What is Cardano (ADA)? How to Buy ADA

Cardano (ADA) is a cryptocurrency that lets its owners help operate the network and vote on changes to it. Developers are able to make use of the Cardano blockchain to write smart contracts and decentralized applications (dApps). ADA crypto is required to run programs like dApps. Cardano boasts a large library of academic research that its founders point to as a factor that makes the blockchain unique. Cardano’s creators also hope that the platform will be used by “innovators and visionaries” to create positive change in the world. This article serves as a cryptocurrency guide for ADA.

What is ADA Cryptocurrency?

In 2017, Cardano was created by two technologists named Jeremy Wood and Charles Hoskinson. Hoskinson co-founded Ethereum (ETH), the second-largest cryptocurrency by market cap. It makes sense, then, that Cardano and Ethereum have a lot of similarities. Namely, both networks are primarily used for programming based on smart contract technology.

A smart contract is a program that initiates a digital transfer between parties when specific conditions have been met. It’s not unlike a regular, written paper contract. The big difference lies in the fact that smart contracts require no third-party intermediary and can be programmed to execute automatically when the right conditions are met.

Cardano claims to be different by focusing its design on research and academics, believing this could help accelerate its adoption. Cardano is written in a sophisticated programming language known as Haskell, which is also used by banks and governments.

The company that built Cardano, IOHK, has a strong reputation in the world of academia. IOHK has published over 60 academic research papers (as of 2020) describing its technology. Research can be found on the official website of Cardano , where the team also publishes blogs posts and videos to educate users.

ADA Crypto Proof-of-Stake Blockchain

Cardano (ADA) is a proof-of-stake blockchain. This differs from Bitcoin and most mineable cryptocurrencies which use the proof-of-work consensus method. On the Bitcoin network, miners solve complex mathematical problems to process transactions (“work”) in a race to solve the next block and receive the rewards that it yields. Mining difficulty is constantly increasing and there is a limited amount of bitcoin that can ever be created.

On Cardano, things work a little differently. All of the ADA coins that will ever exist have already been created. ADA was a “pre-mined” coin, meaning there’s no work to be done to mine additional coins.

Instead, ADA holders can participate in the Cardano network and “stake” their coins, effectively locking them up for a period of time, in hopes of receiving the next reward in a lottery-like format. The more “stake” one has in ADA, the greater their chances of receiving winning the next block.

Proof-of-stake blockchains have a few advantages over proof-of-work blockchains. Perhaps most notably, they use far less energy. Mining requires servers to be running at all times, consuming a huge amount of electricity. There is a constant “search” for more bitcoin. Proof-of-stake removes the search aspect, since the coins already exist.

What is Cardano ADA Used For?

Like many other cryptographic tokens and coins, ADA cryptocurrency can be used as a medium of exchange. People can send each other ADA through digital wallets for whatever purposes they like. ADA can also be used for speculative purposes. Traders can try to buy coins when the price is low and sell them after the price rises.

When asking the question “what is Cardano cryptocurrency,” however, it’s important to look at the specific use case for ADA on the Cardano blockchain. The ADA crypto is used as fuel to run programs, much like ETH is used as “gas” on Ethereum.

Ethereum and Cardano are both smart contract platforms. Because smart contracts represent decentralized agreements that execute themselves when certain conditions are met, there is no intermediary (like a bank or a notary) to facilitate the transaction. Instead of paying a fee to a third-party provider, users on these blockchains must use the appropriate crypto token as a tool to conduct business, run programs, play games, etc.

Some examples of projects that have been created on the platform include a workplace incentive platform and an enterprise traceability solution.

Is Cardano ADA a Good Investment?

Ultimately, the question of whether Cardano ADA is a good investment is one the individual investor must answer for themselves.

Investing in any cryptocurrency like ADA crypto is generally seen as a speculative investment that comes with high risk and lots of volatility.

Someone with a high risk tolerance who doesn’t mind the potential losses might see ADA as a good investment, if they’re looking for potentially quick profits without a dividend.

Like all cryptocurrencies, ADA doesn’t yield any interest or pay a dividend. Some investors assert that based on this metric alone, the entire crypto asset class doesn’t qualify as an investment. Altcoins like ADA also aren’t accepted by many online merchants, so the only way to profit is to buy low, sell high, and take profits in bitcoin or a stablecoin like USDT. (Here are 6 things to know before investing in crypto.)

On the other hand, when considering any of the other hundreds of altcoins, by some metrics Cardano (ADA) might be considered a better choice than many. The coin currently sits in the 6th spot for largest cryptocurrencies by market cap, meaning there are only 5 cryptos in the world larger than ADA. Cardano has remained in the top ten cryptocurrencies spot since its inception in 2017.

Investors who believe in technology that enables decentralized applications might find ADA to be a more appealing investment than other types of cryptocurrency. And crypto enthusiasts who believe in the future of proof-of-stake blockchains might also decide to hold ADA.

What is the Price of Cardano?

At the time of writing, one ADA coin is worth about $0.31. To reach a valuation of $1 would imply a rise of roughly 220%. Such moves are not unheard of in the cryptocurrency space. But they tend to take some time, unless there is a big news item that causes people to rush into a particular digital asset.

In the case of ADA crypto specifically, the one factor most likely to drive higher prices might be use of the platform itself. That’s because people need ADA tokens to run decentralized applications (dApps) on the Cardano network. So, the more people use the network, the more demand for tokens increases, and the price of ADA could, in theory, keep rising.

This is the dynamic thought to be behind the rise of Ether (ETH), the token of the Ethereum network, which is used for much the same purpose. ETH has soared from under $10 in 2016 to over $1,100 at the time of writing.

How to Buy ADA Cryptocurrency

Now that we’ve answered the question “what is Cardano cryptocurrency,” let’s quickly run down how to buy ADA.

Buying ADA is not unlike buying any other cryptocurrency. ADA is traded on many of the prominent crypto exchanges. Binance, Upbit, and Huobi all trade ADA, for example. There are often both ADA/BTC and ADA/USDT trading pairs available, meaning users can exchange either bitcoin or the Tether stablecoin for ADA.

To buy ADA, a user will need to take the following steps:

1. Create an account on an exchange that trades ADA.
2. Deposit some BTC or USDT to your wallet.
3. Exchange your BTC or USDT for ADA.

After the third step, you will hold ADA in your exchange-hosted wallet. From there, users can either hold coins, send them to another secure cryptocurrency wallet, or trade them for a different cryptocurrency.

The Takeaway

Cardano ADA is a proof-of-stake cryptocurrency that currently ranks as the 6th largest cryptocurrency by market cap. Developed in 2017, the Cardano platform was intended to be used by “innovators and visionaries” to create positive change in the world, according to its founders.

Cardano is just one of many cryptocurrencies investors might explore as they look to investing in this relatively new digital asset class. Others include Ethereum, Bitcoin, Litecoin, and more.

Buying cryptocurrency with SoFi Invest® is simple—and the app safely stores your crypto investments for you.

Find out how to get started with SoFi Invest today.



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The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
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Using a Personal Cash Flow Statement

If you’re often surprised when you open up your credit card and bank statements and see how much money you spent, or you worry that your cash outflow may be exceeding your cash inflow, there could be a simple solution: A personal cash flow statement.

Creating a personal cash flow statement can give you a clear picture of your monthly cash inflow (money you earn) and your monthly cash outflow (money you spend) to determine if you have a positive or negative net cash flow.

And while it may sound intimidating, creating a personal cash flow statement is relatively simple. All you need to get started is to gather up your bank statements and bills for one month (or more). Then, it’s a matter of some basic calculations.

Once you have your personal financial statement, you’ll know where you currently stand. You’ll also be able to use your personal financial statement to help you create a budget and goals for increasing your net worth.

Here’s how to start getting your financial life back into balance.

What Is a Personal Cash Flow Statement?

“Cash flow” is a term commonly used by businesses to detail the amount of money flowing in and out of a company.

Companies can use cash flow statements to determine how well the company is generating cash to pay its debts and operating expenses.

Just like the ones used by companies, tracking your own cash flow can provide you with a snapshot of your financial condition.

You might learn, for example, that you have less leftover at the end of each month than you thought, or that you are indeed going backwards.

Once you have the numbers down in black and white, you can then make any needed changes, such as reducing costs and expenditures, increasing income, and making sure that your spending is in line with your goals.

So, how do you set up a personal finance cash flow statement?

It might seem overwhelming to get started, but these steps can simplify the process.

Listing all Your Sources of Income

A good first step when creating a personal cash flow statement is to get out all of your pay stubs, bank statements, credit card statements, and bills.

Next, you’ll want to start listing any and all sources of income–the inflow.

Cash inflows generally include: salaries, anything you make from side hustles, interest from savings accounts, income from a rental property, dividends from investments, and capital gains from the sale of financial securities like stocks and bonds.

Since a cash flow statement is designed to give a snapshot into the overall flow of where your money is coming from and where it is going, you might want to avoid listing money in accounts that aren’t available for spending.

For example, you may not want to list dividends and capital gains from investment accounts if they are being automatically reinvested, or are part of a retirement account from which you aren’t actively taking withdrawals.

Since income can vary from one month to the next, you might choose to tally inflow for the last three or six in order to come up with an average.

Once you’ve collected and listed all of your income for the month, you can then calculate the total inflow.

Listing all of Your Expenses

Now that you know how much money is coming in each month, you’ll want to use those same statements and bills, as well as any statements for any debts (such as mortgage, auto loan, or student loans) to list how much was spent during the month.

Again, if your spending tends to fluctuate quite a bit from month to month you may want to track it for several months and come up with an average.

To create a complete picture of how much of your money is flowing out each month, you’ll want to include necessities like food and gas, and also discretionary expenses, such as trips to the nail salon or your monthly streaming services.

Small expenses can add up quickly, so it’s wise to be precise.

Once you’ve compiled all of your expenses, you can calculate the total and come up with your total outflow for the month.

Determining Your Net Cash Flow

To calculate your net cash flow, all you need to do is subtract your monthly outflow from your monthly inflow. The result is your net cash flow.

A positive number means you have a surplus, while a negative means you have a deficit in your budget.

A positive cash flow is desirable, of course, since it can provide more flexibility, and can allow you to decide how to best use the surplus.

There are a variety of options. You could choose to save for an upcoming expense, make additional contributions to your retirement fund, create or add to an emergency fund, or, if your savings are in good shape, consider a splurging on something fun.

A negative cash flow can signal that you are living a more expensive life than your income can support. In the future, maintaining this habit could lead to additional debt.

It’s also possible to have net neutral cash flow (all money coming in and going out is fairly equal).

In that case, you may still want to jigger things around if you are not already putting the annual maximum into your retirement fund and/or you don’t have a comfortable emergency cushion.

The Difference Between a Personal Cash Flow Statement and a Budget

A personal cash flow statement provides a comprehensive look at what is currently coming in and going out of your bank accounts each month.

A cash flow statement tells you where you are.

A personal budget, on the other hand, helps you to get where you want to go by giving you a spending plan that is based on your income.

A budget can provide you with some general spending guidelines, such as how much you should spend on groceries, entertainment and clothing each month so that you don’t exceed your income–and end up with a negative net flow.

Creating a budget can also be a good opportunity to check in with your financial goals.

For example, are you on track for saving for retirement? Do you want to amp up your emergency fund?

Are you interested in tackling the credit card debt that has been spiraling due to high interest rates?

Perhaps you want to work toward paying off your student loans.

Whatever your goal, a well-crafted budget could serve as a roadmap to help you get there.

Using Your Personal Financial Statement to Create a Simple Budget

Because a cash flow statement provides a comprehensive look at your overall spending habits, it can be a great jumping off point to set up a simple budget.

When you’re ready to create a budget, there are a variety of resources online, from apps, like SoFi Relay®, to spreadsheet templates and printable worksheets .

A good first step in creating a budget is to organize all of your monthly expenses into categories.

Spending categories typically include necessities, such as rent or mortgage, transportation (like car expenses or public transportation costs), food, cell phone, healthcare/insurance, life insurance, childcare, and any debts (credit cards/ loans).

You’ll also need to list nonessential spending, such as cable television, streaming services, concert and movie tickets, restaurants, clothing, etc.

You may also want to include monthly contributions to a retirement plan and personal savings into the expense category as well.

And, if you don’t have emergency savings in place that could cover at least three to six months of living expenses, consider putting that on the spending list as well, so you can start putting some money towards it each month.

Once you have a sense of your monthly earnings and spending, you may want to see how your numbers line up with general budgeting guidelines. Financial counselors sometimes recommend the 50/30/20 model, which looks like this:

•  50% of money goes towards necessities such as a home, car, cell phone, or utility bills.
•  30% goes towards your wants, such as entertainment and dining out.
•  20% goes towards your savings goals, such as a retirement plan, a downpayment on a home, emergency fund, or investments.

Improving Your Net Cash Flow

If your net cash flow is not where you want it or, worse, dipping into negative territory, a budget can help bring these numbers into balance.

The key is to look closely at each one of your spending categories and see if you can find some ways to trim back.

The easiest way to change your spending habits is to trim some of your nonessential expenditures. If you’re paying for cable but mostly watch streaming services, for example, you could score some real savings by getting rid of that cable bill.

Not taking as many trips to the mall or cooking (instead of getting takeout) more often could start adding up to a big difference.

Living on a budget may also require looking at the bigger picture and finding places for more significant savings.

For example, maybe rent eats up 50% of your income and it’d be better to move to a less costly apartment. Or, you might want to consider trading in an expensive car lease for a less pricey or pre-owned model.

There may also be opportunities to lower some of your recurring expenses by finding a better deal or negotiating with your service providers.

You may also want to look into any ways you might be able to change the other side of the equation–the inflow.

Some options might include asking for a raise, or finding an additional income stream through some sort of side hustle.

The Takeaway

One of the most important steps towards achieving financial wellness is cash flow management–i.e., making sure that your cash outflow is not exceeding your cash inflow.

Creating a simple cash flow statement for yourself can be an extremely useful tool.

For one reason, it can show you exactly where you stand. For another, a personal cash flow statement can help you create a budget that can bring the inflow and outflow of money into a healthier balance.

Creating–and sticking with–a budget that creates a positive net cash flow, and also allows for monthly saving (for retirement, a future purchase, or a rainy day) can help you build financial security and future wealth.

If you need help with tracking your spending, a SoFi Money® cash management account may be a good option for you.

With SoFi Money, you can see your weekly spending on your dashboard, which can help you stay on top of your spending and make sure you are on track with your budget.

Check out everything a SoFi Money cash management account has to offer today!



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The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.

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What Is Earnings Per Share & How to Calculate It

Knowing a stock’s earnings per share can be a valuable portfolio benchmarking tool. Think of EPS as GPS for where a public company is on the value map, based on how profitable it has been.

What is earnings per share? It’s a ratio arrived at by taking a company’s quarterly or annual net income and dividing it by the number of its outstanding shares of stock.

Knowing an investment’s EPS gives investors—and portfolio managers—a good indicator of a stock’s performance over a specific period of time and its potential share price performance in the near future.

What is Earnings Per Share?

The starting point for any conversation about the EPS ratio is the earnings report companies issue to regulators, shareholders, and potential investors.

Publicly traded companies must, by law, report their earnings quarterly and annually. Earnings represent the net income a company generates (after taxes and after expenses are deducted), along with an estimate of what profits or losses can be expected going forward.

Typically, investment analysts, money managers and investors look at earnings as a major component of a company’s profit potential, with earnings per share a particularly useful measurement tool when gauging a company’s financial prospects.

While a company’s earnings call represents a publicly traded company’s revenues, minus operating expenses, earnings per share is different.

EPS indicates a firm’s earnings for investors, divided by the company’s number of remaining shares. Earnings per share is perhaps most optimal when comparing EPS rates of publicly traded firms operating in the same industry.

evaluate a company’s stock price going forward.

Even a moderate increase in EPS may indicate that a company’s profit potential is on the upside, and investors may take that as a sign to buy the company’s stock.

Conversely, a small decrease in a company’s EPS from quarter to quarter may trigger a red flag among investors, who could view a downward EPS trend as a larger profit issue and shy away from buying the company’s stock.

Basically, the higher the EPS, the more attractive that company’s stock is to investors. But the higher a stock’s EPS, the more expensive it’s likely to be.

Once investors have an accurate EPS figure, they can decide if a stock is priced fairly and make an appropriate investment decision.

Earnings Per Share Ratio Considerations

Investors should prepare to dig deeper and examine what factors influence EPS figures. These factors are at the top of that list:

•  EPS numbers can rise or fall significantly based on earnings’ rise or fall, or as the number of company shares rises or falls.
•  A company’s earnings may rise because sales are surging faster than expenses, or if company managers succeed in curbing operations costs. Additionally, investors may get a “false read” on EPS if too many company expenses are shed from the EPS calculation.
•  A company’s number of outstanding shares may fall if a company engages in significant stock share buybacks. Correspondingly, shares outstanding may jump when a firm issues new stock shares.
•  A company’s profit margins are also a big influencer on EPS. A company that is losing money usually has a negative EPS number. (Then again, that may send a wrong signal to investors. The company could be on the path to profits, and that trend may not show up in an EPS calculation.)
•  A price to earnings ratio is another highly useful metric to evaluate a stock’s share growth potential. Investors can find a P/E ratio through a proper calculation of EPS (“P” is the price per share; “E” refers to EPS), though it’s easy to look up a P/E ratio on any site that aggregates stock information.

EPS can be reported for each quarter or fiscal year, or it can be projected into the future with a forward EPS.

How to Calculate Earnings Per Share

The most common way to accurately gauge an EPS figure is through an end-of-period calculation. Here’s a snapshot of how it works.

With Preferred Dividends

Investors can calculate EPS by subtracting a stock’s total preferred dividends from the company’s net income. Then divide that number by the end-of-period stock shares that are outstanding.

Basic EPS = (net income – preferred dividends) / weighted average number of common shares outstanding

For example, ABC Co. generates a net income of $2 million in a quarter. Simultaneously, the company rolls out $275,000 in preferred dividends and has 12 million outstanding shares of stock. In that calculation, knowing that shares of common stock are equal in value, the company’s earnings per share is $0.14.

(2,000,000 – 275,000) ÷ 12,000,000= 0.14

Without Preferred Dividends

For smaller publicly traded companies with no preferred dividends, the EPS calculation is more straightforward.

Basic EPS = net income / weighted average number of common shares outstanding

Let’s say DEF Corp. has generated a net income of $50,000 for the year. As the company has no preferred shares outstanding and has 5,000 weighted average shares on an annual basis, its earnings per share is $10.

50,000 ÷ 5,000= 10

In any EPS calculation, preferred dividends must be pared off from net income. That’s because earnings per share is primarily designed to calculate the net income for holders of common stock.

Additionally, in most EPS end-of-period calculations, a company is mostly likely to calculate EPS for end-of-year financial statements. That’s because companies may issue new stock or buy back existing shares of company stock.

In those instances, a weighted average of common stock shares is required for an accurate EPS assessment. (A weighted average of a company’s outstanding shares can provide more clarity because a fixed number at any given time may provide a false EPS outcome, as share prices can be volatile and change quickly on a day-to-day basis.)

The most commonly used EPS share model calculation is the “trailing 12 months” formula, which tracks a company’s earnings per share by totaling its EPS for the previous four quarters.

The Takeaway

Earnings trends, up or down, make earnings per share one of the most valuable metrics for assessing investments. Four or five years of positive EPS activity is considered an indicator that a company’s long-term financial prospects are robust and that its share growth should continue to rise.

A careful EPS calculation can help clarify a short- or long-term view of a company’s financial and share price potential, allowing an investor to make choices based on data and not assumptions.

Ready to put those stock-picking skills to use? Get started with SoFi Invest® today.



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The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Source: sofi.com

Guide to Zcash Cryptocurrency

Zcash is a potentially private cryptocurrency that offers unique “shielded” features. The set-up allows for addresses and amounts in a Zcash transaction to be encrypted on the blockchain. Here’s a guide to its privacy features, price performance, technology and history.

What Is Zcash?

Zcash crypto falls under the category of cryptocurrencies known as “privacy coins,” or different types of cryptocurrency that make it hard for outside observers to detect details of the coins’ movements.

Zcash is basically a bitcoin clone with one key difference – the ability for shielded transactions, as mentioned. Zcash relies on a technology known as zk-SNARKS to hide the particulars of Zcash wallet activity.

Zcash transactions are not private by default. For users seeking privacy, the “shielded” feature must be turned on to prevent the transaction from appearing on the public Zcash blockchain.

Zcash Price and Performance

Zcash has soared more than 400% since the end of 2019 to $146.38 in mid-February. Its market cap is $1.62 billion, making it the 47th biggest cryptocurrency market, according to data from CoinMarketCap. Zcash has the third-largest market cap of any privacy coin (with Monero being #1 and DASH being #2).

Zcash Privacy

Zcash was created in response to Bitcoin‘s lack of anonymity. Activity on the Bitcoin blockchain and most other blockchains is transparent. Anyone can see everything that has ever happened on a public blockchain. The details of each transaction, including the parties sending and receiving coins, the time of the exchange, and the amount of value exchanged, are all public knowledge.

Zcash functions differently than Bitcoin in the sense that Zcash activity can be “shielded,” or hidden from the public, so users can transact privately. But if no one can see the details of a transaction, how can they be sure that it even happened? That’s where the privacy tech behind Zcash known as zk-SNARKS comes in.

Zcash is the first large-scale, real-world implementation of a privacy technology called zk-SNARKS. This tech allows for shielded Zcash transactions to be fully encrypted (private) while at the same time being validated under the network’s consensus rules (so everyone knows they really happened).

How “Shielding” Works

Zk-SNARK stands for “Zero-Knowledge Succinct Non-Interactive Argument of Knowledge.” This is a way of sharing data that allows one party to prove to another that they have specific information without revealing what that information is, and without requiring any interaction between the parties.

The exact details of how zk-SNARKs work and how they are applied to the Zcash blockchain are quite technical. Interested readers can reference the Zcash website for all of the intricate workings of this type of encryption technology.

While some people believe this tech offers the best, most comprehensive solution to the issue of private crypto transactions, others have criticized the security of a coin like Zcash.

The fact that the encryption technology used is so new and that the coin was launched using an unorthodox “ceremony” (more on this later) are key points of contention for some crypto observers. On top of that, most Zcash isn’t even private.

As mentioned earlier, transactions made on the Zcash blockchain are not private by default. For the currency to be used privately, a transaction must be “shielded.”

The vast majority of Zcash transactions are not shielded (as of April 2020, only 6% of the Zcash network had been using fully shielded transactions). This could be due to the fact that most wallets and exchanges use public Zcash addresses by default, something many users might not be aware of.

Types of Zcash Transactions

There are four different types of transactions that can be made on the Zcash blockchain. They are:

•  Private
•  Deshielding
•  Shielding
•  Public

Zcash addresses begin with either a Z or a T. Those beginning with a Z are private addresses, and those beginning with a T are transparent. Using different combinations of these two types of addresses allows for the four specific types of transactions.

In a private transaction (Z-to-Z) will be visible on the public blockchain. There’s proof that it occurred and the necessary network fees were paid. The specific details like the transaction amount and addresses involved, however, are encrypted and can’t be seen by the public.

A public transaction (T-to-T) works in the same way that a typical Bitcoin transaction works – everything can be seen on the public blockchain, including the sender, receiver, and amount transacted.

The Zcash website notes that most exchanges and wallets today use T-addresses by default, although more are allegedly moving to shielded addresses over time.

The other two types of transactions involve sending funds between T and Z addresses. In other words, either sending funds from a private address to a public one (Z-to-T, or Deshielding), or sending funds from a public address to a private one (T-to-Z, or Shielding).

Zcash History

Zcash cryptocurrency launched in 2016. The coin was forked from the original Bitcoin code, so both are minable proof-of-work cryptocurrencies that have a hard supply cap of 21 million. The block reward for Zcash also gets cut in half every four years or so to keep the currency deflationary by limiting supply, just like bitcoin.

Zcash has its roots in a 2013 publication called the Zerocoin white paper, which was written by professors Eli Ben-Sasson and Matthew Green. They saw the design of Bitcoin as being a threat to user privacy, and offered their own solutions in response.

But Zerocoin was designed for Bitcoin, meaning Bitcoin developers would have had to implement a lot of complex changes to the Bitcoin blockchain technology to make Zerocoin work. This led to the project being shelved for a time.

Then, in 2015, a cryptographer named Zooko Wilcox created a startup to discover ways that the Zerocoin concept might be successfully implemented in a new cryptocurrency. In 2016, Zcash was announced, and the coin launched in October of that year.

Launch of Zcash

The launch of Zcash is a focal point of many criticisms against the privacy coin. To make its new type of cryptography workable, the Zcash blockchain had to be created using something known as the “Zcash ceremony.”

This “ceremony” involved people from around the world collaborating to create what amounts to a master public key for the blockchain using pieces of a private key. Those involved were instructed to destroy the data they used so that it couldn’t be taken advantage of by someone else in the future, who could potentially use it to compromise Zcash.

Of course, no one has any way to verify that those involved actually destroyed the data they used in this ceremony, and no one can verify that Zcash was created in the way it claims to have been created.

Today, Zcash is operated by the Electric Coin Company with Zooko Wilcox as its CEO. The company employs a team of cryptographers to continue developing the Zcash blockchain. There is also a non-profit organization known as the Zcash Foundation that helps support this work. Both groups are funded in part by the issuance of new Zcash (ZEC) tokens.

Is Zcash a Good Investment?

Privacy coins in particular have a very uncertain future. Coins like Monero, Zcash, and DASH were delisted from the Bittrex exchange at the start of 2021. Because many people associate them with illicit activity, privacy coins could see their use restricted in various ways.

Exchanges could continue to delist coins with privacy features or regulatory authorities could seek to punish anyone who deals with them through new crypto regulations, perhaps claiming that people use privacy coins to avoid paying taxes on crypto, for example.

Many altcoins have gone to zero over the years, so that possibility also can’t be ruled out.

How to Buy Zcash

Some U.S. exchanges offer Zcash on their platform. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to buy and trade it:

1. Sign up for an account with a cryptocurrency exchange that offers Zcash.
2. Verify your account. This may involve providing documents that confirm your identity and address.
3. Deposit fiat currency or digital money into your account.
4. Buy Zcash with the deposited funds.
5. Withdraw Zcash into your hot or cold wallet.

The Takeaway

Zcash is a privacy coin that allows for completely private or “shielded” transactions. It is the first practical implementation of the zk-SNARK encryption technology. The vast majority of transactions made on the Zcash blockchain are not private and function in the same way as Bitcoin transactions because Zcash was forked from the original Bitcoin code.

SoFi Invest gives investors the tools they need to trade cryptocurrency, stocks, and ETFs. Learn the basics of investing in crypto firsthand by opening an Invest account today.

Learn more about SoFi Invest today.



Crypto: Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies aren’t endorsed or guaranteed by any government, are volatile, and involve a high degree of risk. Consumer protection and securities laws don’t regulate cryptocurrencies to the same degree as traditional brokerage and investment products. Research and knowledge are essential prerequisites before engaging with any cryptocurrency. US regulators, including FINRA , the SEC , and the CFPB , have issued public advisories concerning digital asset risk. Cryptocurrency purchases should not be made with funds drawn from financial products including student loans, personal loans, mortgage refinancing, savings, retirement funds or traditional investments.
SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Digital Assets—The Digital Assets platform is owned by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, http://www.sofi.com/legal.

Third Party Brand Mentions: No brands or products mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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Source: sofi.com

How Much Money Should You Have Saved For Retirement By 40?

At some point or another, you’ve probably asked yourself, “how much money should I have saved by 40?”

It’s a valid question that can be daunting to think about. The good news is you’re probably already saving money for retirement. The bad news is, you might not be saving enough money to retire when you want.

There are different ways to save money for retirement. The sooner, the better—so that it can start adding up. And that’s exactly what an increasing number of people in their 20s and 30s have been doing.

A Bank of America report found that almost one in four millennials (ages 24-41) have $100,000 or more saved as of winter 2020—a nearly 17% increase compared to that same report in 2015. The rising numbers are promising, but are these savings even enough? We’ll dig deeper into the numbers.

How Much Should I Have Saved by 40?

A general rule of thumb is to have the equivalent of your annual salary saved by the time you’re 30. By your 40s, many financial advisors recommend having two to three times your annual salary saved in retirement money.

In your 50s, conventional wisdom holds that you should have six times your annual salary in your retirement savings by the end of the decade.

How Can I Get My Retirement Money On Track?

If you feel you don’t have enough money saved yet, it’s never too late to get back on track. As you reach your 40s, it’s likely that your income increases, but so do the obligations tied to your money.

You might be saving money for your kids’ college; you probably have mortgage payments and existing debt; you may even be taking care of aging parents. It’s a lot of financial multi-tasking and you have to prioritize.

The key is to establish money goals and create a budget. Tracking your income and spending can help you figure out how much money you need to save for each goal and what kind of investments or savings make sense to achieve your goals.

This can be made much easier by using SoFi Relay to know where you stand with your money, what you spend, and how to hit your financial goals. With SoFi Relay you can track all of your money in one place, plus get credit score monitoring, spending breakdowns, financial insights, and more.

A key priority to think over is paying off any high-interest debt, including credit card debt. Be sure to make the payments on any existing loans to avoid any late fees or penalties for missed payments. It may be worth reviewing any loans you currently hold to see if you could potentially refinance to a lower interest rate.

If you don’t have an emergency money fund yet, consider putting that at the top of your priority list. You could plan to have three to six months’ worth of expenses saved.

Once you have high-interest debt paid off and an emergency money saved, you can allot a larger portion of your funds to save for retirement and other money goals. If you’re playing catch-up with your retirement money, try contributing any financial windfalls toward your retirement savings.

Saving and Investing Money by 40

If you already have a 401(k), there are a number of strategies to max out your 401(k) that are worth looking into. For example, it might make sense to contribute at least enough to qualify for any employer matching your company offers. Why lose out on the “free” money that your employer is willing to contribute to your retirement savings?

Try setting monthly or weekly savings targets to help you stay on track for retirement. You can even set up automatic transfers or deposits, so you don’t have to think about it.

As you’re rethinking how much money you need to save for retirement, it also makes sense to look at your lifestyle goals. That includes figuring out when you might want to retire, what kind of lifestyle you want in retirement, and how much money you might have coming in during retirement.

Where to Save Money for Retirement

Next, you’ll also need to figure out which retirement plan is right for you. There are many ways to save for retirement, even beyond the popular employer-sponsored 401(k). Other options include a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA (to see how much you can contribute to a Roth IRA, check out our Roth Contribution Calculator).

Some people choose to put their retirement savings in more than one type of account. This is useful if you want to set aside more than the yearly contribution limits on 401(k) plans—whether because you’re a high-income earner, or you started saving later in life, or you’re trying to achieve financial independence at a younger age. In that case, it might make sense to leverage a Traditional IRA, Roth IRA, or after-tax account to save beyond the 401(k) limits.

Investing in a Roth IRA now, with post-tax dollars, can also be useful if you want to withdraw money in retirement without paying taxes on the money. In contrast, 401(k) contributions are tax-deferred, meaning you will be taxed on funds you withdraw in retirement. That said, there are income limits on Roth IRAs, so this might not be an option depending on your salary.

After-tax accounts can be appealing to individuals who plan to achieve financial independence at a younger age and retire early. Unlike qualified plans, which place penalties on withdrawing funds before a certain age, an after-tax account is a pool of money that you can withdraw from without having to worry about penalties if you access the account before age 59 ½.

The Takeaway

While there are conventional rules of thumb as to how much money you should have saved by 40, the truth is everyone’s path to a comfortable retirement looks different. One piece of advice is universal, however: The sooner you start saving for retirement, the better your chances of being in a financially desirable position later in life.

Interested in boosting your retirement savings? You can open a Traditional IRA, Roth IRA, or after-tax account with SoFi Invest® to supplement your 401(k) or other qualified retirement plan savings.

Find out how SoFi Invest can help you start saving for your future.



SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Digital Assets—The Digital Assets platform is owned by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, http://www.sofi.com/legal.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Source: sofi.com

Understanding the Margin of Safety Formula

The margin of safety formula provides a way for investors to calculate a safe price at which to buy a security. This method derives from the value investing school of thought.

According to value investing principles, stocks have an intrinsic value and a market value. Intrinsic value is the price they ought to be trading at, while market value is its current price.

Figuring out the difference between these two prices, typically expressed as a percentage, is the essence of the margin of safety formula. Using it correctly can help protect investors from painful losses.

What is a Margin of Safety?

Making profitable investment decisions is largely about investment risk management. The risk involved in a trade needs to be balanced with the potential reward. In financial markets, taking greater risks often gives the potential for greater rewards but also for greater losses–a concept known as the risk-reward ratio.

both institutional and retail investors–all don’t always make the right call.
To try and correct for this possibility, value investors can determine their margin of safety when entering a position.

Expressed as a percentage, this figure is intended to represent the amount of error that could go into calculating the intrinsic value of a stock without ruining the trade. In other words, the percentage answers the question, “By what margin can I be wrong here without losing too much money?”

Who Uses the Margin of Safety Formula?

The margin of safety is typically used by investors of value stocks. Value investors look for stocks that could be undervalued, or trading at prices lower than they should be, to find profitable trading opportunities. The method for accomplishing this involves the difference between market value and intrinsic value.

The market value of a stock is simply what price it’s trading for at the moment. This fluctuates constantly and can extend well beyond intrinsic value during times of greed or fall far below intrinsic value during times of fear.

Intrinsic value is a calculation of what price a stock likely should be trading at based on fundamental analysis. There are several factors that determine a stock price and the analysis considers both quantitative and qualitative factors. That might include things like past, present, and estimated future earnings, profits and revenue, brand recognition, products and patents owned, or a variety of other factors.

After determining the intrinsic value of a stock, an investor could simply buy it if the current market price happens to be lower. But what if their calculations were wrong? That’s where a margin of safety comes in. Because no one can consider all of the appropriate factors and make a perfect calculation, factoring in a margin of safety can help to ensure investors don’t take unnecessary losses.

The margin of safety formula is also used in accounting to determine how far a company’s sales could fall before the company becomes unprofitable. Here we will focus on the definition used in investing.

How to Calculate Margin of Safety

The margin of safety formula works like this:

Margin of safety = 1 – [Current Stock Price] divided by [Intrinsic Stock Price]

Example Calculating Margin of Safety

Let’s look at a hypothetical case.

An investor wants to buy shares of company A for the current market price of $9 per share. After a thorough analysis of the company’s fundamentals, this investor believes the intrinsic value of the stock to be closer to $10. Plugging these numbers into the margin of safety formula yields the following results:

1 – (9/10) = 10%.

In this example, the margin of safety percentage would be 10%.

The idea is that an investor could be off on their intrinsic value price target by as much as 10% and theoretically not take a loss, or only a very small one.

How to Use Margin of Safety

Now an investor has determined their margin of safety. How might they use this figure?

To provide a substantial cushion for potential losses, an investor could plan to enter into a trade at a price lower than its intrinsic value. This could be done using the calculated margin of safety.

In the example above, say an investor decided that 10% wasn’t a wide enough margin, and instead wanted to be extra cautious and use 20%. They would then set a price target of $8, which is 20% lower than the stock’s estimated value of $10.

The Takeaway

In investing, the margin of safety formula is a way for investors to be extra careful when selecting an entry point in a security. By determining a percentage and placing a discount to a stock’s estimated value, an investor can find a mathematical framework with which they can try to be safer with their money.

how to value a stock, the margin of safety formula has a large subjective component, even though it’s meant to be rooted in math.

SoFi Invest makes it easy for investors to buy and sell stocks and exchange-traded funds (ETFs). Investors can try to apply the margin of safety formula to their own trades, while learning from educational tools and taking advantage of a user-friendly interface.

Try SoFi Invest and learn the basics today.


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Digital Assets—The Digital Assets platform is owned by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, http://www.sofi.com/legal.

Disclaimer: The projections or other information regarding the likelihood of various investment outcomes are hypothetical in nature, do not reflect actual investment results, and are not guarantees of future results.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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Source: sofi.com

How Long Will My Savings Last?

If only we had access to a reliable crystal ball, how simple saving for retirement could be. Instead, the process can feel more like a Magic 8 Ball® inquiry, finding fresh and fleeting new answers to the familiar question “How long will my savings last?”

Telling you to concentrate and ask again, that it is uncertain or better not to tell you are a few ways to answer common queries of this childhood toy, but signs point to yes for a breakdown of the many factors that can impact how long your retirement savings have to go.

What Factors Affect My Retirement Savings?

While it isn’t always easy to save money in your 20s, when many workers might still be paying off student loan debt, starting to save for retirement sooner than later could mean hundreds of thousands more in accumulated investments when it’s time to retire.

There are a few other variables that can come into play when deciding how long retirement savings might last:

Retirement Plan Type

Whether it’s a defined benefit plan like a pension, or a defined contribution plan like an employer-sponsored 401(k), 403(b), or 457, the kind of account you contribute to will likely have an impact on how much and what method you use to save for retirement:

Pension Plan

With a pension plan, retirement income is usually based on an employee’s longevity with the company, how much was earned, and their age at the time of retirement. Pensions can be a reliable retirement savings option because they reward long-term employees with a regular payment, typically once per month. One potential downside, however, is that pension plans can be terminated if a company is acquired, goes out of business, or decides to update or suspend its employee benefits offerings.

401(k) Plan

With a 401(k) plan, participants can contribute either a percentage of or a predetermined amount from each paycheck, and it might be matched by their employer up to a certain amount. Unlike a pension plan, the amount of retirement funds the participant saves is based on how much they personally contributed, whether they received an employer match, the rate of return on their investments, and how long they’ve had the plan.

IRA or Roth IRA

An Individual Retirement Account (or sometimes Arrangement), or IRA, is a retirement account that’s not sponsored by an employer. There are no income limits for a Traditional IRA (outside of tax deductible contributions), so it can be an appealing savings option for people who haven’t quite crystallized how high their earnings could go. A Roth IRA, on the other hand, has limits on contributions based on filing status and income level.

Less Common Plans

Other types of retirement plans like Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOP) and Profit Sharing Plans are less common and have their own unique benefits, drawbacks, and details.

Social Security

Social Security is a federally run program used to pay people aged 65 or older a continuing income. If eligible for the funds, they could be used to supplement or sustain savings in retirement.

Expected Rate of Return On Investments

If a person puts money into a defined contribution plan or makes investments in stocks, bonds, real estate, or other assets, there are a number of return outcomes that could affect their retirement savings.

An investment’s performance is about more than just appreciation over time. Learning how to calculate the expected rate of return on the investment can help you get a clearer picture of what the payoff will look like when it’s time to retire.

Unexpected Expenses

One never really knows what retired life might bring. Lots of unexpected expenses could arise.

An extensive home repair or renovation or maybe even a costly relocation to another state or country might make an unforeseen dent in retirement funds.

A major medical incident or the factoring in of long-term care can be another unexpected expense, as are caregiver costs if you or a family member need help.

Some seniors are surprised to learn that health care can get costly in retirement and Medicare may not always be free. Many of the services they might need could require out-of-pocket payments that eat into savings
As much as we might not want to imagine such scenarios, there could be the chance of a divorce during retirement, which could cause a redraft of the savings plan.

Creating a budget to estimate expenses is a great way to get ahead of any surprising financial setbacks that could sneak up down the line.

Inflation

Inflation can take a hefty toll on retirement savings. Even average rates of inflation might have a significant impact on how much retirement funds will actually be worth when they’re withdrawn. For example, $1,500 in January 2000 had the same buying power as $2,293.68 in March of 2020.

Understanding how inflation can affect your retirement savings might ensure you have enough funds padded out to support you for the long haul.

Market Volatility and Investment Losses

Regardless of financial situation or age, checking in on retirement accounts and the climate on Wall Street could help clarify how market swings might affect your retirement savings.

Retirees with defined contribution plans might suffer financial losses if they withdraw invested funds during a volatile market. Not panicking and having enough emergency funds to cover 3-6 months of living expenses can help you weather the storm. Talking to an investment advisor about rebalancing a portfolio to reduce risk is another option for getting ahead of this unexpected savings speedbump.

Ways to Calculate How Much You Might Need to Retire

Are you on track for retirement? That’s something that can be calculated in many ways, which vary in efficacy depending on who you ask.

Here are a few formulas and calculations you can use to consider how much to save for retirement:

The Four Percent Rule

The Four Percent Rule, first used by financial planner William Bengen in 1994, assesses how different withdrawal rates can affect a person’s portfolio to ensure they won’t outlive the funds. According to the rule , “assuming a minimum requirement of 30 years of portfolio longevity, a first-year withdrawal of 4 percent, followed by inflation-adjusted withdrawals in subsequent years, should be safe [for retirement].” Bengen has since adjusted the rule to 4.5% for the first year’s withdrawal.

The jury is out on whether 4% is a safe withdrawal rate in retirement, but many people have used it to weather poorly performing stock markets.

Fidelity also recommends withdrawing 4% to 5% from retirement savings yearly, with adjustments for inflation.

The Multiply by 25 Rule

This one can get a little controversial, but the Multiply by 25 rule, which expanded upon Bengen’s 4% Rule with the 1998 Trinity Study , involves taking a “hoped for” annual retirement income and multiplying it by 25 to determine how much money would be needed to retire.

For example, if you’d like to bring in $75,000 annually without working, multiply that number by 25, and you’ll find you need $1,875,000 to retire. That figure might seem scary, but it doesn’t factor in alternate sources of income like Social Security, investments, etc.

This rule has been banked on by many retirees. However, it’s based on a 30-year retirement period. For those hoping to retire before the age of 65, this could mean insufficient funds in the later years of life.

The Replacement Ratio

The Replacement Ratio helps estimate what percentage of someone’s pre-retirement income they’ll need to keep up with their current lifestyle during retirement.

The typical target in many studies shows 70-85% as the suggested range, but variables like income level, marital status, homeownership, health, and other demographic differences all affect a person’s desired replacement ratio, as do the types of retirement accounts they hold.

Also, the Replacement Ratio is based on how much a person was making pre-retirement, so while an 85% ratio might make sense for a household bringing in $100,000 to $150,000 per year, a household with higher earnings—say $250,000—might not actually need $212,000 each year during retirement. A way to supplement this calculation could be to estimate how much of your current spending will stay the same during retirement.

Social Security Benefits Calculator

By entering the date of birth and highest annual work income, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Social Security Calculator can determine how much money you might receive in estimated Social Security benefits during retirement.

Other Factors To Calculate

Expected Rate of Returns

Determining the rate of return on investments in retirement can help clarify how long your savings could last. An investment’s expected rate of returns can be calculated by taking the potential return outcomes, multiplying them by the likelihood that they’ll occur, and totaling the results.

Here’s an example: If an investment has a 50% chance of gaining 30% and a 50% chance of losing 20%, the expected rate of returns would be 50% ⨉ 30% + 50% ⨉ 20%, which is an estimated 25% return on the investment.

Home Improvement Costs

If a renovation is looking like it will be necessary down the line, you might calculate how much that home repair project could cost and factor it into your retirement planning.
Inflation

You might also consider using an inflation calculator to uncover what your buying power will really be worth when you retire.

Making Retirement Savings Last Longer

If you’re still wondering how long your savings will last or seeking potential ways to make it last longer, a few of these strategies could help:

Lower Fixed Expenses

Unexpected expenses are likely to creep up regardless of how much you save, but by lowering fixed expenses like mortgage and rent payments, food, insurance, and transportation costs, you might be able to slow the spending of your savings over time. Setting a budget is a solid way to see this in black and white.

Maximize Social Security

While opting into Social Security benefits immediately upon eligibility at 62 might sound appealing, it could significantly reduce the benefit over time. With smaller cost of living adjustments later in life, a lengthy retirement (people are living longer than ever before) could mean less money when you need it the most.

Stay Healthy

Unexpected medical expenses might still occur, but by safeguarding health and wellbeing earlier in life, you could avoid costly chronic conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes, or heart disease.

Keep Earning

Whether it’s staying in the full-time workforce for a couple more years or starting a ride-share side hustle during retirement, continuing to bring in money can help you stretch your savings out a little longer.

Get Good Advice

Financial planning can get even more complicated during retirement. Finding someone who’s smart, qualified, and reliable for advice on the available options is one way to help stay on course with retirement goals and make your retirement savings last as long as possible.

When it comes to planning for retirement, your future doesn’t have to be quite so uncertain. By talking to a real, human advisor about the many factors that impact how long your savings will last, you might settle on exactly what you need to set aside to get you there.

SoFi Invest® gives members free access to financial advisors available to talk about your big picture financial goals—like saving up for retirement or the path that leads you there.

Learn how SoFi Invest® can help you save for retirement.


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . The umbrella term “SoFi Invest” refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
Third Party Brand Mentions: No brands or products mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.
Disclaimer: The projections or other information regarding the likelihood of various investment outcomes are hypothetical in nature, do not reflect actual investment results, and are not guarantees of future results.
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Source: sofi.com