A Guide to Property Taxes in 2021: States With the Highest (and Lowest) Rates

With tax season upon us, it seems like a good time to check what homeowners pay in property taxes—and a new survey confirms that where you live makes a huge difference in how much you’ll have to cough up.

According to researchers at WalletHub, which analyzed tax data on all 50 states and the District of Columbia, the average American household pays $2,471 on real estate property taxes. But that can vary widely. And just in case you thought the country wasn’t polarized enough already, political leanings can often be an indicator of state tax rates: “Blue states” (defined by WalletHub as how they voted in the 2020 presidential election) generally pay higher property taxes than “red states.”

As for the state with the highest property tax rate, that’s New Jersey, where residents pay a rate of 2.49%, which means that people living in a median-priced home in the area ($335,600) will pay Uncle Sam $8,362 in property tax per year.

In fact, the five states with the highest tax rates are all east of the Mississippi.

Meanwhile, people in Hawaii are blessed with the lowest real estate tax rate of 0.28%. So even though a median-priced home in the area is expensive ($615,300), homeowners end up paying only $1,715 in taxes per year. In Alabama, the state with the second-lowest tax rate (0.41%) as well as bargain-basement median home prices ($142,700), you’ll pay even lower property taxes of just $587 per year.

Curious how your state stacks up? Below are the top 10 states with the highest—and lowest—property taxes:

States with the highest property taxes

  1. New Jersey: $8,362 (2.49%)
  2. Illinois: $4,419 (2.27%)
  3. New Hampshire: $5,701 ( 2.18%)
  4. Connecticut: $5,898 (2.14%)
  5. Vermont: $4,329 (1.90%)
  6. Wisconsin: $3,344 (1.85%)
  7. Texas: $3,099 (1.80%)
  8. Nebraska: $2,689 (1.73%)
  9. New York: $5,407 (1.72%)
  10. Rhode Island: $4,272 (1.63%)

States with the lowest property taxes

  1. Hawaii: $1,715 (0.28%)
  2. Alabama: $587 (0.41%)
  3. Colorado: $1,756 (0.51%)
  4. Louisiana: $890 (0.55%)
  5. District of Columbia: $3,378 (0.56%)
  6. South Carolina: $924 (0.57%)
  7. Delaware: $1,431 (0.57%)
  8. West Virginia: $698 (0.58%)
  9. Nevada: $1,614 (0.60%)
  10. Wyoming: $1,337 (0.61%)

Why are my property taxes so high—or low?

While property taxes may be high in some states, lower home prices may offset this tax burden. For example, Illinois—which has the second-highest tax rate, at 2.27%—has a low median home price of only $194,500, resulting in annual property taxes hovering around $4,419. That’s less than you’d pay in other states with lower tax rates (like New Hampshire and Connecticut).

So what can you do if you live in a state with high tax rates and high home prices?

“Unfortunately, living in the Northeast has become a very expensive proposition if you want to own properties,” says Ralph DiBugnara, president of Home Qualified and senior vice president at Cardinal Financial. “But homeowners should be aware of what they can write off when it comes to homeownership, especially in these high-tax areas.”

In other words, in high-tax-rate states with pricy properties, the good news is that you are allowed to write off (or deduct) up to $10,000 of your property taxes. Just remember that this may not cover all of your property taxes; it depends on how much your home is worth.

“If your home is worth $500,000 or below, you should be able to write off all of your property taxes,” says DiBugnara. “But if your home value is above $500,000 and in a state with tax rates around 2%, most of the time this is not enough of a write-off to cover all of your property taxes.”

This problem is typical in Northeast states. Still, any write-off is better than none, right?

To help with your overall tax bill, you can also write off mortgage interest as a tax deduction for a balance of up to $750,000. And if you buy or sell a home in a tax year, in most cases you will be able to write off transfer taxes—local or state taxes charged in any real estate transaction.

Green energy sources for homes that are powered by solar are also tax-deductible. You also have the right to appeal the amount of your property taxes if you think the assessed value of your home is too high.

Also weigh what your property taxes go toward when deciding where you want to live.

“People should definitely consider property taxes when they move, alongside information about the local services that those property taxes pay for,” says Stephanie Leiser, lecturer in public policy at the Ford School at the University of Michigan. “They should consider the ‘value for the dollar’ they would get from paying property taxes.”

For example, in some communities, services like trash pickup will be covered by property taxes, while in others, there will be a separate fee.

“It’s also important to keep the overall tax picture in mind when deciding where to move,” adds Leiser. “Low property taxes may sound great, but they may be offset by higher local sales taxes or other taxes and fees.”

Source: realtor.com

The 10 Worst States for Millennials

worst-states-for-millennials

Millennials are struggling. With rising student debt, stagnant wages, and avocado toast, many are working hard to hardly get by.

It is no surprise millennials are struggling financially. As a group, 24-39 years old earn less and have less assets than their parents did a generation ago. However, just like the job market and cost of living, where you live matters. We analyzed all 50 states and the District of Columbia to uncover where it is hardest for millennials to thrive.

Below we detail the criteria we used to rank the states and have the full ranked list. But first, let’s see the 10 states where millennials have it the roughest.

The south dominates this list with 5 of the top 10 being southern states. The other 5? Include some areas notorious for high costs of living or in economic distress.

Keep reading to see why these states have the least to offer millennials and to see the full list.

How We Determined The Worst States For Millennials

Each state and DC were ranked 1 to 51 in four categories:

  • Millennial Unemployment Rate
  • Average Student Loan Debt
  • Millennial Home Ownership
  • Percent Of Millennials Living In Poverty

All four categories were then averaged together, each weighted equally. The lower score in each category, the lower the rank. For example, DC’s $55,400 was the highest average student loan debt, earning it a rank of #1 for student loan debt.

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We used the most recent American Community Survey 2014-2018 data from the U.S. Census Bureau to get unemployment rate by state for those 25-34. The ACS data also provided the poverty rate by state for the 25-34 age demographic.

To analyze millennial home ownership, we once again used the ACS data to find the percentage of homeowners under 35 in each state.

To gather average student loan debt by millennial borrower, we used the most recent report from Educationdata.org.

If your state isn’t among the top 10, jump down to the bottom of the post to see where it lands on the full list. Otherwise, learn more about why these states are the worst place to be a millennial.

1. Mississippi

mississippi class=

Unemployment: 10%
Poverty Rate: 29%
Homeownership: 10%

It is no surprise to see Mississippi top the list of worst places to be a millennial. Mississippi often comes in dead last in education and quality of life metrics. Why is it so hard being a millennial in
the Magnolia state?

More than 1-in-4 Mississippi millennials live in poverty, in addition to facing the worst unemployment in the nation. While housing in Mississippi is relatively affordable, it’s simply not enough to help the millennials struggling just to get by.

2. Florida

florida class=

Unemployment: 7%
Poverty Rate: 22%
Homeownership: 7%

Florida may be a beloved destination for vacationers, but millennial residents may find themselves experiencing hardship. Not only do Floridian millennials stand a 22% chance of living in poverty, the state also the 3rd worst Millennial homeownership rate in the nation.

The beautiful surroundings can only provide so much comfort to adults striving to make a living.

3. Alabama

alabama class=

Unemployment: 8%
Poverty Rate: 27%
Homeownership: 10%

Alabama comes in at #3 for the worst place to be a millennial. While unemployment for millennials is 2% lower than Mississippi, it’s still not great. 27% of Alabama millennials are below the federal poverty rate.

4. South Carolina

south carolina class=

Unemployment: 7%
Poverty Rate: 22%
Homeownership: 10%

Just graduating college in South Carolina sets you up for an average $38,300 in student loan debt. Considering 7% of millennials are unemployed, it can’t be easy paying off those hefty student loan payments.

5. Georgia

georgia class=

Unemployment: 7%
Poverty Rate: 21%
Homeownership: 10%

Georgia tells a similar story to other southern states that top the list– a high poverty rate, paired with less than stellar unemployment. Toss in the high average student debt and it’s easy to see it isn’t all peaches for millennials in the peach state.

6. North Carolina

north carolina class=

Unemployment: 7%
Poverty Rate: 22%
Homeownership: 10%

North Carolina has similar stats to its neighbor, South Carolina- paired with worst homeownership and slightly less crippling debt.

7. West Virginia

west virginia class=

Unemployment: 9%
Poverty Rate: 32%
Homeownership: 9%

West Virginia is one of the states with a shrinking population. Every year residents are packing up and moving in hopes of a brighter future. Millennials in West Virginia have the highest poverty rate in the nation, with a depressing 1-3 live below the poverty level).

Pair that with sky high unemployment, and chances are pretty good wherever they move, the grass is greener.

8. New Mexico

new mexico class=

Unemployment: 8%
Poverty Rate: 27%
Homeownership: 10%

Why is it so rough being a millennial in New Mexico? A terrible 8% unemployment rate. Since jobs make creature comforts affordable, like food and shelter, this doesn’t bode well for millennials who call New Mexico home.

9. Oregon

oregon class=

Unemployment: 6%
Poverty Rate: 23%
Homeownership: 9%

In Oregon, more millennials are working than most other states. However judging from dismal homeownership rate and a surprisingly high poverty rate, folks are working just to get by in Oregon.

10. California

california class=

Unemployment: 7%
Poverty Rate: 20%
Homeownership: 8%

California may be the golden state, but for millennials living there may not look so shiny. High home costs mean home ownership is out of reach for many millennials. When paired with high unemployment and an unpleasantly high poverty rate, it earns California its spot at #10.

Some states offer Millennials worst opportunities than others

There you have it, the 10 states where millennials have the hardest time thriving.

At the end of the day, millennials are struggling nationwide. However, some states have less job opportunities, higher costs of living, and other blockers to achieving the American Dream– or even just not living in desperate poverty.

Where should millennials go for the best opportunities? Out west! Western states dominate the top 10 best states for millennials.

Best States For Millennials

  1. North Dakota
  2. Nebraska
  3. Iowa
  4. South Dakota
  5. Wyoming
  6. Minnesota
  7. Utah
  8. Wisconsin
  9. Kansas
  10. Colorado

If your state wasn’t in the top 10, you can see where it landed below.

See Where Your State Fell On The List:

Rank Geographic Area Name Unemployment(%) Poverty Rate(%) Homeownership(%) Student Debt
1 Mississippi 9 28 10 $36,700
1 Florida 6 21 7 $39,700
3 Alabama 8 26 10 $37,100
4 South Carolina 7 21 9 $38,300
5 Georgia 7 20 9 $41,500
6 North Carolina 6 21 9 $37,500
7 West Virginia 8 32 9 $31,800
8 New Mexico 8 27 10 $33,600
9 Oregon 6 22 9 $36,900
10 California 6 20 8 $36,400
11 New York 6 18 7 $37,800
12 Michigan 7 22 10 $35,900
13 Louisiana 7 26 11 $34,400
13 Tennessee 6 22 10 $36,200
15 Delaware 6 17 9 $37,000
15 Connecticut 7 17 7 $34,900
15 Hawaii 4 20 6 $36,500
18 Arizona 6 22 9 $34,100
19 New Jersey 6 17 7 $35,100
20 Illinois 6 18 10 $37,600
21 Maryland 6 15 9 $42,700
22 Pennsylvania 6 19 9 $35,400
23 Kentucky 6 24 11 $32,500
23 Ohio 6 21 10 $34,600
25 Nevada 6 20 10 $33,600
26 Maine 5 22 9 $32,500
26 Arkansas 6 24 11 $33,300
26 Virginia 5 16 9 $39,000
29 Rhode Island 6 18 8 $31,800
30 Vermont 4 15 8 $36,700
31 Missouri 5 20 11 $35,400
32 Massachusetts 5 16 8 $34,100
33 New Hampshire 3 15 8 $36,700
34 Washington 5 17 10 $35,000
35 Indiana 5 21 11 $32,800
36 Alaska 7 15 12 $33,600
37 Idaho 4 23 12 $32,600
37 District of Columbia 5 10 12 $55,400
39 Montana 4 21 10 $33,300
40 Oklahoma 5 23 12 $31,500
41 Texas 5 18 11 $32,800
42 Colorado 4 15 11 $35,800
43 Kansas 4 20 12 $32,500
44 Wisconsin 4 16 10 $31,800
45 Utah 3 20 15 $32,200
46 Minnesota 3 14 12 $33,400
47 Wyoming 5 17 13 $31,000
48 Iowa 3 19 13 $30,500
48 South Dakota 3 19 14 $31,100
50 Nebraska 3 17 13 $32,100
51 North Dakota 2 13 16 $29,200

Want the latest research and most engaging stories first? Email Kathy Morris at kmorris@zippia.com to be added to our weekly newsletter.

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Source: zippia.com

Delinquency Rate Lowest in COVID Era; but Lingering Risks Remain

Loan performance continued to
improve in January although the number of delinquencies remains significantly elevated
from pre-pandemic levels. Black Knight’s first look at the month’s loan
performance data has both good news and some that is disquieting. The good news
is a 121,000-loan decline in the number of loans that are 30 or more days past
due but not in foreclosure when compared to the prior month. This reduced the national
delinquency rate to 5.85 percent, the first time the rate has been under 6
percent since the pandemic hit
in March 2020.

The number of seriously delinquent loans,
those 90 or more days past due but not in foreclosure, was reduced by 56,000
loans. Black Knight includes loans that are in active forbearance plans in its
delinquency numbers if they are non-current.

However, despite the improvement,
there are still over 3.1 million delinquent loans nationwide
, 1.4 million or 82
percent more than in January of 2020. Of these, slightly more than 2 million
are over 90 days past due. Black Knight says this is five times the
pre-pandemic level.

Because of relief provided by
Congress, there are relatively few loans entering the foreclosure process. There
were 5,900 foreclosure starts in January, 86 percent fewer than a year earlier.
The foreclosure inventory, the number of loans in the process of foreclosure,
at 171,000, is down by 7,000 from December and 75,000 year-over-year.

Black Knight says recent extensions
in forbearance plans terms and of the national foreclosure moratorium have
reduced near-term risk, but at the same time may have the effect of extending
the length of the recovery period.
 
At the current rate of improvement,
1.8 million mortgages will still be seriously delinquent at the end of June
when foreclosure moratoriums on government-backed loans are currently slated to
expire.

It doesn’t appear at present, even
with the elevated levels of serious delinquency, that the country is looking at
a repeat of the last decade’s foreclosure epidemic. Of the five states with the
highest rates of seriously past due loans, Mississippi, Louisiana, Hawaii,
Nevada, and Maryland, none have rates exceeding 6.25 percent rate. At the peak
of the housing crisis all had higher levels of delinquency and Mississippi,
Louisiana, and Nevada had rates in double digits.

Black Knight will provide a more
in-depth review of this data in its monthly Mortgage Monitor report. It will be
published on March 8.

Source: mortgagenewsdaily.com

Amerifirst Financial Review: They Take Home Purchase Lending Seriously

Posted on February 24th, 2021

It’s not every day you come across a large-scale independent mortgage lender that has been around since the 1980s, but Amerifirst Financial Inc. fits that description.

The Arizona-based company understands that there’s more to the mortgage business than just refinances, which is why their goal is to be the lender of choice for real estate professionals in all the markets they serve.

This could be a pretty smart strategy if and when interest rates rise and the pool of eligible refinance candidates begins to run dry.

If you’re thinking about buying a home, Amerifirst could be good choice for your financing needs since they’re heavily focused on purchase loans. Let’s discover more about them.

Amerifirst Financial Fast Facts

  • Direct-to-consumer retail mortgage lender
  • Founded in 1989, headquartered Mesa, Arizona
  • Offers home purchase financing and mortgage refinances
  • Funded more than $2 billion in home loans last year
  • Most active in Arizona, Colorado, and California
  • Licensed to do business in 43 states and the District of Columbia
  • Also operate several DBAs including AFI Mortgage, Spire Financial, and Truly Mortgage

Amerifirst Financial Inc. is a direct-to-consumer retail mortgage lender, meaning they operate a call center along with branches throughout the country.

The company was founded all the way back in 1989 and is headquartered in Mesa, Arizona, which is just east of Phoenix.

They also have branches in nine states, including Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Mississippi, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, and Utah.

Amerifirst appears to specialize in home purchase financing, with roughly two-thirds of total volume dedicated to home buyers.

The rest can be attributed to mortgage refinances, including rate and term refinances and cash out refinances.

Last year, the company funded more than $2 billion in home loans, with nearly a billion in their home state of Arizona.

They’re also very active in Colorado and California, and have a decent presence in Nevada and Texas as well.

While they’re licensed in most states nationally, they don’t seem to be available in Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, or West Virginia.

How to Apply with Amerifirst Financial

  • You can get started instantly by visiting their website and clicking “Apply Now”
  • They offer a digital mortgage application powered by ICE that lets you complete most tasks on your own
  • It’s also possible to browse their online loan officer (or branch) directory first to find someone to work with nearby
  • Once your loan is submitted you can manage it 24/7 via the online borrower portal

Amerifirst Financial makes it super easy to get started on your home loan application.

Simply head to their website and click on the big “Apply Now” button and you’ll be off to the races.

That will take you to their digital mortgage application powered by ICE that lets you input all your personal and financial details electronically.

Then you can link financial accounts using your credentials to avoid having to scan/upload or track down your documents.

Additionally, you can order your own credit report and eSign disclosures to speed through the more painstaking part of the process in a matter of minutes.

Once your loan is submitted and approved, you’ll receive a to-do list with any conditions that must be met to get to the finish line.

You’ll also be able to track and manage your loan via the online borrower portal, and get in touch with your lending team if and when you have questions.

Those who prefer a more human touch can also visit a local branch and/or browse the online loan officer directory to learn more about the individuals who work there.

It may also be advisable to speak with a loan officer first to discuss loan pricing and available loan programs, then proceed to the online mortgage application.

In any case, they make it really simple to apply for a mortgage and manage your loan from start to finish thanks to the latest technology.

Protect Your Transaction Pre-Approval for Home Buyers

Protect Your Transaction

One perk to using Amerifirst Financial, especially if you’re buying a home in a competitive market, is their “Protect Your Transaction” loan commitment.

It goes beyond both a pre-qualification and pre-approval in that it’s underwritten upfront by a real human loan underwriter.

In fact, the PYT even comes with monetary assurance (up to $15,000, with an additional $5,000 for first responders and teachers), which represents their belief in the strength of your application.

So if the loan falls through and it turns out to be the lender’s fault, you could be entitled to that cash, which can also be shared with the seller. This may strengthen your offer.

Next to a cash offer, they believe it provides the greatest assurance that they can provide financing for your home purchase.

And that could just be enough to give you edge versus other home buyers on a hot home.

It may also give you peace of mind in the process, knowing you can actually get financing when all is said and done.

Loan Programs Offered by Amerifirst Financial

  • Home purchase loans
  • Refinance loans: rate and term, cash out, streamline
  • Conforming home loans
  • High-balance and jumbo home loans
  • FHA/USDA/VA loans
  • Down payment assistance
  • Green Value Mortgage
  • Fixed-rate and adjustable-rate options available

Amerifirst Financial offers both home purchase loans and refinance loans, including rate and term, cash out, and streamline refinances.

You can get financing on a primary residence, including townhomes/condos, along with a vacation home or 1-4 unit investment property.

They offer all the popular loan types, including conforming loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, high-balance and jumbo loans, and government-backed options like FHA, USDA, and VA loans.

They also offer an exclusive loan program known as the “Green Value Mortgage” that offers a reduced interest rate, fees, and discounted mortgage insurance if your property has a green score of 75 or lower.

You may also be eligible to receive up to 3.5% of the purchase price as a non-repayable gift. All the more reason to go green!

In terms of loan programs, you can get either a fixed-rate mortgage such as a 30-year or 15-year fixed, or an adjustable-rate mortgage like a 7/1 or 5/1 ARM.

Amerifirst Financial Mortgage Rates

One slight negative to Amerifirst Financial is the fact that they don’t mention their mortgage rates anywhere on their website.

As such, we don’t have any clues about their loan pricing relative to other banks and lenders out there.

The same goes for lender fees, which aren’t clearly listed on their website to my knowledge.

This means you’ll need to get in touch with a loan officer to discuss rates and fees to ensure they are competitively priced.

Be sure to compare their rates/fees with other lenders before you proceed to the application if you want peace of mind on pricing front.

Customer service and competence is always important, especially when it comes to a home loan, but so is cost.

Amerifirst Financial Reviews

On Zillow, Amerifirst has a very impressive 4.98-star rating out of 5 from roughly 900 customer reviews, which is quite impressive given the volume of feedback.

On LendingTree, they have a perfect 5-star rating, though it’s based on just about 30 reviews. They also have a 100% recommended score there.

If you’re looking for more reviews, you can also check out local ones on Google for their brick-and-mortar branches nearest you.

Lastly, the company is Better Business Bureau accredited, and has been since 2014. They currently enjoy an ‘A+’ rating based on complaint history.

To sum it up, Amerifirst Financial could be a solid choice for someone purchasing a home (especially a first-time buyer) thanks to their robust Protect Your Transaction loan approval and variety of down payment assistance programs.

Amerifirst Financial Pros and Cons

The Good

  • You can apply for a home loan from any device in minutes
  • Offer a digital mortgage application powered by ICE
  • Lots of loan programs to choose from
  • Discounts for those who purchase a green home
  • Protect Your Transaction loan approval for home buyers
  • Excellent customer reviews from former customers
  • A+ BBB rating, accredited business since 2014
  • Free mortgage calculators and mortgage dictionary on site

The Not

  • Not available in all states currently
  • Do not list mortgage rates or lender fees on their website

(photo: nathanmac87)

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

The 10 Worst Climate Disasters in U.S. History

Woman outside her ruined home after a natural disaster or fire
Vlad Teodor / Shutterstock.com

This story originally appeared on Porch.

One impact of climate change is that the number and severity of climate-related disasters is on the rise.

With the warming of the planet, several factors combine to make extreme weather more common.

Higher temperatures are more likely to produce heat waves and drought conditions, which increase the likelihood of wildfires. Warmer air can hold more water vapor, which leads to wetter storms, and with them, more flooding. Increased heat and evaporation have also combined to make tropical cyclones more common and more severe in recent years.

The financial consequences of these trends are enormous. Loss of life, property damage, infrastructure failures and business interruptions are some of the widely felt direct consequences when more intense natural disasters occur.

In the U.S., the costs associated with so-called billion-dollar weather and climate disaster events — those in which total damages exceeded $1 billion in today’s dollars — have grown sharply over the last decade, from a five-year annual average of $29.2 billion in 2010 to $121.4 billion in 2020.

Apart from direct damages, even the threat of weather disasters can have financial impacts. Property values in vulnerable areas may shift downward as severe weather disasters become more likely. Insurers can charge higher rates or make coverage harder to obtain for properties that could be at risk. And property owners may find themselves paying a premium for structures that are resistant to weather-related damage.

To find the worst disasters, researchers analyzed data from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information and ranked events based on their estimated cost in 2020 dollars.

Following is the list of the worst climate disasters in U.S. history.

10. U.S. drought/heatwave

Hot sun
aapsky / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: 2012
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $34.5 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $30 billion
  • Number of deaths: 123
  • Most impacted area: Midwest and West

High temperatures and low moisture brought on the most severe drought the U.S. had seen in decades during the summer of 2012. Drought conditions and more than two months of heat waves were directly responsible for more than 100 deaths and billions in economic losses due to failed harvests for crops like corn and soybeans.

9. Hurricane Ike

Hurricane Ike causing flooding in Florida
forestpath / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: September 2008
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $36.9 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $30 billion
  • Number of deaths: 112
  • Most impacted area: Texas

After hitting Cuba as a Category 4 storm several days earlier, Hurricane Ike made landfall as a Category 2 storm near Galveston, Texas, on Sept. 13, 2008.

Ike damaged or destroyed more than 75% of the homes in Galveston and brought widespread damage elsewhere in eastern Texas. Damage totaled $30 billion.

8. Midwest flooding

Flooding
Brymer / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: Summer 1993
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $38.1 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $21 billion
  • Number of deaths: 48
  • Most impacted area: Midwest

The Midwest experienced unusually high precipitation from rain and snow in 1992 and the first half of 1993.

As a result, parts of the Upper Mississippi River were at flood levels for almost 200 days in some locations, while the Missouri River basin experienced flood levels for nearly 100 days.

The ongoing floods destroyed tens of thousands of homes and inundated millions of acres of farmland.

7. U.S. drought/heatwave

high temperatures
Antonio Guillem / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: Summer 1988
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $45 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $20 billion
  • Number of deaths: 454
  • Most impacted area: Midwest, West, Southeast

As the worst drought the U.S. had seen since the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, the drought of 1988 covered nearly half of the United States at its peak, and continued as late as 1990 in some locations.

The persistent hot, dry conditions led to billions of dollars in losses from crops and livestock, along with wildfires in Yellowstone National Park that burned nearly 800,000 acres.

6. Hurricane Andrew

Homes destroyed by Hurricane Andrew
Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: August 1992
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $50.8 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $27 billion
  • Number of deaths: 61
  • Most impacted area: Florida and Louisiana

The 1992 Atlantic hurricane season’s first major storm was one of the most powerful on record. Andrew is only one of four hurricanes ever to make landfall in the U.S. as a Category 5 storm, with winds reaching nearly 174 miles per hour.

The storm ripped through southern Florida before re-emerging in the Gulf of Mexico and making a second landfall on the Louisiana coast several days later, causing more than $27 billion in damage.

5. Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma flooding in Florida
FotoKina / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: September 2017
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $52.5 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $50 billion
  • Number of deaths: 97
  • Most impacted area: Florida and South Carolina

2017’s hyperactive Atlantic hurricane season remains the costliest on record, and Hurricane Irma is one of the major reasons why.

After making landfall as a Category 4, Irma carved a path northward through the heart of Florida and into the southeastern U.S., bringing coastal flooding to Georgia and South Carolina as well. The storm’s damage totaled $50 billion.

4. Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane
Harvepino / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: October 2012
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $74.8 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $65 billion
  • Number of deaths: 159
  • Most impacted area: New York and New Jersey

At more than 900 miles in diameter, Hurricane (or Superstorm) Sandy was felt in 24 states, but Sandy is most remembered for its damage to the Mid-Atlantic region. After following a path north along the Atlantic coast, Sandy made an unusual westward turn into New York and New Jersey before merging with another storm system. Flooding and storm damage in New York City and other major East Coast metros contributed to Sandy’s $65 billion in damage.

3. Hurricane Maria

Hurricane Maria damage in Puerto Rico
Sheryl Chapman / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: September 2017
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $94.5 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $90 billion
  • Number of deaths: 2,981
  • Most impacted area: Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands

Another one of 2017’s major hurricanes, Hurricane Maria brought catastrophic damage to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

With the region still suffering from the effects of Hurricane Irma from two weeks prior, Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico as a powerful Category 4 storm.

Storm surge, heavy rains, and high winds leveled neighborhoods and destroyed much of Puerto Rico’s power grid, causing $90 billion in damage and nearly 3,000 deaths.

2. Hurricane Harvey

storm
AMFPhotography / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: August 2017
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $131.3 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $125 billion
  • Number of deaths: 89
  • Most impacted area: Texas

The costliest of the storms from the catastrophic 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, Hurricane Harvey also holds the distinction of being the wettest tropical cyclone on record.

Harvey made landfall in Texas as a Category 4 hurricane, but it was the storm’s prolonged stall over Houston and the Gulf Coast that made Harvey so expensive.

Over several days, Harvey dropped more than 5 feet of rain in some locations, causing floods that produced $125 billion in damage.

1. Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina flooding damage
Stratos Brilakis / Shutterstock.com
  • Date: August 2005
  • Estimated cost (2020 dollars): $170 billion
  • Estimated cost (actual dollars): $125 billion
  • Number of deaths: 1,833
  • Most impacted area: Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama

Hurricane Katrina is perhaps remembered more for the infamously mismanaged government response than for the damage of the storm itself, but Katrina brought widespread devastation to the Gulf Coast. After reaching Category 5 strength in the Gulf of Mexico, Katrina eventually made landfall in Louisiana as a Category 3. Storm surge and heavy rains led to catastrophic failures in New Orleans’ flood protection infrastructure, leaving most of the city underwater for weeks. At $170 billion in 2020 dollars, Katrina remains the most expensive climate disaster in U.S. history.

Methodology and detailed findings

A man studies financial data at his computer
NicoElNino / Shutterstock.com

To determine which climate disasters were the worst in U.S. history, researchers analyzed data from the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information’s (NCEI) U.S. Billion-Dollar Weather and Climate Disasters (2021) report. Weather events were ranked according to their CPI-adjusted estimated cost (adjusted to 2020 dollars).

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Most Affordable (and Warm) Places to WFH This Winter

Remember that warm-weather place you cherished as a winter getaway back in those hazy, crazy, pre-pandemic days of, say, 2019? What would it be like to live there year-round?

For more Americans, this alluring fantasy has become a reality, especially during this particularly bleak COVID-19 winter. As office and home, work and play blend together in this pandemic age, areas that once served as sunny vacation respites from chillier climes are emerging as desirable long-term locations for remote workers—and that’s been a game changer for real estate markets across the country.

“Traditionally, winter is a season when many residents of northern, colder states move south to enjoy the warmer weather in states nearer the Gulf Coast,” says George Ratiu, senior economist for realtor.com®. “This year, the migration is compounded by the COVID pandemic, leading lots of residents from the Northeast and Midwest to seek not only a seasonal escape but a permanent home.”

One driving force: These are often much cheaper places to buy a home, in an era when working remotely is becoming a viable long-term option. While expensive cities have long held a monopoly on great jobs, it now turns out that you don’t actually have to pay for an overpriced, undersized urban apartment to make a great salary. And housing data shows that house hunters from snowy states have been bidding on homes in warmer and more affordable markets in Southern markets for a change of lifestyle, weather, and cost of living.

To find the most affordable warm-weather destinations where folks can ride out the rest of the pandemic—and well beyond—the realtor.com data team scoured the United States for counties with high median temperatures for January and February, lower cost of living with median home prices below $350,000, actual inventory, access to cultural and outdoor amenities, and high-speed internet so it’s possible to get work done. We also factored in the number of vacation rentals in each county just in case there’s a need to rent the place out.

So why not escape that tiny, overpriced apartment amid the polar vortex gales to somewhere you can actually thaw out this winter—and possibly every winter? Spring and summer, too!  Let’s take a tour of your potential new WFH headquarters.

Infographic: Warm-weather escapes
Infographic: Warm-weather escapes

Tony Frenzel for realtor.com

Median home price: $275,000

Tampa Bay residents are still celebrating their Super Bowl win, but the area has a lot more going for it than Tom Brady. The metro boasts 246 days of sunshine per year, average February temperatures in the 70s, and some of the softest sand in the continental U.S. along the Gulf Coast beaches in Pinellas County.

The county, which sits along the Gulf of Mexico, across the bay from Tampa, has seen an influx of home buyers from colder, more expensive places like Illinois, Minnesota, and even New York, who have been snatching up real estate.

“We are having New Yorkers come to the Gulf Coast,” says Terry Tillung, real estate agent with Coldwell Banker Realty. “There used to be separation where East Coast people would come to the east coast of Florida and Midwesterners would come here. We’re seeing a shift now.”

Those Northeasterners and others from cold climes have been trading out their cramped apartments for homes near the water, including this two-bedroom condo with killer views of Clearwater Beach listed for $250,000 and this two-bedroom house in St. Petersburg Beach on the market for $245,000.

Median listing price: $339,900

The Intracoastal Waterway as it bisects a residential neighborhood in the Pompano Beach area of South Florida just north of Fort Lauderdale.
The Intracoastal Waterway as it bisects a residential neighborhood in the Pompano Beach area of South Florida just north of Fort Lauderdale.

Getty Images

As winter approached, remote workers from New York City, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Chicago, and pricey California began flocking to Broward County’s beaches in droves. The area, home to Fort Lauderdale, is just north of Miami-Dade and all of its world-class cultural offerings, but boasts a more chill vibe.

Its beachfront strip, once infamous for spring break shenanigans, now boasts high-end restaurants. Walkable and sophisticated Las Olas Boulevard attracts visitors from across the region who want to eat, shop, and drink.

Plus, the area boasts a wide range of housing at a wide range of prices. For just $269,000, buyers can get into this two-bedroom condo right next to one of the nicest beaches in Fort Lauderdale. And those who want newer homes with more space and better public schools can drive 20 minutes west to find places like this three-bedroom townhouse in desirable Cooper City listed at $299,900. But these days, buyers need to move fast.

“It’s been a complete frenzy,” says Samantha DeBianchi, estate agent for DeBianchi Real Estate. “If I put a home on the market and it’s priced right, I’ll get five calls within the first 30 minutes.”

Median listing price: $225,000

According to the San Diego Audubon Society, Corpus Christi is “America’s birdiest place.” The large, shallow bay on which it lies attracts diverse flocks of water birds, songbirds, and raptors that bring in avian aficionados from across the U.S. But it’s not just amateur ornithologists who have been migrating here.

The family-friendly metro is protected from the Gulf of Mexico by the gorgeous Padre and Mustang islands, which offer outdoor activities ranging from beach combing and watching sea turtles hatch to camping and paddling trails—along with plenty of tourists looking to rent vacation homes during season.

Those homes are a steal. Starting in the mid-$100,000 range, buyers can get into condos with a view, including this two-bedroom on the water listed at $144,500 or a single-family nearby for a couple of hundred thousand more, including this three-bedroom house listed for $279,900.

Median listing price: $175,000

Pelicans on Padre Island National Seashore
Pelicans on Padre Island National Seashore

iStock

One county south of Nueces, Cameron County, home to Padre Island National Seashore and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, has the same warm winter weather (average highs are in the 60s) with even more nature access and cheaper real estate. For $159,000, house hunters can get into this three-bedroom home in Laguna Vista, right near the waterfront and the wildlife refuge. Folks seeking a beach lifestyle can find a two-bedroom condo in the hub of South Padre Island for $172,500.

Median listing price: $179,800

Subdivision in Yuma, AZ
Subdivision in Yuma, AZ

iStock

There’s a reason Yuma County is called “America’s salad bowl.” The border region produces much of the lettuce, broccoli, and other leafy greens that Americans eat during the winter months. That’s because with highs in the mid-70s come February, plants can get all the sun they need to thrive when much of the rest of the country is frozen over.

The idyllic weather is reason enough to pack your bags and head south, but the landscape is just as impressive. It’s home to Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, a 665,400-acre preserve with one of the largest herds of desert bighorn sheep in the Southwest, deer, foxes, and a wide variety of plants, some found only in this small slice of the Grand Canyon state.

Yuma County has plenty of affordable options for those seeking to thaw out through the winter, from relaxing retreats in the desert, such as this two-bedroom on an acre of land in Wellton for $139,900, to nice spreads in town with a pool, like this three-bedroom listed at $174,900.

Median listing price: $179,000

Terrebonne Parish is known as a paradise for outdoor activities, where locals spend their free time hiking through nature preserves and hunting and fishing in the freshwater bayous and the Gulf of Mexico. Because everyone is outside so much anyway, the pandemic hasn’t changed that much in terms of everyday life.

“My house is on the water, so COVID times did not even affect me,” says Melanie Rogers Bruce, real estate agent with Keller Williams Bayou Partners. “I sit out on my little dock, and any stress I have goes away.”

While the area does boast multimillion-dollar waterfront homes, the $250,000 to $400,000 range gets the most action. At that price, buyers can get their own little “camp,” a waterfront house raised on stilts with a dock, including this cute three-bedroom with a boat lift for $259,900.

Median listing price: $175,000

One parish over from Terrebonne and just a hop, skip, and a jump from all the action and music of New Orleans, Lafourche Parish offers a similarly outdoorsy lifestyle to its outlying neighbor with the same mild winter climate. But the area also gives Nueces County (see above) a run for its money in birding.

From fall through spring, a diverse array of migratory birds including herons, egrets, and hummingbirds spends time in the county’s idyllic pockets of salt marsh, shallow bays, grassy meadows, and shady live oak forests.

“It is one of the biggest bird-watching communities in the nation, and there’s monarch butterfly migration,” says Rogers Bruce. “Really it’s great for any kind of outdoor animal watching.”

Nature lovers can get into their own base near Grand Isle at prices starting around $200,000, including this $225,000 four-bedroom.

Median listing price: $254,900

Savannah, GA
Savannah, GA

iStock

Savannah’s oak-covered squares and historic homes have been drawing new residents seeking a calmer (and warmer) pace of life for the past decade or so, but the city has offered yet another carrot to lure remote workers since COVID-19 roiled big tech centers: a $2,000 reimbursement for relocaters.

With its great restaurants, quaint streets, and gorgeous nearby beaches, it’s no surprise that this year has seen a massive influx of Northerners.

Buyers who want to be right near the historic core—and take advantage of the city’s moving incentive—can find small houses with compact yards starting in the $200,000s, including this two-bedroom cottage listed for $239,000.

Median listing price: $260,000

Tucson and greater Pima County have been growing steadily over the past decade. This Sun Belt city’s population has grown by a healthy 6.8% in the past decade, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Even more people have been coming in since COVID-19 hit. Remote workers from California, Nevada, and beyond have been snatching up fully contained spreads with room for entertaining (outdoors, obviously) and private pools, including this $260,000 four-bedroom and this $260,000 three-bedroom on an acre just outside Tucson Mountain Park.

“Everyone wants amenities now,” says Jen Anderson of the Jen Anderson Team, Long Realty.

Median listing price: $177,900

Biloxi beach in Harrison County, MS
Biloxi beach in Harrison County, MS

iStock

Want to know where you can buy a single-family house just steps from the beach for less than $200,000? Look to Mississippi, specifically Harrison County. The popular second-home and retirement area offers mild winter temperatures (highs in the 60s), a plethora of outdoor activities, frequent events (in normal times), and incredibly affordable housing, including this four-bedroom ranch right near the sand in Pass Christian listed for $185,000.

Mississippi’s beaches, which have been dubbed the Secret Coast, traditionally haven’t drawn as much attention as Florida, Alabama, and other coastal states, but that’s started to change as more buyers from cold places like Michigan and Colorado have been buying up homes and land.

“Many people don’t realize what a gem we have here, but I think the word is getting out,” says Wendy Hope Boyd, a Realtor with Coldwell Banker Alfonso Realty.

Source: realtor.com

Here’s How Much Teachers Are Paid in Every State

Teacher in a classroom
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

The coronavirus pandemic rages on, but one way or another, teachers returned to work last fall and have continued doing their jobs throughout this school year.

Elementary school teachers in the U.S. earned an average annual wage of $63,930 as of 2019, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Middle school teachers earned an average of $63,550 at that same time. High school teachers averaged $65,930 per year.

But teacher pay varies considerably by state. States also vary as to which level pays best. Often, elementary school teachers make less than their middle school and high school counterparts, but not always.

Following are the average annual wages for elementary, middle and high school teachers in each state. The states are ranked based on elementary-school pay.

50. Mississippi

Mississippi road sign
Peek Creative Collective / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $44,060
  • Employment: 12,340

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $48,170
  • Employment: 6,180

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $46,580
  • Employment: 8,850

49. South Dakota

Teacher in a face mask explaining math
Deliris / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $44,110
  • Employment: 4,070

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $44,990
  • Employment: 1,920

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $44,610
  • Employment: 3,500

48. West Virginia

Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $45,390
  • Employment: 5,330

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $47,570
  • Employment: 5,160

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $47,610
  • Employment: 4,460

47. Arizona

Asia Images Group / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $45,600
  • Employment: 23,290

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $45,120
  • Employment: 12,330

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $50,320
  • Employment: 16,990

46. Oklahoma

sevenMaps / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $45,970
  • Employment: 17,980

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $46,360
  • Employment: 8,320

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $47,320
  • Employment: 11,680

45. North Carolina (tie)

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $48,560
  • Employment: 42,520

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $49,620
  • Employment: 18,770

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $49,930
  • Employment: 24,030

44. Louisiana

stockfour / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $48,630
  • Employment: 23,670

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $49,790
  • Employment: 7,600

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $52,090
  • Employment: 14,810

43. Arkansas

Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $48,800
  • Employment: 13,010

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $50,720
  • Employment: 6,450

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $51,870
  • Employment: 11,940

42. Idaho

Teach online
Agenturfotografin / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $48,880
  • Employment: 8,380

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $53,970
  • Employment: 1,820

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $50,640
  • Employment: 6,210

41. Alabama

Young teacher using internet to remotely teach during the coronavirus crisis
Timothy Kuiper / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $50,270
  • Employment: 23,650

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $51,600
  • Employment: 10,310

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $51,950
  • Employment: 15,230

40. Kansas

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $50,650
  • Employment: 16,340

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $53,500
  • Employment: 6,630

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $52,050
  • Employment: 12,310

39. Missouri

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $50,920
  • Employment: 22,850

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $51,930
  • Employment: 11,080

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $50,980
  • Employment: 30,640

38. Montana

DGLImages / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $52,160
  • Employment: 4,920

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $58,710
  • Employment: 2,070

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $52,360
  • Employment: 3,670

37. Indiana

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $52,570
  • Employment: 25,530

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $52,450
  • Employment: 11,320

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $53,150
  • Employment: 21,180

36. Kentucky

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $52,660
  • Employment: 19,270

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $53,830
  • Employment: 8,160

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $55,100
  • Employment: 12,280

35. Maine

Young girl in online class with geometry teacher on her laptop
Aleksandra Suzi / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $52,860
  • Employment: 5,780

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,740
  • Employment: 3,230

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $55,260
  • Employment: 5,400

34. South Carolina

DGLImages / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $53,450
  • Employment: 22,550

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $55,180
  • Employment: 9,790

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,730
  • Employment: 14,050

33. Tennessee

Undrey / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $53,540
  • Employment: 30,620

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $53,880
  • Employment: 13,240

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $55,060
  • Employment: 20,690

32. Iowa

iofoto / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $53,950
  • Employment: 18,720

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $55,250
  • Employment: 7,920

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,570
  • Employment: 11,950

31. Colorado

Asian woman teacher checking homework at her desk.
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $54,670
  • Employment: 25,740

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $54,940
  • Employment: 12,980

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,370
  • Employment: 17,580

30. Florida

child reading
KK Tan / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $55,210
  • Employment: 77,170

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,640
  • Employment: 33,600

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $57,880
  • Employment: 50,640

29. North Dakota

Older teach wearing a face mask in an empty classroom
vladaphotowiz / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $55,630
  • Employment: 4,450

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $59,700
  • Employment: 1,380

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,250
  • Employment: 2,800

28. Texas

Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,280
  • Employment: 131,880

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,290
  • Employment: 64,340

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $58,000
  • Employment: 107,190

27. Nevada

A female teacher in an empty classroom during the pandemic
POP-THAILAND / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $56,980
  • Employment: 10,480

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $59,150
  • Employment: 4,000

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $58,090
  • Employment: 5,760

26. New Mexico

ESB Professional / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $57,330
  • Employment: 7,650

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $49,570
  • Employment: 3,250

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $57,410
  • Employment: 6,880

25. Wisconsin

GagliardiImages / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $57,980
  • Employment: 28,240

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $58,940
  • Employment: 13,800

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $59,180
  • Employment: 17,880

24. Georgia

Oksana Kuzmina / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $58,190
  • Employment: 50,250

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $58,830
  • Employment: 28,440

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $59,860
  • Employment: 26,500

23. Wyoming

ESB Professional / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $58,940
  • Employment: 2,550

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $61,340
  • Employment: 1,090

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $61,400
  • Employment: 1,690

22. New Hampshire

Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $59,930
  • Employment: 6,070

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $60,290
  • Employment: 3,100

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $60,720
  • Employment: 5,000

21. Nebraska

Pressmaster / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $60,390
  • Employment: 9,810

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $62,130
  • Employment: 4,310

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $60,500
  • Employment: 6,890

20. Utah

Students in a classroom during the pandemic
saravutpics / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $60,660
  • Employment: 13,110

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,720
  • Employment: 6,540

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $61,050
  • Employment: 8,920

19. Minnesota

Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,250
  • Employment: 22,420

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $64,790
  • Employment: 9,730

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $64,960
  • Employment: 20,130

18. Illinois

ESB Professional / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,280
  • Employment: 64,270

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,630
  • Employment: 21,700

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $74,340
  • Employment: 44,810

17. Hawaii

Poznyakov / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,360
  • Employment: 5,780

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,520
  • Employment: 2,090

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $62,580
  • Employment: 4,320

16. Vermont

Student in face mask raising hand
Halfpoint / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,480
  • Employment: 3,770

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $61,470
  • Employment: 1,030

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $66,660
  • Employment: 2,770

15. Delaware

ESB Professional / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,970
  • Employment: 3,800

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $64,800
  • Employment: 2,200

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $66,920
  • Employment: 3,330

14. Ohio

Ohio roadway sign
Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $64,090
  • Employment: 57,220

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,510
  • Employment: 30,880

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $64,410
  • Employment: 47,510

13. Michigan

Teacher writing on blackboard
l i g h t p o e t / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $69,050
  • Employment: 37,130

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $64,920
  • Employment: 13,910

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $63,000
  • Employment: 22,820

12. Washington

Kids working with robotics.
Syda Productions / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $69,390
  • Employment: 30,440

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $70,970
  • Employment: 9,430

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $71,690
  • Employment: 14,810

11. Pennsylvania

Hurst Photo / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $69,630
  • Employment: 57,100

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $69,330
  • Employment: 26,460

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $66,920
  • Employment: 46,130

10. Virginia

Parent and child use hand sanitizer and face masks at school
1641857584 / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $69,690
  • Employment: 38,700

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $71,920
  • Employment: 18,300

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $69,070
  • Employment: 25,620

9. Oregon

Hurst Photo / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $69,980
  • Employment: 15,950

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $70,660
  • Employment: 6,250

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $71,780
  • Employment: 8,840

8. New Jersey

ESB Professional / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $71,880
  • Employment: 40,640

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $73,380
  • Employment: 26,590

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $78,090
  • Employment: 30,230

7. Rhode Island

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $72,310
  • Employment: 4,100

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $75,130
  • Employment: 1,670

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $75,950
  • Employment: 4,840

6. Maryland

Rawpixel.com / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $75,380
  • Employment: 28,610

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $74,400
  • Employment: 14,890

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $77,050
  • Employment: 17,150

5. Alaska

Schoolboy with backpack in snow.
Romrodphoto / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $75,860
  • Employment: 3,820

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $80,730
  • Employment: 1,160

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $75,820
  • Employment: 2,790

4. Connecticut

Teacher on camera during the pandemic
Hananeko_Studio / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $78,070
  • Employment: 15,930

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $79,510
  • Employment: 8,320

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $78,540
  • Employment: 15,820

3. Massachusetts

racorn / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $82,450
  • Employment: 31,430

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $80,520
  • Employment: 15,910

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $81,070
  • Employment: 27,120

2. California

African American woman with grade school students wearing red caps.
Rawpixel.com / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $82,560
  • Employment: 164,910

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $80,160
  • Employment: 39,780

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $85,080
  • Employment: 109,840

1. New York

iofoto / Shutterstock.com

Elementary school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $82,830
  • Employment: 92,560

Middle school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $87,050
  • Employment: 42,010

High school teachers:

  • Average annual wage: $87,240
  • Employment: 75,360

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

How Much Nurses Get Paid in Every State

Health care worker in a mask and face shield
DC Studio / Shutterstock.com

Nurses serve on the front lines of health care. Their work is tough, but fortunately it’s well-compensated. And if you are considering a career as a nurse, the good news is that the industry is growing and the pay tends to be good.

The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates there are more than 2.9 million registered nurses across the country, pulling down an average annual wage of $77,460. Additionally, there are some 200,000 nurse practitioners, earning an average of $111,840, and some 697,000 licensed practical and vocational nurses, earning an average of $48,500.

But the pay varies greatly depending on where the nurse practices.

Following are the average annual wages for multiple types of nurses in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, according to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics data, which is for 2019. The states are ranked based on pay for RNs.

51. South Dakota

Sanford USD Medical Center
Ken Wolter / Shutterstock.com

South Dakota is one of several states predicted to have a shortage of registered nurses (RNs) by 2030, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that the state will be short 1,900 RNs by 2030.

South Dakota is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $59,540

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $102,230

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $38,760

50. Mississippi

Nurse
insta_photos / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively low average wages in Mississippi. The state ranks dead last for its average annual wages for elementary-school teachers, for police officers and sheriff’s deputies and even for cashiers, as we have reported.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $59,750

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,740

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $39,020

49. Alabama

Prattville Baptist Hospital
JNix / Shutterstock.com

In Alabama and nationally, nurse practitioners earn more money than multiple other types of nurses, on average. To become an NP, you must first be a registered nurse and also pursue specialized graduate education, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $60,230

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $99,570

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $39,310

48. Iowa

Hospital nurse in mask and gloves
Rawpixel.com / Shutterstock.com

Different types of nurses are most likely to work in different types of health care settings, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. RNs most commonly work in hospitals, and NPs in physicians’ offices. Meanwhile, licensed practical and vocational nurses most often work in nursing care facilities, also referred to as skilled nursing facilities.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $60,590

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,910

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,220

47. Arkansas

Nurse with elderly patient
Alexander Raths / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $61,330

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,840

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $40,760

46. Kansas

University of Kansas Hospital
APN Photography / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $62,450

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $100,550

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,260

45. Tennessee

Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital
Travel_with_me / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $62,570

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $96,510

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $41,270

44. West Virginia

nurse
Syda Productions / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $63,220

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $103,170

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $37,500

43. Kentucky

Nurse with patient
michaeljung / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $63,750

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $99,560

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,740

42. Missouri

Jon Rehg / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,160

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,050

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $43,410

41. Oklahoma

Man in the hospital coughing
wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,800

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $113,200

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,090

40. South Carolina

home health nurse taking a senior's blood pressure
Dmytro Zinkevych / Shutterstock.com

South Carolina is one of seven states projected to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to the report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts the Palmetto State will be short 10,400 RNs by that year.

South Carolina is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $64,840

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $100,680

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,190

39. Louisiana

Home health aide
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Louisiana is home to more than 19,000 licensed practical nurses and licensed vocational nurses, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Consequently, Louisiana has a higher concentration of this type of nursing job than any other state in the nation.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $65,850

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $40,300

38. North Dakota

Hospital staff
Spotmatik Ltd / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,290

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,760

37. North Carolina

Thank you sign for health and essential workers
Darwin Brandis / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,440

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,890

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,880

36. Indiana

Floyd Memorial Hospital in Albany, Indiana.
Thomas Kelley / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,560

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,380

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,050

35. Nebraska

Essential worker
G-Stock Studio / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $66,640

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,450

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,450

34. Florida

Boca Raton Regional Hospital
Mike Kuhlman / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $67,610

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $101,510

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,580

33. Utah

nurse
Cryptographer / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $67,970

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,660

32. Ohio

Cleveland Clinic
Duttagupta M K / Shutterstock.com

Ohio is home to the Cleveland Clinic — which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the nation’s No. 2 hospital overall, and the No. 1 specialty hospital for cardiology and heart surgery, as we report in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $68,220

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $103,780

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $45,020

31. Wyoming

senior receiving long-term care
Photographee.eu / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $68,690

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $118,110

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,980

30. Montana

Young female medical student working at a hospital
Stokkete / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,340

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,120

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $44,730

29. Idaho

Idaho state capital building
Charles Knowles / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,480

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,860

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,430

28. Georgia

Mark Winfrey / Shutterstock.com

Georgia is one of several states predicted to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that the Peach State will be short 2,200 RNs by that time.

Georgia is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the analysis found. The state is projected to be short 10,500 LPNs by that year.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,590

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,670

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $42,570

27. Maine

nurse
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $69,760

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,960

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,930

26. Vermont

University of Vermont Medical Center
Bob LoCicero / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $70,240

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $105,840

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $50,210

25. Pennsylvania

hospital
Ilze_Lucero / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $71,410

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $101,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,200

24. Virginia

UVA health care heroes banner
Kim Kelley-Wagner / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $71,870

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $109,110

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,070

23. Wisconsin

Senior man with nurse
Nejron Photo / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $72,610

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $112,130

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $46,550

22. Michigan

University of Michigan Hospitals
Susan Montgomery / Shutterstock.com

University of Michigan Hospitals-Michigan Medicine ranks among the top 20 hospitals in the United States. Like the University of Michigan itself, the hospital is located in the city of Ann Arbor.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,200

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $108,660

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $50,300

21. New Mexico

Home health care worker
Rob Marmion / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,300

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,930

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $48,330

20. Illinois

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Chicago is home to two of the top 20 hospitals in the United States — Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Rush University Medical Center — according to the rankings of U.S. News & World Report.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,510

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $107,860

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,290

19. New Hampshire

Manchester, New Hampshire
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $73,880

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $110,680

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,220

18. Delaware

nurse
wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $74,100

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $112,430

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,520

17. Texas

MD Anderson Cancer Center
JHVEPhoto / Shutterstock.com

Texas is one of several states facing a serious shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It’s also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030.

Additionally, Texas has a larger share of uninsured residents than any other state, as we detail in “16 States With the Worst Rates of Health Insurance.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $74,540

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,440

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $47,370

16. Colorado

Denver, Colorado
f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $76,230

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $106,760

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $53,180

15. Maryland

Johns Hopkins Hospital
Richard Thornton / Shutterstock.com

Baltimore is home to the Johns Hopkins Hospital, which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the top hospital in the country for multiple specialties — from ear, nose and throat care to psychiatry — as we report in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.” The publication also ranks Johns Hopkins Hospital the No. 3 hospital in the country overall.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $77,910

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,800

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $55,020

14. Arizona

hospital
vewfinder / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $78,330

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,480

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,290

13. Minnesota

Mayo Clinic Hospital
Leigh Trail / Shutterstock.com

The city of Rochester, Minnesota, is home to the Mayo Clinic — which U.S. News & World Report ranks as the No. 1 hospital in the nation, as we detail in “The 20 Highest-Ranked U.S. Hospitals in 2020.” The Mayo Clinic also is ranked No. 1 for multiple types of specialty care, from diabetes and endocrinology to pulmonology and lung surgery.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $80,130

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,850

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $48,460

12. Rhode Island

nurses
Spotmatik Ltd / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $82,310

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,310

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $59,860

11. Connecticut

Candlewood Lake
By tmphoto98 / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $83,440

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,140

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,380

10. New Jersey

Amy Lutz / Shutterstock.com

New Jersey is one of seven states expected to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency predicts that the state will be short a whopping 11,400 RNs in about a decade.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $84,280

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $123,810

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,510

9. Washington

Bellevue, Washington
mandritoiu / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $86,170

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $126,920

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $57,940

8. New York

lev radin / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively high average wages in New York. The state ranks No. 1 for its wages for grade-school teachers, as we report in “Here’s How Much Teachers Are Paid in Every State.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $87,840

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,550

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $49,860

7. Nevada

Nurse
GagliardiImages / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $88,380

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,970

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $58,470

6. Alaska

Anchorage, Alaska
Rex Lisman / Shutterstock.com

Alaska is one of seven states facing a shortage of registered nurses in the near future, according to the report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency forecasts that by 2030, the state will be short 5,400 registered nurses.

Alaska is also among the majority of states forecast to have a shortage of licensed practical nurses by 2030, the report found.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $90,500

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $115,890

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $63,850

5. Oregon

nurse pushing a patient in a wheelchair
Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $92,960

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $113,430

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,740

4. Massachusetts

Worcester, Massachusetts
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

Massachusetts has a larger share of insured residents than any other state in the country, as we detail in “15 States Where the Most People Have Health Insurance.” A mere 3% of Massachusetts’ population is without insurance.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $93,160

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $122,240

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $60,340

3. District of Columbia

Washington D.C.
f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Nurses aren’t the only front-line workers with relatively high average wages in Washington, D.C. The nation’s capital ranks No. 1 — beating out all 50 states — based on its pay for the heroes behind cash registers, as we report in “How Much Cashiers Earn in Every State.”

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $94,820

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $111,950

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $54,220

2. Hawaii

Honolulu, Hawaii
MNStudio / Shutterstock.com

U.S. News & World Report named Hawaii the No. 1 state for health care in general. In the analysis, Hawaii leads the nation in health care quality, is third for health care access and fourth for public health.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $104,060

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $124,000

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $51,010

1. California

Keck Hospital of USC
Kit Leong / Shutterstock.com

California may pay its nurses well, but it is one of seven states forecast to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030, according to an analysis by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The federal agency predicts that the state will be short 44,500 full-time RN jobs — far more than any other state — by that year.

Average annual wage for a registered nurse: $113,240

Average annual wage for a nurse practitioner: $138,660

Average annual wage for a licensed practical or licensed vocational nurse: $60,240

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

21 Pharmacy Chains Ready to Give COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID vaccination
Prostock-studio / Shutterstock.com

After a miserable year in the dark night of a pandemic, a new day is about to dawn.

Millions of Americans have received the vaccine against COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. And the rest of us will have our opportunity soon.

If you can’t wait to get the shot — and to return to normal life — you’ll want to bookmark this story. Following is a list of pharmacies participating in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program for COVID-19 Vaccination.

The program is a collaboration that includes the federal government, states and territories, and 21 national pharmacy partners and independent pharmacy networks.

Right now, the program is slowly rolling out to select pharmacy locations that are vaccinating eligible individuals. Eventually, more than 40,000 pharmacies will administer the vaccine to everyone who wants it.

Walmart and Sam’s Club

QualityHD / Shutterstock.com

Both the retail giant and its affiliated warehouse club are ready to begin vaccinating Americans.

On Feb. 2, Walmart said select pharmacies at retailer locations in 22 states would begin administering the vaccine once doses are available late next week. According to Walmart:

“Once our locations have received the vaccines, eligible customers and members can reserve a convenient vaccine appointment directly via a scheduling tool on the Walmart and Sam’s Club websites, while allocation lasts. In addition to appointments, the scheduler will provide a digital reminder when it’s time to return for the second dose of the vaccine in order for the vaccine to be fully effective.”

Walmart already is vaccinating patients in states where it has agreements with local governments.

The states in which Walmart will be a federal pharmacy partner are Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and Wyoming.

For more information: Visit Walmart’s COVID-19 vaccine page.

Walgreens

Ken Wolter / Shutterstock.com

Walgreens will begin its vaccination efforts as part of the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program for COVID-19 Vaccination on Feb. 12.

Initially, 15 states and jurisdictions will participate: Chicago, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, New York City, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, Vermont, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

The pharmacy chain already has been vaccinating people in states where it has reached agreements with local governments.

For more information: Visit Walgreens’ COVID-19 vaccine page.

CVS

CVS
Jonathan Weiss / Shutterstock.com

On Feb. 11, certain CVS locations in 11 states will begin giving the vaccine to eligible populations. CVS expects the initial supply to be about 250,000 total doses. According to CVS:

“More than 90,000 health care professionals including pharmacists, licensed pharmacy technicians, and nurses will participate in the vaccination effort, giving CVS Pharmacy the capacity to administer 20-25 million shots per month.”

States where CVS will roll out its vaccination efforts are California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.

CVS is also working directly with Indiana and Ohio to provide some vaccinations.

For more information: Visit CVS’ COVID-19 resource center.

Kroger and related pharmacies

Ralphs
Ken Wolter / Shutterstock.com

The Kroger Co. announced in late December that it would partner with federal and state governments to offer the COVID-19 vaccine across its 2,200 pharmacies and 220 clinics. (The company’s other chains include Fred Meyer, Harris Teeter and Ralphs, among others.)

In January, Kroger said pharmacies at its Ralphs grocery stores had begun giving the vaccine to health care personnel in Southern California.

As of Feb. 3, pharmacies that are part of the Kroger family had received “a limited supply of the COVID-19 vaccine in select areas,” Kroger said, and the company will update its “COVID-19 Vaccine Availability” webpage regularly.

For more information: Visit Kroger’s COVID-19 vaccinations page.

Publix

Boofoto / Shutterstock.com

Publix already has rolled out vaccinations in locations in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. There is no word yet on when or how Publix plans to expand its vaccination efforts in the near future.

For more information: Visit Publix’s COVID-19 vaccine page.

Costco

Costco Wholesale exterior
Jonathan Weiss / Shutterstock.com

The warehouse club giant issued an announcement in late January that simply says it will begin offering the vaccine at its pharmacies “as soon as they are available, in accordance with CDC and state guidelines.”

Costco urges you not to contact your local Costco pharmacy, as such locations will not be able to schedule an appointment at this time.

For more information: Costco’s announcement directs people to visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website or their state department of health website to learn more about vaccine availability in their area and their eligibility for the vaccine.

Others

Senior woman getting vaccine
Image Point Fr / Shutterstock.com

Many other pharmacies — from Rite Aid to much smaller pharmacy chains — are participating in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program for COVID-19 Vaccination. There are 21 chains in all. For a full list, visit the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com