The Income Needed to Afford Home Payments in 15 Cities

Couple with house key
fizkes / Shutterstock.com

This story originally appeared on SmartAsset.com.

Housing costs eat up more of the average American’s salary each month than any other single expense, reaching about one-third of average expenditures in 2019, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. And while homeownership is coded into the DNA of the American dream, buying a home isn’t easy for many. Car payments, student loans, credit card bills and other debts can make it difficult to qualify for a home loan and keep up with mortgage payments. That’s why SmartAsset analyzed data from the 15 biggest U.S. cities to estimate how much money you will need to make — and not exceed the recommended 36% debt-to-income ratio — to afford monthly home payments.

Our study compares these cities using the following factors: median home value, property tax rate, down payment, homeowners insurance and other monthly non-mortgage debt payments. For details on our data sources and how we put all the information together to create our final rankings, check out the Data and Methodology section below.

This is SmartAsset’s fourth study on the salary needed to afford home payments in the 15 largest U.S. cities. Check out the 2020 version of the study here.

1. San Jose, CA

pbk-pg / Shutterstock.com

Homeowners in San Jose, California, need to have the highest income out of all 15 cities to afford their home payments. Our study shows that they have to earn $143,233 (with no debt) to afford a property with a median home value of $999,900. That income goes up to $159,900 when a homeowner has $500 in monthly debt payments, $168,233 if he or she owes $750 a month and $176,657 with $1,000 of additional monthly debt. On a more affordable note, the property tax rate in San Jose is relatively low, at 0.76%.

2. New York City, NY

New York City homes neighborhood
Tupungato / Shutterstock.com

The Big Apple comes in second, but if you want to buy a home in New York City, you will need to earn at least $98,867 with no additional debt to afford house payments. If you owe $1,000 in monthly debt payments, you will need a salary of $132,200. The median home value in NYC is $680,800, and the median real estate tax bill is $5,633.

3. Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles neighborhood.
Andriy Blokhin / Shutterstock.com

Los Angeles’ median home value is slightly higher than New York City’s and the second-highest in the study ($697,200). The property tax rate, however, is the second-lowest overall – at just 0.68%. If you have no debt, you’ll need to earn at least $98,333 to make home payments and keep your debt-to-income ratio less than 36%. But if you owe $500 each month, you’ll need an income of at least $115,000.

4. San Diego, CA

San Diego home
meunierd / Shutterstock.com

San Diego, California’s median home value is $658,400, fourth-highest in the study. The average property tax rate, however, is third-lowest at 0.69%. If you have monthly debt payments of $1,000 before you take out a mortgage, you’ll need to earn at least $126,367 to afford house payments in San Diego. By comparison, if you have a monthly debt of $750, you will need to make $118,033.

5. Austin, TX

Row houses in Austin, Texas
Tricia Daniel / Shutterstock.com

Austin, Texas, homeowners without debt must earn a minimum of $64,600 to make their housing payments. Their income requirement rises to $81,267 if they have a monthly debt payment of $500. The median home value in Austin is significantly lower when compared with the top four cities on this list, at just $378,300. But the property tax rate is more than twice as high, at 1.75%.

6. Chicago, IL

Chicago row houses at sunset
Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock.com

The median home value in the Windy City is $275,200. Chicago homeowners have to pay a fairly high property tax rate, at 1.54%. If they do not have any monthly debts, they’ll need to earn at least $45,400 to afford monthly home payments without exceeding the 36% debt-to-income ratio. If they owe $1,000 in debt payments outside their mortgage, they’ll need to earn $78,733.

7. Dallas, TX

NicholasGeraldinePhotos / Shutterstock.com

Dallas has the fifth-highest property tax rate in this study, at 1.66%. The median home value in the city is $231,400. Homeowners without debt must earn at least $38,933. But if they owe $750 in monthly debt, they’ll need to make at least $63,933 to afford a mortgage.

8. Charlotte, NC

Home surrounded by greenery in Charlotte,NC.
Jon Bilous / Shutterstock.com

Charlotte, North Carolina, has a median home value of $252,100 and a property tax rate of 0.94%. Homeowners here must earn $37,367 without any additional debt to afford housing payments. If you owe $500 in monthly debt payments outside your mortgage, you’ll need to make at least $54,033 for your housing payments.

9. Fort Worth, TX

Fort Worth Texas
Barbara Smyers / Shutterstock.com

The property tax rate in Fort Worth is 1.98%, the highest rate across all 15 cities. The median home value is $209,400, and homeowners with additional monthly debt payments of $750 need to make $62,100 to live comfortably in this city. By comparison, if their non-mortgage debt obligation is only $500 each month, they will need to earn $53,767.

10. Phoenix, AZ

Aerial view of Phoenix, Arizona
Tim Roberts Photography / Shutterstock.com

The property tax rate in Phoenix, Arizona, is 0.58%, the lowest in this study. The median home value is $266,600. Homeowners can afford making mortgage payments with an income of $36,867 as long as they have no other debt. But if they have $750 in monthly debt payments, they’ll need to earn at least $61,867.

11. Houston, TX

Houston homes neighborhood
Stephanie A Sellers / Shutterstock.com

Houston’s property tax rate, like in the other Texas cities in the top 15, is fairly high — third-highest in the study, in fact — at 1.78%. The median home value, though, is much lower on the list, at $195,800. To afford the home payments without breaking the 36% debt-to-income rule, you’ll need to earn at least $50,267 if you have $500 in other monthly debt. If you’ve managed to stay debt-free before the mortgage, you’ll only need $33,600 in annual income.

12. San Antonio, TX

San Antonio, Texas outdoors
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

The median property tax rate in San Antonio, Texas, is 1.91%, the second-highest property tax rate in the study. The median home value is $171,100. To afford payments on the median San Antonio home, you’ll need to earn at least $29,967 and have no additional debt payments. If you owe a monthly debt of $1,000 outside your mortgage, you’ll need to earn at least $63,300 to afford home payments comfortably.

13. Jacksonville, FL

Jacksonville homes neighborhood
Felix Mizioznikov / Shutterstock.com

Jacksonville, Florida’s median home value is $200,200, and the property tax rate is relatively low at 0.87%. This means that you’ll need to make $29,300 to afford an average house payment as long as you have no additional monthly debt. If you are making other debt payments of $500 each month, you’ll need to earn at least $45,967 to afford home payments in Jacksonville comfortably.

14. Columbus, OH

Columbus, Ohio
aceshot1 / Shutterstock.com

Columbus, Ohio’s property tax rate is 1.60%, and the median home value is $173,300. Homeowners with additional debt payments of $500 each month must earn at least $45,533. Doubling those monthly non-mortgage debt payments to $1,000 means that they’ll need a salary of at least $62,200.

15. Philadelphia, PA

Philadelphia neighborhood homes
AnjelikaGr / Shutterstock.com

The median home value in the city of Brotherly Love is $183,200, and the property tax rate is 0.91%. If you have no other debt, you’ll need a salary of at least $27,000 to make home payments in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. If you owe $750 in monthly debt payments outside your mortgage, you will have to earn a minimum of $52,000 per year.

Data and Methodology

Business woman working from home in a dress
Alissa Kumarova / Shutterstock.com

To find the minimum required salary to afford home payments in the 15 largest U.S. cities, we used data from the U.S. Census Bureau. First, we took the median home value in each city and calculated the cost of a 20% down payment. We then used the average real estate taxes paid in each city and the median home value to find the average property tax rate. Using those figures and our mortgage calculator, we found the average monthly home payment in each city assuming a homebuyer would get a 30-year mortgage with a 3% interest rate for 80% of the home value (the balance after paying a 20% down payment). We also factored in an annual homeowners insurance payment of 0.35%.

After finding the average monthly home payment, we calculated the income needed to make those payments while not exceeding a 36% debt-to-income ratio. We also considered the necessary income to make home payments based on prospective homebuyer debt levels, which ranged from no monthly debt payments to debt payments totaling $1,000 per month.

We ranked each city from the highest minimum income (with no additional debt) needed to afford home payments to the lowest minimum income (with no additional debt) needed. Median home values and median household incomes are from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 1-year American Community Survey.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

President Biden could reduce FHA mortgage insurance premiums. Here’s what it means for you

FHA mortgage insurance might get cheaper this year

“Mortgage industry abuzz with speculation of FHA MIP cut,” stated one trade magazine on January 28. And that journalist was right.

Many insiders are confidently predicting a big cut in the Federal Housing Administration’s (FHA’s) annual mortgage insurance rates.

FHA borrowers currently pay 0.85% annually in mortgage insurance premiums (MIP). That’s $1,700 per year, or $140 per month, on a $200,000 mortgage.

So it’s no wonder a possible MIP rate cut is big news. It could help new home buyers and refinancing homeowners save big on their housing payments.

Verify your FHA loan eligibility (Feb 8th, 2021)

Why experts think Biden will lower mortgage insurance premiums

Lowering FHA mortgage insurance rates isn’t a new idea from President Biden. It’s a holdover from former President Obama’s agenda.

American Banker magazine explains “The Department of Housing and Urban Development under former President Barack Obama had announced a scheduled 25-basis-point [0.25%] reduction in the FHA’s annual mortgage insurance premiums just before President Donald Trump took office.”

But Trump reversed this change at the start of his term, leaving FHA MIP rates at 0.85% per year.

Now, says American Banker, “observers expect the Biden administration to follow through on that 25-basis-point cut and potentially go even further.”

Lowering FHA MIP costs would be right in line with President Biden’s goals of expanding affordable housing opportunities for low- and middle-income families.

Of course, this is only speculation for now. No official announcements have been made.

But the pervasiveness of the rumor — and the absence of denials from the administration — mean a change seems likely.

So potential home buyers and FHA homeowners should be aware of what the (potential) change would mean for them.

What an MIP reduction could mean for you 

There’s good news and bad news.

The bad news is that if you already have an FHA loan if and when the reduction takes effect, you won’t see any savings. You would have to refinance into a new FHA loan to see the reduction.

The good news is that if you haven’t applied for an FHA loan yet if/when the cut is announced, you can likely take advantage of the new, lower fees.

But just how much would home buyers and refinancers stand to save?

A 25-basis-point reduction means MIP rates would fall by 0.25%. So you’d be paying 0.6% of your loan balance each year instead of the 0.85% that nearly all FHA borrowers now pay now.

These mortgage insurance rates are calculated annually but charged monthly.

Example: 0.25% MIP rate cut

Let’s say you plan to borrow $200,000 with an FHA loan. Your MIP rate at current levels would be 0.85%, making an annual charge of $1,700 — or $140 per month.

Now let’s assume the new MIP rate falls to 0.6%.

Your annual charge tumbles to $1,200. And your new monthly MIP cost would be exactly $100 per month.

That’s a saving of $500 a year, which few of us would sneeze at. But there’s a possibility that the savings could be even bigger.

Example: 0.50% MIP rate cut

American Banker wondered whether the Biden administration might “potentially go even further.”

So how does the math work if annual MIP rates were to be cut a little more — to 0.5%?

Assuming the same $200,000 loan, a 0.5% rate would reduce the annual payment to $1,000. And that would make the monthly payment just $83 versus $140 per month at current levels.

That would save you $700 a year over your current payment.

Rates haven’t changed yet…

Remember: this is just speculation. Unless and until an official announcement is made, you should continue to budget for your full, existing 0.85% MIP rate.

But if you’re considering a home purchase or refinance later this year, you should keep an eye out for news from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

If a change is announced, it could be worth waiting on that application until you can secure the lower rate.

Verify your FHA loan eligibility (Feb 8th, 2021)

What happens to existing FHA loans?

Homeowners with an existing FHA loan may not benefit from lower mortgage insurance premiums right away.

An MIP rate reduction likely would not change the terms of your current mortgage.

So if a change is announced, you’d have to refinance into a new FHA loan to take advantage of MIP savings.

Keep Streamline Refinancing in mind

The good news is that FHA borrowers may well be in line for an FHA Streamline Refinance — a simplified, low-doc refi program.

FHA Streamline loans typically come with minimum paperwork, low costs, and no credit check. You likely won’t need a new home appraisal or income verification.

However, you’ll have to pay closing costs yourself — only the upfront mortgage insurance charge can be rolled into the loan balance.

And cashing out is not allowed with the FHA Streamline program. If you want cash-back with your refinance, you’ll need the FHA cash-out loan, which requires full underwriting.

How the MIP cut could contribute to the FHA Streamline “net tangible benefit” rule

Right now, FHA Streamline Refinances have a requirement that you gain a ‘net tangible benefit’ (some clear monetary advantage) as a result of using one.

This typically means you need to lower your ‘combined rate’ (mortgage interest plus mortgage insurance) by at least 0.5%.

Say the Biden administration does cut MIP rates by 0.25%. Under the current rule, you’d also need to lower your mortgage interest rate by 0.25% to be eligible for Streamline Refinancing.

But with rates trending downward through 2020 and into 2021, it’s quite likely that a 0.25% reduction is in reach.

But do keep in mind that your current FHA loan has to be at least 210 days old before you’re allowed to refinance.

When could the change take place?

Some mortgage industry insiders are expecting an announcement during President Joe Biden’s first 100 days in office. And they may be proved right.

But there’s a reason we rarely quote speculation from mortgage industry insiders. They’re often wrong.

And the fact is, nobody outside the government knows whether there will be an announcement at all, let alone its likely date. Which raises an important question: What are you supposed to do with this information?

What are you supposed to do with this information?

We wouldn’t be sharing this speculation with you if we didn’t think there was a good chance of the rate cut really happening. But there’s no guarantee it will.

So you probably shouldn’t change immediate plans to purchase a home or refinance.

Today’s FHA mortgage rates are at historic lows — and your interest rate has a much bigger impact on your total loan cost than your mortgage insurance rate.

If you wait on a rate cut and miss today’s low interest rates, it could negate your savings. You could also risk losing out on your dream home by waiting for financing.

Keep in mind, you only need to wait 210 days — about 7 months — from your FHA home purchase or refinance before you can refinance again.

If Biden does cut MIP rates, the change will be long-term. So you can always refinance if it makes financial sense for you to do so later on.

Verify your FHA loan eligibility (Feb 8th, 2021)

Will other aspects of FHA loans change?

Most people who opt for an FHA loan do so because it’s the easiest, most affordable path to homeownership that’s open to them.

American Banker describes FHA borrowers as, “traditionally first-time homebuyers and largely minorities and lower-income earners.”

And they choose FHA loans because they can get approved with lower credit scores and higher existing debts than Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and other conventional loans usually allow.

None of that’s likely to change if the Biden administration comes through with the rumored changes.

The only difference should be the amount these borrowers have to pay for their annual mortgage insurance.

Remember, there’s also an upfront mortgage insurance (UFMIP) fee equal to 1.75% of the loan amount. Most borrowers roll this into their loan balance so they don’t have to pay it at closing.

So far, we haven’t heard talk of the UFMIP rate changing — only the annual mortgage insurance premium of 0.85%.

The bottom line

An FHA MIP reduction would be a great win for borrowers, helping to keep monthly housing costs low.

If you plan to buy a home or refinance via an FHA loan later this year, there’s a good chance you could see lower mortgage insurance premiums.

But if you’re already in the process of buying or refinancing, we don’t recommend waiting on news of lower MIP rates. You’re likely to see bigger savings by taking advantage of today’s ultra-low mortgage rates.

Verify your new rate (Feb 8th, 2021)

Source: themortgagereports.com

Salary Needed to Afford Home Payments in the 15 Largest U.S. Cities – 2021 Edition

Salary Needed to Afford Home Payments in the 15 Largest U.S. Cities – 2021 Edition – SmartAsset

Tap on the profile icon to edit
your financial details.

Housing costs eat up more of the average American’s salary each month than any other single expense, reaching about one third of average expenditures in 2019, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And while homeownership is coded into the DNA of the American Dream, buying a home isn’t easy for many. Car payments, student loans, credit card bills and other debts can make it difficult to qualify for a home loan and keep up with mortgage payments. That’s why SmartAsset analyzed data from the 15 biggest U.S. cities to estimate how much money you will need to make – and not exceed the recommended 36% debt-to-income ratio – to afford monthly home payments.

Our study compares these cities using the following factors: median home value, property tax rate, down payment, homeowners insurance and other monthly non-mortgage debt payments. For details on our data sources and how we put all the information together to create our final rankings, check out the Data and Methodology section below.

This is SmartAsset’s fourth study on the salary needed to afford home payments in the 15 largest U.S. cities. Check out the 2020 version of the study here.

Key Findings

  • California is expensive. Three California cities – San Jose, Los Angeles and San Diego – are included in the 15 largest U.S. cities, and they all rank within the top four of this study, at first, third and fourth, respectively (with New York City claiming second place). Our findings show that living in California can be very costly if you want to own a home. The average salary (with no additional debt) needed to afford home payments across these three cities is $111,533.
  • Home prices vary by more than 5x. Homes in big cities are usually more expensive than homes in suburbs or small towns. But our study reveals that there is also a big difference among the 15 largest U.S. cities. The highest median home value on our list is higher than five times more expensive than the lowest. San Jose, California has a median home value of almost $1 million, while San Antonio, Texas has a median home value of just $171,100.

1. San Jose, CA

Homeowners in San Jose, California need to have the highest income out of all 15 cities to afford their home payments. Our study shows that they have to earn $143,233 (with no debt) to afford a property with a median home value of $999,900. That income goes up to $159,900 when a homeowner has $500 in monthly debt payments, $168,233 if he or she owes $750 a month and $176,657 with $1,000 of additional monthly debt. On a more affordable note, the property tax rate in San Jose is relatively low, at 0.76%.

2. New York, NY

The Big Apple comes in second, but if you want to buy a home in New York City, you will need to earn at least $98,867 with no additional debt to afford house payments. If you owe $1,000 in monthly debt payments, you will need to make $132,200. The median home value in NYC is $680,800, and the median real estate tax bill is $5,633.

3. Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles’ median home value is slightly higher than New York City’s and the second-highest in the study ($697,200). The property tax rate, however, is the second-lowest overall – at just 0.68%. If you have no debt, you’ll need to earn at least $98,333 to make home payments and keep your debt-to-income ratio less than 36%. But if you owe $500 each month, you’ll need an income of at least $115,000.

4. San Diego, CA

San Diego, California’s median home value is $658,400, fourth-highest in the study. The average property tax rate, however, is third-lowest at 0.69%. If you have monthly debt payments of $1,000 before you take out a mortgage, you’ll need to earn at least $126,367 to afford house payments in San Diego. By comparison, if you have a monthly debt of $750, you will need to make $118,033.

5. Austin, TX

Austin, Texas homeowners without debt must earn a minimum of $64,600 to make their housing payments. Their income requirements rise to $81,267 if they have a monthly debt payment of $500. The median home value in Austin is significantly lower when compared to the top four cities on this list, at just $378,300. But the property tax rate is more than twice as high, at 1.75%.

6. Chicago, IL

The median home value in the Windy City is $275,200. Chicago homeowners have to pay a fairly high property tax rate, at 1.54%. If they do not have any monthly debts, they’ll need to earn at least $45,400 to afford monthly home payments without exceeding the 36% debt-to-income ratio. If they owe $1,000 in debt payments outside of their mortgage, they’ll need to earn $78,733.

7. Dallas, TX

Dallas has the fifth-highest property tax rate in this study, at 1.66%. The median home value in the city is $231,400. Homeowners without a debt must earn at least $38,933. But if they owe $750 in monthly debt, they’ll need to make at least $63,933 to afford a mortgage.

8. Charlotte, NC

Charlotte, North Carolina has a median home value of $252,100 and a property tax rate of 0.94%. Homeowners here must earn $37,367 without any additional debt to afford housing payments. If you owe $500 in monthly debt payments outside of your mortgage, you’ll need to make at least $54,033 for your housing payments.

9. Forth Worth, TX

The property tax rate in Fort Worth is 1.98%, the highest rate across all 15 cities. The median home value is $209,400, and homeowners with additional monthly debt payments of $750 need to make $62,100 to live comfortably in this city. By comparison, if their non-mortgage debt payments are only $500 each month, they will need to earn $53,767.

10. Phoenix, AZ

The property tax rate in Phoenix, Arizona is 0.58%, the lowest in this study. The median home value is $266,600. Homeowners can afford making mortgage payments with an income of $36,867 as long as they have no other debt. But if they have $750 in monthly debt payments, they’ll need earn at least $61,867.

11. Houston, TX

Houston’s property tax rate, like in the other Texan cities in the top 15, is fairly high – third-highest in the study, in fact, at 1.78%. The median home value, though, is much lower on the list, at $195,800. To afford the home payments without breaking the 36% debt-to-income rule, you’ll need to earn at least $50,267 if you have $500 in other monthly debt payments. If you’ve managed to stay debt-free before the mortgage, you’ll only need $33,600 in annual income.

12. San Antonio, TX

The median property tax rate in San Antonio, Texas is 1.91%, the second-highest property tax rate in the study. The median home value is $171,100. To afford payments on the median San Antonio home, you’ll need to earn at least $29,967 and have no additional debt payments. If you owe a monthly debt of $1,000 outside of your mortgage, you’ll need to earn at least $63,300 to afford home payments comfortably.

13. Jacksonville, FL

Jacksonville, Florida’s median home value is $200,200, and the property tax rate is relatively low at 0.87%. This means that you’ll need to make $29,300 to afford an average house payment as long as you have no additional monthly debt. If you are making other debt payments of $500 each month, you’ll need to earn at least $45,967 to afford home payments in Jacksonville comfortably.

14. Columbus, OH

Columbus, Ohio’s property tax rate is 1.60%, and the median home value is $173,300. Homeowners with additional debt payments of $500 each month must earn at least $45,533. Doubling monthly non-mortgage debt payments to $1,000 means that they’ll need a salary of at least $62,200.

15. Philadelphia, PA

The median home value in the city of Brotherly Love is $183,200, and the property tax rate is 0.91%. If you have no other debt, you’ll need a salary of at least $27,000 to make home payments in Philadelphia. If you owe $750 in monthly debt payments outside of your mortgage, you will have to earn a minimum of $52,000 per year.

Data and Methodology

To find the minimum required salary to afford home payments in the 15 largest U.S. cities, we used data from the U.S. Census Bureau. First, we took the median home value in each city and calculated the cost of a 20% down payment. We then used the average real estate taxes paid in each city and the median home value to find the average property tax rate. Using those figures and our mortgage calculator, we found the average monthly home payment in each city assuming a homebuyer would get a 30-year mortgage with a 3% interest rate for 80% of the home value (the balance after paying a 20% down payment). We also factored in an annual homeowners insurance payment of 0.35%.

After finding the average monthly home payment, we calculated the income needed to make those payments while not exceeding a 36% debt-to-income ratio. We also considered the necessary income to make home payments based on prospective homebuyer debt levels, which ranged from no monthly debt payments to debt payments totaling $1,000 per month.

We ranked each city from the highest minimum income (with no additional debt) needed to afford home payments to the lowest minimum income (with no additional debt) needed. Median home values and median household incomes are from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 1-year American Community Survey.

Tips for Homeownership

  • Feel at home in your finances with a trusted advisor. Want to buy a house and make sure your finances stay sound? Consider working with a financial advisor. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with financial advisors in your area in five minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors, get started now.
  • Be realistic. Make sure you know how much house you can afford before you even start looking at homes so you don’t fall in love with a unit that is above your price range.
  • Budgeting is key. If you want to start saving for a down payment, make a budget and designate a certain amount to put aside for that each month.

Questions about our study? Contact press@smartasset.com.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/KenWiedemann

Ben Geier, CEPF® Ben Geier is an experienced financial writer currently serving as a retirement and investing expert at SmartAsset. His work has appeared on Fortune, Mic.com and CNNMoney. Ben is a graduate of Northwestern University and a part-time student at the City University of New York Graduate Center. He is a member of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing and a Certified Educator in Personal Finance (CEPF®). When he isn’t helping people understand their finances, Ben likes watching hockey, listening to music and experimenting in the kitchen. Originally from Alexandria, VA, he now lives in Brooklyn with his wife.
Read next article

About Our Home Buying Expert

Have a question? Ask our Home Buying expert.

smartasset.com

10 million U.S. renters are behind on their monthly payments

The economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is hitting renters hard, with more than 18% of U.S. renters saying that it’s caused them to fall behind on their monthly housing payments.

That’s according to a study by Moody’s Analytics and the Urban Institute, which says around 10 million renters missed rental payments in the last year, CNBC reported.

As renters continue to struggle, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently extended its eviction moratorium through the end of March. Meanwhile, $25 billion in rental assistance to renters and property owners started being released to states last week.

Despite the aid being promised, housing groups say it’s not clear who is eligible to receive these funds. Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, and Jim Parrott, a fellow at the Urban Institute, said in their study that around 6.3 million renters will still be behind on their payments in March, even with this help.

The report found that the average delinquent renter owes $5,600 in missed rental payments and unpaid utility bills, representing around four months of missed payments.

“Compared to renters who are making their rent payments on time, currently delinquent renters are more likely to be lower-income, less educated, Black, and with children,” Zandi and Parrott said. They warned that “eviction is a serious possibility” for those who can’t make up their missed payments.

Housing groups say that extending the eviction moratorium is not sufficient on its own. They say that property owners need more help too. Since the start of the pandemic, several groups including the National Association of Realtors have pushed for more assistance to help landlords, who must still pay the mortgages on their properties.

In its $1.9 trillion COVID-19 stimulus package, the new administration under President Joe Biden has proposed $25 billion in additional rental assistance, but housing groups say it might not be enough.

“Allocated rental assistance funds do not fully address the $70 billion in outstanding debt nor accruing debt moving forward,” said the National Multifamily Housing Council. “The industry simply cannot continue operation under these policies without disastrous harm to housing affordability.”

Source: realtybiznews.com