4 Ways to Ensure Your Pet Is a Good Rental Resident

Yapping, chewing, howling, scratching … not in this home!

Nobody likes living next to a yappy dog — or even a howling cat. And while a growing number of rental properties specialize in pet-friendly apartments and homes, it’s understandable why both property owners and their leasing agents are skeptical about pets.

Here are some quick tips to help your pet be a neighborly renter.

1. Get them certified

To really show your future landlord that your dog is a good resident, consider getting a Canine Good Citizen (CGC) certificate. Offered by the American Kennel Association (AKC), this certification proves that a dog has received basic training and is well socialized around both people and other dogs — thus, less likely to cause disturbances.

If your dog is currently working with a trainer, ask about this certification, as many trainers are also CGC certified. The AKC provides details about groups in various states that also offer this certification.

Additionally, get a letter of recommendation from a previous landlord about your pet’s behavior. It can put you in a strong position to look at a wider variety of pet-friendly properties.

2. Keep them busy

Take your dog for a long walk or run before you go to work to leave them tired and happy — and content to snooze instead of scratching the front door or annoying the neighbors by howling nonstop.

Separation anxiety and stress often lead to bad behavior in your absence. Give your pets distraction toys to keep them busy, or leave on a TV or radio for a sense of companionship.

Consider employing a dog walker to come once a day, or send your pup to day care. Even if it’s only one day a week, it’s one day less of them being stressed because they’re home alone.

A variety of calming products — such as plug-in pheromone diffusers and anxiety wraps like the ThunderShirt — may help reduce your pet’s anxiety levels and prevent nonstop barking throughout the day.

3. Mind the felines

If you have a cat, get a large litter box and scoop it daily. Cats will go outside the litter box and pee on carpets if their box is dirty.

Similarly, keep a variety of scratchers around the home. Cats usually like to scratch soon after they wake up from a nap, so place scratching posts close to a favorite sleeping spot. This will deter them from permanently damaging your woodwork and carpets.

4. Prevent pests

Summer is the height of flea and tick season. Make sure your pet has the necessary protection so they don’t bring fleas indoors to infest your home.

Interestingly, fleas only spend 20 percent of their life span on a pet. They spend the rest of their time in your carpeting and furnishings — and they can be difficult to eradicate quickly. Plus, landlords will charge for this kind of pest control.

Like with so many other things in life, prevention is key.

Looking for more information about renting? Check out our Renters Guide

Related:

Originally published July 13, 2016.

Source: zillow.com

Car Repossession: What to Do Before, During and After

So what can you do if you know you’re in danger of having your car repossessed — or if it’s already been repossessed? Check out this guide to help you before, during and after car repossession to help you and your finances survive this bumpy ride.
If you’ve missed even one payment, here’s why now is the time to dig up the loan agreement you signed when you originally bought or leased the car:
“Act very quickly,” she said. “Because at that point, the loan has not been sent out to collections.”
“Communication is one of the best tools that you have in the earliest stages when you’re late making car payments,” he said. “The fewer unanswered questions that your lender has, the more likely they are to try to cooperate.”

Car Repossession: What Can You Do Before, During and After?

And if you think hiding the car will keep the repo company at bay, you’re likely only adding to the fees you’ll end up having to pay as the company expends resources — including paying someone to follow you — to locate the vehicle.
“I would put it on that scale of somewhere around bankruptcy or foreclosure,” McClary said. “You can climb out of this hole, but it will take some time.”
Ready to stop worrying about money? The effects of the coronavirus pandemic have been especially burdensome on auto loans borrowers. Unlike student loans and mortgages, there are no government-backed relief programs to cover a monthly auto payment.
That’s where you drive the car to your lending institution and hand over the keys. Doing so voluntarily still counts as a type of repossession, but you’ll avoid towing costs and other expenses the repossession company charges to locate your car.

What to Do if You Can’t Make Your Auto Loan Payments

But will a lender really take your car if you’re late on this month’s payment? It’s unlikely, according to Bruce McClary, vice president of communications for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling in Washington, D.C.
The result is most devastating for subprime borrowers — those with credit scores under 600. Serious delinquency levels within that group rose about 22% between the fourth quarters of 2019 and 2020.

Pro Tip
If the deficiency balance is small enough, McClary recommended trying to negotiate with the lender to settle the remaining balance so you aren’t still paying for a car you no longer own.

If you had enough money to pay off your loan in the first place, you probably should have done this before the repo company took your car. But if you pay off the loan and all fees, you get your car back free and clear of any loans.

  • Ask about forbearance programs. Call your lender to explain why you’re unable to make your monthly payment and request a forbearance. Be prepared to share details and documentation if it’s due to a job loss, illness or change in family status. Your lender may offer a delay in your payment or a revised schedule of payments, but you’ll still be responsible for the loan — and oftentimes the accruing interest. But if the situation is temporary, a forbearance could let you delay payments until you’re back on your financial feet.
  • Downsize to a cheaper car. If you can trade in your current set of wheels for a more economical version — think smaller and older — you could roll your old loan into a new, more manageable one. Be sure to get a pre-approved auto loan to give yourself some leverage when negotiating the interest rate.
  • Sell your car. If you don’t need the vehicle, you could potentially sell it for enough money to pay off the loan balance, which would free you from monthly payments entirely.
  • Refinance. This option may be the most difficult to successfully pursue for many borrowers, as lenders have tightened their standards due to the current economic situation. But if you have an excellent credit history and you have stable employment, you could qualify for refinancing your loan at a lower interest rate, thus reducing your monthly payment.

Tiffany Wendeln Connors is a staff writer/editor at The Penny Hoarder. Read her bio and other work here, then catch her on Twitter @TiffanyWendeln.
If you haven’t been paying your auto loan, there’s a good chance you haven’t been paying your auto insurance either, and some lenders require insurance as a condition of your loan. Even if you haven’t missed enough payments to have your car repossessed, the lender could potentially take your vehicle due to inadequate auto insurance.

What to Do if Your Car Is in Danger of Being Repossessed

After taking possession of your car, the lender begins the process for recouping the money you still owe on the car loan, plus any fees incurred — think towing, storage of the vehicle, re-keying the car and legal fees.
Although lenders may have the legal right to start the repossession process the day after a missed payment, most give customers a grace period of at least 10 days when they won’t even charge a late fee. If you’re in this situation, the time to act is now.

  1. Depending on where you are in the car repossession process, you do have options for keeping your car — and more of your money.
  2. Car repossession can remain on your credit report for seven years — making it more difficult to qualify for another loan, increasing the interest rate you’re charged on other loans and even potentially affecting your ability to get a job or a place to live.

And although a voluntary repossession will affect your credit score, your lender will technically report it to the credit reporting agencies as a “voluntary surrender” rather than an involuntary “repossession” — which could help as you recover.
How can your bank, credit union or leasing company possibly have the right to take back your vehicle? Read your loan agreement.
Avoid a Friday evening car repossession if possible: Repo companies are often closed over the weekend, but they’ll charge you storage fees for Saturday and Sunday.

Pro Tip
The lender will sell the car, typically at auction, to get some of its money back. It’s technically possible for you to buy back your car by bidding on it at auction, but you’ll still be responsible for paying your old loan, plus all those fees.

If you don’t have enough money to cover the missing payments, you should explain your situation and offer at least a partial amount — in cash — as a show of good faith, according to Davis.
“The efforts to repossess your car typically start after you’ve missed a couple of consecutive payments,” he said. “If you miss two payments, you should start getting a little bit concerned, and if you miss three payments and your car is still sitting in your driveway, you may not have much more time.”
By contacting your lender early in the process, you’ll not only create a record of your attempts to satisfy the loan, you’ll avoid additional fees that the lender may incur by hiring a third party to collect your vehicle.
The first rule of preventing a vehicle repossession: Communicate early and often.
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If the amount is too large to settle, though, the lender will contact you and, depending on the state where you live, can pursue the deficiency balance through collections.

Pro Tip
The repo company cannot “breach the peace” — aka break the law. If the collector uses physical force or destroys your property, you can potentially file a lawsuit. Keep notes of all interactions.

Related Posts
An auto loan contract states if you fail to make a payment — and the process can legally start after one missed payment — the lender has the right to take back your car.

What to Do if Your Car Has Been Repossessed

“They could take you to court over the money you owe, and try to garnish your wages,” he said. “There are all kinds of ways that they could legally pursue repayment of that debt, beyond the sale of the vehicle.”
“There’s no shame in saying… ‘I have a couple hundred bucks in my budget, can I throw this on the loan so that I don’t get it repoed?’” she said.
If you know that you’re already in danger of having the car repossessed, there is a way to mitigate the financial impact: voluntary repossession.
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  1. Reinstate your loan.

    Your credit score will take a hit — a big one.

  2. Redeem your loan.

    If you can’t reach a deal with your lender, you should prepare to have the car repossessed by removing all personal items from your car, as repo companies can take your car at any time — whether the car is parked in front of your home, at work or at the grocery store.

  3. Give up your car, then buy it back.

    If you’re unable to come up with the money to get your car back, the lender will use the proceeds from the sale to pay off what you owe. If the sale price is less than your loan balance plus any fees, the difference is called the deficiency balance. That’s the amount you’ll be responsible for paying.

Pay the past-due amount, plus any late fees and repossession costs. You get your car back and resume paying your car loan.

Pro Tip
Your loan agreement should state how many payments you can miss before the lender can repossess your car.

But a car repossession isn’t the end of the world, so long as you commit to making smart money-management moves that raise your credit score and help get yourself back on the road to recovery.
Find your contract and contact your lender’s loss mitigation or collections department to explain your situation, advised Jenelle Davis, who worked in the credit union industry for seven years.
Your car has been repossessed. Now how do you get it back?

The Long-term Effects of Car Repossession

If you have the cash, paying off what you owe to make your loan current again may be the ideal solution, but there are other options if you’re struggling to make payments:
If you miss even one payment, and your lender technically can repossess your wheels.
“The difference between the two in terms of impact on your credit score is slight,” McClary said. “But if you’re thinking about trying to restore your good credit and how much effort it’s going to take, every little bit helps.”
You have a few options — some are less costly than others, but none are particularly easy:
Facing bankruptcy? You may be able to hold onto your car. Consult your bankruptcy attorney about whether your filing status allows you to retain property, including your vehicle.
Source: thepennyhoarder.com

Don’t destroy your car to get revenge. Your lender may not take the vehicle if it’s deemed worthless, but then they can’t sell the car to pay off your loan. You’ll end up owing more.

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The best way for the lender to get that money is to sell the car, often through an auction. So you’ll have to act fast if you want your car back.

7 Steps to Buying a Reliable Used Car

Buying a car with bad credit is possible—it’s just going to cost you. You’ll probably have a higher interest rate and require a bigger down payment, and you may have a much smaller selection to choose from than someone with a better credit history.

Here’s how to go about buying a car with bad credit and what you’ll need to be aware of to avoid being overcharged.

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1. Check Your Credit
2. Improve Your Score
3. Fix Credit Errors
4. Know What You Can Pay
5. Make a Bigger Down Payment
6. Get a Shorter Loan
7. Work with a Bad Credit Car Dealer
8. Get Preapproved
9. Get a Co-signer
10. Comparison Shop
11. Read the Fine Print
12. Refinance

Buying a Car With Bad Credit

If you have poor or bad credit, buying a vehicle requires some common steps that people with good credit don’t necessarily need to worry about. Consider taking these steps when buying a car with bad credit.

1. Check Your Credit

If your credit is poor, you may be stuck paying a higher interest rate until you can improve your credit scores. Your credit score is a huge factor when it comes to the interest rate and credit financing you will receive for your auto loan—or if you’ll be approved at all. You’ll want to go into this process knowing what your score is and what your options are.

Check your credit from all three major credit bureaus several months before you begin your car shopping journey so you have time to rebuild your credit if possible. Track your credit history to determine the areas where you can most improve before applying for a car loan.

2. Improve Your Score

There is no official minimum credit score you need to buy a car, but a higher score will open up more options and better rates. According to Experian, the average credit score for used car purchases at the end of 2018 was 659.

If your score is below 660, look for ways to improve your score before applying for a car loan. Your free Credit Report Card from Credit.com will help you determine the most efficient ways to improve your score: paying off debt, clearing up errors or taking care of old collection accounts could bump you over that coveted 700 threshold. Delaying the car finance process to improve your poor credit score and rebuild your credit can save you money in the long run.

3. Fix Credit Errors

If you find mistakes on your credit reports, fixing those errors could bring your score up quite a bit. If possible, give yourself at least 30 days to dispute credit report mistakes before you start car shopping and looking for an auto finance company or submit a loan application. If you think this is your best option, you can try DIY credit repair, or work with a credit repair service such as those from Lexington Law.

4. Know What You Can Pay

Whether or not you’re able to improve your credit score, you should know what you can afford to pay before you start shopping—and stay committed to your budget. Auto loan calculators are helpful tools to use when you are trying to determine how much car you can afford. These calculators can also provide you with an estimate of what you will be paying for the entire term of the auto loan, interest included.

〉 Try it now: Auto Loan Calculator

5. Make a Bigger Down Payment

If your score is still on the low side and you don’t have more time to rebuild your credit before purchasing a car, be prepared to put a large chunk of money down. If you’re able to put down more money, you can borrow less money—which will usually mean more savings overall. How much you have to put down on a car with bad credit depends on how low your score is (and why) as well as the price of the car and the dealer you’re working with. In general, at least $1,000 or 10% of the purchase price is recommended.

If you’re unable to put any money down, your options will be severely limited. You may be able to buy a car from a private seller who is willing to take payments, but this scenario is unlikely.

6. Get a Shorter Loan

Longer loans are generally considered a higher risk: there’s more time for you to potentially default on the loan, so the interest rates tend to be higher. The monthly payments will be higher for shorter loans, however, so make sure you are able to fit this into your budget with some room to spare.

7. Work with a Bad Credit Car Dealer

If you need a car now and have a credit score that falls below the 600 range, you may need to go to bad credit car dealerships that specialize in no-credit or poor-credit buyers. These dealerships will work with your credit history to get approval, but interest rates will likely be high and terms may be unfavorable.

8. Get Preapproved

Getting preapproval for auto financing from a bank or credit union could better prepare you for the car shopping process. This preapproval process analyzes your income, expenses, credit score and credit report and determines if you qualify for an auto loan from the lender and how much the lender would be willing to lend. Submitting your paperwork early and learning what obstacles you face could spare you a lot of headaches later when going through the loan approval process.

9. Get a Co-signer

If you have a poor credit score, it may be helpful to get a co-signer for your loan application. Not all lenders offer this option, so consider this carefully before moving forward.

10. Comparison Shop

Always shop around for your loan. You never know what options are available until you look. Look for the best possible terms and make sure that you can actually afford the payments so you don’t end up negatively affecting your credit even more. It’s also a good idea to compare rates from other lenders like banks or credit unions before settling on a loan straight from the dealership.

11. Read the Fine Print

The fine print can make a big difference in the overall purchase price of the vehicle, especially if your credit means a high interest rate. Make sure there’s no prepayment penalty so you’re not fined for paying off a loan quicker than agreed, and avoid pricey add-ons that increase the sales price.

12. Refinance

Auto loan refinancing could help lower your auto loan rates and your monthly payment, which could end up saving you hundreds over the life of the loan. For loan refinancing, you typically want a strong history of making on-time payments for at least 12 months. However, keep in mind that the loan refinancing will also take your credit history and current credit scores into account as well. So, as always, continue working diligently to improve and rebuild your credit rating.

Key Takeaways

Whether or not you can get a car loan with bad credit depends on many factors. If you follow these tips, you may be able to get an auto loan and save money even with poor credit scores.

You can view your credit score and get an easy-to-understand Credit Report Card for free at Credit.com or via the mobile app for iPhone and Android. Start by taking a look at what factors are having the most impact on your scores and credit rating so you know what to address first.

Source: credit.com

Locked Out? What to Do Before and After Losing Your Key

It’s no fun being locked out of your apartment, but it’s bound to happen sooner or later. You walk up to your front door and the key is nowhere to be found. And where exactly is the spare? A few feet away. In the hallway junk drawer. Inside your apartment.

Nice.

There’s no need to panic. Everything is under control. Breathe. Chances are that Fido isn’t actually tucked away in the closet quietly feasting away on your new blue suede shoes. But then again, anything’s possible.

Okay, enough with the wisecracks. We’re going to tell you how to prevent this inconvenient dilemma from ever happening, so take notes.

Before:

  • Know your buildings lockout and key policy: A lot can depend on your building. If there’s a leasing office, they might be able to let you in during business hours without hassle, while during off-hours you might be on your own to handle things. When you lose your key, there may also be a policy for changing locks or getting new keys made, which should all be in your lease.
  • Give someone you trust a copy of your key: If there’s someone you really trust, they can help you in a real pinch. They can be a neighbor, a relative, or friend who lives close, but they can save you when you get locked out. Just make sure this is someone you can trust with access to your place when you’re not there.
  • Keep a spare on you: If you have a large purse or wallet with a pocket you never use, you can keep a spare key in there. If your phone is in a large case with some room, that’s also a great place to hide a key. Ideally, you’ll forget it’s even there until you need to use it. So long as it’s not your regular key, that backup can be helpful.
  • Keep a spare somewhere nearby: This is risky and not entirely recommended, as having a spare key somewhere nearby is just inviting thieves to take a shot. If you think you can come up with somewhere good enough to hide a spare, though, it might save you from being locked out in the future.

Read more: Meet Your Neighbors: Why It’s Smart to Make the Effort

During:

So, even the best plans fail sometimes, and you’re locked out of your apartment. What do you do at that point?

  • Trace your steps: See if you can find the key, going back over where you’ve been. Did you drop it, or leave it wherever you were coming home from? If you can find it, you’ll be out of this mess with nothing more than just feeling foolish.
  • Check for your spare key: If you have a spare kept on you, left with a friend or neighbor, or hidden somewhere, go there. It’s no help if you don’t have one, but a situation like this is exactly why you have a spare key.
  • Contact whoever you live with: If you have a roommate or partner, contact them. You might just end up having to wait somewhere until they get back, but they’re your best way out if you can’t find your key and don’t have a spare.
  • Contact your landlord/management: If you can make it to the leasing office, a quick trip over there should be able to resolve things. If it’s during business hours and they’re off-site, try calling them. Follow whatever process is spelled out in your lease – these are only general guidelines.
  • Try to break in: Are your security practices a little lax? Is there an unlocked window or anything you can get through? Can you slide the lock open with a credit card if you had to? Thinking like a thief can get you back in your apartment when other things have failed and help you find gaps that you need to fix later.
  • Call a locksmith: This should only be your last resort. It’ll take a while for them to arrive and it’s going to cost a lot once they get there. If there’s any damage done to the door, frame, or lock, you’re going to have to pay for it, and if you’re locked out of the building entirely, they might not even be willing or able to let you in at all. You’re likely better off waiting for the morning and dealing with the leasing office, but this is a last resort in case you absolutely can’t wait.

After:

Sure, you just got through a big ordeal and want to just relax, right? It’s tempting, but now is the time to do something about it.

See all the advice above, under the “Before” header? Do that now. If you forget or lose your key in the future, those precautions may help you from having to do this again. So, go and follow that advice, then take a well-deserved break.

Read more: How to Never Get Locked Out Again

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Technology Revolution Calls Multi-Family Home

Speaker at Optech conferenceOne of the great proving grounds for technology lies within the apartment industry. In an effort to offer greater amenities for their residents, while staying one step ahead of the local competition, property management companies have been on the forefront of lifestyle-based technology. And, as society’s craving for technological offerings have steadily increased along with the preference for the apartment lifestyle, apartment communities that do not evolve with the times are doomed to fall into obscurity within their marketplace. This week, apartment industry professional meet for the annual Optech Conference to focus on the present and future of the technology that proliferates today’s apartment communities. Here are a few of the exciting new developments they will discuss:

Smart Technology in Apartments

The news today is frequented with discussions of the Internet of Things and the evolution of smart technology around the home. The smart phones that are in the hands of two-thirds of Americans have initiated a new era in connectivity, and that technology is having a profound impact on people who enjoy the apartment lifestyle. Keyless entry via smartphone and appliances that send alerts to your phone are just a few of the technology items that were once considered sci-fi, but are now becoming mainstream amenities. Amazon Dash Buttons, smart lightbulbs, and countertops that can wirelessly charge digital devices are also prolific. As smart technology continues to evolve into the centerpiece of household life, you are sure to see more technology available – both inside your apartment and inside your apartment community’s office.

Package Delivery to Apartments

The increased technology available to apartment management teams has done much more than enabled maintenance teams to complete your requests faster and create a world where rent can be paid online. Property management teams are becoming almost extensions of the family with their increased ability to assist renters in a variety of ways. One in particular that has come under scrutiny recently is the ability for community staff to accept package delivery on a resident’s behalf. In the past, that was a no-brainer for delivery companies such as UPS and FedEx. Packages were to be delivered at the community office in order to guarantee safety against weather and possible theft.

However, the significant increases in package delivery – thanks to more of us buying products online – have caused some communities to discontinue this policy in favor of other alternatives. However, technologically-advanced solutions are available for management teams to make sure your package deliveries still successfully arrive in your hands. Package notification systems can send text and email alerts about a parcel’s arrival. In some communities, package lockers take the place of leasing office storage for deliveries. In either case, tomorrow’s technology is available today for apartment communities, to help ensure you get your deliveries in time for the holidays.

Digital Connectivity for Apartments

Two things that are essential to modern apartment life are quality cellular connectivity and access to high speed internet. The challenges to find both of these are not new to apartment shoppers. Many communities have begun to add cell signal booster stations to buildings and are partnering with service providers to increase internet speeds. Instead of free premium internet offered in solely common area, many communities are offering it throughout the entire community. Google Fiber, AT&T GigaPower and other such services are bringing internet speeds to new heights, to ensure that you will always be connected.

As you shop for your next apartment, the technology that is important to you is available at many apartments in your city. All the things you want and need for your lifestyle can be found when you search for your next apartment using www.apartmentsearch.com. Sort by amenity, location and price and, when you find the apartment of your dreams, be sure to tell them how you found the community. When you mention ApartmentSearch, you can earn up to $200 in rewards. That bonus goes a long way to help you get ready for the holiday shopping season.

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Top 5 Qualities to Look for in a Landlord

Smiling young apartment landlord, reaching out with apartment keysLooking for an apartment that fits your needs doesn’t have to be a headache, and neither does finding a landlord that you can get along with. Developing a positive working relationship with your landlord can make a huge difference when it comes to negotiating the terms of your lease or requesting maintenance. When visiting any prospective apartment, look for these qualities in your next landlord.

#1: Good Communication

Good communication is the key to any healthy professional (or personal) relationship. Does the landlord listen to your questions and give thoughtful, direct answers? Are they transparent and clear in communicating their expectations for you and for themselves? Do they seem approachable and respectful?

If you sense any hostility, ambivalence, or if the landlord seems reluctant to answer your questions, it could be a red flag. You might be dealing with someone who sees tenants as expendable and interchangeable, someone who isn’t interested in working with you to build a long-term partnership.

#2: Organization

You took the effort to fully prepare for the meeting with your landlord, arriving with your ID, bank statements, and reference letters in tow. Can the same be said for them? Are the lease documents ready to sign? Do they appear to have a well organized system for signing new tenants? Does it look like they’ve done this before? If the initial meeting seems disorganized, it could be a sign that your experience with the complex’s staff could be too…think lost receipts, forgotten maintenance appointments, and overlooked tenant messages.

#3: Reliability

You should be able to rely on your landlord to follow through with their commitments. Did they arrive on time to your meeting? Do they return your phone calls promptly? Do they make excuses or change their story? A landlord who deals fairly and plainly with you during the application process will likely continue to be reliable in the future.

4: Professionalism

Are the landlord and their employees courteous and respectful? Is the apartment, its grounds, and the leasing office tidy, well-organized, and inviting? Does the office staff seem to take pride in their complex’s brand and their overall appearance? A landlord who maintains a respected, well-run business is likely someone who has a knack for building and maintaining positive working relationships with their tenants as well.

#5: Reputation

It’s worth looking up your landlord or their property management firm online to see what kind of reputation they have. You can even ask the landlord for the contact information of current or past tenants. If they are forthcoming, that’s a good sign. There are also online resources such as WhoseYourLandlord.com where you can search for landlord reviews by name and location. (Only bummer is that it’s limited to Philly, NYC, and DC right now.) While it’s good information to know, take anything you find on the internet with a grain of salt. One bad review from a disgruntled tenant doesn’t necessarily mean you’re dealing with a slumlord.

Ready to put your landlord know-how to good use? Browse recently listed apartments in your area on ApartmentSearch.com and schedule a few tours today! With our landlord tips in hand, you’ll be able to pick the apartment that’s right for you in no time.

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

When Does A Furnished Apartment Make More Sense?

Stack of moving boxes and blonde woman with head in hands, stressedSometimes life is funny. One minute you’re gliding through your daily routine and then all of a sudden…Wham! You are hit with something new and/or unexpected. Ferris Bueller said it best when observing, “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

That’s what happens for many people seeking a new apartment. There is more to it than simply walking into the first community you see and signing a lease. In fact, for many, the first step is looking around and asking about the things that go inside the apartment. And, if you fall within any of these groups, maybe the first thing you should ask the leasing professional in front of you is, “Does this apartment come furnished?”

Relocating Business Professional

Your job is sending you someplace new for the next 6 to 12 months. Could be shorter, could be longer. The problem is that you have a house full of stuff that you can’t take with you. And, since your family is staying put and you’ll be traveling back and forth, even pieces of your existing place would be tough to bring along. Finding a furnished apartment means that you can have all the luxuries of home while you are away. You can even lease a unit that has all of your electronics and housewares included. Why buy something only to hassle with trying to sell it on Craigslist in a few months? Finding a furnished place saves both time and money.

Going Through a Separation

A breakup or divorce is something no one wants to face, but the reality is, they happen. While finding an apartment is the first concern, the next needs to be what happens to the decor and items that are in the previous home. It can take weeks and sometimes months to agree on the division of belongings. At the same time, you still have a life to lead, work to get done, and other daily responsibilities to consider. It is much simpler to find a furnished apartment than to get stuck in a tug-of-war with your ex. That way, you can focus on getting yourself over this hump in life!

Being a Student or an Intern

On almost every university campus across the nation, first-year freshmen are required to live on campus. And, although the digs of on-campus living may be spartan at times, they almost always come with the items that you need inside your space. Once you transition into off-campus housing, many of the options you have available will also be fully furnished. Finances are incredibly tight for students and, since many don’t have jobs, the meager living funds from student loans don’t tend to leave much wiggle room for purchasing the things you need or want. Furnished apartments are surprisingly affordable for students, especially when you factor in the costs of moving.

These are just three of the many different groups of people who know that having a furnished apartment can make life easier, save money, and lead to greater success. So, when you seek your next apartment, be sure to ask if they offer a fully-furnished option. And whether you seek an apartment that is move-in ready or you want to take the time to find your own items to furnish the inside, start your search on ApartmentSearch.com. Our comprehensive, nationwide listing service can help you quickly and easily find the apartment that meets all of your needs. We’ll even pay you up to $200 in rewards when you let your leasing team know that you found your new apartment community on ApartmentSearch.com!

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com