How to Create or Claim Your Small-Business Listing on Manta

Manta.com is one of the most popular local business information websites in the United States. According to its own data, Manta draws about 11 million unique visitors per month and boasts more than 5 million small, mostly local businesses in its database — a significant fraction of all U.S.-based small businesses with physical storefronts.

Does this site’s popularity mean you, a small-business owner eager to reach more potential customers in your hometown (and perhaps beyond) should invest the time and effort necessary to create, optimize, and maintain a Manta listing?

Perhaps. It depends on what type of business you operate, how much effort you can devote to your listing, and whether business directory websites like Manta truly complement your marketing efforts — or whether you’d do just fine without them.

Pros & Cons of Creating a Listing on Manta.com

Does it make sense to create a small-business listing on Manta.com? This is the first question you need to ask before putting in the effort to create your Manta listing.

The truth is, Manta works better for certain types of businesses. Its most popular searches relate to customer-facing service businesses, such as retailers, restaurants, bars, entertainment venues, and others:

  • Automotive businesses
  • Hotels and travel services
  • Beauty shops and spas
  • Cleaning services
  • Plumbing, electrical, and other trade services
  • General contracting services
  • Health and medical

Like many other business information directory sites, Manta sorts listed companies geographically, down to the municipality or neighborhood level. This is vital for location-bound businesses, such as restaurants and brick-and-mortar retailers, that cater mostly or exclusively to local customers.

Manta is less useful, although not entirely useless, for companies that don’t rely on physical locations or local marketing to drive sales. E-commerce businesses that sell through platforms like Shopify or Etsy and rely more on word of mouth and social media marketing aren’t guaranteed to find Manta and its ilk valuable.

Pros of Listing Your Business on Manta

Why create a business profile on Manta? Advantages include the inherent legitimacy of a claimed business listing, SEO benefits, and the importance of sites like Manta in customers’ research process.

1. Claiming Your Listing Makes Your Business Seem More Legitimate

Manta’s “Claim This Listing” button makes clear which of its listings are “claimed” — acknowledged and maintained by the featured business — and which are not.

The simple act of claiming your business, therefore, confers substantial legitimacy upon it, if only because doing so shows Manta-using consumers that you care enough about your establishment to take two minutes to make its listing your own. Rightly or wrongly, consumers might take an unclaimed listing as a sign you aren’t really interested in attracting new customers.

I’m guilty of this myself. All else being equal, I try to avoid businesses with unclaimed online directory listings unless I know of them by other means — such as word of mouth — or they’re part of a recognizable business franchise that I trust.

2. Manta Listings Are Good for SEO

Popular search engines’ ranking algorithms have a “black box” quality to them — no one knows exactly how they work except the people responsible for them — and maybe not even they do. Still, conduct 10 Google searches for 10 of your favorite local businesses and you’re liable to deduce that business directory sites like Manta rank well in organic search results — the list of results you see below the paid search ads on search engines like Google or Bing.

Moreover, Manta’s featured product or service pages often rank separately from the main directory pages. This means that your Manta listing could end up being responsible for several discrete search results, depending on how many featured products or service pages it appears on.

The bottom line is this: Unless your business’s name is easily confused with common or generic terms (“Quality Plumbing,” “Fast Oil Change,” “Tasty Sandwiches”), your Manta listing is likely to appear on Google’s or Bing’s first results page of a search engine. This is crucial because many consumers never venture past the first results page.

3. Consumers Rely Heavily on Directory Listings for Research

If you thought a PCMag study that found roughly 40% of online reviews to be fake would deter shoppers from relying on them, you’d be wrong. According to a 2017 ReportLinker survey, 60% of consumers give online reviews as much weight as recommendations from real-world acquaintances.

Setting aside the question of whether this is a wise policy for consumers to abide by, it’s a compelling case for taking the time to maintain listings on business directory sites with user-generated reviews, such as Manta.

Cons of Listing Your Business on Manta

Manta is a useful part of many a business’s online presences, but it’s not appropriate for every enterprise. Drawbacks include the time and resources involved in maintaining a profile and the fact that listings display potentially sensitive information — which may, in turn, invite abuse.

1. Maintaining Your Profile Takes Time and Effort

Although the initial step of claiming your Manta listing takes just a few minutes, keeping your listing optimized and up-to-date requires real ongoing work. Uploading photos, analyzing user data, responding to reviews, changing listing information that’s no longer relevant — all these activities take time and effort.

If you have an online store, other business directory listings, and multiple social media accounts, staying on top of your digital presence could prove overwhelming.

And, if you’re a cash-poor small business without the means to hire a part- or full-time marketing employee or social media manager, or even work with an outside PR or marketing firm, you’ll need to do this work yourself. If you can — otherwise, there’s no shame in waiting until your business has grown a bit to invest in a first-rate directory profile.

2. May Not Be a Great Resource for User Reviews

Although Manta never experienced the sorts of high-profile fake review scandals that bedeviled Yelp in the late 2000s and early 2010s, the platform is certainly mindful of the potential for inauthentic reviews to interfere with and dilute genuine user feedback.

Indeed, Manta and reputable business directory sites like it take measures to combat fraudulent reviews that can at times be overzealous — filtering out real reviews that you might want your customers to see.

Separately but relatedly, many Manta business listings simply don’t have many user-generated reviews, making them less useful for consumer research. Many of my favorite businesses — enterprises I know to be legitimate — have zero Manta reviews, likely through no fault of their own.

If you want to ensure your customers see every review of your business, good or bad, you’re better off investing in a more “social” directory like Facebook or Yelp.

3. Directory Listings Contain Sensitive Information

Certain types of businesses, such as restaurants and brick-and-mortar retailers, have no choice but to reveal their business addresses, phone numbers, and other basic bits of important-if-sensitive information. Customer-facing businesses like these can’t survive in anonymity.

That said, other types of local businesses — including those that make house calls, like home service providers — might prefer to conceal their physical locations, and possibly contact information, from the public. For example, you might not want your clients to know that you work out of a home office or coworking hub rather than an office suite.

To be clear, if an unclaimed listing exists for your business, it may well list your true place of business, be it a residential address, coworking space, or virtual office. You’ll need to claim your listing to remove this information — but once that’s done, you can feel free to let it lapse.

4. Your Listing Could Attract Abuse

There’s a small but real possibility that your listing could become a forum for abusive or hateful reviews or feedback from misguided customers — and, potentially, members of the public with no connection to your business.

Unlike some online retailers, business directory sites like Manta tend not to require would-be reviewers to verify that they’ve patronized a listed business in the past. This makes it easier than it should be for people with a political agenda or personal grievances to single out individual businesses for criticism.

When they occur, such campaigns typically revolve around controversial actions or stances taken by the targeted business’s owners or employees. For example, in early 2015, the owners of an Indiana pizzeria made headlines for publicly announcing that they’d follow their state’s recently passed Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which was widely interpreted to condone discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

The stance prompted a backlash that saw thousands of comments, some of which were obscene and threatening, posted to the restaurant’s website. Citing safety concerns, the shop closed shortly thereafter, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Reasonable people can disagree with the restaurant owners’ politics without condoning threats to their and their employees’ safety. And, even if you have no plans to publicly announce your business’s support for controversial legislation, your digital presence might nevertheless become a venue for customers to air their grievances.

If you’d rather not deal with such backlash, perhaps it’s best to lay low.


How to Claim or Create Your Manta.com Listing

Follow these processes and tips to claim or create your Manta business listing.

Claiming an Existing Business Listing

Manta uses user-submitted and publicly available information to generate business listings, which legitimate owners can claim. Claiming your Manta profile allows you to do the following:

  • Update Your Listing Information. Claiming your listing unlocks the ability to edit your business name, contact information, business hours, brands carried, payment accepted, business categories (such as “doctors’ offices”), and other basic information. You can also add a brief, customized description of what your business does and provide links to your company website or social media pages.
  • Add Logos and Photos. You can upload your business’s logo or another representative photograph to appear at the top of your listing.
  • Highlight Products or Services. Basic Manta profiles allow for three highly detailed product or service pages, which are useful for describing core or high-value offerings to prospective customers. You can add photos, list prices or price ranges, and include a “Purchase Info” button, which prompts visitors to take a specific action like “call for a free quote.”

Manta has a good primer on claiming a legitimate business listing. To finalize your listing claim and any changes you’ve made, you’ll need to create a user account with your email address, Facebook account, or Google account. If you create a listing with an email address, you’ll need to input your full name, email, and a unique username and password.

If desired, you can add a headshot. Your profile doesn’t contain a ton of personal information about you — it’s more about managing your own business listing, recommendations for other businesses, and account privacy.

Once your profile is created, you can find out whether your business is listed by searching Manta’s database for your exact business name and city. If a listing already exists, click the “Verify Now” button next to it to sync it with your personal profile.

Unlike Yelp, Manta doesn’t require verification of ownership, but you can follow a similar process to earn a “Verified” badge, which Manta claims confers legitimacy. With your listing synced to your profile, you can begin editing and improving to your heart’s content.

Creating a New Listing

If your business isn’t yet listed, simply click the “Add Business” button that appears at the top of every Manta page. Doing so leads you to a form to list your company, where you’ll fill out some basic information about your business: exact company name, exact location, and contact details. This unlocks your listing and syncs it with your personal profile.


How to Optimize Your Manta Listing

Use these tips and resources to optimize your Manta listing once it’s claimed or created:

1. Create a Compelling “About Us” Section

A detailed About Us section is great for boosting your page’s visibility on search engine results pages. Use Google Keyword Planner or a similar tool to identify keywords that your business already ranks for, and then sprinkle them into your About Us copy.

Make sure your About Us is comprehensive, but not awash in detail — the goal is to create a high-level look at your business that shows why you’re different from the competition without overwhelming the reader with granularity.

2. Take Full Advantage of the Product and Service Showcases

Manta lets you highlight up to three products, services, or packages on separate pages within your listing, and there’s no reason not to take full advantage. Focus on popular, preferably high-margin products and services that somehow stand out from what the competition offers. Include images, pricing information, and keywords — check Google Keyword Planner.

3. List as Many Contacts and Links as Possible

In addition to your main business phone number and company website link, include as many relevant contact numbers and web property links as necessary to provide one-stop access to your entire business.

If your business has multiple departments — such as a dining room, bakery, and catering service — provide names and direct lines for the manager of each. Likewise, link to each of your social media properties and your online store, if you have one.

4. Solicit and Curate Customer Recommendations

Manta doesn’t make customer feedback a core part of its appeal. Manta frowns upon customer feedback manipulation, so don’t offer special deals to customers who provide glowing recommendations.

However, it does still allow customers to leave what are essentially reviews on companies’ directory listings, so you can certainly ask and encourage customers to leave feedback if they wish.

5. Use Educational and Social Resources

Manta publishes educational articles on how to get the most out of your Manta profile, as well as general tips on running and marketing your business. It also hosts discussion forums that allow you to connect with other Manta users, talk about your experience on the platform, and seek out advice from more experienced users.


Final Word

Manta isn’t the only free business listing site that small-business owners like you should consider using. Dozens of other sites, including some you’ve probably heard of — Yelp, for example — can increase your company’s name recognition and promote its services to more potential customers than you’d reach via more expensive marketing channels.

Not all such sites are created equal, of course. Some are free or nearly so, while others require a one-time fee or monthly subscription. And many are ill-suited to certain types of businesses or have other drawbacks that might give you pause.

Instead of spending time and money chasing after every directory site that might possibly help your business, take some time to research the most popular options and develop a narrower, more manageable list that works within the constraints of your marketing plan and budget.

Along the way, feel free to speak with peers and competitors about their own experiences on these platforms, assuming they’re willing to talk. With so much else on your plate, you certainly don’t need to make an investment that has little chance of paying off.

Source: moneycrashers.com

5 IRA Mistakes You May Be Making

This article provides information and education for investors. NerdWallet does not offer advisory or brokerage services, nor does it recommend or advise investors to buy or sell particular stocks or securities.

For some investors, IRAs may be long-term, hands-off investment vehicles. That doesn’t mean you should ignore them completely. This year, give a little love to your IRA and make sure you’re not making these common mistakes.

1. Not taking enough risk

We often talk about risk as a bad thing, but it isn’t always a four-letter word, financial advisors say. A young investor who isn’t planning to touch their IRA for 20 or 30 years should have enough time to weather near-term market swings, meaning they could take on more risk in exchange for potentially higher long-term returns. Advisors say such a portfolio could comprise mostly stocks — or even all stocks — instead of splitting the allocation between stocks and bonds. (Learn more about how to choose investments for your IRA.)

“When it comes to investing, the most powerful commodity is time. However, time is only useful if you know what to do with it,” says Dejan Ilijevski, an investment advisor at Sabela Capital Markets in Munster, Indiana. “Investing in an asset allocation that’s not right for you can be detrimental for your investment success over the long term.”

Simply put, too conservative of a portfolio now could potentially limit returns down the road, making it more difficult to hit your retirement goals. However, it’s equally important to rebalance your portfolio away from those riskier assets as you get closer to retirement.

2. Failing to fully fund your IRA every year

We get it. Long-term IRA investing isn’t as exciting as trading in a taxable brokerage account. But if you’re investing more in a taxable account without first maxing out your tax-advantaged IRA, experts might want a word with you.

By not fully funding your IRA first (that means contributing $6,000 in 2021 if you’re under 50 years old), you’re forgoing enormous tax advantages and the potential opportunity for that money to compound tax-free, says Robert Johnson, a chartered financial analyst and CEO at Economic Index Associates in Omaha, Nebraska.

“Too often people fail to realize the huge advantages of a tax-deferred account, instead investing in a taxable account,” Johnson says. “These advantages are greatest for those with the longest time horizons to retirement.”

Speaking of taxes, it’s also important to know the differences between traditional and Roth IRAs. In short, traditional IRA contributions are tax-deductible, while withdrawals are taxable. Roth IRA contributions are not tax-deductible, but withdrawals in retirement are tax-free.

3. Contributing slowly instead of all at once

In many cases, making regular contributions to your investment account — a strategy known as dollar-cost averaging — is sound advice. However, if you’ve got the cash, maxing out your IRA as early in the year as possible may be the way to go.

Any time a large amount of cash is involved, investing it incrementally over time may feel like the responsible thing to do. However, according to John Pilkington, a chartered financial analyst and senior financial advisor with Vanguard Personal Advisor Services in Charlotte, North Carolina, those positive feelings are generally the only benefit.

“Dollar-cost-averaging equates to taking risk later. While you may mitigate short-term regret, you’re more likely reducing long-term returns,” says Pilkington. “A better exercise may be reevaluating your asset allocation target relative to your risk tolerance.”

In other words, dollar-cost averaging could help you avoid the stress that comes from stock market volatility, but more often than not, it leads to lower long-term returns than lump-sum investing, Pilkington says. And if you’re still uneasy about investing all $6,000 upfront, consider a less-risky asset allocation — such as investing more in bonds — instead of spreading out contributions, he says.

4. Failing to explore your investment options

If you started an IRA by rolling over a workplace 401(k), you probably noticed you were no longer confined to the investments offered through your 401(k). This is a pretty big deal, and the influx of options shouldn’t go unnoticed.

“A lot of the IRAs I see are invested in a default investment option,” says James DesRocher, a financial advisor with Park Avenue Securities in Middleton, Massachusetts. “An advantage of an IRA is the flexibility you have of what to invest in. You can really dial in on a specific investment strategy that is tailored to you, and most people do not take advantage of this.”

5. Maintaining multiple retirement accounts

There’s no rule that says you can have only one IRA. As long as your annual contributions don’t exceed the limit, you’re free to disperse those contributions across any traditional or Roth IRAs you’ve opened. But that’s probably not a wise strategy, DesRocher says.

“Keeping multiple IRA accounts rather than consolidating into one very often leads to overlap,” DesRocher says, referring to investing in the same assets in different accounts. “It also takes away from the positive effect of rebalancing, which can reduce your overall risks.”

This goes for hanging on to old 401(k)s instead of rolling them over to an IRA, too. Not only will you avoid overlap and find more investment options with IRAs, but it’s also possible you’ll pay less in fees. (Learn more about how investment fees work.)

Source: nerdwallet.com

How Much Nurses Get Paid in Every State

Health care worker in a mask and face shield
DC Studio / Shutterstock.com

Nurses serve on the front lines of health care. Their work is tough, but fortunately it’s well-compensated. And if you are considering a career as a nurse, the good news is that the industry is growing and the pay tends to be good.

The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates there are more than 2.9 million registered nurses across the country, pulling down an average annual wage of $77,460. Additionally, there are some 200,000 nurse practitioners, earning an average of $111,840, and some 697,000 licensed practical and vocational nurses, earning an average of $48,500.

But the pay varies greatly depending on where the nurse practices.

Following are the average annual wages for multiple types of nurses in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, according to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics data, which is for 2019. The states are ranked based on pay for RNs.

51. South Dakota

Sanford USD Medical Center
Ken Wolter / Shutterstock.com

South Dakota is one of several states predicted to have a shortage of registered nurses (RNs) by 2030, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that the state will be short 1,900 RNs by 2030.

South Dakota is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $59,540

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $102,230

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $38,760

50. Mississippi

Nurse
insta_photos / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively low average wages in Mississippi. The state ranks dead last for its average annual wages for elementary-school teachers, for police officers and sheriff’s deputies and even for cashiers, as we have reported.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $59,750

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,740

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $39,020

49. Alabama

Prattville Baptist Hospital
JNix / Shutterstock.com

In Alabama and nationally, nurse practitioners earn more money than multiple other types of nurses, on average. To become an NP, you must first be a registered nurse and also pursue specialized graduate education, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $60,230

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $99,570

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $39,310

48. Iowa

Hospital nurse in mask and gloves
Rawpixel.com / Shutterstock.com

Different types of nurses are most likely to work in different types of health care settings, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. RNs most commonly work in hospitals, and NPs in physicians’ offices. Meanwhile, licensed practical and vocational nurses most often work in nursing care facilities, also referred to as skilled nursing facilities.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $60,590

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,910

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,220

47. Arkansas

Nurse with elderly patient
Alexander Raths / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $61,330

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,840

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $40,760

46. Kansas

University of Kansas Hospital
APN Photography / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $62,450

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $100,550

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,260

45. Tennessee

Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital
Travel_with_me / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $62,570

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $96,510

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $41,270

44. West Virginia

nurse
Syda Productions / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $63,220

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $103,170

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $37,500

43. Kentucky

Nurse with patient
michaeljung / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $63,750

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $99,560

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,740

42. Missouri

Jon Rehg / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,160

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,050

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $43,410

41. Oklahoma

Man in the hospital coughing
wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,800

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $113,200

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,090

40. South Carolina

home health nurse taking a senior's blood pressure
Dmytro Zinkevych / Shutterstock.com

South Carolina is one of seven states projected to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to the report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts the Palmetto State will be short 10,400 RNs by that year.

South Carolina is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,840

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $100,680

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,190

39. Louisiana

Home health aide
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Louisiana is home to more than 19,000 licensed practical nurses and licensed vocational nurses, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Consequently, Louisiana has a higher concentration of this type of nursing job than any other state in the nation.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $65,850

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $40,300

38. North Dakota

Hospital staff
Spotmatik Ltd / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,290

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,760

37. North Carolina

Thank you sign for health and essential workers
Darwin Brandis / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,440

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,890

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,880

36. Indiana

Floyd Memorial Hospital in Albany, Indiana.
Thomas Kelley / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,560

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,380

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,050

35. Nebraska

Essential worker
G-Stock Studio / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,640

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,450

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,450

34. Florida

Boca Raton Regional Hospital
Mike Kuhlman / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $67,610

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $101,510

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,580

33. Utah

nurse
Cryptographer / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $67,970

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,660

32. Ohio

Cleveland Clinic
Duttagupta M K / Shutterstock.com

Ohio is home to the Cleveland Clinic — which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the nation’s No. 2 hospital overall, and the No. 1 specialty hospital for cardiology and heart surgery, as we report in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $68,220

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $103,780

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,020

31. Wyoming

senior receiving long-term care
Photographee.eu / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $68,690

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $118,110

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,980

30. Montana

Young female medical student working at a hospital
Stokkete / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,340

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,120

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,730

29. Idaho

Idaho state capital building
Charles Knowles / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,480

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,860

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,430

28. Georgia

Mark Winfrey / Shutterstock.com

Georgia is one of several states predicted to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that the Peach State will be short 2,200 RNs by that time.

Georgia is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the analysis found. The state is projected to be short 10,500 LPNs by that year.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,590

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,670

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,570

27. Maine

nurse
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,760

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,960

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,930

26. Vermont

University of Vermont Medical Center
Bob LoCicero / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $70,240

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,840

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $50,210

25. Pennsylvania

hospital
Ilze_Lucero / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $71,410

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $101,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,200

24. Virginia

UVA health care heroes banner
Kim Kelley-Wagner / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $71,870

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,110

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,070

23. Wisconsin

Senior man with nurse
Nejron Photo / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $72,610

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $112,130

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,550

22. Michigan

University of Michigan Hospitals
Susan Montgomery / Shutterstock.com

University of Michigan Hospitals-Michigan Medicine ranks among the top 20 hospitals in the United States. Like the University of Michigan itself, the hospital is located in the city of Ann Arbor.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,200

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $108,660

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $50,300

21. New Mexico

Home health care worker
Rob Marmion / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,300

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,930

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $48,330

20. Illinois

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Chicago is home to two of the top 20 hospitals in the United States — Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Rush University Medical Center — according to the rankings of U.S. News & World Report.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,510

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $107,860

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,290

19. New Hampshire

Manchester, New Hampshire
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,880

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,680

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,220

18. Delaware

nurse
wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $74,100

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $112,430

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,520

17. Texas

MD Anderson Cancer Center
JHVEPhoto / Shutterstock.com

Texas is one of several states facing a serious shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It’s also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030.

Additionally, Texas has a larger share of uninsured residents than any other state, as we detail in “16 States With the Worst Rates of Health Insurance.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $74,540

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,440

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $47,370

16. Colorado

Denver, Colorado
f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $76,230

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,760

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,180

15. Maryland

Johns Hopkins Hospital
Richard Thornton / Shutterstock.com

Baltimore is home to the Johns Hopkins Hospital, which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the top hospital in the country for multiple specialties — from ear, nose and throat care to psychiatry — as we report in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.” The publication also ranks Johns Hopkins Hospital the No. 3 hospital in the country overall.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $77,910

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,800

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $55,020

14. Arizona

hospital
vewfinder / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $78,330

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,480

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,290

13. Minnesota

Mayo Clinic Hospital
Leigh Trail / Shutterstock.com

The city of Rochester, Minnesota, is home to the Mayo Clinic — which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the No. 1 hospital in the nation, as we detail in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.” The Mayo Clinic also is ranked No. 1 for multiple types of specialty care, from diabetes and endocrinology to pulmonology and lung surgery.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $80,130

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,850

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $48,460

12. Rhode Island

nurses
Spotmatik Ltd / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $82,310

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,310

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $59,860

11. Connecticut

Candlewood Lake
By tmphoto98 / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $83,440

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,140

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,380

10. New Jersey

Amy Lutz / Shutterstock.com

New Jersey is one of seven states expected to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency predicts that the state will be short a whopping 11,400 RNs in about a decade.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $84,280

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $123,810

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,510

9. Washington

Bellevue, Washington
mandritoiu / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $86,170

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $126,920

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,940

8. New York

lev radin / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively high average wages in New York. The state ranks No. 1 for its wages for grade-school teachers, as we report in “Here’s How Much Teachers Are Paid in Every State.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $87,840

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,550

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,860

7. Nevada

Nurse
GagliardiImages / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $88,380

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,970

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $58,470

6. Alaska

Anchorage, Alaska
Rex Lisman / Shutterstock.com

Alaska is one of seven states facing a shortage of registered nurses in the near future, according to the report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that by 2030, the state will be short 5,400 registered nurses.

Alaska is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $90,500

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,890

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $63,850

5. Oregon

nurse pushing a patient in a wheelchair
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $92,960

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $113,430

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,740

4. Massachusetts

Worcester, Massachusetts
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

Massachusetts has a larger share of insured residents than any other state in the country, as we detail in “15 States Where the Most People Have Health Insurance.” A mere 3% of Massachusetts’ population is without insurance.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $93,160

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $60,340

3. District of Columbia

Washington D.C.
f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively high average wages in Washington, D.C. The nation’s capital ranks No. 1 — beating out all 50 states — based on its pay for the heroes behind cash registers, as we report in “How Much Cashiers Earn in Every State.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $94,820

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,220

2. Hawaii

Honolulu, Hawaii
MNStudio / Shutterstock.com

U.S. News & World Report named Hawaii the No. 1 state for health care in general. In the analysis, Hawaii leads the nation in health care quality, is third for health care access and fourth for public health.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $104,060

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $124,000

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $51,010

1. California

Keck Hospital of USC
Kit Leong / Shutterstock.com

California may pay its nurses well, but it is one of seven states forecast to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency predicts that the state will be short 44,500 full-time RN jobs — far more than any other state — by that year.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $113,240

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $138,660

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $60,240

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Here’s the Best Place to Play Bingo Online for Money

A well-designed bingo app really hits the sweet spot. It’s a great way to pass the time and have some fun.

It’s even better when you can win real money.

An app called Blackout Bingo lets you do just that. This free app lets you play a game you already know and love, plus it matches you with players in your skill level, so you can go head-to-head in tournaments where you can win real money. Plus, the games are quick — about two minutes each, and you can play them on the go.

How to Win Real Money Just for Playing Bingo on Your Phone

You might be thinking this sounds too good to be true. But here’s the thing: It’s really not.

Here’s how it works: Download the free app and create an account, then you can play some practice games to get the hang of it. If you don’t already know how to play, this is an easy way to learn. Then, when you’re ready, Blackout Bingo will pair you with one of thousands of other online players at your same skill level. Beginners play beginners; experts play other experts. You and your opponent will both get the same board, so winning is totally skills-based.

The app is free to download, but if you want to play for money, you’ll need to deposit at least $10. Then you can play head-to-head in large pools and live tournaments — some tournaments have even paid out prizes as big as $350,000. You can make deposits and get paid via PayPal, credit card or Apple Pay — cashing out is just a matter of seconds.

Blackout Bingo has a 4.5-out-of-5-star rating from more than 40,000 users in Apple’s App Store. As for Skillz, the platform that hosts the game, it operates hundreds of games and has paid out more than $2 billion in prizes so far. Take Shay, from Georgia, for example, who won $10,000 playing Skillz games. The company has invested years into its player-matching technology, ensuring you only compete with players of the same skill level.

Win or lose, you always receive “ticketz” that you can redeem in Skillz’ Ticketz store for cash or prizes, like Amazon gift cards, a 65-inch TV — even a BMW or a Porsche. Seriously. The higher stakes you play for, the more ticketz you receive.

For bingo players, here’s the most important part: The game is well designed, a classic bingo experience. To get started, just download the free app and start playing your first game immediately. What could you win in a two-minute bingo game?

Mike Brassfield ([email protected]) is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. He is familiar with the lure of bingo.

Unfortunately, you can’t play for money in the following states: Arkansas, Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Montana, South Carolina, South Dakota or Tennessee. However, in those states, you can still play for fun with the game’s virtual currency.

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Source: thepennyhoarder.com