How to Make the Leap From Side Hustle to Full-Time Dream Job

Learn real tips from real side hustlers who are now thriving full time.

For Michelle Schroeder-Gardner it all began with a blog. When she started Making Sense of Cents in 2011, a chronicle of her journey paying off $38,000 in student loans, it was a fun way to make money on the side while maintaining her full-time job as a financial analyst. Fast forward two years and she’s left her day job to focus on the blog exclusively. Fast forward another five years and she’s earning more than $1 million annually from her site.

If you too are looking to turn your side hustle into a full-time job, experiences like Schroeder-Gardner’s prove that just about anything is possible. And you’re not alone. Nation1099, an online resource for freelancers, published a 2018 report to summarize data from various career studies and concluded that approximately 11 percent of the working adult population in the U.S. is working primarily as full-time independent contractors in the gig economy. Gig workers, also known as on-demand workers, function with a non-standard work arrangement and without a long-term employment contract.

Some, like Schroeder-Gardner, have ditched a traditional lifestyle and are working while on the go and whenever they’re most productive (she travels around the world in an RV and sailboat and writes when motivation strikes). Others are logging full-time hours at home or in a coworking office space.

With a thriving gig economy, it could be the right time to turn your side hustle into a full-time job.

Although figuring out how to turn your side hustle into your dream job requires hard work, with patience and persistence, you can succeed.

Learn from the experts themselves and consider these steps for turning your side hustle into a successful business:

Educate yourself

The first step for turning your side hustle into a successful business is building the right skill set so you can stand out in your field. Research industry best practices and in-demand skills, speak to successful professionals and read about others who’ve made the leap from side hustle to full-time job.

The first steps for turning your side hustle into a successful business are doing your research and developing skills to make yourself stand out.

When Jill DeConti, founder of the blog The Luxe Travelers, decided to leave her finance job to devote all of her time to her side hustle as a travel blogger, she knew that knowledge would be instrumental to her success.

“I began researching, reading books, soaking in knowledge,” DeConti says, adding that she also focused on learning marketing best practices and how to generate revenue from her blog.

Reading about the steps for turning your side hustle into a successful business proved useful to DeConti not just for the practical tips she gleaned, but for motivation as well.

“This made me realize that my dreams were actually possible,” she says, “and made me feel less alone in pursuing them.”

“Even though I was earning a good income from my side gig before I turned it into my full-time career, I was terrified to leave my day job.”

– Michelle Schroeder-Gardner, founder of the blog Making Sense of Cents

Take baby steps

Schroeder-Gardner says one of the most challenging parts of turning your side hustle into a full-time job is building a business framework and believing in it.

“Even though I was earning a good income from my side gig before I turned it into my full-time career,” she says, “I was terrified to leave my day job.”

Growing her gig on the side to make sure that it actually worked—and would generate income—helped her gain confidence while she still had the security of her day job’s salary. When she was ready to make her side hustle full time, she knew the framework for a blog that could make money from affiliate marketing was already in place.

“I knew it was time when I was earning enough from my blog to live off of,” Schroeder-Gardner says. “I was earning around $5,000 to $10,000 a month from my side hustle at that time.”

Build an emergency fund

If you’re thinking about how to turn your side hustle into your dream job, be prepared for business—and earnings—to not go exactly as planned.

“Build an emergency fund,” Schroeder-Gardner says. “This way, when you turn your side gig into your dream job, you’ll have money set aside in case you have a not-so-good month.”

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You could also dip into your emergency fund to help manage daily expenses and pay your bills while you turn your side hustle into a full-time job. It may also come in handy if you need to finance upfront business costs (new equipment or office supplies, anyone?).

Outside of work, an emergency fund can provide a cushion for other expenses that may not be baked into your budget (think a trip to the doctor’s office or a home repair that came out of nowhere).

As you work on creating an emergency fund as a step for turning your side hustle into a successful business, note that most experts agree that it should include at least six months to a year of expenses.

If you're wondering how to turn your side hustle into your dream job, you'll need an emergency fund to help protect yourself financially.

Invest extra time upfront

You may find that it takes a lot of time to turn your side hustle into a full-time job. There’s networking, promoting your business and accepting new opportunities to build your portfolio—and that’s likely on top of your already packed schedule.

If you’re wondering how to turn your side hustle into your dream job, you may need to carve out time after regular working hours. That was the case for DeConti, whose day job kept her occupied from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In order to get her name out there as she built her travel blog, she looked for freelance social media jobs and worked on her own blog “after work and late into the night and on weekends,” she says.

Putting in the time upfront really paid off. These days DeConti can make her own schedule and work remotely, which is key for someone who has made a career out of her passion for travel.

“I’ve been able to travel to Bali for an extended period of time, spend a month traveling around the Greek islands, swim in the cenotes in Mexico, chase waterfalls around Iceland, eat the best pizza I’ve ever had in Italy, take a camper van around beautiful New Zealand,” she says. “As long as I have my laptop with me, I’m good to go.”

Join the side hustlers who have gone full time

If you’re contemplating how to turn your side hustle into your dream job, take comfort in knowing that you’re in good company. Others are now living their dreams, and you can too with some careful planning and confidence.

So, what are you waiting for?

Source: discover.com

30% of Americans Are Pro-Union for All Workers

Labor unions have been around since the late 18th century. But in recent years, industries not typically known for union membership have seen an uptick in interest in employee activism.

Gawker Media became the first digital media company with a ratified union contract in 2016, ushering in an era of labor organization in the industry that included HuffPost, Salon, Slate, VICE, BuzzFeed, Vox Media, Bustle Media Group, and The New Yorker. With unionization efforts in progress at both Google and Amazon, it looks like big tech is likely to be the next industry to see a significant organizing movement among employees.

Many people still associate the word “union” with stereotypical images of manual laborers and factory workers. For them, organizing was the only means to avoid abuse, physical harm, and even — in cases like the famous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire — death. However, union efforts can also be beneficial in contemporary workplaces, helping workers in all industries negotiate better benefits, greater job security, and higher salaries.

To find out what most Americans think about labor unions today, we asked 1,500 people whether they’re for or against unionization in different employment scenarios.

How Do Unions Help Workers?

Unions can protect and benefit workers in all sorts of industries and in many different ways. The most well-known benefits of a union include protection against unsafe or hostile work conditions and bad or abusive bosses.

But the main benefit unions provide is collective bargaining power, which enables workers to negotiate with a company’s owners and managers. This power to negotiate can help achieve:

  • Higher wages
  • Better benefits
  • Accommodations for parents, caregivers, and people with disabilities
  • More equitable treatment for minority workers
  • Protections in case of layoffs

Some unions even offer health care, allowing workers to access insurance even if they’re unemployed.

Nearly 1 in 3 Support Unions in All Cases

We found that 29%, or nearly a third, of respondents said they’re pro-union in all cases, not just in blue-collar industries or companies with bad management.

Do You Believe Labor Unions Are Beneficial

Just 12% said they’re flatly against unions, while another 10% said they’re for unions only in particular circumstances. Just under half (49%) said they were neutral, neither for nor against unions as a concept.

The breakdown differed a fair amount between male and female respondents. Among women, just 7% said they were anti-union, while 32% said they supported unions for all workers. By comparison, 18% of men said they were against, and 25% said they were for unions in all situations.

If the general population were a workforce, these results would be nearly enough for it to unionize. The National Labor Relations Board conducts a union vote once 30% of a workforce has signed union cards or a petition to organize.

10% Believe Unions Are Only Necessary Under Harsh Working Conditions

Two responses were designed to identify how many people subscribe to the belief that unions are only necessary or beneficial when workers face harsh conditions. About 6% said they believed unions were only necessary for blue-collar workers, while 4% said they’re only beneficial in situations plagued by bad management.

In reality, unions aren’t designed just to fix hostile work conditions. They’re also meant to help improve upon existing positive elements of a company environment and protect workers in unexpected situations like sudden layoffs or major unemployment events (like COVID-19).

Pro Union Americans

12% Are Anti-Union in All Cases

While the benefits of unionization are plenty, many people believe the negatives outweigh the positives. Among respondents, 12% said that they’re anti-union regardless of the scenario.

Anti Union Americans

Managers, executives, and owners are most likely to hold a negative view of unions since unions have the power to force bosses to compromise. Even bosses who treat employees well and pay them fairly may hold reservations about unions, concerned about worst-case scenarios like impossible demands and contentious communications.

How to Respond Positively When Your Workers Want to Unionize

No matter how you feel about your workers organizing, keeping your response measured and positive is key to maintaining open communication, morale, and productivity in the workplace.

If you don’t want your employees to unionize, you can tell them that — as long as you don’t do or say anything to try to prevent their organization effort from moving forward. (That’s illegal.)

However, you can communicate the company’s position on the issue while making clear that each employee is free to make their own decision without fear of retaliation. You can also open a dialogue with workers about what they would ask for with a union’s help, then discuss how you can create a workplace where employees don’t feel the need to organize.

Note that unions provide lots of benefits to bosses that might put you on the pro-union side. Organizing efforts can result in better communication, increased productivity, and improved morale among employees.

Final Word

Whether or not your company has a union or is considering forming one, there’s no denying labor organization and employee activism are becoming more prevalent topics of discussion in the United States. Topics like universal health care, COVID-19 relief, minimum wage laws, infrastructure, and even the Green New Deal are all closely related to employee rights.

A better understanding of what unions are and how they work can benefit everyone, from workers to bosses to politicians to activists and beyond.

Source: moneycrashers.com

Top 6 Home Buying Risks To Avoid

June 22, 2019 Posted By: growth-rapidly Tag: Buying a house

Buying a home, especially as a first time home buyer, while can be an exciting time, can be a scary, stressful and expensive process. That’s why it’s important to be aware of the risks involved. By having an idea of what you may encounter when buying a home, you can take steps to avoid them. If you think you’re ready to buy a house, here are some home buying risks to avoid.

If you are interested in comparing the best mortgage rates through LendingTree click here. It’s completely free.

Check out: 5 Signs You’re Not Ready to Buy a House

If the process of buying a home seems complicated to you, it may make sense to speak with a professional. The SmartAdvisor free matching tool can connect you with up to three financial advisors in your neighborhood.

1. Obtaining the wrong mortgage.

The worst thing you can do when buying a house is to obtain the wrong home loan. A bad mortgage loan can be one with a high interest rate, which means that your monthly payments are higher. You also have to pay more in interest over the term of the loan.

The people who find themselves in this kind of situation are those who fail to shop for multiple mortgage lenders before deciding on one.

Not all mortgage loans are created equal. Mortgage rates and fees may differ from lender to lender. So to avoid this risk, you should plan to compare several mortgage rates. While the mortgage process can be overwhelming at times, you can navigate the process by comparing home loans side by side through LendingTree.


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2. You don’t have any job security.

Another of the several home buying risks to avoid is to make sure you have a stable job with a steady paycheck so you can make your payments on time.

Unless you were able to purchase your home with all cash, you will need to make monthly mortgage payments to satisfy your loan requirements.

In addition, you will need to consider additional expenses, like money to replace the roof or to renovate the kitchen and bathroom. Therefore you will need a steady paycheck or stream of income.

So before you jump into homeownership, make sure you have a stable job.

Related: Apply for a Mortgage Loan Today

3. You forget about other costs.

First time home buyers may think that buying a house only involves finding and getting a mortgage loan, coming up with a down payment, making an offer on a house that they like, and preparing for closing.

However, they may not realize that there are other costs that come with buying a house.

In addition to the down payment and mortgage payments, they need to come up with closing costs, inspection costs, moving costs, maintenance costs, taxes, etc… And if you don’t consider and budget for these costs, you may be in hot water.

4. Buying a home full with problems.

You may have found a house you’ve always dreamed about. But it’s never good idea to purchase a home without conducting a building inspection.

A house inspection is crucial, because it can let you know of a lot of problems that you as a first time home buyer would have never thought existed.

It can reveal problems with the structure of the house, the roof, plumbing, electricity, etc.

Click here to compare mortgage rates through LendingTree. It’s completely FREE.

If you ignore house inspection and move in anyway, these issues can end up cost you a lot of money and can also be detrimental to your safety and well-being.

In conclusion, buying a home can be a fun and exciting experience. It can also come with unique challenges. By being aware of these home buying risks, you can take steps to avoid them.

More articles on buying a house:

The Biggest Mistakes Millennials Make When Buying a House

How Much House Can I Afford

5 Signs You’re Better Off Renting

10 First Time Home Buyer Mistakes to Avoid

Not All Mortgage Lenders Are Created Equally

When it comes to getting a mortgage, rates and fees vary. LendingTree allows you to view and compare multiple mortgage rates from multiple mortgage lenders all in one place and at the same time, so you can choose the best rates for your needs. LendingTree makes getting a loan faster, simpler, and better. Get started today >>>

Source: growthrapidly.com

Paying Off Debt to Buy a House

January 21, 2020 &• 5 min read by Scott Sheldon Comments 89 Comments

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When you buy a house, a big part of a lender’s decision whether to approve your mortgage rests on whether or not you can afford it.If you have a lot of debt, the monthly payments on those obligations chip away at the total amount you can pay each month on a mortgage.

But that doesn’t mean it’s impossible to buy a house if you’re in debt. It’s just a bit more challenging. If you want to stop paying rent and enter the exciting world of homeownership, here’s how you can pay off debt to buy a house.

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1. Calculate Your Debt to Income Ratio

Your debt-to-income ratio, often called DTI ratio, is a measurement that compares the amount of debt you have to your income. It helps determine how much you can actually afford when it comes to mortgage payments.

How Much Debt Can You Have and Still Qualify for a Mortgage?

Most lenders won’t approve you if your DTI is higher than around 43%.

For example, let’s say you make $52,000 a year. This means your gross income each month is around $4,333. If half your paycheck is devoted to paying off debts, then about $2,166 of your income goes towards paying off your various debts.

By these numbers, your DTI would be 50%. The bank would probably not approve you for a mortgage since your DTI is higher than the maximum 43%. To fix this problem, you can do one of two things: start making more money and/or lower your monthly recurring debt payments.

2. Find Ways to Decrease Your Debt

Consolidate Loans

Qualifying for a mortgage partially depends on what part of your monthly gross income is paid towards the minimum amount due on recurring bills. These might include credit card bills, student loan payments, car loans and other payments. Consolidating can be a way to reduce that amount.

What does consolidating mean? Consider an example where you have five credit card payments each month. Consolidating them means that instead of making five separate payments to individual lenders, you make onepayment each month.

If your credit is good enough, you may be able to get a consolidation loan with better terms. That means your one consolidated payment may be lower than the five payments combined. You can consolidate student loans, too, and get the same potential benefits.

After you’ve consolidated, you can re-calculate your DTI ratio. If it’s lower, you may fall below the DTI threshold required to be approved for a mortgage.

Pay Off or Pay Down Some Debt

If you make an effort to pay off or pay down some of your existing debt, this can help decrease your DTI ratio and make your financial picture look more favorable to lenders. It may be best to concentrate on paying off recurring debts, such as credit cards, to help your chances.

Is It Best to Pay Off Debt Before Buying a House?

There’s no one right answer to this question. It can depend on your mortgage lender. Your mortgage lender may want you to pay off debt before making a down payment while others may be okay with your DTI and want a larger down payment. If you’re under the 43% DTI and have a good credit history, you might consider working with a mortgage lender to find out what your options are.

Credit Repair

If any debts listed on your credit report aren’t yours, this could be hurting your overall financial health. Make sure to closely examine the details of your credit report and make sure the accounts listed are actually ones you’re responsible for. If you do notice errors on your credit report, you can work to repair your credit by disputing the entries.

3. Find Ways to Increase Your Income

One of the ways to make your DTI more favorable is to increase your income. You can usually do this by either getting a better paying job or by getting a second job if you have the means. If you’re married and are applying for a mortgage with your joint income, perhaps your spouse can get a job to help increase their income. One drawback to this solution is that it’s a long-term solution and not a short-term one. Getting a new job, whether primary or secondary, takes time and effort.

4. Consider Making a Down Payment

Contrary to popular belief, a 20% down payment on a home isn’t required in many cases. FHA loans, for instance, only require 3.5% down, and some mortgage lenders may only ask for 5% down on a conventional loan.

However, keep in mind that the more you put down upfront, the less your monthly payments are and the lower your interest rate is likely to be. If you can put more money down, it makes the mortgage more affordable. If you’re hovering at the higher end of an acceptable DTI ratio, that may make a difference.

Looking at the Big Picture

When you’re ready to buy a house, it’s important to consider your level of debt, how much money you have coming in and your job security. If you’re able to consolidate your debt and get lower monthly payments as a result, your job is well-paying and seems secure and your credit is excellent, you can probably buy a home even if you have other debts.

Assess the Risks

Remember that just because you might qualify for a home loan doesn’t mean you should buy a house. Stretching your limits to meet that 43% DTI ratio can be risky unless you foresee your income continuing to rise oryou know any debt obligations you have are set to be paid off in the future.

Can Paying Off Debt Hurt My Credit Score?

Most of the time, paying off debt has a neutral or positive impact to your credit score. First, you decrease your credit utilization, which accounts for 30% of your credit score. A lower credit utilization can bring up your score. Second, you show the lender that you have the means to pay off debts, which can be a positive factor in whether you’re approved.

However, in a few cases, paying off debt could lower your score. If you pay off old accounts, you could change the age of your credit. How old your accounts are play a role in your score. You could also reduce your credit mix, which also factors into your score.

Neither of these factors plays as large a role as credit utilization, though. And if your mortgage company wants to see you with less outstanding debt, a tiny and temporary hit to your credit score may be worth getting approved for a loan.

To find out more about your credit score and where you stand with financial health, sign up for a free Credit Report Card today. You’ll get feedback about the five major areas that impact your score and how you can improve them before applying for a mortgage.


Sign up now.

Source: credit.com