‘The Shield’ Actor Walton Goggins Lists His Quaint 1920s Home for Sale

Walton Goggins is selling his Los Angeles home, a lovely 5-bedroom home tucked behind dense landscaping just above Hollywood Boulevard. The actor, known for his prominent roles in The Shield, Sons of Anarchy, Justified or Django Unchained and now the star of CBS’s heartwarming sitcom The Unicorn, bought the home back in 2010, when he was getting ready to welcome his son Augustus, now 10.

The two-story brick home has both French and Spanish touches as well as beautiful, eclectic interiors that combine vintage décor and boho chic influences with modern elements. The results are so spectacular that the home caught the eye of over 20 publications, with Architectural Digest, Maison Du Monde or GQ all featuring it in the past. Now, Goggins is looking to sell the charming home for $3.35 million and has enlisted the help of Josh Myler of The Agency to find a buyer.

Inside Walton Goggins’ quaint Los Angeles home, now on the market for $3.35 million. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo

Stylish vintage interiors pay tribute to the roaring 20s

Originally designed and built by Harold O. Sexsmith in 1927, Goggins’ home retains many of its original features. From the original coffered front door to the hardwood floors, or the arched openings to the casement windows, every detail has been meticulously restored, maintaining the original charm, warmth, and essence of the 1920s.

The foyer that welcomes visitors is accentuated by original period tile floors. To the left, there’s a stylish and sophisticated formal living room, whose surrounding windows and overall scale allow light in from every side. The most striking elements in this room are an oversized, original stone wood-burning fireplace and floor-to-ceiling bookshelves that line one of the walls.

The foyer leads into the formal living room, which has its original stone wood-burning fireplace. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo

The living room opens to indoor/outdoor dualling lounges, which are connected by French doors and offer privacy for more intimate gatherings. In fact, the whole house is filled with comfy gathering places, both indoors and out.

 “My philosophy is a person shouldn’t have to take more than six or eight steps without having an opportunity to sit down for a conversation to begin,” the actor once told a GQ reporter that toured his home.

The expansive living room has two separate seating areas. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo
One wall of the living room is covered in floor-to-ceiling bookshelves. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo

A wonderfully elegant kitchen

The main floor is completed by a fully equipped eat-in chef’s kitchen with wood and marble open shelving, punctuated by elegant brass fixtures that complement the rich, dark wood cabinets. The actor’s kitchen features a lovely dining area that, just like the living room, is surrounded by top-to-bottom bookshelves that complete the inviting, bohemian look. Next to the kitchen, there’s also a large pantry with accompanying laundry facilities.

The elegant kitchen has rich, dark wood cabinets, marble counters and brass fixtures. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo
The actor’s kitchen features a lovely dining area surrounded by top-to-bottom bookshelves. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo

The bedrooms are bright and inviting

On the main level, there’s also a guest bedroom with a full en-suite bathroom. But the bulk of the sleeping quarters are on the second level, where there’s a primary suite (boasting a chic bathroom and large walk-in closet) and two additional guest bedrooms and a bathroom.

Main floor guest bedroom with a full en-suite bathroom. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo
Bright and spacious master bedroom with vintage elements. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo

Walton Goggins’ retro home office

One of the most eye-grabbing rooms of this celebrity house is the home office, with its distinctive retro style and vintage furniture. With big windows inviting plenty of natural light in, the actor’s office also has a comfy seating area and a wall made entirely out of corkboard, perfect for memorabilia or for staying organized with work files and charts.

The home office has a distinctive retro style and comfortable seating. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo
There’s vintage furniture and a practical corkboard wall. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo

Stepping outside to a whimsical backyard

In line with the overall romantic feel of the European-inspired home, the outdoor area is whimsical and inviting, with a large swimming pool that is framed by citrus fruit trees and string lights. Since the actor finds gathering spaces to be of utmost importance, the quiet, private backyard features two outdoor dining areas, and extra seating set around a fire pit.

Walton Goggins’ house has a whimsical backyard with two outdoor dining areas, a pool, and a fire pit. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo
The quiet, private backyard has several seating areas, including one set around a fire pit. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo
Walton Goggins’ house has a whimsical backyard with two outdoor dining areas, a pool, and a fire pit. Image credit: Anthony Barcelo

Lead image credit: Property – Anthony Barcelo, courtesy of The Agency. Walton Goggins headshot – Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons

More celebrity homes

Matt Damon’s Zen Los Angeles Home Asks $21 Million
Inside ‘Supernatural’ Star Jensen Ackles Hip Lake House
Check Out this Beautiful House the Hemsworth Brothers Just Sold in Malibu
Extreme Makeover’s Ty Pennington Lists Bright and Beautiful Venice Beach Home

Source: fancypantshomes.com

Chocolate Brown Home Decor Is Trending Now — Here’s How To Try It – The Zoe Report

According to Pantone, 2021 is all about Ultimate Gray and Illuminating — but if you ask interior designers, there’s an entirely different hue that’s invading homes of late. Chocolate brown home decor is having a moment, and experts believe that’s because the shade manages to be neutral while adding a little drama, depending on how you use it.

The color — which has also been popping up on the nails of nearly every influencer — may be especially hot right now, but it’s also a forever classic for moody, elegant interiors. “I wouldn’t call it a trend, but rather, a renaissance,” says Lance Thomas of Thomas Guy Interiors. “I think people are realizing that gray isn’t the only neutral one can use to ground a space. I think brown, as a neutral, can provide comfort and a humble confidence to a room. It warms up the room without screaming for attention; playing best-supporting actress to bold design choices elsewhere. Brown is the new gray.”

Because of this versatility, even deep browns can be used in a variety of home decor styles and in any size room. For example, Cara Woodhouse of Cara Woodhouse Interiors recently designed a powder room for a client that was bathed in brown tones. “I have noticed that clients love creating a moody space with lots of character and this brown shade is the perfect play on that,” she shares. And according to Woodhouse you can achieve the effect in big or small ways — from wall paint color to antiques. “I say don’t be afraid,” she says. “You can start with just paint on the walls that can always be repainted! You don’t have to do an entire sofa but you can lighten things up with a white sofa and then add some fun accessories or some cozy velvet brown pillows!”

Want even more ideas for designer-approved ways to bring chocolate into your home? Ahead find expert tips for trying the hue on your walls, as an accent, or even as a dramatic statement piece, so there’s a little something for every kind of space.

We only include products that have been independently selected by TZR’s editorial team. However, we may receive a portion of sales if you purchase a product through a link in this article.

Chocolate Brown Home Decor: For The Walls

Putting a deep, bold color like chocolate on your walls is admittedly intimidating. But if you’re up to the challenge, designers recommend a few ways to do it well. Firstly, it’s probably best used in a room that you want to feel a little more moody — like your home bar. “Shades of brown in a bar room (which has grown very popular this year due to the pandemic) create a feeling and a mood for space,” says Woodhouse. “It definitely encapsulates you and creates an experience.”

Worried about the size of the space? Don’t be, says Rebecca Johnston of RJohnston Interiors, who explains that painting a small room dark actually ups the coziness factor. “Try painting a nook a dark color and make it a cozy space. Start small and don’t be afraid,” she says. And Mel Bean of Mel Bean Interiors agrees. “Choose a space that is enclosed (a bedroom or home office) rather than an open space such as a combo living, dining, and kitchen, ideally with good natural light, and embrace chocolate in your wall color,” the designer explains.

If you want to amp up the drama, follow Thomas’ advice and choose a paint that has some sheen. “Sheen is everything,” he says. “Imagine the warm hug of a brown wall color, but now in a lacquer finish. Then imagine it covering all of the walls, the moldings, and the ceiling for a monolithic effect. Don’t be afraid to take it there.”

Chocolate Brown Home Decor: For An Accent Piece

“Some easy ways to integrate chocolate tones without a major commitment are through layering accessories, such as pillows, throw blankets, and accessories into your existing interior,” Bean shares. “A textural brown throw combined with patterned pillows with dominant browns could be the perfect tie-in to your existing color palette!”

Besides textiles, the designer suggests using wood as a way of introducing some chocolate accents. “Another alternative is to bring in wood elements that carry the rich brown through the room,” she adds. “I have antique wood carved sculptures in my home that have this rich tone! It could also be a side table, wooden box, or bowls.”

Finally, as Johnston reminds, don’t forget your floors as a place to bring in this inviting shade. “Go with deep browns and warm greys in a rug to ground your space,” she says.

Chocolate Brown Home Decor: For A Statement Piece

For those not afraid to go big, Thomas says an antique leather chair or ottoman is a great option. “There is no better piece of furniture than an old chocolate leather chair,” he offers. “Its weathered and warm brown tones add a calming confidence while creating a beautiful tension to anything new in the room.”

If leather doesn’t work for your lifestyle, Bean explains that chocolate works well in a variety of other textiles, like a velvet sofa for example. “This can feel like a big commitment, but chocolate brown can make an incredible ‘base’ in upholstery to layer from and is really so versatile,” she says. “A textural brown sofa can be layered with neutral textures and earth tones to be taken in the casual and natural direction so many love right now. But it can also be bold, with vibrant velvet pillows in tones that can be carried throughout the room to a more dramatic effect!”

Source: thezoereport.com

What the Flip? Portland Home Gets a Major Face-Lift and Gains $600K in Value

Flipping a house is a lot of work that can yield a big profit. But not every project is guaranteed to be lucrative. So what’s the key to successfully making over a fixer-upper and selling it for a gain? Our series “What the Flip?” presents before and after photos to identify the smart construction and design decisions that ultimately helped make the house desirable to buyers.

Known for friendly faces, eclectic locals, and beautiful scenery, Portland, OR, has been seen as a desirable place to put down roots for a while now. It was even rated the ninth best U.S. city to live in by U.S. News & World Report. All of those benefits, plus historically low real estate inventory, mean housing prices in Portland are high. But for flippers who can nab a fixer-upper with good bones, there’s plenty of potential for profit—as this example shows.

The flippers who took on this five-bedroom, five-bathroom house made a smart move by pouncing on the well-worn property for $875,000 when it was listed in June 2019. After a full-on renovation, they put the home up for sale, and in December 2020 it was sold for $1,475,000.

So how did they raise the home’s value by $600,000 in just a year and a half—and during a pandemic, no less? The booming market wasn’t the only thing that made this home sale such a success. The fresh renovations also had something to do with making this a must-have property.

Taking into account the home’s now-stylish interior design, we asked our team of experts to look at before and after photos and weigh in on the changes that made the biggest difference in this home. Here’s what they had to say.

Living room

Talk about major changes! Once full of dark, drab wallpaper and a dated, textured ceiling, the living room now has a brighter, cleaner look.

“The application of white paint on everything really works well in this room,” says designer, real estate agent, and house-flipping investor Laura Schlicht. “Two of this house’s biggest assets have been artfully played up: the architectural moldings and the fantastic view.”

“It was a great move to get rid of the extra door on the side of the fireplace,” adds real estate investor and agent Molly Gallagher, of Falk Ruvin Gallagher. “There are plenty of other ways in and out of the room, and it allowed them to widen the hearth and keep the green-tiled theme going.”

Kitchen

The old kitchen was spacious, but that’s about all it had going for it. Once the flippers worked their magic, they had a kitchen that would impress any prospective buyer.

“Removing a section of the wall between the dining room and kitchen brings much more light into the kitchen, bouncing off the bright white cabinets, rather than keeping the view for the dining room itself,” says Kate Ziegler, real estate investor and real estate agent.

She adds that her top question from buyers touring homes is whether or not they can remove a wall.

“Having done this update for the buyers broadens the audience for this home, and boosts sale price as a result,” says Ziegler.

Real estate investor and agent Tracie Setliff, also with Falk Ruvin Gallagher, was impressed with the island addition.

“The island placement is perfect—it seems like it was always there and makes up for some of the storage lost by opening up the wall,” she adds.

“We love that they nod to the original lights and time period of the home with the updated light fixtures they chose,” adds Gallagher. “And they smartly chose to appeal to a wide buyer pool by not adding in some specific tile that will be dated in five years.”

Home office

Before 2020, a home office was just a bonus, but now it’s essential—whether it’s for work or school, or both. Even though this renovation was started before the coronavirus pandemic, the flippers chose to upgrade this home office in a major way, which really paid off by the time they listed the home.

“I love that they removed the old attached bookshelf,” says Setliff. “The room has an airier feel to it without the hulk of the built-in shelving. There are so many cute bookshelves that are much sleeker.”

Schlicht agreed, explaining that the built-in bookcase, while often a bonus, was actually the wrong size for the space and made the room feel crowded.

“Let’s take a moment to notice the windows,” says Ziegler. “New windows are a significant cost that most new buyers don’t want to take on in the near term—but the payback in efficiency can be remarkable. Replacing windows as part of a flip makes the whole space look more contemporary and polished, but also adds real value to the home that buyers can quantify.”

Dining room

At first glance, it may seem like the only real change in the dining room was a new coat of white paint, but Ziegler says that’s not the case. In fact, she was rather impressed with the flippers’ efforts in this room.

“The dining room demonstrates places where the investors behind this work took the time to restore and retain older details: keeping the built-in sideboard, and even the mirror detail below the smaller window shows a thoughtful approach and is indicative of more time-intensive work,” Ziegler says.

“Restoring details rather than replacing with cheaper, contemporary alternatives requires patience and care, and that attention to detail is something buyers notice even if they don’t have the vocabulary to describe it,” she adds. “The updated chandelier is trendy but also a nod to midcentury modern styling that is appropriate for a house of this age.”

Setliff is happy to see the “boring” light fixture go, in favor of the new “sophisticated, sculpturelike light.”

“Buyers do not want to have to change fixtures, as simple as it seems, and keeping it fun yet unfussy was the way to go,” she says. “It is interesting how you notice the views from the windows now that your eye isn’t drawn to the dark brown of the built-in cabinets and window trim.”

Den

This old den went from afterthought to amazing after this flip, and our experts are impressed with the results.

“Goodbye, ’60s; hello, now!” says Gallagher. “Knotty pine is best reserved for Wisconsin supper clubs these days, and today’s buyers are not interested in having a supper club theme for their den.”

“Removing drop ceilings and wood paneling is an easy, instant update, but the nicer detail here is the addition of recessed lighting,” says Ziegler. “Recessed lighting in a basement space creates the illusion of more headroom, making for a much more comfortable den. Updating the basement den adds valuable square footage that buyers might have otherwise written off as just basement space.”

And we can’t forget about the star of this room: the fireplace.

“Replacing the dated brick with a pop of green tile and the white surround and mantel transform this new den,” says Setliff.

Source: realtor.com

10 Relaxing Home Decor Ideas to Transform Your Space

Much of our time these days is spent at home. Whether you’re still working from a home office, meal-prepping in your kitchen on weekends, or spending most of your leisure time looking at other homes for sale on your favorite real estate app, you may feel your home is not the calming space you’d hope it to be. Regardless of how you spend your time, your home is your sanctuary, where you should feel relaxed and be able to unwind from your daily life. If you want to design a more calming space but don’t know where to start, we’ve got you covered.

From adding cozy blankets and scented candles to dedicating a space to practice meditation, creating a relaxing house is just a couple of design steps away. Whether you live in warm Los Angeles, CA, or rainy Seattle, WA, one of these 10 relaxing home decor ideas is sure to transform your home into an even more calming place you’ll be happy to spend time in.

relaxing-home-decor-ideas

relaxing-home-decor-ideas

1) Design your space with cozy fabrics

There’s no better place to start designing a calming space than decorating with cozy fabrics. Whether that’s getting a new throw blanket for your couch or reupholstering your chair with a crushed velvet fabric, you can decorate just about anything with textiles. Soft fabrics bring a soothing, cozy feel to your home and can make you feel like you’re in a serene environment no matter the season. So break out the quilts, incorporate a fuzzy shag carpet, or pick up some soft throw pillows to make your space more relaxing after a long day.

2) Create balance between colors

When looking for the right relaxing home decor idea, think about how you’ll strike a balance between the colors in your space. Rather than bringing in lots of bright colors, consider adding a pop of color with a pillow or throw blanket against a neutral couch or chair. Unless you find yourself drawn to vibrant colors, less is more when it comes to incorporating these statement elements in your home. 

3) Choose classic and calming decor ideas

When it comes to choosing relaxing home decor, you may find yourself tempted by all the up-and-coming home trends. Opting for the latest trends can be fun, but if it’s not something you totally love, chances are you may not feel that relaxed in your space. One of the keys is to pick trends that you like along with those that will stand the test of time. If you’re interested in a new style but not sure how that fits into your home, looking into reversible home design ideas may just be your best option. 

4) Carve out a space for yoga or meditation

Nothing makes a home more relaxing than creating a designated space to wind down. Whether that’s a simple corner of your living room or a small room of its own, you can easily design a space that feels secluded from the rest of your home. With a yoga mat or a floor pillow, a few green plants, and a photo you love, you can easily make a calming nook for your yoga flow or mindfulness practice.

relaxing-house

relaxing-house

5) Use a weighted blanket in your bedroom

Chances are you’ve heard about weighted blankets. If you haven’t, weighted blankets range from 5 to 30 pounds and mimic therapeutic techniques of deep pressure stimulation, much like a massage. For those that have trouble balancing work and home life, choosing a weighted blanket for your bed or living room may help you relax. Either way, having a great blanket is one of the easiest relaxing home decor ideas to bring into your space to help you shut off for the evening. 

6) Light candles or diffuse essential oils throughout your home

Scents can be the gateway to creating a relaxing environment in your home. Whether you gravitate towards a calming chamomile scent or the smell of lavender before you go to sleep, there’s an essential oil for everything. If you’re more of a candle user, you can find a variety of scents perfect for cultivating a relaxing space. Fresh baked cookies, check. Christmas cheer, check. Nothing beats lighting your favorite candle or turning on your essential oil diffuser after a long day and letting your favorite aromas fill your home.

7) Mood lighting makes a relaxing home

If the weather is gloomy or it’s dark by the time you finish your workday, some much needed light can be all you need for a peaceful home. From sun lamps that mimic the benefits of sunlight or just incorporating string lights throughout your home, the options are endless. You can easily make your space more relaxing by switching up your lights and bringing a new vibe to your home. 

bright-living-room

bright-living-room

8) Embrace any and all natural light

Natural light is one of the easiest elements to brighten up your space. But if you live in an apartment with minimal windows or your living room doesn’t let in much natural light, there’s no need to worry. It all starts with embracing what natural light you do have in your home. Highlight the windows with high drapes to draw your eyes upward or keep window shades pulled open for as long as the daylight hours allow. Making an effort to let in any light from clouds or sun into your home can make your space more calming and welcoming. 

9) Take inspiration from nature for relaxing home decor

If getting out into nature makes you feel more relaxed, look to nature for inspiration when designing your house to be more relaxing. Incorporating the right shade of wood furniture into your home can evoke feelings of the mountains or the beach. Consider lighting a Fraser fir-scented candle or adding a few drops of pine essential oil in your diffuser to bring the mountain relaxation into your home. Taking inspiration from nature may be as simple as hanging a picture of your favorite beach or lake. That way you’ll have a serene feeling every time you see the photo.

10) Incorporate a plant garden

Plants are known to be a great way to incorporate nature and its properties into your relaxing home decor. The key is to choose plants that work with your space, like small succulents against a windowsill or tall fiddle leaf figs in a sunny room. For greenery that has multiple uses, consider starting an herb garden so you’ll have fresh herbs year-round. No matter how you bring plants into your home you’re likely to find yourself enjoying the greenery you see each day.

Source: redfin.com

Society6 Presidents Day Sale: Best Wall Art, Prints, Home Decor, Summer Essentials, and More – Thrillist

I’ve been living in the northeast, a veritable winter hellscape of sludge-colored snow and sidewalks blanketed in black ice. But in lieu of moping around, I broke out my lounge chair, turned up my space heater, and threw on a four hour HD video of a random, tropical, beach on YouTube. It wasn’t much, but it gave me hope for warmer days ahead—something to look forward to.

Society6 is also giving you something to look forward to with its robust Presidents’ Day Sale. Though the online shop is primarily known for its hundreds of thousands of prints and framed art, it also offers home decor, furniture, stuff for your home office, and even outdoor equipment like custom chairs, towels, koozies, sun shelters, and beach totes. Check out these creative and inspired spring/summer essentials that are just as colorful & fun as the halcyon days of spring ascending just beyond the horizon.

Source: thrillist.com

10 Relaxing Home Decor Ideas to Transform Your Space – Redfin

Much of our time these days is spent at home. Whether you’re still working from a home office, meal-prepping in your kitchen on weekends, or spending most of your leisure time looking at other homes for sale on your favorite real estate app, you may feel your home is not the calming space you’d hope it to be. Regardless of how you spend your time, your home is your sanctuary, where you should feel relaxed and be able to unwind from your daily life. If you want to design a more calming space but don’t know where to start, we’ve got you covered.

From adding cozy blankets and scented candles to dedicating a space to practice meditation, creating a relaxing house is just a couple of design steps away. Whether you live in warm Los Angeles, CA, or rainy Seattle, WA, one of these 10 relaxing home decor ideas is sure to transform your home into an even more calming place you’ll be happy to spend time in.

relaxing-home-decor-ideas

relaxing-home-decor-ideas

1) Design your space with cozy fabrics

There’s no better place to start designing a calming space than decorating with cozy fabrics. Whether that’s getting a new throw blanket for your couch or reupholstering your chair with a crushed velvet fabric, you can decorate just about anything with textiles. Soft fabrics bring a soothing, cozy feel to your home and can make you feel like you’re in a serene environment no matter the season. So break out the quilts, incorporate a fuzzy shag carpet, or pick up some soft throw pillows to make your space more relaxing after a long day.

2) Create balance between colors

When looking for the right relaxing home decor idea, think about how you’ll strike a balance between the colors in your space. Rather than bringing in lots of bright colors, consider adding a pop of color with a pillow or throw blanket against a neutral couch or chair. Unless you find yourself drawn to vibrant colors, less is more when it comes to incorporating these statement elements in your home. 

3) Choose classic and calming decor ideas

When it comes to choosing relaxing home decor, you may find yourself tempted by all the up-and-coming home trends. Opting for the latest trends can be fun, but if it’s not something you totally love, chances are you may not feel that relaxed in your space. One of the keys is to pick trends that you like along with those that will stand the test of time. If you’re interested in a new style but not sure how that fits into your home, looking into reversible home design ideas may just be your best option. 

4) Carve out a space for yoga or meditation

Nothing makes a home more relaxing than creating a designated space to wind down. Whether that’s a simple corner of your living room or a small room of its own, you can easily design a space that feels secluded from the rest of your home. With a yoga mat or a floor pillow, a few green plants, and a photo you love, you can easily make a calming nook for your yoga flow or mindfulness practice.

relaxing-house

relaxing-house

5) Use a weighted blanket in your bedroom

Chances are you’ve heard about weighted blankets. If you haven’t, weighted blankets range from 5 to 30 pounds and mimic therapeutic techniques of deep pressure stimulation, much like a massage. For those that have trouble balancing work and home life, choosing a weighted blanket for your bed or living room may help you relax. Either way, having a great blanket is one of the easiest relaxing home decor ideas to bring into your space to help you shut off for the evening. 

6) Light candles or diffuse essential oils throughout your home

Scents can be the gateway to creating a relaxing environment in your home. Whether you gravitate towards a calming chamomile scent or the smell of lavender before you go to sleep, there’s an essential oil for everything. If you’re more of a candle user, you can find a variety of scents perfect for cultivating a relaxing space. Fresh baked cookies, check. Christmas cheer, check. Nothing beats lighting your favorite candle or turning on your essential oil diffuser after a long day and letting your favorite aromas fill your home.

7) Mood lighting makes a relaxing home

If the weather is gloomy or it’s dark by the time you finish your workday, some much needed light can be all you need for a peaceful home. From sun lamps that mimic the benefits of sunlight or just incorporating string lights throughout your home, the options are endless. You can easily make your space more relaxing by switching up your lights and bringing a new vibe to your home. 

bright-living-room

bright-living-room

8) Embrace any and all natural light

Natural light is one of the easiest elements to brighten up your space. But if you live in an apartment with minimal windows or your living room doesn’t let in much natural light, there’s no need to worry. It all starts with embracing what natural light you do have in your home. Highlight the windows with high drapes to draw your eyes upward or keep window shades pulled open for as long as the daylight hours allow. Making an effort to let in any light from clouds or sun into your home can make your space more calming and welcoming. 

9) Take inspiration from nature for relaxing home decor

If getting out into nature makes you feel more relaxed, look to nature for inspiration when designing your house to be more relaxing. Incorporating the right shade of wood furniture into your home can evoke feelings of the mountains or the beach. Consider lighting a Fraser fir-scented candle or adding a few drops of pine essential oil in your diffuser to bring the mountain relaxation into your home. Taking inspiration from nature may be as simple as hanging a picture of your favorite beach or lake. That way you’ll have a serene feeling every time you see the photo.

10) Incorporate a plant garden

Plants are known to be a great way to incorporate nature and its properties into your relaxing home decor. The key is to choose plants that work with your space, like small succulents against a windowsill or tall fiddle leaf figs in a sunny room. For greenery that has multiple uses, consider starting an herb garden so you’ll have fresh herbs year-round. No matter how you bring plants into your home you’re likely to find yourself enjoying the greenery you see each day.

Source: redfin.com

19 Purchases That Buyers Almost Always Regret

a shopper regrets a purchase
Prostock-studio / Shutterstock.com

There are certain purchases that buyers tend to regret.

No, that doesn’t mean everyone: There are plenty of happy boat and hot tub owners out there, and surely more than a few people count their timeshare property as a true delight.

But when faced with one of the potential purchases listed here, it’s a good idea to take a breath and think seriously about whether to buy it.

1. DVDs

Dragon Images / Shutterstock.com

Movie-watching has moved online, with streaming and downloadable films that are easier to manage and watch than ever. You can buy or rent movies on demand from streaming services like Redbox or Amazon’s Prime Video.

What’s for sure is, you don’t have storage space for hundreds of DVDs. You’re not Blockbuster Video, and besides, look what happened to them.

2. Extended warranty

Extended Warranty
rawpixel.com / Shutterstock.com

You’ve bought the product, but the sales pitch isn’t over: Now your clerk is gunning to sell you an extended warranty, just in case the brand-new product falls apart.

Research the product you’re buying. Extended warranties can be complicated. We explain the ins and outs in “Should I Buy an Extended Car Warranty?” and “Are Extended Warranties Worth It?”

Whatever you do, first check whether you have coverage through other sources, such as a manufacturer’s warranty or through your credit card. You may not even need to fork out for extra coverage.

3. Boats

Motorboat
freevideophotoagency / Shutterstock.com

There’s an old saying: The two best days of owning a boat are the day you buy it and the day you sell it.

Owning a boat is a lot of work. If you live on a lake and have plenty of room for it, and are willing to spend the money needed to keep afloat, then ship ahoy! But most of us can get by with an occasional boat rental, or wait until our friend Gilligan invites us over for a sail.

For more options, check out “4 Ways to Go Boating Without Buying a Boat.”

4. Timeshare

Virginia Beach, Virginia
JoMo333 / Shutterstock.com

Timeshares, which give you a partial share of ownership in a vacation property, are probably one of the most stereotypically regretted purchases — and for good reason.

You may love vacations, but do you always want to vacation in the exact same spot? Yes, you can exchange your timeshare with others, but booking a hotel or resort is more flexible.

Those are a few reasons why Money Talks News founder Stacy Johnson says, “I’d chop off my own foot with a dull ax before buying a timeshare.”

5. An extravagant wedding

Wedding couple
Cedric Carter / Shutterstock.com

A wedding lasts one day, and then it’s all photos and memories.

You’ll be just as legally married in a $100 gown as in a $5,000 one, and you’ll have a lot more money left over. You can pull off a wedding elegantly without going into debt in the process.

Learn how: “Your Own Royal Wedding: 20 Classy Ways to Save on the Big Day.”

6. Pricey engagement ring

Diamond ring
Vladimir Sazonov / Shutterstock.com

And speaking of weddings, consider whether a whopping diamond ring is really the best way to tie the knot.

Modern jewelers offer more price-conscious alternatives that are just as lovely. Your hard-earned dollars can bring more satisfaction if they’re used for a down payment on a home. So, consider lab-grown diamonds — not only are they cheaper, they’re more environmentally friendly.

7. Desktop computer

NicoElNino / Shutterstock.com

Desktop computers once were an amazing innovation, but few people need that kind of computing power these days. A tablet or laptop gives you the flexibility to move your home office around and travel with your computer if you wish.

Think different, a la Apple’s motto. And when it comes to home computing, don’t think big — think small.

8. Giant tent or other expensive camping gear

dezy / Shutterstock.com

For hardcore campers, owning a nuclear-fueled camp stove, a three-bedroom tent, an enormous inflatable mattress or a kit specifically made for roasting s’mores might make sense.

But for those of us who camp maybe only once every year or two, a small tent and standard sleeping bag work just as well. And you can always just toast marshmallows on sticks, which are still free.

9. Camcorder

StockKK / Shutterstock.com

Most of us carry smartphones these days, and their video capabilities keep getting better and better. Hauling around a camcorder, storing it and getting the videos off of it is a chore few of us need.

10. Home printer

Using a printer to print out documents
FabrikaSimf / Shutterstock.com

Even those who run a home business are finding fewer and fewer opportunities to use gigantic printers, since so many documents can be filled out, signed, sent and received electronically.

Printers take up a ton of space and require replacement ink cartridges that can cost as much as a new printer.

Those in major cities who need a printer for a one-time use can make the occasional trek to the public library or local business offering printing services.

11. Pedometer

Andrew Haddon / Shutterstock.com

Counting steps to keep yourself moving is trendy again, but it’s not pedometers that brought it back. Instead, it’s wrist-worn fitness trackers and smartphones and smartwatches.

You have to plan to wear a pedometer. With a smartphone or smartwatch, you can track your steps almost without thinking.

12. Home exercise equipment

Sladic / Shutterstock.com

There likely have been days when you wished you didn’t have to make the trek to the gym to work out. At those times, buying exercise equipment seems like a no-brainer.

But the equipment is huge and bulky, and storing it takes up precious space in your home. Did we mention that it’s also seriously expensive?

13. Single-purpose kitchen gadgets

Woman making fruit juice with a juicer
ABO PHOTOGRAPHY / Shutterstock.com

Some kitchen appliances make solid sense: Coffeemakers and toasters earn their keep every day. But appliances that are super-specific and can perform only one rarely needed task? They’re rarely worth the money.

Will you really use a juicer, a bread maker, a hot-dogger, a food dehydrator? Maybe once or twice, but it is unlikely to earn the space it takes up on your kitchen counter.

14. Pools and hot tubs

kurhan / Shutterstock.com

Sure, some people swim every day. And some of us can’t imagine gloomy winters without a hot tub.

But for many people, there’s only a short period of time when a pool or hot tub is used enough to earn its keep. After that, it becomes a huge bowl of water that needs to constantly be cared for and cleaned.

15. Piano

Skumer / Shutterstock.com

If you’re on Facebook, head to the online shopping section to see how many people are desperately trying to give away pianos for free. Few things take up more space and are more difficult to move than a piano.

If you truly have a junior Beethoven in your house, you may genuinely need a piano. But if your kid hasn’t even learned where middle C is, you can start with a borrowed portable keyboard and see if music lessons hit the right note.

16. Fine china

Kondor83 / Shutterstock.com

Once, fine china was on every couple’s wedding registry and was broken out regularly for dinner parties and family holidays. Ours is a more casual world now, for good or for ill. Few engaged couples want 12 place settings of Royal Doulton china.

If china appeals to you, check with the older generations in your family. They may be happy to give you theirs.

17. Collectibles

Toy Collection
Tinxi / Shutterstock.com

Face facts: Beanie Babies that were the rage in the 1990s are never going to make you rich.

The same goes for most collectibles, from Franklin Mint collector plates to Department 56 Snow Village buildings.

If it makes you happy to buy a spoon or shot glass from each country or state you visit, have your fun. But don’t collect with the expectation that you’ll make money from the collection one day.

18. Baby gadgets

Africa Studio / Shutterstock.com

New moms and dads don’t need half of the things on many baby registries. Diapers and clothes, sure. Burp cloths and bassinets? Go for it. But a diaper wipe warmer?

If you’re giving a present to a new parent, consider a gift card.

19. Giant desserts

Man eating giant sundae
Todd Castor / Shutterstock.com

Many restaurants have one on the menu — the giant, jumbo, lollapalooza, monster-sized dessert. But eat one, and you’ll quickly regret it.

Unless you have a soccer team or hungry family to help you eat the giant treat, skip it.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Getting a Master’s While Working Full Time | ApartmentSearch

Professor lecturing in front of students

If you’re interested in earning a master’s degree to help you stand out from the crowd, congratulations! It’s a big move that can make a significant difference in your career! However, just like a graduate degree can help you move up the corporate ladder, the amount of time and dedication required to get one may force you to take time off work.

If you want the best of both worlds, you may want to try studying while working full-time, but that’s easier said than done! Not sure that’s the right choice for you? Before you decide what to do, ask yourself the questions below — they’ll help you assess your options and prepare for your next big step!

Question #1: Do you feel comfortable asking for help?

Let’s be real: full-time school and full-time work will put a lot of stress on you. Sometimes, you won’t have an option but to ask for help — whether that’s asking your boss to cut you some slack or asking a professor for a deadline extension.

Are you the type of person willing and able to ask for help before small issues snowball into major problems? Consider this before you decide to stick with your job while going to grad school.

Question #2: Are you ready to do your — financial aid — homework?

Working full-time doesn’t mean you won’t qualify for financial aid, grants, and scholarships. However, it does mean that you’ll have to spend time studying your financial aid options before school even starts!

The following links provide advice and resources to help pay for grad school:

  • Types of Financial Aid
  • Financial Aid for Graduate School
  • Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Question #3: When and how will you tell your coworkers and supervisors?

It’s impossible to avoid conflict in your life. Often, the best course of action is to get out in front of potential issues. Accordingly, you’ll want to share your plan with your boss so that if and when a conflict between your studies and your job appears, it will be easier to call out and resolve. And let’s face it, what employer doesn’t love the idea of a hardworking associate striving to learn and achieve more?

A bonus: some employers offer partial or even total tuition reimbursement if the field of study is likely to positively influence your work performance (and their bottom-line). That would take the sting out of your efforts to get a master’s while working full time!

Question #4: Can you relax?

While juggling school and work, it can be hard to take a break, relax, and rejuvenate. Regardless, it’s an integral part of earning a master’s degree while working full-time or tackling any challenge.

Despite that, many people struggle to unplug and unwind! Knowing how and when to relax is a valuable skill and one that’s worth learning before you hop into working and studying simultaneously.

Question #5: Do you have the physical and mental bandwidth for grad school and work?

It’s time for a little introspection! Reflect on what your current work-life balance looks like — do you have plenty of time left after the 9-to-5 to hang out with friends, work out, and do the other things you’re passionate about? How many hours a week are you expecting to be at school or studying? Is it going to be manageable? Meditate on these things before you make any big decisions.

Having room left in your schedule for work, life, and studies is one thing — but having space in your home to complete your professional and academic projects is another! Look around your apartment and ask yourself, “Can I create a dedicated space for my studies?”

Whether you have a dedicated home office or an unused dining space that can be converted into one, having a physical room for concentration will help you conquer work and grad school. And if you need temporary furniture to transform a space for the duration of your academic pursuits, turn to CORT Furniture Rental for temporary office and bedroom furnishings.

An Easy A: Finding Your Next Place

Whether you decide to do grad school full-time while staying at work, work and study part-time, or quit work to go to pursue a different trade entirely — ApartmentSearch has your back. Find apartments that fit your budget wherever life takes you!

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Home Decor – Big Home Trends For 2021: More Automation, Multi-functional Living Spaces – Fintech Zoom

Home Decor – Big Home Trends For 2021: More Automation, Multi-functional Living Spaces


Shutterstock

The Covid-19 lockdown has changed the way we look at our home and live in it. People now want fancier kitchens, dedicated entertainment rooms, home offices and increased automation at home, to be able to live indoors for a long period of time. The demand for eco-friendly building materials and made-in-India is also on the rise.
“Now is the time for architects and designers to become problem solvers and have an empathetic approach towards people’s lives. After the lockdown, people’s requirements from their homes have changed and evolved,” says Jimmy Mistry, luxury décor retailer, architect, and designer. “Luxury stores and brands have never seen better days. People are investing in their homes, which they have realised is the safest haven,” he adds. 



HNIs and UHNIs who had left India during the lockdown are back and looking for alternate homes away from metro cities that are designed to be safer and more comfortable. “These clients are asking for fabrics and materials with antibacterial treatments,” says architect Alfaz Miller.  
While Mistry has been working on a 50,000-sq-ft multi-brand home furniture and décor store in Della Lonavala, Miller has been busy with the Bangalore International Airport’s Terminal 1 domestic lounge. The two highlight the top luxury home trends of 2021. 
Home offices and multifunctional spaces
People are reassessing their home design. They want their gym to also be a study, a guest room and/or a theatre room, says Miller. There is a lot happening in the home office space. People are building both large and small office set-ups at home, which can be an isolated and disturbance-free zone. “From collapsible set-ups to permanent rooms and studies, everyone today wants a corner where they can work from home,” says Mistry. 
making office space at home -shutterstock_1120813820-bg
Shutterstock
Kitchens
Kitchens are now becoming fancier as not just the house-helps but even the owners are working in the space. 
Modern, user-friendly kitchen models, which enables all the members of the family, young and old, to cook are being made. Many UHNIs are also building two kitchens, one indoors and another outdoors, especially for Indian cooking. Small kitchenettes are also being built in the living room. 
The demand is also for germ-free cooking spaces. “One way to minimise dust is to get stainless steel kitchens,” says Miller. 
Automation has become very important in kitchens. Dish washers, machines that help you cook–from kneading the dough to rolling chapatis or slicing vegetables, and to make cold press juices are in great demand. 
2021 illuminating yellow and ultimate gray-shutterstock_1873731577-bgShutterstock
2021’s colours 
“We foresee a shift from neutral pastel colours to brighter, bolder and vibrant colours, especially in furnishings,” says Miller. “The Pantone colours of 2021 are grey and illuminating (yellow), and I see all our projects moving away from their brown colour palette to greys and monochrome shades.” Earlier, clients always preferred white and creams for marble, but now they are asking for greys, even in granite and basalt. 
Furniture
While ergonomic furniture continues to be in demand, antique furniture is making its way back in contemporary homes and so is lightweight and easy-to-maintain cane furniture. Curvilinear shapes can be seen in interiors and facades, in curved sofas, round tables, curved walls and partitions.

Click here to see Fintech Zoom India’s comprehensive coverage on the Covid-19 situation and its impact on life, business and the economy​

Home Decor – Big Home Trends For 2021: More Automation, Multi-functional Living Spaces

Tags: Home Decor

ADVERTISEMENT

Source: fintechzoom.com

How to Decide Where to Live If You Work Remotely From Home

When you no longer need to physically report to work, it detaches where you live from where you work. Suddenly you can live anywhere in the world, rather than being restricted to a single city.

It’s an incredibly freeing feeling. But it also leaves remote workers, freelancers, and other digital nomads with an overwhelming abundance of options. How do you choose a place to live when you can live anywhere on the planet?

As you review the following checklist, sort it by your priorities. For some, living near their parents or children is nonnegotiable. Others feel perfectly happy living in another state or even another country.

Most of all, look to design your perfect life starting from the ground up, in the most literal sense.

Choosing a Country & State

It never occurs to most Americans that they might enjoy living in another country. Most never even move to another state; North American Moving Services reports that 72% of Americans live in or near the town where they grew up.

Yet as an expat myself, I can tell you firsthand how many advantages you can find living in another country. I’ve also lived in multiple U.S. states, some of which I liked far more than my home state.

Consider the following as you choose a country and state to live in, and don’t get caught up in the details of “how” when you first consider places to live. Focus on the “why” first, and when you’ve chosen a country or state based on your ideal lifestyle, you can then figure out the “how.”

Time Zone

As an international school counselor, my wife gets job offers all the time in Asia and the Middle East. But my business is located in the U.S., and I refuse to do any more 3am conference calls.

Just because you can work remotely doesn’t mean you can necessarily set your own hours. And even when you can set your own hours, you still have to communicate and collaborate with others. That could mean coworkers and supervisors, or it could mean partners, suppliers, or clients. Sometimes you need to hop on a phone call with people in real time, and if they work in a time zone on the opposite side of the world, that means working inconvenient hours.

Know your work, and set your own limits on time zones.

Proximity to Family

If you can’t stand the idea of living more than an hour away from your family members, you have a clear radius you must live within. It makes your decision easier, if more limited.

But if you have a little more leeway, such as a living “within a few hours from family, it frees you up to explore travel by air and rail rather than just road travel.

For example, if you want to be able to reach your family within three hours, that gives you 150 to 200 miles of driving radius but over a thousand miles of flying radius. You can then start looking at cities with cheap direct flight routes (more on that shortly), rather than simply drawing a circle around the town where your family lives and shackling yourself to it.

Tax Policies

Different countries tax in vastly different ways. As a remote worker, you have the luxury of choosing a low-tax country or state.

My wife and I spent four years living in the United Arab Emirates, where they don’t charge income tax at all. That saved us tens of thousands of dollars in taxes every year, allowing us to save and invest that money to build wealth faster.

Even within the U.S., some states charge vastly higher taxes than others. Look at total tax burden, combining income tax, property taxes, and sales and excise taxes to compare states and countries, and start with these states with the lowest tax burden.

The difference can easily amount to thousands of dollars a year — a sum that can dramatically change your quality of life and wealth over time.

Connectivity & Communication Infrastructure

Becoming a digital nomad requires a strong digital Wi-Fi connection. In today’s world, most cities around the globe offer reliable, fast Internet connectivity. But smaller towns in developing countries may not meet your needs.

Ask around among residents, especially knowledge workers and expats, before moving to a smaller city in a developing country. If the connectivity and communication infrastructure can’t meet your needs, look elsewhere.

Climate

Not everyone wants to spend half the year bundled up in coats and scarves to weather the frozen tundra. I certainly don’t.

Consider climate as you choose a country and state to live in. Whether you enjoy having four distinct seasons or would just as soon hike and swim all year round, find a place where you actually enjoy the weather most of the year.


Choosing a City

Many countries and even states are sprawling, with an enormous diversity of big cities, small towns, and everything in between.

As you consider the best cities for remote workers, keep the following factors in mind to choose the right fit.

Airport Routes

Not all airports are created equal. Depending on your penchant for travel, you may want easy access to a major international airport with hundreds of flight routes.

Smaller regional airports often only offer a few routes to nearby hubs. It adds hours to each trip, and usually costs more to boot.

If proximity to family matters to you, then air routes can play a major role in where you feel comfortable living. You can cross a thousand miles in two hours of direct flight time, or you can waste 10 hours on multiple flight legs, layovers, and driving gaps.

Natural Amenities

There’s an old trope that all people fall into one of two camps: seaside people or mountain people. Whether you buy into it or not, the fact remains that you can’t have every natural amenity you want, so you have to choose based on your priorities.

Few cities sit nestled between tropical beaches and mountains with pristine skiing. You can find cities with beautiful shorelines and beaches, cities up in the mountains near great hiking and skiing, cities near wine country, and everything in between, but it’s hard to find cities with everything. Prioritize what you want because it’s hard to get it all.

The few cities with easy access to many natural amenities — such as San Francisco and Santa Barbara — tend to come with outrageously high living expenses.

Cost of Living

The median home in San Francisco ($1,405,199) costs nearly 20 times the price of a median home in Cleveland ($73,686), according to Zillow. Twenty times!

Put another way, you could buy your own home in Cleveland plus 19 rental properties, all generating passive income, for the same price you’d spend on only your residence in San Francisco. The rental income from those 19 properties would likely cover your living expenses, allowing you to reach your financial goals faster.

Cost of living matters. It doesn’t just mean the difference between affording a three-bedroom and a four-bedroom house — it often means the difference between becoming wealthy and living a middle-class lifestyle. Between being able to pay for your kids’ college education or not. Between retiring at 45 and retiring at 70. Between an acceptable quality of life and a great one.

If you can earn a New York City salary without paying New York City rents, find somewhere fun and affordable to laugh all the way to the bank.

Keep in mind that cost of living doesn’t just include lower housing costs. Low cost of living can include low food and grocery costs, cheap restaurants and nightlife, low utility costs, affordable health care, and other discounts that help you save money across the board.

As a final thought, take a second look at living overseas. Start with these countries where you can live a luxurious lifestyle for $2,000 a month.

Cultural Amenities & Local Culture

For many people, the local culture matters, both in terms of amenities and the people themselves.

That could mean access to museums, sports teams, art galleries, and performing arts. Most smaller towns only offer these cultural amenities sparsely, although exceptions certainly exist. Larger cities tend to offer more of these amenities, though they still vary greatly.

Beyond amenities, most people also prefer to surround themselves with those culturally similar to them — politically, socioeconomically, and linguistically. If this kind of similarity is important to you, consider moving somewhere where you feel you’d fit right in and where the local values reflect your own.


Choosing a Neighborhood

As someone who hails from Baltimore, I can assure you that different neighborhoods within a city can feel like completely different cities. So choose your neighborhood with care.

Safety

When you can live anywhere, there’s no reason to live somewhere unsafe.

People feel comfortable with what they know, but you don’t have to play that game anymore. Choose a city and neighborhood with extremely low crime rates. With the world at your fingertips, you have infinite options.

And bear in mind that your impressions of a place might not match the reality. I still laugh when I think of my friends’ and family’s reactions when I told them I was moving to Abu Dhabi: “What?! Is it safe?!” Not only is it one of the safest cities in the world, but I was moving there from one of the most dangerous of the U.S. cities. Yet my family in Baltimore couldn’t wrap their heads around that notion.

Try NeighborhoodScout or AreaVibes to research any city’s, zip code’s, or neighborhood’s crime statistics.

Quality of Public Schools

In some cities and neighborhoods, the public schools are so bad that middle-class parents are forced to budget the money to send their children to private schools. It severely restricts their budget and savings rate.

Again, when you can telecommute, you don’t have to play by those rules anymore. You can pick a school district with outstanding public schools and actually cash in on those tax dollars you have to pay regardless.

Alternatively, you could home-school your children. But that requires far more effort and time on your part, both in educating them and in making sure they get plenty of social interaction with other kids.

Try GreatSchools.org to look up school quality measures for any given district.

Walkability

When my wife and I lived in the U.S., we each had a car, as many Americans do. Then we moved overseas, and our home sat in a somewhat walkable neighborhood. We shared one car there, which worked out well.

The next time we moved, we intentionally chose a city and neighborhood that was extremely walkable. It lay within walking distance of my wife’s work, a coworking space for me to work from, and dozens of restaurants, bars, retail stores, and other amenities. We no longer own a car at all, and I don’t miss it in the slightest.

When you can walk, bike, or Uber everywhere, it forces you to be more active. Physical activity aside, living without a car also saves you a phenomenal amount of money. The average American spends $9,282 per car every single year, according to AAA, between maintenance, repairs, gas, parking, insurance, and car payments.

Public Transportation

Similarly, an extensive public transportation system can also help you ditch your car while still letting you reach every amenity you need.

A city with excellent public transportation can reduce your transportation costs and save money far faster.


Choosing a Home

Found the perfect corner of the world to live in?

With the hard part behind you, you can focus on the easier business of finding a hospitable home.

Before even deciding whether to rent or buy a home, start by deciding how long you plan to live there. When you buy a home, you take an initial loss based on the closing costs, both those incurred to buy the home and the second round of closing costs you owe when selling it. It takes time to recover these expenses by building equity.

If you don’t know how long you plan to stay or plan on just a year or two, renting is definitely your best option. Beyond two years, sometimes it makes sense to buy. You have to calculate the costs both ways. Be sure to include all ownership costs, including maintenance, repairs, insurance, property taxes, and both rounds of closing costs. Far too many people just assume they should buy without actually running these numbers.

Bear in mind your changing needs in the years to come. For example, if you plan to have a family, you may need another bedroom or two soon. You may want to rent rather than buy if your needs may change shortly.

Many telecommuters prefer to work from home rather than from a coworking space or coffee shop. You can avoid distractions and boost productivity by choosing a home with a dedicated home office, rather than working from the sofa or dining room table.

Whether you have children or not, many people love having their own outdoor space. It proved a consistent trend during the COVID-19 pandemic. Suburban and rural areas saw a spike in demand as people clambered for outdoor space to call their own.

When you move to a new city, rent for a few months or a year before buying. It takes time to get to know a new city, and giving yourself the luxury of time helps you discover exactly what you want for the long term before you commit.


Visit Before Moving

Word to the wise: Don’t uproot yourself and move across the country or world without visiting your destination first.

It’s all too easy to fall in love with the idea of a place. But your vision of a city and the reality of living there will inevitably clash, so take the time to discover those differences firsthand before you move.

A long weekend spent visiting is better than nothing. A week gives you a better sense, and a month better still.

Walk the streets, talk to the locals, test the Internet speed. Get a sense of the local culture, eat the local food, attend the kind of social and cultural events you would if you lived there. You may find you love it just like you imagined — or you might discover it’s nothing like you envisioned.


Final Word

No one says you have to stay in the first place you move.

Remote work offers endless possibilities and lets you live anywhere in the world. I’ve lived in six U.S. states and five countries, some of which I enjoyed far more than others.

As you design your perfect life, bear in mind it will always be a work in progress. You don’t have to get it exactly right the first time around, and even if you do, your needs and wants will continue to evolve.

Stretch yourself and your comfort zone as you explore ideas for the ideal place to live. Otherwise, you’ll limit yourself to what you already know and remain one of the 72% of Americans who live where they grew up rather than choosing a home that fits the life they truly want.

Source: moneycrashers.com