Actor Walton Goggins Puts His Glamorous Hollywood Hills House on the Market

The actor Walton Goggins, currently starring in the sitcom “The Unicorn,” has put his unique Hollywood Hills home on the market for $3.35 million.

The five-bedroom, three-bathroom home is extraordinary in a number of ways. Chief among them is the fact that it was designed and built by Harold Ogden Sexsmith in 1927, and has only traded hands three times since.

Goggins purchased the place in 2010 for $1,555,000, and has done an admirable job of updating and restoring the property since then, while being careful to preserve its old Hollywood charm. The home is said to resemble the look of the nearby Chateau Marmont.

Among the meticulously restored features are the original coffered front door, hardwood and tile floors, an original wood-burning fireplace, arched openings leading from room to room, and classic casement windows.

Hollywood Hills home
Hollywood Hills home

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Living room
Living room

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Arched passageways and casement windows
Arched passageways and casement windows

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With many original lighting fixtures hanging graciously from wood-beamed ceilings, the 3,240-square-foot home exudes a classic yet comfortable, well-lived-in vibe. Built-in bookcases in many rooms, even the kitchen, provide character.

Breakfast nook
Breakfast nook

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The kitchen also features a cozy breakfast nook, top-of-the-line stainless-steel appliances, and is attached to a butler’s pantry/laundry room with a charming Dutch door leading to the side yard.

Vintage kitchen with modern appliances
Vintage kitchen with modern appliances

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Every one of the bedrooms, one en suite guest room downstairs and four others upstairs, feature the beautiful and classic casement windows.

Guest room
Guest room

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Bedroom
Bedroom

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The main suite features a pristine bath and a large walk-in closet. Another bedroom located upstairs is currently being used as a spacious office, with more built-ins. The listing photos show that it was well-used by Goggins.

Main bedroom
Main bedroom

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Office
Office

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The outdoor areas on the private and gated large lot also have a natural, vintage feel, and have been masterfully tended. There are two outdoor dining areas, a fire pit/lounge, mature fruit trees that yield a generous harvest every year, and a lovely pool, lit with strings of overhead lights.

Porch with built-in seating
Porch with built-in seating

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Outdoor dining area
Outdoor dining area

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Pool
Pool

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Goggins, 49, is one of the busiest men in Hollywood, currently starring in not one but two comedy series, the aforementioned “The Unicorn” and “The Righteous Gemstones.” Prior to that, he’s had leads in TV series including “The Shield,” “Justified,” “Vice Principals,” and “Six.” He has also appeared in such films as “Cowboys and Aliens,” “Django Unchained,” “The Hateful Eight,” and “Ant-Man and the Wasp.”

Josh Myler of The Agency has the listing.

Source: realtor.com

9 Dumb Ways You Are Ruining Your Home Value

Men wallpapering a home
Rawpixel.com / Shutterstock.com

Your home might be your biggest asset — and yet, you could be inadvertently making it less valuable. Some updates and renovations can backfire when it comes time to sell.

“What I have seen a lot of people do is rip out a closet,” says Steven Gottlieb, a licensed real estate salesperson with Warburg Realty Partnership in New York City.

Where he works, space is at a premium. That means eliminating a closet can be a costly mistake.

“I don’t know that it detracts from the [appraised] value,” he tells Money Talks News, “but it inevitably shrinks the [buying] audience.”

And with fewer people interested in a property, the chances of a quick sale or a full-price offer can decrease.

From removing closet space to painting walls garish colors, here are some dumb ways you could be dragging down your home’s resale potential.

1. Selecting the wrong color paint

Woman painting a wall
dotshock / Shutterstock.com

You may think neutral is boring, but buyers could be turned off by brightly colored walls.

That may seem silly, since it’s relatively easy to repaint. But some people don’t want the hassle, says Keri Rizzi, a real estate salesperson with HomeSmart in White Plains, New York.

“Buyers will judge based on paint alone,” she tells Money Talks News.

So, consider yourself forewarned if you decide to paint your rooms every color of the rainbow.

2. Using bold and busy designs

Living room with ugly wallpaper
ariadna de raadt / Shutterstock.com

It isn’t just colorful walls that can derail a potential sale. Busy or bright patterns on wallpaper, tiles or flooring can be a problem for some people.

“Those are much harder to change than just paint and can have more of an effect on value,” says Amanda Rogers, a Realtor with Rogers Real Estate Group in Ada, Michigan.

If you don’t have any reason to think you’ll be moving, go ahead and be creative. Otherwise, think twice about loud designs and bold colors.

“Always choose neutral options for permanent items, and add your personal style with accessories, furniture pieces, wall art, etc.,” Rogers tells Money Talks News.

3. Removing closets

Clothing rack
Pixel-Shot / Shutterstock.com

“In an urban setting, especially New York City, space is at a premium,” Gottlieb says. An apartment with minimal closets might not get a second look from buyers.

Even in a suburban or rural setting, storage space often is highly valued. Consider carefully before converting closets to living space or removing a rarely used pole barn from your property.

4. Ripping out bathrooms or laundry rooms

Older worker demolishing bathroom tiles
sima / Shutterstock.com

If you have a small household, you may be tempted to rip out a rarely used bathroom for closet or living space. Don’t do it, Gottlieb says.

“A bathroom is worth a lot,” he explains.

Even in urban areas, bathrooms and laundry hook-ups trump closet space.

5. Making trendy updates

Room with blue carpet
Artazum / Shutterstock.com

Renovating a home with the latest trends can backfire if the look becomes dated or is not the preference of a potential buyer. Rizzi has seen this happen when sellers install new wall-to-wall carpeting only to find that buyers really want hardwood flooring.

If parts of your house are looking tired and worn, consider giving buyers a credit to do their own work. Don’t sink money into updates that may not boost value.

6. Adding too much tech

Woman using a smart home control system
Andrew Angelov / Shutterstock.com

Technology changes quickly, which means an expensive smart home system may be obsolete in just a few years.

“People invest too much for the most current electronic system,” Gottlieb says. “Then, they are often disappointed in five to seven years when [buyers] are not impressed.”

Go ahead and install the latest bells and whistles for your own use and enjoyment. Just don’t expect such upgrades to boost your home’s sale price down the road.

7. Lowering ceilings

Workers plaster a ceiling
Daniel Besic / Shutterstock.com

Some people might want to lower their ceilings to accommodate lighting, but avoid that if possible, Gottlieb says. Ceilings on a main floor of 9 feet or more were among the most desirable features and design trends for 2020, according to the National Association of Home Builders.

By some estimates, high ceilings can add as much as 25% to the value of a home.

8. Failing to control landscaping

Man mowing weeds in an overgrown lawn
sherwood / Shutterstock.com

Curb appeal isn’t necessarily reflected in a home’s appraised value, but it can make or break a sale, according to real estate professionals.

“Make that first impression the best impression,” Rizzi says.

Clear out debris, trim overgrown bushes and pull weeds to create a clean exterior.

9. Letting your home fall into disarray

Plumber at work
Nor Gal / Shutterstock.com

Keep a home’s interior clean and well maintained.

“If something breaks, fix it,” Rogers says. “If you don’t know how to fix it, hire it done.”

Neglecting plumbing and electrical work could have dire consequences to your home’s value if it leads to structural damage.

Bottom line, according to Rogers: “Clean sells.”

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Should I Buy a Backup Standby Power Generator for My Home?

In October 2019, Californians experienced a series of rolling blackouts aimed at preventing wildfires. Afterward, Aaron Jagdfeld, the CEO of home generator company Generac, told CNBC its sales there had more than tripled. He also said generators were going quickly in the Northeast as homeowners sought emergency power in the wake of repeated hurricanes and ice storms.

Demand for generators tends to surge after major storms as people realize how easily they could be stuck without power for a week or more. In 2014, I learned firsthand what it was like. Over 14 days, we had eight power outages varying from a few hours to a full day. After 10 days of bitter cold and limited connection to the outside world, I found myself wondering whether we should buy a backup power generator.

But I didn’t take the plunge right away. Instead, I took the time to do some research on generators first — their downsides as well as their benefits.

If you’re thinking about buying a generator, it makes sense to do the same thing. Before you shell out the money, consider the purchase from every angle — the costs, downsides, hassle, and what you really want the generator to do. That way, if you decide to take the plunge, you’ll know how to pick the best type of generator for you and your family.

Should You Buy a Backup Power Generator?

Only certain people need a generator to make it through a disaster. How well you can manage without one depends on where you live and how much you rely on electricity at home.

For instance, Sandra Bockhorst of American Preppers Network writes that she managed just fine during a week without power in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Hortense by using stored water, kerosene lamps, and a propane grill. However, after moving to Pennsylvania, she decided to buy a generator after a series of storms took out the power to her farm and nearly cost her a freezer full of food.

To figure out whether a generator is a worthwhile investment for you, you must be able to answer several questions:

  1. How Common Are Power Outages? Only buy a generator if you’re really going to need it. If the power grid in your area goes down every time there’s a big storm, a generator could make a significant difference in your comfort — but if you’ve had one blackout in the last five years, you can probably get by without one.
  2. How Long Do They Last? Even frequent power outages are no big deal if they only last a couple of hours. A generator is much more useful for handling prolonged outages that last for days. And if blackouts in your area can last for weeks, it could be worth investing in a more expensive generator that lasts longer.
  3. How Extreme Is the Weather in Your Area? Think about the weather conditions in your area. In a mild climate, going a week without heating or cooling could be no big deal. But if you live in the Deep South, where summertime temperatures can reach over 100 degrees F with punishing humidity, a whole week with no air conditioning could be incredibly unpleasant or even unsafe. And if you live in a very cold area, you have to worry about both protecting yourself from frostbite — which you can probably manage with enough layers of clothing — and keeping the pipes in your home from freezing and bursting in the cold.
  4. Do You Have the Space? A running generator needs a spot in your yard that’s a safe distance from your home. Stationary generators have to stay in this space all the time, and portable ones also need a separate space for storage. Both types require a supply of fuel, which you must also store.
  5. Do You Have the Time? It takes a bit of work to keep a generator in good running order. And if it’s a portable generator, it takes effort to set it up and get it started during a storm. That’s a hassle that could outweigh the benefits of getting the power back on a little sooner.
  6. What’s Your Budget? Generators cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars — and that’s not even counting fuel costs. Not everyone has that much money to spare, and everyone has other things they could do with it. Consider what else you might use the money for, then think about whether a generator is really what you want most.
  7. What Are the Alternatives? The more dependent you are on electricity, the more a generator is likely to help you. Make a list of all the things you use power for at home — for example, heating, cooling, and refrigeration. For each one, ask yourself whether there’s some alternative you could rely on if the power were down for a week. If you have no other way of keeping your home warm or cool or rely on your well-stocked freezer for your food supply, then keeping the power on at your home is crucial. But if your only real concern is keeping your cellphone working, there are other options, such as solar and hand-crank chargers.

You can answer some of these questions based on previous experience. But others require a bit more information. Before you can make an informed decision, you need to know more about how generators work, their costs, the amount of space and maintenance they require, and the possible alternatives.


How Backup Generators Work

A generator works on the principle of electromagnetic induction. That means that when you move a wire through a magnetic field, it creates a current in that wire. A generator simply spins a magnet repeatedly around a wire, forcing electrons through the wire like a pump forcing water through a pipe.

To make the magnet turn, a home power generator contains a small engine, which can be powered by gasoline, liquid propane, or natural gas. The engine pushes a piston back and forth, causing the generator to turn and produce a steady electric current.

There are two main types of home power generators: portable and stationary.

Portable Generators

These smaller generators are mounted on wheels. When a power outage hits, you have to wheel the generator outside, start it, and hook it up to your home’s power system. You can plug your devices directly into the generator or hire an electrician to install a special cable called a manual transfer switch, which feeds the current into your home’s electrical system. From there, you can flip the circuit breakers to route power to the devices you need, such as the fridge and lights.

Portable generators can typically provide enough backup power to keep a few critical systems running, such as your refrigerator and a few lights.

Stationary Generators

Also known as a standby generator, a stationary generator sits in a permanent location outside your house. A stationary generator has an automatic transfer switch built in. If the power goes out, it automatically starts and feeds power into your home’s systems.

Standby generators are bigger than portable ones and can produce enough wattage to run an entire house. However, these whole-house generators are a lot more expensive than portable generators, and you have to hire a professional to install one.


Downsides of Owning a Generator

The benefits of owning a generator are easy to see.

When a storm knocks out power to your area, and all your neighbors are shivering in the dark, you’ll still have heat and lights. If the power outage continues for several days, your generator can also save hundreds of dollars’ worth of food in your fridge and freezer. And if you choose a portable generator, you can take it with you to power a few essential gadgets on a camping trip or at a tailgate party.

However, that doesn’t mean everybody should rush out to buy one. Owning a generator has its share of downsides, including cost, space, maintenance, noise, and safety considerations.

Cost

Home generators aren’t cheap. According to Consumer Reports, the smallest portable models are good for powering your fridge, a sump pump, a few lights, and maybe a TV, and they cost at least $400. Larger portable models can run bigger appliances, such as an air conditioner, and can cost up to $1,500.

Standby generators are more convenient to use but usually run at least $2,000. On top of that, you have to pay a professional installer to hook them up. According to Consumer Reports, generator installation can cost anywhere from a few thousand to over $10,000.

Space

It can be hard to find a place to use a portable generator. It has to be on level ground and at least 20 feet from your house — but close enough to connect to it with an extension cord.

You also have to protect it from the weather because it could electrocute you if it gets wet. But you can’t put it inside a shed. It’s unsafe to run in an enclosed space. And between uses, you have to find a place to store it to protect it from harsh weather and theft.

Stationary units live in the same spot in your yard year-round, so you don’t need to worry about storing them. However, they take up a fair bit of space and can be unattractive.

You also need to store fuel for your generator. That’s easy if you have a home standby generator that runs on natural gas, but you must store gasoline and propane outside your home for safety reasons. That said, you must keep the fuel locked up to protect it from thieves and vandals, which means adding a shed or detached garage unless you already have one.

Maintenance

Like any appliance, a generator needs regular maintenance to keep it running well. You have to keep it fueled and check the oil, filters, and spark plugs regularly. You also need to start it monthly and run it for about 20 minutes to keep the battery charged and the fuel lines free of moisture.

You also have to maintain your fuel supplies. Gasoline can go bad over time, so you must add a fuel stabilizer and refill your cans every year or so. Regular maintenance is necessary if you want to be able to count on your generator to work when an emergency strikes.

Noise

Generators are loud. The best ones are quiet enough to avoid bothering you while you’re indoors, but you could still get complaints from the neighbors. Some towns even have anti-noise ordinances that restrict how loud your generator can be or at what times you can use it.

Safety

You have to be careful when using a portable generator. It must be properly ventilated to avoid causing a fire or producing deadly carbon monoxide. HuffPost reports that during Hurricane Sandy, generators were responsible for at least nine deaths, mostly from carbon monoxide poisoning.

Even a properly vented generator gives off some fumes. So ensure it is at least 20 feet from all doors and windows to avoid letting any harmful fumes into the house. Burning gas or propane produces carbon dioxide, which is toxic to humans. It’s also the main gas responsible for climate change. That means the more you run your generator, the more you increase your carbon footprint.


Alternatives to Owning a Generator

Despite the many drawbacks of owning an emergency generator, some people think they have no choice because it’s the only way to keep the power on. But there are other ways to provide power for a few of your devices — or to get by with no backup power source at all.

In many cases, it’s possible to stay safe and comfortable for at least a few days without electricity.

Portable Power Stations

If your power needs are modest, you can meet them with a device called a portable power station. These backup power mini-systems are basically large batteries inside protective cases with built-in AC outlets and other ports for plugging in your various devices.

According to Wirecutter, they weigh around 50 pounds and can store anywhere from 100 to 1,800 watts of energy. That’s enough to keep key electronics, such as a phone or laptop, running for hours or even days at a time.

Unlike generators, portable power stations run silently and don’t require a backup supply of fuel. You can charge them with ordinary household current or, in some cases, with a solar panel.

However, they typically cost more than portable generators, and their power output is insufficient to run your central air conditioning or any large appliance. And even if you’re using them only for electronic devices, fans, or medical equipment, such as a CPAP machine (breathing mask), they can’t store enough juice to get you through a weeklong blackout.

Cooling Methods

There are many ways to stay cool without air conditioning. You can block out the sun’s hot rays with curtains and reflective window film and keep your home well insulated to prevent it from heating up as quickly. At night, when it’s cooler, you can open windows to let in the breeze.

You can also cool yourself, rather than the space around you. Taking a cold shower or applying cold compresses lowers your body temperature directly. Or if your home has a basement, you can retreat down there during the day to take advantage of the cooler temperature.

Heating Sources

Most heating systems depend on electricity to either create heat or distribute it throughout the house. So if a winter storm takes out the power to your home, you need some way to stay warm until the power comes back on.

You can heat an indoor space with a wood-burning or gas-burning fireplace, wood stove, pellet stove, or kerosene heater. Like a generator, all these fuel-burning appliances need proper ventilation for safety.

And if the winters in your area aren’t all that cold, you might be able to get away with bundling up in your warmest clothing and piling on the blankets at night.

Water Supply

If your home is hooked up to the municipal water and sewer lines, a power outage shouldn’t disrupt your water supply. But if you have a well that works with an electric pump, you need another source of water for bathing, drinking, and flushing your toilets.

One solution is to store water in jugs to get you through an emergency. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends keeping at least 1 gallon of water per day for each person and each pet in the house in your family emergency kit. Ideally, you should have a total of 14 gallons per person — enough to get you through two weeks without water.

You can also use rainwater collected in buckets or a water barrel for washing or flushing toilets.

Backup Power for Sump Pumps

Many homes rely on a sump pump to keep the basement from flooding. But if a storm knocks out the power, it can disable the pump when you need it the most.

To avoid this problem, you can choose a pump with a battery backup, which uses a car or boat battery to keep it going while the power is out. If you’re on the municipal water system, another option is to install a backup pump that relies on water pressure rather than electricity.

Food Storage

During a prolonged power outage, keeping your refrigerator door closed as much as possible helps the food stay fresh. Food stored in a full freezer should stay safe for up to 48 hours without power, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. However, food in the refrigerator will go bad much faster.

Packing the fridge with blocks of ice or dry ice can keep food safe to eat for a couple of days. Alternatively, you can transfer perishable food to a cooler, which requires less ice to pack. A good rule of thumb is to eat all your perishable food first, before it goes bad. After that, you can rely on shelf-stable foods, such as canned goods, cereal, pasta, dry beans, crackers, peanut butter, and powdered or ultra-pasteurized milk.

Cooking Methods

If you have a gas stove, you can continue to use it during a power outage. Most modern stoves use electric igniters, but you can always light them the old-fashioned way — with a match.

You can also cook outdoors on a grill, portable camp stove, or solar cooker. If you have a wood-burning stove or fireplace, you can do some cooking on that.

Power for Phones

If you have an old-fashioned landline phone — the kind that runs on actual copper cable — it will probably still work during a power outage. If not, there are several ways to recharge your cellphone when the electricity is out.

For $25 to $80, you can buy a solar phone charger that can top up your phone battery after about half an hour in direct sunlight. There are also inexpensive hand-crank chargers, which often double as emergency flashlights or portable radios. And finally, you can conserve your phone’s battery power by keeping it switched off in between calls.

Lighting Sources

At night, you can keep your home lit with candles, flashlights, or battery-powered lanterns. Modern LED technology makes it possible for a lantern or flashlight to last a lot longer on one set of batteries. However, it’s worth keeping extra batteries on hand in case the power outage goes on for weeks.

Entertainment

In the modern world, we tend to rely a lot on electronic gadgets — TVs, smartphones, computer games — to keep us amused. During a power outage, you have to fall back on more old-fashioned diversions, such as books. Besides reading to yourself, you can take turns reading aloud with your family members to entertain each other.

You can also work on jigsaw puzzles or play tabletop games, such as board games, card games, and party games like charades.


Final Word

In the end, my husband and I decided not to invest in a generator.

Instead, we opted to find other ways to prepare for winter storms. We installed a gas fireplace for heat, bought a hand-cranked radio that could also charge our cellphones, and got an LED lantern for lighting. These supplies — plus a gas stove and plenty of water, nonperishable food, and books — give us the confidence we can make it through another long stretch without power if we have to.

And in the end, that’s the most critical consideration: peace of mind. If you can’t sleep easy without a generator or some other backup power source to get you through a lengthy power outage, then a generator is a worthwhile investment, regardless of what the numbers say.

But if you decide the expense and effort of owning a generator outweigh the benefits, there are plenty of other ways to weather a natural disaster.

Source: moneycrashers.com

14 Stores With the Best Return Policies

fizkes / Shutterstock.com

The COVID-19 pandemic seems to be leaving few things unchanged. Some retail stores, whether brick-and-mortar or online (or both), are loosening their policies on returns, says ModernRetail, an industry publication. This buys customer goodwill and gives the companies time to process returned products. Other retailers may have tightened previously liberal returns policies.

To help ensure that you and the recipients of your gifts can exchange a too-small sweater or return an extra toaster, consider shopping at stores like these, whose return policies are more customer-centered. We’ve summed up the rules. We link to each store’s policy so you can read the fine print, including exceptions and caveats.

1. Costco

Trong Nguyen / Shutterstock.com

Selling everything from cucumbers to caskets, Costco says it stands behind its products 100%. That means full refunds on almost anything. A caveat: Some products — mainly electronics and appliances — must be returned within 90 days of purchase for a full refund.

Exceptions include diamonds, which are subject to special terms, and cigarettes and alcohol, which may not be returned where prohibited by law.

Love shopping at Costco? See “18 Surprising Things You Can Buy at Costco.”

2. Lands’ End

Ken Wolter / Shutterstock.com

The Lands’ End return policy is short and sweet. If you aren’t happy with a product, return it at any time for a refund or exchange.

The policy says:

“Refund requests received within 90 days of purchase will be issued to the original form of payment when available. Refund requests received beyond 90 days from the date of purchase or refund requests without a Lands’ End proof of purchase will be issued a Lands’ End Merchandise Credit.”

3. Ikea

IKEA
FotograFFF / Shutterstock.com

Thanks to its “No-Nonsense — 365 Days to Change Your Mind” policy, Ikea is one of the best stores for customer returns.

As the policy name suggests, shoppers get one year (365 days) to make a return for a full refund — for new and unopened products.

But you must have a receipt. If you don’t, the store will attempt to locate your purchase in its system. Failing that, you’ll get merchandise credit equal to the lowest selling price of the purchase from the previous 365 days.

Opened products may be returned within 180 days. You’ll need proof of purchase for a full refund.

If you love shopping at Ikea, here some tips: “4 Ways to Save More Money at Ikea.”

4. Bath & Body Works

Tooykrub / Shutterstock.com

If you’re looking for a sweetly scented gift, Bath & Body Works can be a good place to go.

In case the fragrance you selected from the vast selection isn’t just what they wanted, the store has a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

Return a product for any reason with a receipt for a full refund. No receipt? Your refund will be for the lowest selling price of the item.

5. REI

Joshua Rainey Photography / Shutterstock.com

REI is a mecca for outdoor enthusiasts. The store has a liberal return policy. In brief, you can return or exchange almost anything from the store within one year.

Outdoor electronics must be returned within 90 days. Tip: REI won’t take returns on items for normal wear and tear or damage caused by accidents or improper use. Used gear is covered by the policy, but must be returned within 30 days. REI Store Garage Sale (as is) purchases aren’t covered — those sales are final.

6. Zappos

360b / Shutterstock.com

You don’t need to worry about buying the wrong shoes online when you purchase from Zappos. The shoe retailer allows 365 days to return unused products and will pay for the return shipping.

So, if those strappy heels don’t look quite as cute on you as they did on the model, you can send them right back. Just don’t wear them to a party first; returns must be unworn and in the original packaging with original tags attached.

7. Athleta

FashionStock.com / Shutterstock.com

A division of Gap, Athleta specializes in workout gear for women. Other stores (including other Gap brands) may only take back unwashed or unworn items, but Athleta lets you return anything for any reason within 60 days, thanks to its Give-It-a-Workout Guarantee. An exception: final sale goods.

Athleta covers the shipping cost for returns and exchanges.

8. Nordstrom

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The days when Nordstrom let shoppers return anything in practically any condition for any reason are in the past. But the chain’s return policy remains one of the best around.

It says:

“We handle returns on a case-by-case basis with the ultimate objective of making our customers happy.”

You can return a purchase without a receipt, and the retailer will try to find it in its computer system. If it can’t, customers may show identification to receive a Nordstrom gift card for the current price.

9. L.L. Bean

E.J. Johnson Photography / Shutterstock.com

The L.L. Bean policy says it will accept returned products that don’t live up to customer expectations within one year of purchase. It’s even better for purchases made before Feb. 9, 2018. These are not subject to the one-year limit.

The retailer adds:

“After one year, we will consider any items for return that are defective due to materials or craftsmanship.”

10. Macy’s

littleny / Shutterstock.com

Macy’s once-mighty chain of department stores is in the midst of a three-year plan to close one-fifth of its stores — shutting roughly 125 locations in all.

But many of its stores still are in business. Macy’s return policy gives shoppers 90 days to take back a purchase. Returned goods must be in original, salable condition with the original tags.

Some exceptions are carved out. These include products from certain lines and manufacturers, lighting, area rugs, tech accessories and watches, dresses, furs, foods and beverages, and furniture and mattresses.

11. Kohl’s

Kohl's store
helga-esteb / Shutterstock.com

Hassle-free returns are a Kohl’s tradition, although the rules can be a bit more complicated than the name implies.

An in-store purchase with an original receipt can receive a refund or an even exchange up to 180 days after the original purchase date, with an exception for premium electronics. If you don’t have a receipt, and the store can’t find one, you may get a merchandise credit based on the lowest discounted 13-week sale price of the item.

12. Target

Target
Jonathan Weiss / Shutterstock.com

Target’s return policy varies, depending on what you purchased, its condition and whether you paid with a Target REDcard.

Most goods that are returned within 90 days, are unopened and in new condition can receive a refund or exchange. Read the policy and check your sales receipt or packing slip for exceptions.

Target allows up to a year to return Target-owned brands or registry purchases.

Using your Target RedCard to make the purchase earns you an extra 30 days to make returns.

Returns by mail are postage-free; you can download and print a prepaid mailing label.

13. JC Penney

JCPenney
Supannee_Hickman / Shutterstock.com

As with Target, JC Penney’s return policy varies significantly based on what you’ve purchased and whether you have a receipt. Here are the highlights:

  • Most purchases can be returned with a receipt for a full refund or exchange. No time window is given. Read the policy to see exceptions.
  • When you return something without a receipt, the refund with be issued as a JC Penney gift card; you’ll get the amount of the lowest selling price in the last 45 days and you’ll need to show a photo ID.

14. Bed Bath & Beyond

City of Angels / Shutterstock.com

Bed Bath & Beyond promises “Easy Exchanges & Returns.” If you have a receipt, you’re in luck. Returns and exchanges can be made (postage-free) online or in stores that are open to the public (this doesn’t include curbside only locations).

You can take back unwanted goods, with exceptions, for a refund in the original form of payment, within 90 days with your receipt. You may be asked to show ID.

Without a receipt, things get a little trickier. If it was purchased within the last 365 days, Bed Bath & Beyond will try to find a record of the transaction. If they can’t, and you are returning new and unopened goods, you may be able to get an exchange or merchandise credit for the current selling price minus 20%.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Your Complete Midtown, Atlanta Neighborhood Guide

Right where I-75 and I-85 connect (hence the “Downtown Connector” name), you’ll find the Atlanta neighborhood of Midtown.

As a business center and many amenities, Midtown remains one of the most coveted areas in Atlanta. Its tree-lined streets, multi-unit small buildings, street-facing retail, green spaces (perfect for a dog!) and walkability are hard to beat.

Midtown is also a hub for the arts, fine dining, late-night bars and the city’s LGBTQIA community. As a newcomer, it is often challenging to get to know the neighborhood and make sure it’s a good fit before you move. Get to know Midtown below.

Where is Midtown in Atlanta?

Nestled between Buckhead to the north and downtown Atlanta to the south, Midtown borders the connector’s east side. Midtown is one of the priciest neighborhoods in the city, thanks to its endless amenities.

The iconic Peachtree Street cuts through half of the neighborhood and follows a semi-grid pattern. All streets are numbered consecutively, with 10th street being a hub for most attractions. Midtown ZIP codes are 30308 and 30309.

map of midtown atlanta

Source: Rent.com

Midtown’s main demographic skews younger, including young families, Georgia Tech students and business professionals. The neighborhood is home to several museums, several Fortune 500 companies like Turner Broadcasting and plenty of ways to reduce your commutes via bike and public transportation.

  • Studio average rent: $1,519
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,205
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,542

Living in Midtown

Living in Midtown is living in the heart of the city. In Atlanta, nightlife, the arts scene and dining all congregate in this 1.2-mile area. From festivals like Music Midtown to cultural events like the Dogwood Festival, you can easily immerse yourself in the neighborhood’s culture. Keep reading to get to know this neighborhood a bit more.

Demographics

Midtown is home to young families, business professionals and students heavily involved in their community — 79 percent have a strong sense of community. According to a report from the Midtown Alliance, two in three residents are millennials or Gen-Xers. The neighborhood has seen five times the population growth compared to the city of Atlanta as a whole.

Transportation

With four MARTA stops available to its residents and ample bike lanes, Midtown residents truly have an array of options to leave their car at home. The neighborhood street grid encourages walking. The Atlanta BeltLine connects to more than five miles of bike lanes as well across the neighborhood.

midtown atlanta ga

Economy

Midtown has over 20 million square feet of office space, with 96% of it being less than a six-minute walk from a MARTA stop. That kind of convenience is rare in Atlanta. Thanks to its proximity to Georgia Tech and its emerging talent, world-class startup incubators and accelerators live within the neighborhood.

Technology Square, a project sponsored by Georgia Tech, has nurtured innovation, research and venture funds within Midtown. Companies like Fortune 500 NCR Corporation are one of many that have moved their headquarters into the area.

Outdoor recreation

With more than 300 acres of green space between Piedmont Park, the Atlanta Botanical Garden and nearby smaller parks, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy Atlanta’s mild weather. You can also hop onto the BeltLine right on 10th Street to explore beyond Midtown, as the trail connects all 45 neighborhoods in the city of Atlanta.

Entertainment

From jazz nights at the Woodruff Arts Center and exhibitions at the High Museum of Art to plays at the 14th Street Playhouse and concerts at the Fox Theatre, there’s no lack of entertainment in Midtown. You can also find late-night entertainment at bars along Peachtree and 10th Street. On average, you can see more than 3,000 cultural events in Midtown.

Education

Top-ranked institutions like Georgia Tech and SCAD Atlanta have bred talent within Midtown. Corporate innovation centers like Coca-Cola’s and co-working spaces with workshops for entrepreneurs have helped keep Midtown the hub for all things tech in Atlanta.

atlanta botanical garden midtown

10 things to do in Midtown

Thanks to its great walkability, Midtown feels like a real city neighborhood with many attractions that even locals enjoy. Thanks to Atlanta’s mild weather, you can enjoy the neighborhood mostly year-round. But it’s lovely during spring when the dogwoods bloom and in the fall as the tree-lined streets turn from yellow to orange.

Here are 10 out of the many things you can do in Midtown.

1. Alliance Theatre

In the heart of Midtown, you’ll find the Woodruff Arts Center complex and the core of the arts district. Catch a show at the Alliance Theatre, whether it’s the classic A Christmas Carol or one of their new shows that feature emerging Broadway stars.

2. Laughing Skull Lounge

Comedy and improv scene is alive and well in Atlanta. You can get a few laughs at the Laughing Skull Lounge in Midtown, a small, less than 75-seat venue inside burger joint, The Vortex.

3. Atlanta BeltLine Eastside trail

The Atlanta BeltLine has several sections, and the Eastside Trail, the first one to debut, comes right through Midtown. You can hop on the trail at Monroe Drive and 10th Street by foot or on your bike. The trail will connect you to other attractions in Old Fourth Ward, like Ponce City Market.

4. The High Museum of Art

Pay a visit (or better yet, become a member) of the Southeast’s leading museum, the High Museum of Art. Part of the Woodruff Arts Center complex, the museum holds more than 15,000 works of art in its permanent collection. Plus ongoing new, visiting exhibitions, like Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors.

5. Coffee at Café Intermezzo

For the past 40 years, Café Intermezzo has remained an afternoon beacon for long conversations and delicious cakes in Atlanta. At its Midtown outpost, you can quickly walk over after a long day at the office or on the weekends to enjoy a hot latte and a slice of one of their exquisite desserts.

6. Piedmont Park

One of Atlanta’s main green spaces, Piedmont Park transforms into a concert venue, festival site or just an excellent place to have a picnic depending on the time of year. Right in the middle of the city, the park is an incredible amenity to have nearby with a dog park, a community pool and, of course, plenty of walking trails to unwind at the end of the day.

7. Atlanta Botanical Garden

Attached to the back of Piedmont Park, the 30-acre Atlanta Botanical Garden changes from season to season. From lighting shows during the holidays to large, blooming sculptures during the spring, it’s worth visiting throughout the year.

8. Fox Theatre

The Moorish architecture of the Fox Theatre will take your breath away before you even go in through its doors. The historic landmark now functions as a venue for concerts, plays and musicals. You can also take a ghost tour of the facilities in the fall to learn more about the theatre.

9. Center of Puppetry Arts

Did you know that Jim Henson and Kermit the Frog cut the ribbon on the Center of Puppetry Arts’ opening day? It is one of the only puppet museums in the world. While this family-friendly attraction offers exhibitions and workshops for children, it hosts after-hours adult-only events that are just as fun.

10. Orpheus Brewery

Atlanta has more breweries than you can count on two hands, all with their niche and personality. Orpheus Brewery, right next to Piedmont Park, hires local artists to illustrate their sour beers’ cans. Head to their beer garden tasting room with a beautiful view of the park.

Finding an apartment in Midtown

With a vibrant arts scene and walkability, Midtown is hard to beat. One of the many neighborhoods around town that are lucky to have access to MARTA trains and buses, plus the Atlanta BeltLine and a high walk score, is easy to get around within the neighborhood.

Get from work to your Midtown apartment by skipping traffic. On the weekends, enjoy the outdoors at Piedmont Park or ride your bike on one of its many bike lanes.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments. We pulled our data in February 2021, and it goes back for one year. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

Source: rent.com

What the Flip? Portland Home Gets a Major Face-Lift and Gains $600K in Value

Flipping a house is a lot of work that can yield a big profit. But not every project is guaranteed to be lucrative. So what’s the key to successfully making over a fixer-upper and selling it for a gain? Our series “What the Flip?” presents before and after photos to identify the smart construction and design decisions that ultimately helped make the house desirable to buyers.

Known for friendly faces, eclectic locals, and beautiful scenery, Portland, OR, has been seen as a desirable place to put down roots for a while now. It was even rated the ninth best U.S. city to live in by U.S. News & World Report. All of those benefits, plus historically low real estate inventory, mean housing prices in Portland are high. But for flippers who can nab a fixer-upper with good bones, there’s plenty of potential for profit—as this example shows.

The flippers who took on this five-bedroom, five-bathroom house made a smart move by pouncing on the well-worn property for $875,000 when it was listed in June 2019. After a full-on renovation, they put the home up for sale, and in December 2020 it was sold for $1,475,000.

So how did they raise the home’s value by $600,000 in just a year and a half—and during a pandemic, no less? The booming market wasn’t the only thing that made this home sale such a success. The fresh renovations also had something to do with making this a must-have property.

Taking into account the home’s now-stylish interior design, we asked our team of experts to look at before and after photos and weigh in on the changes that made the biggest difference in this home. Here’s what they had to say.

Living room

Talk about major changes! Once full of dark, drab wallpaper and a dated, textured ceiling, the living room now has a brighter, cleaner look.

“The application of white paint on everything really works well in this room,” says designer, real estate agent, and house-flipping investor Laura Schlicht. “Two of this house’s biggest assets have been artfully played up: the architectural moldings and the fantastic view.”

“It was a great move to get rid of the extra door on the side of the fireplace,” adds real estate investor and agent Molly Gallagher, of Falk Ruvin Gallagher. “There are plenty of other ways in and out of the room, and it allowed them to widen the hearth and keep the green-tiled theme going.”

Kitchen

The old kitchen was spacious, but that’s about all it had going for it. Once the flippers worked their magic, they had a kitchen that would impress any prospective buyer.

“Removing a section of the wall between the dining room and kitchen brings much more light into the kitchen, bouncing off the bright white cabinets, rather than keeping the view for the dining room itself,” says Kate Ziegler, real estate investor and real estate agent.

She adds that her top question from buyers touring homes is whether or not they can remove a wall.

“Having done this update for the buyers broadens the audience for this home, and boosts sale price as a result,” says Ziegler.

Real estate investor and agent Tracie Setliff, also with Falk Ruvin Gallagher, was impressed with the island addition.

“The island placement is perfect—it seems like it was always there and makes up for some of the storage lost by opening up the wall,” she adds.

“We love that they nod to the original lights and time period of the home with the updated light fixtures they chose,” adds Gallagher. “And they smartly chose to appeal to a wide buyer pool by not adding in some specific tile that will be dated in five years.”

Home office

Before 2020, a home office was just a bonus, but now it’s essential—whether it’s for work or school, or both. Even though this renovation was started before the coronavirus pandemic, the flippers chose to upgrade this home office in a major way, which really paid off by the time they listed the home.

“I love that they removed the old attached bookshelf,” says Setliff. “The room has an airier feel to it without the hulk of the built-in shelving. There are so many cute bookshelves that are much sleeker.”

Schlicht agreed, explaining that the built-in bookcase, while often a bonus, was actually the wrong size for the space and made the room feel crowded.

“Let’s take a moment to notice the windows,” says Ziegler. “New windows are a significant cost that most new buyers don’t want to take on in the near term—but the payback in efficiency can be remarkable. Replacing windows as part of a flip makes the whole space look more contemporary and polished, but also adds real value to the home that buyers can quantify.”

Dining room

At first glance, it may seem like the only real change in the dining room was a new coat of white paint, but Ziegler says that’s not the case. In fact, she was rather impressed with the flippers’ efforts in this room.

“The dining room demonstrates places where the investors behind this work took the time to restore and retain older details: keeping the built-in sideboard, and even the mirror detail below the smaller window shows a thoughtful approach and is indicative of more time-intensive work,” Ziegler says.

“Restoring details rather than replacing with cheaper, contemporary alternatives requires patience and care, and that attention to detail is something buyers notice even if they don’t have the vocabulary to describe it,” she adds. “The updated chandelier is trendy but also a nod to midcentury modern styling that is appropriate for a house of this age.”

Setliff is happy to see the “boring” light fixture go, in favor of the new “sophisticated, sculpturelike light.”

“Buyers do not want to have to change fixtures, as simple as it seems, and keeping it fun yet unfussy was the way to go,” she says. “It is interesting how you notice the views from the windows now that your eye isn’t drawn to the dark brown of the built-in cabinets and window trim.”

Den

This old den went from afterthought to amazing after this flip, and our experts are impressed with the results.

“Goodbye, ’60s; hello, now!” says Gallagher. “Knotty pine is best reserved for Wisconsin supper clubs these days, and today’s buyers are not interested in having a supper club theme for their den.”

“Removing drop ceilings and wood paneling is an easy, instant update, but the nicer detail here is the addition of recessed lighting,” says Ziegler. “Recessed lighting in a basement space creates the illusion of more headroom, making for a much more comfortable den. Updating the basement den adds valuable square footage that buyers might have otherwise written off as just basement space.”

And we can’t forget about the star of this room: the fireplace.

“Replacing the dated brick with a pop of green tile and the white surround and mantel transform this new den,” says Setliff.

Source: realtor.com

10 Relaxing Home Decor Ideas to Transform Your Space

Much of our time these days is spent at home. Whether you’re still working from a home office, meal-prepping in your kitchen on weekends, or spending most of your leisure time looking at other homes for sale on your favorite real estate app, you may feel your home is not the calming space you’d hope it to be. Regardless of how you spend your time, your home is your sanctuary, where you should feel relaxed and be able to unwind from your daily life. If you want to design a more calming space but don’t know where to start, we’ve got you covered.

From adding cozy blankets and scented candles to dedicating a space to practice meditation, creating a relaxing house is just a couple of design steps away. Whether you live in warm Los Angeles, CA, or rainy Seattle, WA, one of these 10 relaxing home decor ideas is sure to transform your home into an even more calming place you’ll be happy to spend time in.

relaxing-home-decor-ideas

relaxing-home-decor-ideas

1) Design your space with cozy fabrics

There’s no better place to start designing a calming space than decorating with cozy fabrics. Whether that’s getting a new throw blanket for your couch or reupholstering your chair with a crushed velvet fabric, you can decorate just about anything with textiles. Soft fabrics bring a soothing, cozy feel to your home and can make you feel like you’re in a serene environment no matter the season. So break out the quilts, incorporate a fuzzy shag carpet, or pick up some soft throw pillows to make your space more relaxing after a long day.

2) Create balance between colors

When looking for the right relaxing home decor idea, think about how you’ll strike a balance between the colors in your space. Rather than bringing in lots of bright colors, consider adding a pop of color with a pillow or throw blanket against a neutral couch or chair. Unless you find yourself drawn to vibrant colors, less is more when it comes to incorporating these statement elements in your home. 

3) Choose classic and calming decor ideas

When it comes to choosing relaxing home decor, you may find yourself tempted by all the up-and-coming home trends. Opting for the latest trends can be fun, but if it’s not something you totally love, chances are you may not feel that relaxed in your space. One of the keys is to pick trends that you like along with those that will stand the test of time. If you’re interested in a new style but not sure how that fits into your home, looking into reversible home design ideas may just be your best option. 

4) Carve out a space for yoga or meditation

Nothing makes a home more relaxing than creating a designated space to wind down. Whether that’s a simple corner of your living room or a small room of its own, you can easily design a space that feels secluded from the rest of your home. With a yoga mat or a floor pillow, a few green plants, and a photo you love, you can easily make a calming nook for your yoga flow or mindfulness practice.

relaxing-house

relaxing-house

5) Use a weighted blanket in your bedroom

Chances are you’ve heard about weighted blankets. If you haven’t, weighted blankets range from 5 to 30 pounds and mimic therapeutic techniques of deep pressure stimulation, much like a massage. For those that have trouble balancing work and home life, choosing a weighted blanket for your bed or living room may help you relax. Either way, having a great blanket is one of the easiest relaxing home decor ideas to bring into your space to help you shut off for the evening. 

6) Light candles or diffuse essential oils throughout your home

Scents can be the gateway to creating a relaxing environment in your home. Whether you gravitate towards a calming chamomile scent or the smell of lavender before you go to sleep, there’s an essential oil for everything. If you’re more of a candle user, you can find a variety of scents perfect for cultivating a relaxing space. Fresh baked cookies, check. Christmas cheer, check. Nothing beats lighting your favorite candle or turning on your essential oil diffuser after a long day and letting your favorite aromas fill your home.

7) Mood lighting makes a relaxing home

If the weather is gloomy or it’s dark by the time you finish your workday, some much needed light can be all you need for a peaceful home. From sun lamps that mimic the benefits of sunlight or just incorporating string lights throughout your home, the options are endless. You can easily make your space more relaxing by switching up your lights and bringing a new vibe to your home. 

bright-living-room

bright-living-room

8) Embrace any and all natural light

Natural light is one of the easiest elements to brighten up your space. But if you live in an apartment with minimal windows or your living room doesn’t let in much natural light, there’s no need to worry. It all starts with embracing what natural light you do have in your home. Highlight the windows with high drapes to draw your eyes upward or keep window shades pulled open for as long as the daylight hours allow. Making an effort to let in any light from clouds or sun into your home can make your space more calming and welcoming. 

9) Take inspiration from nature for relaxing home decor

If getting out into nature makes you feel more relaxed, look to nature for inspiration when designing your house to be more relaxing. Incorporating the right shade of wood furniture into your home can evoke feelings of the mountains or the beach. Consider lighting a Fraser fir-scented candle or adding a few drops of pine essential oil in your diffuser to bring the mountain relaxation into your home. Taking inspiration from nature may be as simple as hanging a picture of your favorite beach or lake. That way you’ll have a serene feeling every time you see the photo.

10) Incorporate a plant garden

Plants are known to be a great way to incorporate nature and its properties into your relaxing home decor. The key is to choose plants that work with your space, like small succulents against a windowsill or tall fiddle leaf figs in a sunny room. For greenery that has multiple uses, consider starting an herb garden so you’ll have fresh herbs year-round. No matter how you bring plants into your home you’re likely to find yourself enjoying the greenery you see each day.

Source: redfin.com

10 Relaxing Home Decor Ideas to Transform Your Space – Redfin

Much of our time these days is spent at home. Whether you’re still working from a home office, meal-prepping in your kitchen on weekends, or spending most of your leisure time looking at other homes for sale on your favorite real estate app, you may feel your home is not the calming space you’d hope it to be. Regardless of how you spend your time, your home is your sanctuary, where you should feel relaxed and be able to unwind from your daily life. If you want to design a more calming space but don’t know where to start, we’ve got you covered.

From adding cozy blankets and scented candles to dedicating a space to practice meditation, creating a relaxing house is just a couple of design steps away. Whether you live in warm Los Angeles, CA, or rainy Seattle, WA, one of these 10 relaxing home decor ideas is sure to transform your home into an even more calming place you’ll be happy to spend time in.

relaxing-home-decor-ideas

relaxing-home-decor-ideas

1) Design your space with cozy fabrics

There’s no better place to start designing a calming space than decorating with cozy fabrics. Whether that’s getting a new throw blanket for your couch or reupholstering your chair with a crushed velvet fabric, you can decorate just about anything with textiles. Soft fabrics bring a soothing, cozy feel to your home and can make you feel like you’re in a serene environment no matter the season. So break out the quilts, incorporate a fuzzy shag carpet, or pick up some soft throw pillows to make your space more relaxing after a long day.

2) Create balance between colors

When looking for the right relaxing home decor idea, think about how you’ll strike a balance between the colors in your space. Rather than bringing in lots of bright colors, consider adding a pop of color with a pillow or throw blanket against a neutral couch or chair. Unless you find yourself drawn to vibrant colors, less is more when it comes to incorporating these statement elements in your home. 

3) Choose classic and calming decor ideas

When it comes to choosing relaxing home decor, you may find yourself tempted by all the up-and-coming home trends. Opting for the latest trends can be fun, but if it’s not something you totally love, chances are you may not feel that relaxed in your space. One of the keys is to pick trends that you like along with those that will stand the test of time. If you’re interested in a new style but not sure how that fits into your home, looking into reversible home design ideas may just be your best option. 

4) Carve out a space for yoga or meditation

Nothing makes a home more relaxing than creating a designated space to wind down. Whether that’s a simple corner of your living room or a small room of its own, you can easily design a space that feels secluded from the rest of your home. With a yoga mat or a floor pillow, a few green plants, and a photo you love, you can easily make a calming nook for your yoga flow or mindfulness practice.

relaxing-house

relaxing-house

5) Use a weighted blanket in your bedroom

Chances are you’ve heard about weighted blankets. If you haven’t, weighted blankets range from 5 to 30 pounds and mimic therapeutic techniques of deep pressure stimulation, much like a massage. For those that have trouble balancing work and home life, choosing a weighted blanket for your bed or living room may help you relax. Either way, having a great blanket is one of the easiest relaxing home decor ideas to bring into your space to help you shut off for the evening. 

6) Light candles or diffuse essential oils throughout your home

Scents can be the gateway to creating a relaxing environment in your home. Whether you gravitate towards a calming chamomile scent or the smell of lavender before you go to sleep, there’s an essential oil for everything. If you’re more of a candle user, you can find a variety of scents perfect for cultivating a relaxing space. Fresh baked cookies, check. Christmas cheer, check. Nothing beats lighting your favorite candle or turning on your essential oil diffuser after a long day and letting your favorite aromas fill your home.

7) Mood lighting makes a relaxing home

If the weather is gloomy or it’s dark by the time you finish your workday, some much needed light can be all you need for a peaceful home. From sun lamps that mimic the benefits of sunlight or just incorporating string lights throughout your home, the options are endless. You can easily make your space more relaxing by switching up your lights and bringing a new vibe to your home. 

bright-living-room

bright-living-room

8) Embrace any and all natural light

Natural light is one of the easiest elements to brighten up your space. But if you live in an apartment with minimal windows or your living room doesn’t let in much natural light, there’s no need to worry. It all starts with embracing what natural light you do have in your home. Highlight the windows with high drapes to draw your eyes upward or keep window shades pulled open for as long as the daylight hours allow. Making an effort to let in any light from clouds or sun into your home can make your space more calming and welcoming. 

9) Take inspiration from nature for relaxing home decor

If getting out into nature makes you feel more relaxed, look to nature for inspiration when designing your house to be more relaxing. Incorporating the right shade of wood furniture into your home can evoke feelings of the mountains or the beach. Consider lighting a Fraser fir-scented candle or adding a few drops of pine essential oil in your diffuser to bring the mountain relaxation into your home. Taking inspiration from nature may be as simple as hanging a picture of your favorite beach or lake. That way you’ll have a serene feeling every time you see the photo.

10) Incorporate a plant garden

Plants are known to be a great way to incorporate nature and its properties into your relaxing home decor. The key is to choose plants that work with your space, like small succulents against a windowsill or tall fiddle leaf figs in a sunny room. For greenery that has multiple uses, consider starting an herb garden so you’ll have fresh herbs year-round. No matter how you bring plants into your home you’re likely to find yourself enjoying the greenery you see each day.

Source: redfin.com