Midcentury Modern Design Truly Soars at Portland’s Boomerang House>

A midcentury modern home in the Pacific Northwest that pays homage to Frank Lloyd Wright is ready to swoop into the hands of a new owner.

Known as the Boomerang House, thanks to its unique shape, the home on Skyline Boulevard in Portland, OR, has skimmed onto the market for just under $1.8 million.

“It’s hard to see it necessarily when you’re inside the house, but if you’re looking at it from an aerial point of view, you can totally see that it’s shaped like a boomerang,” explains the listing agent, Mark Bisaccio.

The home was built in 1947, and was completely renovated by the current owners in the past few years. Bisaccio estimates that the owners spent about $700,000 on renovations.

Big changes include the removal of a wall between the kitchen and the living space, the addition of a garage, and the creation of a breezeway between the garage and the home.

“Everybody that sets foot in this house says they absolutely love it,” says Bisaccio. “Nobody walks into this house and says, ‘It’s OK.’ It gets great reactions from everybody.”

Exterior of home in Portland, OR
Exterior of home in Portland, OR

Chuck Schmidt

Exterior
Exterior

Chuck Schmidt

Aerial view
Aerial view

Chuck Schmidt

Interior
Interior

Chuck Schmidt

Interior
Interior

Chuck Schmidt

Windows
Windows

Chuck Schmidt

Interior
Interior

Chuck Schmidt

The home’s huge windows and overall aesthetic are reminiscent of the Wright’s style, and some architecture historians have tried to connect this design directly to the iconic architect. However, no definitive proof connects Wright to the home.

The house was built for the movie actress Margaretta Ramsey—known for starring in in “Mannix,” “Dinah East,” and “Riot on Sunset Strip” in the 1960s and 1970s. There were reports that FLW was friends with Ramsey’s husband, Walter.

The agent says he can see why Wright fans would love to attribute to the master this home that embraces its natural surroundings.

Watch: Illuminating Amenity: Historic Home Features a Real Lighthouse

“It’s just very clearly aimed after his style. It’s got floor-to-ceiling windows that look on to an amazing yard, so you feel like you’re in the forest,” Bisaccio explains. “People initially are drawn to all the windows. There is so much natural light.”

The home, on almost a half-acre, measures 3,693 square feet.

Land
Land

Chuck Schmidt

Kitchen
Kitchen

Chuck Schmidt

Kitchen and dining areas
Kitchen and dining areas

Chuck Schmidt

Kitchen and dining areas
Kitchen and dining areas

Chuck Schmidt

The kitchen is sleek and features high-end appliances with an island and a separate dining area. It opens on to a porch with plenty of room for outdoor living.

Wine room
Wine room

Chuck Schmidt

Lower level
Lower level

Chuck Schmidt

Stairs
Stairs

Chuck Schmidt

Downstairs, on the lower level, a climate-controlled wine room can store 650 bottles.

Master bedroom
Master bedroom

Chuck Schmidt

Master bedroom
Master bedroom

Chuck Schmidt

Bedroom
Bedroom

Chuck Schmidt

Bathroom
Bathroom

Chuck Schmidt

Bathroom
Bathroom

Chuck Schmidt

Bedroom
Bedroom

Chuck Schmidt

The house has a total of four bedrooms and three bathrooms, but it’s possible that the current layout won’t work for every buyer.

“There are two bedrooms on the main level and two bedrooms down below,” Bisaccio explains.

He said the upstairs-downstairs dynamic is the reason the current owners are selling what they thought would be their forever home.

“They were recently surprised with twins,” he says. “With three kids, it’s hard to split them and put them up and down.”

Breezeway
Breezeway

Chuck Schmidt

Breezeway
Breezeway

Chuck Schmidt

Garage
Garage

Chuck Schmidt

Bisaccio says buyers could easily snag a traditional home with more square footage for a similar price in the Portland metro.

However, the Boomerang House is not likely to appeal to that type of buyer.

“The perfect buyer for this house is somebody who appreciates and respects design and architecture, especially midcentury modern architecture,” says Bisaccio.

“It appeals to everybody, but it’s just a matter of who can practically live here,” he says. “People that are creative minded, design-oriented … are just going to go nuts over this thing. And they do.”

Breezeway
Breezeway

Chuck Schmidt

Bathroom
Bathroom

Chuck Schmidt

Living space
Living space

Chuck Schmidt

Outdoor space
Outdoor space

Chuck Schmidt

  • For more photos and details, check out the full listing.
  • Homes for sale in Portland, OR
  • Learn more about Portland, OR

Source: realtor.com

Terrazzo flooring has stood the test of time, enduring for centuries as a durable and versatile surface.

To arrive in Venice for the first time is to be transported into a completely unique world—a city of gothic buildings floating on water, where grand palaces and churches stand above the ubiquitous canals, and an array of building materials is on permanent display. From the dusty-rose clay bricks that can be found on the exteriors of houses, palaces and churches, to the dazzling white Istrian stone that typifies many of the grander Venetian establishments, and the marble mosaics that adorn surfaces throughout the city, Venice is a city of contrasting textures and styles—and this is something that is reflected in one of its most famous exports: terrazzo flooring.

You might know it as that speckly concrete from government buildings of the 1970s and ’80s, but this hybrid flooring material was actually created in the 15th century. Venetian mosaic workers would gather up offcuts of marble and repurpose them, combining them with clay and other materials to use for flooring in their own residences. The workers would grind the stone down for an even walking surface, but without being coated, the color of the aggregate flecks would not emerge; terrazzo was merely a convenient and utilitarian choice for flooring.

The flooring style gained popularity when workers refined the process of installation by creating a grinding stone called a galeto to even out the surface, and discovering that a coating of goat milk would bring out the color and sheen of the stone. Since then, technology has advanced (and coatings other than goat milk have been developed), and terrazzo has established itself as a durable and attractive flooring material, first in Italy, and then across the globe.

In palaces and buildings throughout Venice, terrazzo is omnipresent, having been chosen for its aesthetic appeal and durability. In the centuries since its invention, the surface has made its way around the world, and recently, it has enjoyed a resurgence as a style statement in modern architecture and design.

David Filippi, Vice President of American Terrazzo Co., has a long family history with terrazzo, beginning with his great-grandfather Antonio’s emigration from Italy to the United States. Antonio Filippi set out for the United States from a small town called Casasola, not far from Venice, in the early 1900s. After an arduous journey and years of hardship as a foreigner in a strange land, Antonio established what is now American Terrazzo Co.

“Like so many Italian immigrants, my great grandfather left behind a wife and young child to board a ship and set sail for the country of his dreams,” Filippi says. “Some seven years after arriving in America, he called for his young family to join him and eventually secured a piece of property where he built his shop and home next door. Relatives and friends from the ‘old country’ joined my great-grandfather, and together they earned a reputation for performing the finest in terrazzo and masonry work.”

Terrazzo flooring has stood the test of time, enduring for centuries as a durable and versatile surface. image 1

Filippi’s family is dedicated to the continuation of the business, which is a testament to Italian ingenuity and Filippi’s great-grandfather’s hard work. “Over the years, terrazzo has had its ups and downs,” Filippi says. “Today, it is very popular.

Historically, you would have seen terrazzo mostly in airports and hospitals, and in the lobbies of large commercial buildings. Now, it has expanded to retail stores, universities and high-end homes.” As with many design and architectural trends, terrazzo has come in and out of style, but one of the enduring benefits of the material—and what makes architects and designers come back to it again and again—is that it is durable and versatile.

“Generally, of all building types, airports have the most foot traffic,” Filippi says. “One of the main reasons that terrazzo is so widely used in airports is that it is extremely durable.” It’s because of this that, even though the initial financial outlay for terrazzo might be greater than a simpler form of flooring, terrazzo is considered to be the most cost-effective flooring that there is—because it will never wear out. Fifty years from installation, a terrazzo floor will look as fresh as if it were installed yesterday.

Another major benefit of terrazzo flooring is its uniqueness, and the ability to customize its look to suit any setting. “It has many options,” Filippi says. “There is a wide spectrum of available colors, as well as many aggregate sizes and colors.” In recent years, terrazzo has been embraced as a wildly versatile material that can be used as a refined surface in professional buildings; for a fun and colorful addition to a retail space; and as a personality-laden feature in a beautiful home.

Because terrazzo is poured during installation, a fluid, unbroken surface can be achieved, providing continuity and connection between spaces in your home, which most other flooring and wall surfaces are unable to achieve. And designers are now experimenting with precast terrazzo, opening up a whole new channel for design experimentation—it’s no longer limited to just flooring and walls.

“Over the years, we have fabricated terrazzo sinks, bathtubs, tables, chairs and even sculptures,” Filippi says. “Terrazzo can be placed anywhere and everywhere. It has no limitations.” This expansion from building surfaces to accessories and decor is indicative of the strength of terrazzo in today’s design palette. Modern design outlets jumped on board, with Anthropologie selling a range of terrazzo-inspired bath accessories, West Elm doing a collection of melamine terrazzo-style dishes, and multitudes of furniture and fabric designers incorporating the material’s aesthetic into their products.

If you’re considering terrazzo for your home, there are a few important things to keep in mind. Consider your time line, because terrazzo is still laid by hand, and is considered artistic and artisanal work. If you’re going with traditional cementitious terrazzo, be prepared for it to take more than a month to install. Epoxy, on the other hand, can usually be completed within one to two weeks.

Cost varies, starting from $30 per square foot for installation. If you’re looking for intricate designs or installations in challenging areas, the cost will increase. But remember, the long-term maintenance costs of terrazzo are virtually nonexistent compared with other types of flooring.

Lastly, when you’re choosing the color and aggregates for your terrazzo features, make sure that you’re making a choice based on personal preference rather than trend, because this surface, with its virtual indestructibility, will be with you permanently.

Source: century21.com

‘Perfection in Every Way’: $18M Modern Mansion in San Francisco

A new listing in San Francisco’s Cow Hollow neighborhood has turned heads for its unique design, both inside and out.

The 4,185-square-foot home with four bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms was built in 2016, is on the market for $18 million. It has an top-notch design pedigree that includes Aidlin Darling Design (architecture) and Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture (landscape), who were honored with National Design Awards for the project.

Neal Ward and Rick Teed of Compass are handling the listing. Built in 2016 for the current seller, it’s available for the first time.

“The architecture of this property is so striking, and the detail, from top to bottom, is perfection in every way,” says Ward.

Cello & Maudru Construction built the home, and Allyn Davis’ interior design is showcased in the home’s staging.

While natural light is prominent in the interiors, so is privacy, thanks to exterior walls designed with wood slats. In addition, a walnut and stainless-steel kitchen can be easily separated by five frosted-glass panel walls that are designed to retract if the cook prefers privacy. The home also has a green roof.

Inside, 20-foot ceilings in the living room and a 13-foot-tall light sculpture above the dining room table add elegance. Pivot-hinge doors on the north end of the living room lead to a cantilevered deck offering views of the Palace of Fine Arts, Angel Island, Alcatraz Island, and San Francisco Bay.

Ward calls out the deck’s “bird’s-eye view of the Golden Gate Bridge” as another huge highlight. The home is at the north end of a tree-lined block of single-family homes on Filbert Street, which means that it has some of the neighborhood’s best views. It also has a green roof.

This home is built for entertaining. On the lower level—excavated into the home and beneath a rock—are a media room and DJ booth, as well as a wet bar. That area connects directly with the outdoors, where you’ll find a dining and grilling area, as well as a lanai, bamboo leaves, an outdoor TV, in-ground fire pit, and spa.

Exterior of home in Cow Hollow, San Francisco
Exterior of home in Cow Hollow, San Francisco

Matthew Millman

Entrance
Entrance

Matthew Millman

Dining room
Dining room

Matthew Millman

Living room
Living room

Matthew Millman

Interior
Interior

Matthew Millman

Backyard
Backyard

Matthew Millman

Media room
Media room

Matthew Millman

Interior
Interior

Matthew Millman

“The person that owns the house is into music, technology, and high-tech, and was able to have all of this done custom,” says Ward.

Another selling point is the location.

“The Cow Hollow neighborhood is highly sought after because of its proximity to the Presidio and all the wonderful shops on Union Street, and Chestnut Street in the Marina,” says Ward.

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Watch: You Can Take In Seattle’s Entire Skyline From This Historic Home

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And while San Francisco is often linked with fog and cool temps, this neighborhood does get its fair share of sunlight.

“It’s nice and sunny,” says Ward. “Cow Hollow is known for its good weather.”

Ward believes that a young couple or single person—particularly a tech employee drawn to the custom features who is looking in this price range—will snap up the property.

“It’s not a typical young family with younger children that can’t have the separation from their parents,” he says, alluding to the master bedroom’s location on the top floor, with other bedrooms below. “I’ve also shown it to people looking for a pied-à-terre, couples from New York City,” he says.

  • For more photos and details, check out the full listing.
  • Homes for sale in San Francisco, CA
  • Learn more about San Francisco, CA

Source: realtor.com