There Will Be a 3-Month Waiting Period to Get a Mortgage After Forbearance

Last updated on September 11th, 2020

We’ve finally got some clarity regarding what happens after mortgage forbearance in terms of obtaining a subsequent home loan.

The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which oversees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, announced temporary guidance regarding the matter today.

Waiting Period After Mortgage Forbearance for Fannie and Freddie

  • No wait to buy a home or refinance if you’re in a forbearance plan but continued making payments
  • 3-month waiting period if you didn’t make payments while in a forbearance plan
  • Those who paused payments must make 3 consecutive monthly mortgage payments after forbearance ends to be eligible for a new home loan
  • Only applies to mortgages backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac

While it’s not 100% clear, thanks to ambiguous wording from the FHFA, it appears there will be a three-month waiting period to get a mortgage after forbearance ends, assuming you didn’t make payments during that time.

The key to eligibility is to ensure that you have made three consecutive payments after forbearance comes to an end, via a repayment plan, the payment deferral option, or loan modification if applicable.

Those who just go back to making regular payments via the payment deferral option should only need to make three regular payments to restore eligibility for a mortgage refinance or new home purchase loan.

The semi-confusing part is the release also says borrowers in forbearance plans are eligible to refinance or buy a home, presumably right away, if they are current on their mortgage.

For example, if a homeowner is in a forbearance plan but still making mortgage payments for some reason, possibly because they just wanted the safety net and didn’t actually need the assistance.

FHFA Director Mark Calabria said those “who are in COVID-19 forbearance but continue to make their mortgage payment will not be penalized,” allowing them to take advantage of today’s record low mortgage rates.

That makes sense seeing that someone who didn’t actually miss a payment shouldn’t have to wait to get a mortgage.

But there’s still some uncertainty, from a lender’s standpoint, if a forbearance plan is available to the borrower and they later decide to pause payments.

Apparently, about one-third of borrowers in forbearance plans have continued making payments, per FHFA data shared by Calabria during a webinar titled “MBA Live: State of the Industry.”

Regardless, for the majority who are in forbearance plans and actually not making mortgages payments, the wait will be a mere three months, which is a pretty good deal in my opinion.

The FHFA also extended its policy to purchase mortgages in forbearance, which was due to expire on May 31st, 2020.

They will now buy forborne loans with note dates on/before June 30th, 2020 as long as they are delivered by August 31st, 2020 (and only one mortgage payment has been missed).

Getting an FHA Loan After Forbearance

In mid-September 2020, HUD released a mortgagee letter detailing waiting periods for FHA loans post-forbearance.

Similar to Fannie and Freddie, those who entered a forbearance plan but continued to make all their monthly mortgage payments can get a home loan with no wait provided the forbearance plan is terminated prior to or at closing.

Those in forbearance plans who paused payments will be subject to a three-month waiting period once the forbearance plan has been completed. In other words, they must make three monthly payments post-forbearance.

That rule applies to both home purchase loans and rate and term refinances.

For cash out refinances, the borrower must have completed their forbearance plan AND made at least 12 consecutive monthly payments post-forbearance.

A borrower who is still in a mortgage forbearance plan at the time of case number assignment, or has made less than 3 consecutive monthly mortgage payments post-forbearance, is eligible for a Credit Qualifying streamline refinance provided they meet the other streamline loan requirements.

For Non-Credit Qualifying streamline refinances, you must have made three consecutive monthly mortgage payments post-forbearance and meet the other general requirements for a streamline refinance.

What About Mortgage Forbearance Waiting Periods for Other Types of Home Loans?

  • No waiting period guidance yet for USDA loans and VA loans
  • They tend to be more forgiving/flexible than Fannie and Freddie in these situations
  • Might be a similar waiting period or none at all if certain conditions met
  • Keep in mind that lenders may impose their own overlays above and beyond these rules

It’s unclear how other types of home loans will be treated, such USDA loans, VA loans, jumbo loans, and miscellaneous portfolio loans.

My guess is Ginnie Mae-backed loans will get similar or even more favorable treatment, seeing that they’re usually pretty lax.

Back during the mortgage crisis, you could get an FHA loan just one year after foreclosure, short sale, or bankruptcy with extenuating circumstances.

Clearly COVID-19 is an extenuating circumstance for EVERYONE so I couldn’t see them imposing much of a wait if any at all.

With regard to jumbo loans, non-conforming loans, and portfolio loans, your guess is as good as mine.

It will likely vary by bank/lender and you may need to meet other various conditions to show you’re not a delinquency threat.

The other question is will there be lender overlays that go above and beyond this interim rule?

In other words, will certain banks and mortgage lenders require borrowers to be six or 12 months out of forbearance before extending new financing?

You could certainly make the argument, especially if there’s a correlation between mortgage forbearance and delinquency rates.

Read more: Will Forbearance Prevent You from Getting a Mortgage in the Future?

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

Value of U.S. Housing Market Hits Another All-Time High

Posted on October 29th, 2020

In the second quarter of 2020, the U.S. housing market hit an all-time high of $32.8 trillion, per The Federal Reserve’s Flow of Funds Report, as referenced in the latest Monthly Chartbook from the Urban Institute.

That was up from roughly $32.4 trillion in the first quarter of 2020, thanks to an increase in home equity from $21.1 trillion to $21.5 trillion.

Meanwhile, outstanding mortgage debt remained steady at $11.3 trillion, which tells us most borrowers are paying down existing mortgages and/or applying for rate and term refinances to lower monthly payments.

And that’s a good thing because it means most homeowners aren’t overleveraged like they were back in 2006, before the housing crisis ushered in the Great Recession.

Looking at it a different way, American homeowners have a collective loan-to-value ratio (LTV) of about 34%.

The Housing Market Appears to Be Healthy Despite Record Home Prices

value of housing market

  • U.S. property values continue to rise as mortgage debt keeps falling
  • American homeowners have a collective loan-to-value ratio (LTV) of about 34%
  • Mortgage debt is essentially unchanged from 2006 while home values have risen nearly $8 trillion
  • This means today’s homeowners are in good shape overall, but it’s harder for new buyers to enter the market

While one could always express caution when prices hit all-time highs, you’ve got to consider more than just the price.

More important is to look at housing affordability and the debt held by existing homeowners.

Fortunately, U.S. homeowners only carry a collective $11.3 trillion in mortgage debt, which appears to be flat or even lower than total housing debt back in 2006.

There are several reasons why today’s homeowners are carrying a lot less mortgage debt. For one, most haven’t tapped their equity.

Very few homeowners these days have applied for cash out refinances or pulled equity via home equity line of credit or home equity loan.

cash out share

Instead, they’ve been paying down their home loans each month, enjoying tailwinds propelled by record low mortgage rates.

Simply put, homeowners owe less and pay more in principal with each monthly payment, creating a housing market that is less leveraged.

This is a good thing for individual households and for the housing market as a whole because it means borrowers aren’t overextended, and have options if they’re unable to keep up with monthly payments.

A decade ago, mortgage payments often weren’t affordable because of so-called exploding ARMs that reset much higher after the borrower enjoyed an initial teaser rate.

And because they didn’t have any skin in the game, aka home equity, they couldn’t refinance to seek out payment relief.

That led to a flood of short sales and foreclosures, and eventually the creation of widespread loan modification programs such as HAMP and HARP.

Today, even if a homeowner falls behind due to COVID-19 or another setback, they could potentially sell for a tidy profit and move on.

This protects both that individual and their local housing market, which might otherwise suffer from declining property values due to the presence of distressed home sales.

In summary, this is why today’s housing market is very different than the one we experienced more than a decade ago, despite some economists seeing home prices in “bubble territory.”

But What About Housing Affordability Today?

  • Mortgage affordability has actually improved in recent years despite surging home prices
  • Existing homeowners typically spent 17.5% of household income on their monthly housing payments in September, down from 19.6% two years ago
  • Low mortgage rates are improving affordability, but rising down payments are hurting prospective buyers
  • Property values have grown at 2X rate of incomes over the past six years, and typical U.S. home now worth 3.08 times median homeowner household income

It’s great that existing homeowners are enjoying record low mortgage rates and equally affordable housing payments, but what about prospective home buyers?

Well, housing affordability has actually improved since 2018 due to the ultra-low mortgage rates available, per a new analysis from Zillow.

This is despite the fact that home values have grown at about double the rate of incomes over the past six years.

While households typically spent just 17.5% of income on monthly housing payments in September, down from 19.6% two years earlier, the typical U.S. property is now worth 3.08 times median homeowner household income, an all-time high per Zillow.

In other words, monthly payments are cheap for existing homeowners, but their properties are valued well above their incomes.

They remain affordable because many of these homeowners have small mortgage balances and super low mortgage rates.

But if these same folks were to buy their homes today, it might not work out, which brings us to those prospective buyers, or Gen Z home buyers.

Zillow noted that home values have increased a whopping 38.3% since September 2014, while homeowner incomes have gone up just 18.8% over the same period.

If a home buyer puts down 20% on a median-priced property they would have only needed about $36,600 at the start of 2014, or 6.4 months of income for a median homeowner household.

Today, they’d need a $52,000 down payment, which is 7.5 months of income for that 20% down payment to avoid PMI and obtain a more favorable interest rate.

Even worse for those still renting, Zillow expects home prices to rise a further 7% over the next year, which would increase that required down payment another $3,600 to about $55,600.

This is essentially going to steer more new home buyers into low down payment mortgages, such as FHA loans that only require 3.5% down, or Fannie Mae HomeReady and its mere 3% down requirement.

While it at least gives them an option, they’re going to have higher mortgage payments as a result, due to a larger loan amount, higher mortgage rate, and compulsory mortgage insurance.

Additionally, they’ll have very little skin in the game, which could present a problem if home prices take a turn for the worse, as they did a decade ago.

The good news is the bulk of homeowners are sitting pretty on mounds of equity, so assuming cash out refis don’t become the next big thing, the overall housing market should be relatively safe.

Could Existing Homeowners Afford to Buy Their Properties at Today’s Prices?

One last thing. We’ve basically got this weird situation where a lot of existing homeowners probably wouldn’t be able to afford their same properties if they were to purchase them today.

However, they’ve got a ton of home equity that is only growing each month thanks to regular payments of principal and rising home prices, meaning more money is essentially locked in their properties.

At the same time, it makes a move difficult because even a lateral purchase would be pricey from an affordability standpoint when you factor in stagnant incomes and higher property taxes.

Or the fact that some of these owners are retired or not making peak income.

In the end, it further exacerbates an already difficult situation in terms of housing inventory, which has been on the record low end of things for quite a while.

That just points to even higher home prices and lots of equity accrual, which buffers the housing market, but makes it increasingly difficult for new homeowners to get into the game.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

What is mortgage loan modification, and is it a good idea?

Trouble paying your mortgage? You have options

You might be wondering about mortgage loan modification if you’re:

  • Experiencing financial hardship due to the coronavirus
  • Having trouble making your monthly mortgage payments
  • Currently in mortgage forbearance but worried about what will happen when forbearance ends

The good news is, help is available. But mortgage relief options are not one-size-fits-all.

Depending on your circumstances, you might be eligible for a loan modification. Or, you might be able to pursue another avenue like a refinance. Here’s what you should know about your options.

Check your refinance eligibility (Feb 17th, 2021)


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What is loan modification?

Loan modification is when a lender agrees to alter the terms of a homeowner’s mortgage to help them avoid default and keep their house during times of financial hardship.

The goal of a mortgage loan modification is to reduce the borrower’s payments so they can afford their loan month-to-month. This is typically done by lowering the mortgage rate or extending the loan’s repayment term.

“A mortgage loan modification does not replace your existing home loan or your lender,” explains Karen Condor, a finance and insurance expert with Loans.org.

“However, it restructures your loan in the interest of making it more manageable when you experience difficulties in making your mortgage payments.”

How mortgage loan modification works

With a loan modification, the total principal amount you owe won’t change.

“But the lender may agree to a lower interest rate, reduced loan length, or a longer payoff period,” says Elizabeth Whitman, attorney and managing member of Whitman Legal Solutions, LLC.

Any of these strategies could help reduce your monthly mortgage payments and/or the total amount of interest you pay in the long run.

Modification can also include switching from an adjustable-rate mortgage to a fixed-rate mortgage and rolling late fees into your principal, adds Condor.

Note, loan modification is intended to make a mortgage more affordable month-to-month. But it often involves extending the loan term or adding missed payments back into the loan — which may increase the total amount of interest paid.

Refinancing into a new loan, on the other hand, often reduces the monthly payment and the total interest cost.

Loan modification vs. refinance

A refinance is typically the first plan of action for homeowners who need a lower mortgage payment.

Refinancing can replace your original loan with a new one that has a lower interest rate and/or a longer term. This may offer a permanent reduction in mortgage loan payments without negatively affecting your credit.

However, borrowers going through financial hardship might not be able to refinance.

They may have trouble qualifying for the new loan due to a reduced income, lower credit score, or unexpected debts (such as medical expenses).

In these cases, the homeowner might be eligible for a mortgage loan modification.

Loan modification is usually reserved for homeowners who are not eligible to refinance due to a financial hardship.

Mortgage modification is usually reserved for borrowers who do not qualify for a refinance and have exhausted other possible mortgage relief options.

“With a loan modification, you work with your existing bank or lender on modifying the terms of your existing mortgage,” explains David Merritt, a consumer finance litigation attorney with Bernkopf Goodman, LLP.

“If you’ve defaulted on your existing mortgage, chances are your credit has been negatively impacted to the point where a new lender would be wary to give you a new loan.”

“Typically a refinance is not possible in this situation,” says Merritt.

That means there’s no real contest between loan modification vs. refinancing. The right option for you will depend on the status of your current loan, your personal finances, and what your mortgage lender agrees to.

Check your refinance eligibility (Feb 17th, 2021)

Loan modification vs. forbearance

Forbearance is another way servicers can help borrowers during times of financial stress.

Loan forbearance is a temporary plan that pauses mortgage payments while a homeowner gets back on their feet.

For example, many homeowners who lost their jobs or had reduced income were able to request forbearance for up to a year or more during the COVID pandemic.

Unlike forbearance, mortgage loan modification is a permanent plan that changes the rate or terms of a home loan.

Forbearance and loan modification can sometimes be combined to make a more effective mortgage relief plan.

For instance, a homeowner whose income is still reduced at the end of their forbearance period may be approved for a permanent loan modification.

Or, a homeowner approved for mortgage modification may also have part of their unpaid principal forborne (put off) until the end of the repayment period.

Who is eligible for a loan modification?

To qualify for a loan modification, a borrower usually must have missed at least 3 mortgage payments and be in default.

“Sometimes, a borrower who has experienced financial setbacks, which makes a default imminent, can qualify for a loan modification. But not everyone in default under their mortgage is eligible for a loan modification,” explains Whitman.

“Borrowers whose financial setback is so severe that they will never be able to repay their mortgage won’t receive a modification, nor will borrowers who have the ability to make mortgage payments either from their income or savings.”

“Borrowers whose financial setback is so severe that they will never be able to repay their mortgage won’t receive a modification” –Elizabeth Whitman, attorney & managing member, Whitman Legal Solutions, LLC

In addition to providing a hardship letter or statement, prepare to provide proof of income, two years’ worth of tax returns, and bank/financial statements, says Condor.

Be aware, however, that your lender is not obligated to provide a loan modification.

“Once a lender has an executed contract — meaning the loan — they don’t have to change it. Many [homeowners] are denied a mortgage loan modification,” Gallagher explains.

“If the lender desires to modify the terms, per your request, then you have a starting point.”

How to request a loan modification

The process for requesting a loan modification will vary depending on who manages your loan.

The first thing you need to do is contact your loan servicer. This is the company to which you send payments, and the one you need to work with to determine your options for loan modification.

Some mortgages are managed, or “serviced” by the original lender. But most home loans are serviced by a separate company.

For instance, you may have received the loan from Wells Fargo, but now make payments to U.S. Bank.

The loan servicer is the company that takes your monthly mortgage payments; you can find yours by checking the name and contact information on your latest mortgage statement.

Many borrowers begin the process by sending a ‘hardship letter’ to their servicer or lender. A hardship letter is simply a note that describes the borrower’s financial difficulties and explains why they can’t make payments.

The lender will likely request financial information and documentation, including bank statements, pay stubs, and proof of your assets.

These documents will help your lender understand the full scope of your personal finances and determine the correct path for mortgage relief.

Mortgage loan modification programs

Your loan modification options will depend on the type of loan you have and what your lender or loan servicer agrees to.

Conventional loan modification

“Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and private lenders of conventional loans have their own modification programs and guidelines,” says Charles Gallagher, a real estate attorney.

In particular, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae offer Flex Modification programs designed to decrease a qualified borrower’s mortgage payment by about 20%.

Flex Modification typically involves adjusting the interest rate, forbearing a portion of the principal balance, or extending the loan’s term to make monthly payments more affordable for the homeowner.

To be eligible for a Flex Modification program, the homeowner must have:

  • At least 3 monthly payments past due on a primary residence, second home, or investment property
  • Or; less than 3 monthly payments past due but the loan is in “imminent default,” meaning the lender has determined the loan will definitely default without modification. This is only an option for primary residences

Certain hardships can trigger “imminent default” status; for instance, the death of a primary wage earner in the household, or serious illness or disability of the borrower.

Unemployment is typically not an eligible reason for Flex Modification.

Borrowers who are unemployed are more likely to be placed in a temporary forbearance plan — which pauses payments for a set period of time, but does not permanently change the loan’s term or interest rate.

In addition, government-backed FHA, VA, and USDA loans are not eligible for Flex Modification programs.

FHA loan modification

The Federal Housing Administration offers its own loan modification options to make payments more manageable for delinquent borrowers.

Depending on your situation, FHA loan modification options may include:

  • Lowering the interest rate
  • Extending the loan term
  • Rolling unpaid principal, interest, or loan costs back into the loan’s balance
  • Re-amortizing the mortgage to help the borrower make up missed payments

In some cases where extra assistance is needed, FHA borrowers may be eligible for the FHA-Home Affordable Modification Program (FHA-HAMP).

FHA-HAMP allows the lender to defer missed mortgage payments to bring the homeowner’s loan current. It can then request that HUD (FHA’s overseer) further reduce the monthly payment by opening an interest-free subordinate loan of up to 30% of the remaining loan balance. The borrower only pays principal and interest based on 70% of the balance, and can pay back the remainder upon a sale or refinance of the home.

Deferring this extra principal amount can help make it easier for FHA borrowers to get back on track with their loans.

FHA-HAMP is typically combined with one of the loan modification methods above to lower the borrower’s monthly payment.

Eligible FHA borrowers must complete a trial repayment plan to qualify for either loan modification or the FHA-HAMP program. This involves making on-time payments in the modified amount for 3 months straight.

VA loan modification

Veterans and service members with loans backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs can ask their servicer about VA loan modification.

VA loan modification can roll missed payments back into the loan balance, as well as other delinquent homeownership costs like unpaid property taxes and homeowners insurance.

After these costs are added to the loan, the borrower and servicer work together to establish a new repayment schedule that will be manageable for the veteran.

Note, VA modification is unique in that the interest rate might actually increase. So while this plan can help veterans bring their loans current, it won’t always reduce the homeowner’s monthly payments.

“For VA loan modification, several requirements apply,” notes Condor. She explains:

  • “Your VA loan must in default
  • You must have since recovered from the temporary hardship that caused the default
  • You must be able to support the financial obligations of the modified VA loan
  • And you must not have modified your VA loan in the past three years”

Some homeowners with VA loans may qualify for a ‘Streamline Modification.’

Streamline Modification does not require as much documentation as the traditional VA modification plan, but includes two extra requirements:

  • The combined principal and interest payment must drop by at least 10%
  • The borrower must complete a 3-month trial repayment plan to prove they can make the modified payments

Talk to your loan servicer about options for your VA loan.

USDA loan modification

USDA loan modification is for homeowners whose current loans are backed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

A USDA loan modification allows missing mortgage payments (including principal, interest, taxes, and insurance) to be rolled back into the loan balance.

USDA modification plans also allow a term extension up to 480 months, or 40 years total, to help reduce the borrower’s payments. And the servicer can lower the borrower’s interest rate, “even below the market rate if necessary,” according to USDA.

Servicers may cover up to 30 percent of the homeowner’s unpaid principal balance using a mortgage recovery advance.

Contact your loan servicer to find out whether you’re eligible for a USDA loan modification.

Is mortgage loan modification a good idea?

A mortgage loan modification is worth pursuing for the right candidates.

“A modification can give you a second bite at the apple and get you out of the default or foreclosure process, allowing you a chance to remain in your home,” says Merritt.

But caveats apply.

“Typically, a modification will take all of your missed payments and add those to the outstanding principal balance,” Merritt says.

Say your current mortgage has an outstanding balance of $300,000. Assume you missed $50,000 in payments. In this example, your modified balance would be $350,000, which is called ‘capitalization.’

“But imagine your home’s value is only $310,000,” adds Merritt. “Here, a modification would allow you to stay in your home and avoid foreclosure, but you would owe more than your house is worth. That would be a problem if, say, two years after modification you wanted to sell your home.”

Refinancing and other alternatives to modification

Loan modification isn’t your only option, thankfully.

Possible alternatives include refinancing, forbearance, a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, or Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

Refinancing

As mentioned above, you should first check if you’re eligible to lower your interest rate and payment with a mortgage refinance.

You’ll have to qualify for the new mortgage based on your:

  • Credit score and credit report
  • Debt-to-income ratio
  • Loan-to-value ratio (your loan balance versus the home’s value)
  • Income and employment

It may be difficult to qualify for a refinance during times of financial hardship. But before writing this strategy off, check all the loan options available.

For instance, FHA loans have lower credit score requirements and allow higher debt-to-income (DTI) ratios than conventional loans. So it may be easier to refinance into an FHA loan than a conventional one.

Streamline refinancing

Homeowners with FHA, VA, and USDA loans have an additional option in the form of Streamline Refinancing.

A Streamline Refinance typically does not require income or employment verification, or a new home appraisal. Even the credit check might be waived (though the lender will always verify you have been making mortgage payments on time).

These loans are a lot more forgiving for homeowners whose finances have taken a downturn.

Note, Streamline Refinancing is only allowed within the same loan program: FHA-to-FHA, VA-to-VA, or USDA-to-USDA.

Check your Streamline Refi eligibility (Feb 17th, 2021)

Other mortgage relief options

Refinancing typically requires a loan-to-value ratio of 97% or lower, meaning the homeowner has at least 3% equity.

However, “borrowers who have less than 3 percent equity in their homes may qualify for Fannie Mae’s HIRO program,” suggests Whitman.

This ‘High-LTV Refinance Option‘ is intended for homeowners with Fannie Mae-backed loans who owe more on their mortgage than the property is worth.

“Other choices for borrowers with little or no equity in their homes include a consensual foreclosure or a short sale, which involves selling the property for less than the outstanding mortgage amount.”

What should you do?

Whitman continues, “Any borrower who will struggle to repay their mortgage and other debts after a loan modification should consider whether it is better to dispose of their home and find a more affordable housing option.”

To better determine if a refinance or mortgage loan modification is the right strategy for you, consult with your loan servicer, an attorney, or a housing counselor.

Mortgage loan modification FAQ

What happens when you get a loan modification?

The goal of a loan modification is to help a homeowner catch up on missed mortgage payments and avoid foreclosure. If your servicer or lender agrees to a mortgage loan modification, it may result in lowering your monthly payment, extending or shortening your loan’s term, or decreasing the interest rate you pay.

How do I get a mortgage loan modification?

Contact your mortgage servicer or lender immediately to alert them of your financial hardship and ask about loan modification options available. Be ready to provide all documentation requested, which can include financial statements, pay stubs, tax returns, and more.

How long does loan modification last?

Expect your loan modification process to take anywhere from one to three months, according to finance and insurance expert Karen Condor. Once your loan modification has been approved, the changes to your interest rate and/or loan terms are permanent.

Does loan modification hurt your credit?

A mortgage loan modification under certain government programs will not affect your credit. “But other loan modifications may negatively impact your credit and show up on your credit report. However, since your mortgage usually must be in default to request a modification, your financial difficulties are probably already on your credit report,” explains attorney Elizabeth Whitman.

Can you be denied a loan modification?

Yes. A mortgage loan is a contract, and the mortgage lender isn’t obligated to agree to a loan modification. “Borrowers whose financial situation is such that they will never be able to repay their mortgage loan, as well as borrowers who do not cooperate with lender requests, are likely to be denied a modification,” says Whitman.

How much does mortgage modification cost?

While there are no closing costs for a mortgage modification, your lender may charge a processing fee. “If your modification involves extending your loan’s term, that means you’ll pay more interest over the life of your loan,” explains attorney Charles Gallagher.

Do you have to pay back a loan modification?

Paying back a loan modification will depend on the type of modification you are given. “Your lender can apply a reduced interest amount to your loan’s principal on the backend that you must later pay back,” says Condor. “With a principal deferral loan modification, your lender reduces the amount of principal paid off with each payment. But the amount of principal your lender deferred will be due when your loan matures or the home is sold.”

Understand your options

Mortgage loan modification is typically reserved for homeowners who are already delinquent on their loans.

If you’re worried about mortgage payments, get ahead of the issue by checking your eligibility for a refinance or contacting your loan servicer about options before your loan becomes delinquent.

Many homeowners are facing financial hardship right now, and many lenders and loan servicers are willing to help. But help is only available to those who ask for it.

Verify your new rate (Feb 17th, 2021)

Source: themortgagereports.com

Are You a Homeowner Seeking Forbearance on Your Mortgage? Watch Out for These Red Flags

Homeowners are asking for breaks on their mortgage payments in droves, as millions of Americans face the prospect of unemployment or reduced income because of the coronanvirus pandemic. But requesting forbearance on your mortgage isn’t foolproof.

The $2.2 trillion CARES Act stimulus package requires servicers to provide forbearance — a temporary postponement of payments — to any homeowner with a federally-backed mortgage. Americans with other mortgages may also be able to receive forbearance at their servicers’ discretion.

Requests for forbearance have poured in. Forbearance requests grew by 1,896% between March 16 and March 30, according to a recent report from the Mortgage Bankers Association, a trade group that represents the mortgage industry. And before that, forbearance requests had increased some 1,270% between March 2 and March 16.

As consumers have rushed to call their servicer in search of assistance, call centers have been overwhelmed, leading to longer wait times to speak with a representative.

“If you are eligible for this and you need the help, take full advantage of the program,” said Rick Sharga, a mortgage industry veteran and founder of CJ Patrick Company, a real-estate consulting firm. “But similarly, if you don’t need the help, and if you can pay your mortgage, don’t try and game the system and make it harder for people who really do need the benefits to access.”

For those who have yet to get a forbearance agreement in place, here’s what you need to know:

‘Forbearance is not forgiveness’

To be clear, mortgage borrowers will still need to pay off their loan eventually if they receive forbearance.

“Forbearance is not forgiveness,” said Karan Kaul, a research associate at the Urban Institute, a left-of-center nonprofit policy group. “You still owe the money that you were paying, it’s just that there’s a temporary pause on making your monthly payments.”

‘Forbearance is not forgiveness. You still owe the money that you were paying, it’s just that there’s a temporary pause on making your monthly payments.’

Karan Kaul, a research associate at the Urban Institute

Under a forbearance agreement, a borrower can pause payments entirely or make reduced payments on their mortgage. Homeowners with federally-backed mortgages are eligible for up to 180 days of forbearance initially under the CARES Act. At that point, if they’re still facing financial difficulty, they can request an extension of up to another 180 days of forbearance.

The provisions in the stimulus package stipulate that during the forbearance period, mortgage servicers cannot make negative reports about the borrower in question to credit bureaus, including the three main ones, Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. Borrowers also will not owe any late fees or penalties if they are granted forbearance.

You need to know who your servicer is

Struggling homeowners won’t automatically receive forbearance. You need to request it from your servicer.

Mortgage servicers are the companies who receive your monthly payments. A homeowner’s mortgage servicer isn’t necessarily the same as their lender — many lenders sell the servicing rights for mortgages to other companies.

The first step to figure out who your servicer is would be to check your mortgage statement. If for some reason the information isn’t there, you can look it up by searching the Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems website. Alternatively, you can check with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, if your loan is backed by one of them.

How do you know if you qualify?

To qualify for forbearance, a borrower must have a mortgage backed by one of the following federal agencies:

• Fannie Mae

• Freddie Mac

• The Federal Housing Administration (FHA)

• The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

• The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Borrowers should avoid calling their servicers to find out if they’re eligible, Sharga said.

“Find out what you can before you try and reach your mortgage servicer, because they are overwhelmed with call volume right now,” Sharga said.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac both have websites where you can check whether your loan is backed by one of them. You can access those websites here and here. Almost half of all mortgages in the U.S. are backed by Fannie and Freddie.

To find out if your loan is backed by the FHA, check the original closing documents or your most recent mortgage statement. If you pay for FHA Insurance, then that agency is backing your loan. Alternatively, your closing documents should include a HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) statement and a 13-digit HUD number.

Because the VA and USDA loan programs target specific borrowers, those borrowers should already know if they have loans backed by those agencies. In the event you are still unsure, you can call your servicer.

Those who aren’t eligible aren’t necessarily out of luck, though. Servicers for non-federally-backed mortgages may still be willing to provide forbearance to borrowers facing financial trouble right now.

Be prepared to answer some questions

You don’t need to provide documentation to prove your financial hardship at this time, but your servicer may have some questions to determine how much assistance they will offer you.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau suggests being prepared to answer the following:

• Why you can’t make your payments?

• Is the problem you are facing temporary or permanent?

• What is the current state of your income, expenses and other assets, including money in the bank?

• Are you a service member with permanent change of station orders?

“Consumers should indicate they have had a hardship due to COVID-19 and ask about their forbearance options with the company servicing the mortgage loan,” said Chris Diamond, director of financial products at online mortgage lender Better.com. “They should ask how long of a forbearance they can qualify for as well as what their options are at the end of that forbearance period.”

Get your forbearance agreement in writing

The CFPB stresses that any borrower who has received a reprieve on mortgage payments should get their agreement in writing.

“Once you’re able to secure forbearance or another mortgage relief option, ask your servicer to provide written documentation that confirms the details of your agreement and that you’re clear on what the terms are,” the agency said on its website.

Having the agreement in writing will protect you if there are errors in your mortgage statement or your credit report.

Watch out for balloon payments

After a borrower has secured a forbearance agreement from their servicer, they should discuss repayment options.

“You don’t want a surprise like finding out that six months of deferred loan payments are all due immediately upon the end of the forbearance,” Sharga said. “Most people simply won’t have six months’ worth of mortgage payments available.”

Some borrowers have expressed concerns after being offered a balloon payment option like the one Sharga described. With a balloon payment, a borrower would pay back the entire amount owed for the forbearance period at once.

While a lender may offer a balloon payment as an option, there is no mandate that a borrower must repay in this manner, Kaul said.

Homeowners can and should aim to negotiate the best possible repayment options for them. “All those terms are negotiable,” Sharga said. “Be diligent, be steadfast and try and stand your ground.”

Beyond a balloon payment, servicers may offer to extend the term of the mortgage and tack on the missed payments at the end, so a 30-year mortgage would be extended by 4 months if that’s how much forbearance a borrower received.

There is no mandate that a borrower must repay what they owe in missed payments in one balloon payment after forbearance.

Alternatively, a borrower may also be offered the option to amortize the balance they owe over the life of the loan. This means they would repay a portion of the balance owed in addition to their usual monthly payments.

A borrower can request information on who owns their mortgage note, since the owner might be able to provide more relief options. Servicers must respond to these requests within 10 business days, said Andrea Bopp Stark, an attorney with the National Consumer Law Center.

“If the servicer does not respond, the borrower should send another letter and seek legal assistance,” Bopp Stark said. “The servicer could be held liable for actual damages and up to $2,000 statutory damages for a failure to respond.”

If you’re still in financial trouble after forbearance, consider a loan modification

It’s too soon to tell whether 12 months of forbearance will be enough assistance for those who are among the millions of Americans who have lost their jobs in recent weeks.

“The most beneficial option if the borrower might be out of work or impacted for an extended period is to request to modify the loan at the end of forbearance,” Diamond said.

Unlike forbearance, a loan modification involves a permanent change to the details of the mortgage. This can include adjusting the interest rate, extending the duration of the loan or deferring the amount owed until the end of the loan as a separate lien.

A servicer will determine whether or not a borrower qualifies for the modification.

For more smart financial news and advice, head over to MarketWatch.

Source: realtor.com

Partial Claim May Be Option for VA Borrowers Exiting COVID-19 Forbearance

Posted on December 10th, 2020

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has proposed a new loss mitigation method to help homeowners with VA loans in COVID-19 related forbearance get back on track.

The new program, known as the COVID-19 Veterans Assistance Partial Claim Payment program, or COVID-VAPCP for kind of shorter, somewhat mirrors existing programs offered by the FHA and USDA to pay forbearance back.

It would allow veteran borrowers to defer the repayment of missed mortgage payments for up to 60 months.

And the full repayment of any forborne payments wouldn’t be due in full for 120 months, or 10 years to provide veterans with a “soft landing.”

However, there would be interest charged, though at a very nominal 1% rate, which differs from the interest-free offerings at the FHA/USDA.

Additionally, the FHA/USDA both don’t require repayment until the loan is refinanced or otherwise paid-in-full.

While perhaps not as attractive, it has to do with the VA’s smaller guaranty percentage versus those other loan types.

Still, when compared to a standard loan modification, a veteran homeowner could stand to save thousands in interest and stay on track with respect to paying off their loan in full.

It should be noted that loan servicers would only consider this proposed partial claim option after evaluating “all loss-mitigation options for feasibility.”

How the COVID-VAPCP Works

  • Any missed mortgage payments from CARES Act forbearance are set aside
  • Monthly payments on this amount are deferred for up to 60 months (five years)
  • The repayment period begins in years 6 through 10 if not otherwise paid off earlier
  • Homeowners also have the option of repaying earlier, refinancing, or selling to satisfy the debt

This proposed program would allow a servicer to consider a partial claim option after all loss-mitigation options are evaluated, including repayment plans, special forbearances, and loan modifications.

Assuming those other options weren’t appropriate, the VA would act as a mortgage investor of last resort, thereby purchasing the amount of indebtedness necessary to bring the veteran’s guaranteed loan current.

This amount would then be secured as a lien against the property and the veteran would resume making regularly scheduled monthly mortgage payments to the servicer.

The homeowner would receive up to 60 months of repayment deferral for the delinquent amount, followed by a 60-month repayment window to the VA, with an interest rate fixed at 1%.

In other words, once their forbearance comes to an end, any missed payments would simply be set aside and no payments would be necessary for five years, at which point they’d have an additional five years to extinguish the debt.

Of course, chances are most homeowners would simply pay off the debt when they refinanced the mortgage or sold the property.

If you recall, the CARES Act provides mortgage forbearance for up to 180 days, with an additional period of up to 180 days permitted at the request of the borrower.

In total, homeowners could be looking at six months of missed payments, which can add up depending on the size of the loan.

The VA provided a hypothetical scenario where a borrower enters forbearance with 300 monthly payments remaining and an unpaid principal balance of $239,450.

Assuming a monthly payment of $1,587.83, they would owe $19,054 at the end of a 12-month forbearance period.

Clearly most Americans already suffering a financial setback wouldn’t be able to simply pay $20,000 out-of-pocket in one lump sum.

While a loan modification set at the same interest rate with a fresh 30-year loan term would actually result in a $26 decrease in monthly payment, $39,518 in additional interest would be paid over the life of the loan.

Conversely, a VA partial claim payment would require a monthly payment of $341.58 in years 6 through 10, but just $1,441 in additional interest over the life of the loan.

So for a veteran homeowner who actually keeps their loan and their home, the COVID-VAPCP is a much better option, assuming they can afford it.

COVID-VAPCP Requirements

  • Must be a VA home loan
  • Borrower must have been current or less than 30 days past due as of March 1st, 2020
  • Only available to borrowers who occupy property as primary residence
  • Partial claim amount cannot exceed 15% of unpaid principal balance
  • Monthly payments on partial claim deferred for first 60 months
  • Full repayment of partial claim due in 120 months
  • Can pay off during deferment if amount is not less than what would be due for one full monthly payment
  • Repayment in full required if title to the property transferred, loan refinanced, or underlying loan paid off
  • Interest rate set at 1%

Read more: There Will Be a 3-Month Waiting Period to Get a Mortgage After Forbearance

Lock in a lower rate.
About the Author: Colin Robertson

Before creating this blog, Colin worked as an account executive for a wholesale mortgage lender in Los Angeles. He has been writing passionately about mortgages for nearly 15 years.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

Biden’s executive order will extend foreclosure moratorium

Following his inauguration on Wednesday, President Joe Biden revealed that he plans to sign 17 executive orders his first day in office, including a further extension of the eviction and foreclosure moratorium to at least March 31.

Brian Deese, Biden’s choice to lead the National Economic Council, said the president will call upon the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the departments of Veterans Affairs, Agriculture and Housing and Housing and Urban Development, to aid in an immediate extension of their federally backed mortgages.

“These emergency measures are important,” Deese said. “There are more than 11 million mortgages guaranteed by the VA, Department of Agriculture and HUD that would be affected by the extension of the foreclosure moratorium.”

Biden had previously outlined strategies to mitigate foreclosures and evictions in his housing agenda, which included a Bill of Rights that will prevent mortgage servicers from advancing a foreclosure when the homeowner is in the process of receiving a loan modification.

The agenda also outlined plans to build upon the Obama-Biden Administration’s Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act, that includes a law prohibiting landlords from discriminating against renters receiving federal housing benefits.


Low mortgage rates fuel the demand for valuation and settlement services  

VRM Mortgage Services CEO shares how the company is navigating a difficult year, and how its services are impacted by the different national, state and local directives on foreclosure.

Presented by: VRM Mortgage Services

On Tuesday, the Federal Housing Finance Agency extended for a fifth time moratoriums on single-family foreclosures and real estate owned evictions for loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac until Feb. 28, 2021.

HUD had previously extended its moratoriums for loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration in late December – also through the end of February.

“Today’s foreclosure moratorium and forbearance extensions for single family homeowners ensure American homeowners continue to have the critical relief and support they need to get back to financial stability,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson following the December extension.

Although foreclosures have remained at record lows due to the widespread moratoriums, data analytics giant Black Knight estimated seriously past-due mortgages (90+ day delinquencies) were still 1.8 million above pre-pandemic levels in November.

Source: housingwire.com