

Flying Blue is a joint loyalty program of two European airlines: Air France (headquartered at Charles de Gaulle Airport in France) and KLM (headquartered in Amsterdam Airport Schiphol in the Netherlands).

In 2004, the two airlines merged and created a combined Air France-KLM Group. Both of the airlines are part of the SkyTeam alliance, which consists of 19 carriers.

Here’s what a strategic points collector needs to know and understand about Air France-KLM and its loyalty program, Flying Blue. We’ll cover how earning and redeeming works, how to get the maximum value from your miles, plus other facets that make this rewards program worth a second glance.

About Air France-KLM

Here’s a quick overview of a few key features of Air France-KLM.

  • Fare types: Air France operates aircraft with economy, premium economy, business class and first, or La Première, class. KLM operates service in economy and either World Business Class (on international routes) or Europe Business Class (on international or domestic routes within Europe) cabins.

  • Main U.S. routes: Both Air France and KLM cover quite a bit of the world with their routes. In the U.S., Air France flies to Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas (seasonally), Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis (seasonally), New York City, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C. KLM operates service to Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami (seasonally), Minneapolis, New York City, San Francisco, Salt Lake City (seasonally) and Washington, D.C.

  • Points currency and loyalty program: The two airlines’ joint loyalty program is called Flying Blue and it’s free to join. As a member, you’ll earn Flying Blue miles redeemable for award flights.

How to earn Flying Blue miles

Earn by flying

You can earn Flying Blue miles by flying on the following airlines and crediting the flights to Flying Blue. Note that the list includes non-SkyTeam partners of Air France-KLM.

When you fly partner airlines, the miles earned are credited based on the percentage of distance flown, which is calculated based on the fare code of a flight you purchase and vary by which partner airline you are on. You can click through the individual partner pages on the Flying Blue website to get specifics.

When you fly Air France or KLM, the miles you earn are determined by how much you spend on each ticket — minus taxes — and your elite status with the airline. Keep in mind, Flying Blue works in euros. In terms of an exchange rate, 1 euro has typically been worth $1.10 to $1.25 over the past five years.

Elite status

Earning rate

4 miles per euro ($1.10-$1.25)

6 miles per euro ($1.10-$1.25)

7 miles per euro ($1.10-$1.25)

8 miles per euro ($1.10-$1.25)

Flying Blue is an example of a revenue-based rewards program, at least on the earning side for Air France- and KLM-operated flights. The more money you spend, the more rewards you earn.

Earn by spending on credit cards

With the Air France KLM World Elite Mastercard®, Air France-KLM flyers will earn extra bonus miles and a statement credit after spending a set amount on purchases in the first 90 days of account opening.

After this initial welcome bonus, you’ll continue earning 3 miles per dollar spent with Air France, KLM and other SkyTeam airlines, and 1.5 miles per dollar on all other purchases.

Each membership year you spend $50 on the airline credit card, you’ll earn 5,000 anniversary miles that are automatically added to your Flying Blue account.

Earn by transferring points between programs

Perhaps the easiest way to get your hands on Flying Blue miles is by transferring flexible currency from one of the bank rewards programs. Luckily, Air France-KLM partners with all of the major transferrable point programs.

You can transfer the following points to Flying Blue:

Of all the flexible point programs listed above, we recommend using American Express Membership Rewards, Chase Ultimate Rewards® or Citi ThankYou Points as they provide the highest conversion rates.

Nerd tip: Occasionally, AmEx and Citi add bonus miles to point conversions. During these promotional transfer periods, the bonus can be as high as 30% more miles in your Flying Blue account, which can make certain mileage bookings really attractive.

Other ways to earn

  • Hotels: Earn Flying Blue miles on hotel stays at brands like Marriott, Hilton and Hyatt, among others.

  • Car rentals: Earn Flying Blue miles on car rentals made with car rental companies such as Hertz, Avis and Budget.

  • Shopping: Collect more miles when you shop with Batavia Stad Amsterdam Fashion, the Bicester Village Shopping Collection and Voyageurs du Monde.

  • Buy miles: In a pinch, you can buy Flying Blue miles starting at around $66 for 2,000 miles. Purchasing as many as 75,000 miles will set you back upward of $2,500. The program sometimes runs bonuses on mileage purchases.

Nerd tip: Since miles are always at risk of being devalued, we don’t recommend making speculative points purchases without a redemption in mind.

How to redeem Flying Blue miles for maximum value

Book award seats early

Flying Blue uses a dynamic-style chart for its award flights. In other words, redemption rates start at a certain point and can increase based on when and where you fly.

Flying Blue sells a certain number of award seats at the lowest redemption level before it hikes the rates based on demand. To find out what that level is, enter a city pair into the Miles Price Estimator and watch what comes up on your preferred route.

For example, say you want to fly from Salt Lake City to Budapest, Hungary. According to the Miles Price Estimator, the lowest redemption level is set at 24,000 Flying Blue miles for a one-way ticket in economy and 53,000 miles for a one-way ticket in business class.

So if you’re flexible with your travel plans, look for dates when tickets are available at the low-level rates for mileage redemption.

Use Promo Rewards

One of the sweet spots of the Flying Blue program is its Promo Rewards. Every month, the airline releases discount routes for certain city pairs, and you can get up to 50% off standard award rates in economy, premium economy and business classes of service.

The promo page is updated the first day of the month, and you have the whole month to book a discounted flight for travel during a specific time period. Keep in mind that some trips sell out quickly — we don’t recommend waiting too long to snag one of these promotional fares if you see one you like.

Delta partner flights

Because Air France-KLM is an alliance partner of Delta Air Lines, use Flying Blue for the following mileage redemptions on Delta-operated flights.

  • U.S. to Hawaii: This redemption will set you back 35,000 miles on a round-trip ticket from the continental U.S. to the Aloha State.

  • U.S. to Mexico: Another great redemption that will cost you 29,000 on round-trip flights from the U.S. to Mexico.

Flying Blue’s elite status program

Think of reaching Flying Blue elite status like playing a game. The more experience points, or XP, you earn by flying Air France-KLM or their partners, the quicker you level up. The number of XP earned per flight depends on travel class and flight type.

Tiers

Flying Blue flyers are divided into four elite levels: Explorer, Silver, Gold and Platinum. Everyone starts at the Explorer level when they join the loyalty program, then members can make their way up as they fly.

Once you reach a status level within 12 months of being a member, you get the benefits associated with it for 15 months (unless you qualify for a higher tier in that time — then the clock resets). On the flip side, if you fail to re-qualify for the same status tier within 12 months, you’ll drop to the previous tier.

What status holders get

Here are the perks associated with each elite status level. As mentioned previously, Flying Blue works in euros. We’ve listed a typical range in dollars for comparison.

It’s worth mentioning that one of the desirable benefits of holding either Gold or Platinum elite status with Flying Blue is the ability to redeem miles for La Première awards — Air France’s first-class cabin. The redemption option isn’t available to Silver elites or Explorer members of the program.

What makes Air France-KLM unique?

Passengers flying in KLM’s World Business Class cabin receive a unique gift: a miniature Delft Blue house filled with jenever, a juniper-flavored drink of the Netherlands. The airline designs a new Dutch house every year and has presented these souvenirs to KLM premium-cabin flyers since the 1950s.

To add a porcelain Delft house to your collection, simply book an intercontinental flight in World Business Class.

The bottom line

Flying Blue may be a foreign loyalty program, but U.S.-based travelers shouldn’t overlook it.

Its miles are easily accessible via multiple transferrable programs, which means that pooling rewards into a single account when you’re ready to redeem miles for an award isn’t difficult.

Although the program uses dynamic pricing for its redemption rates, it still makes low-level awards available to those whose schedule is flexible. On top of that, transfer bonuses from certain bank programs can drop redemption rates even lower.

If you’re looking to fly a SkyTeam partner on an award ticket, consider Flying Blue and its redemption options.

How to Maximize Your Rewards

You want a travel credit card that prioritizes what’s important to you. Here are our picks for the best travel credit cards of 2021, including those best for:

Source: nerdwallet.com