How to Retire in Poland: Costs, Visas and More

How to Retire in Poland: Costs, Visas and More – SmartAsset

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For those exploring a retirement abroad, Poland has plenty to offer the budget-savvy retiree. Poland is a relatively low-cost retirement destination when compared with some of its European nation neighbors, even in its capital, Warsaw. You’ll find that the country sits at centuries-old crossroads between Western and Eastern Europe, blending the best of their architectures, foods and cultures.

If you want to retire in Poland, speak to a financial advisor to help you reach your retirement goals and needs. 

Cost of Living and Housing

The cost-of-living database Numbeo says that consumer prices in Poland are roughly 41.53% more affordable than in the U.S., when you exclude rent. If you factor in rent, the cost of living in the eastern European country is 55.60% lower than in the U.S. This makes Poland an attractive destination for American retirees who are looking to cut spending and live off a pension comfortably.

For a specific comparison, let’s take a look at the Eastern European capital Warsaw, Poland’s most populous city. Rent in this capital is significantly lower than in New York City — 74.76% less. If you rent a one-bedroom apartment in Warsaw’s city center, you will pay approximately $772.02 each month. But if you rent a one-bedroom in New York City’s center, it will cost you roughly four times more — $3,269.65.

If you want to compare the cost of living in Warsaw with other big U.S. cities, consumer prices, including rent, are 53.38% lower than in Los Angeles, 47.57% lower than in Chicago, 32.81% lower than in Houston, and 31.73% lower than in Phoenix.

And if you are interested in comparing the cost of living in Warsaw with popular U.S. retirement cities, consumer prices, including rent, are 34.57% lower than in Orlando, 41.04% lower than in Tampa, 44.72% lower than in Charleston and 48.19% lower than Miami.

Poland has a lot to offer, especially if you’re looking for a cost-effective place to retire.

Retire in Poland: Visas and Residence Permit

U.S. citizens are allowed visa-free entry into Poland for up to 90 days. But to become a legal resident in the Eastern European country, you will have to contact a Polish consulate in the U.S. to apply for a temporary or flat residence permit. You may have to show proof of sufficient funds to support your stay, so make sure that all of your documentation is in order.

When your residency permit has been approved, you’ll receive a residency card that will help you find housing and pay your taxes. The first residence permit’s lifespan is only up to three years, but it can be renewed for longer periods.

Once you’ve lived in Poland for about five years, you will have the opportunity to pursue a permanent residence. This comes with two conditions: stable income and a property you either rent or own that you live in. Your permanent residence card then has to be renewed every 10 years.

Keep in mind that you will have to pay some base processing fees for your permit application, and they depend on the type. So, prepare to pay upwards of $120 for yours.

Retire in Poland: Healthcare

Article 68 in Poland’s constitution guarantees free medical care and hospital stay for all of its citizens. The eastern European country’s health service is financed through a national health fund, and American retirees could join that fund to get emergency care and coverage for pre-existing conditions.

Many Polish citizens use private insurance to supplement their public health care coverage. While Poland’s public facilities have more treatment options than their private health center counterparts, private insurance allows covered individuals to sometimes get medical appointments and treatments faster.

Expats will have to obtain a personal identification number (PESEL) before they can apply for public health insurance. And they should also consider looking into private medical insurance to get the most comprehensive coverage for their health needs.

Retire in Poland: Taxes

Like many European countries, Poland has different income tax regulations based on your residency status. Those who are naturalized are taxed on their worldwide income, whereas non-residents are only taxed on income earned from solely Polish sources. So, if your employer is not a Polish resident, you are not subject to the income tax.

However, you can expect to pay a flat-rate tax for approximately 20% of your revenue during the first 183 days of the tax year in Poland. After you have resided in the country longer than six months, you will be subject to the same progressive tax rates as a resident, ranging between 18% and 32%.

Note that even when you’ve paid your taxes accordingly to your residence status in Poland, you will still have to file a U.S. tax return.

Retire in Poland: Safety

The U.S. Department of State says that Poland has a low crime level. This implies that both citizens and foreign nationals can live and travel in the Eastern European country with relative safety. General precautions are advised, as in other countries, to avoid crimes that as infrequent as they may be could target tourists and other expats. You should also note that crime in Poland is still significantly lower than in the U.S., and the public healthcare system can be a valuable safety net for unexpected travel injuries and other physical accidents.

Bottom Line

Poland is one of Europe’s most affordable retirement destinations, and it keeps up with neighboring nations in healthcare and culture. Expats will find the Eastern European country both safe and comfortable, easy to travel in and one in which they can enjoy a slower pace of life while remaining very connected with nature.

Tips to Help You Afford Retirement

  • If you have the option to move abroad for retirement, a financial advisor can help you understand all the moving parts of relocation, including the tax implications. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with local financial advisors in your area within 5 minutes. If you’re ready to speak with an advisor that will help you hit your financial goals, get started now.
  • You could comfortably retire in Poland, even in its capital, with the average Social Security income of $1,500 per month. For some, the value of your Social Security benefit can cover your cost of living depending on the area you settle in. Use SmartAsset’s Social Security calculator to estimate your benefit amount.
  • Whether you want to retire comfortably abroad or in the U.S., both an IRA or a 401(k) plan will offer you tax benefits, and help you grow your retirement savings with compound interest.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Marcus Lindstrom, ©iStock.com/udmurd_PL, ©iStock.com/PIKSEL

Ashley Chorpenning Ashley Chorpenning is an experienced financial writer currently serving as an investment and insurance expert at SmartAsset. In addition to being a contributing writer at SmartAsset, she writes for solo entrepreneurs as well as for Fortune 500 companies. Ashley is a finance graduate of the University of Cincinnati. When she isn’t helping people understand their finances, you may find Ashley cage diving with great whites or on safari in South Africa.
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