Today’s mortgage rates see highest mark since June 2020 | February 26, 2021 – Fox Business

Our goal here at Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, referred to as “Credible” below, is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we do promote products from our partner lenders, all opinions are our own.

Check out the mortgage rates for February 26, 2021, which are trending up from yesterday. (iStock)

Based on data compiled by Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, mortgage rates have risen since yesterday.

  • 30-year fixed mortgage rates: 3.125%, Up from 3.000%, +0.125
  • 20-year fixed mortgage rates: 3.125%, Up from 2.875%, +0.250
  • 15-year fixed mortgage rates: 2.500%, Up from 2.250%, +0.250

Rates last updated on February 26, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

To find the best mortgage rate, start by using Credible, which can show you current mortgage and refinance rates:

Browse rates from multiple lenders so you can make an informed decision about your home loan.

Looking at today’s mortgage refinance rates

Today’s mortgage refinance rates have risen since yesterday, with 30-year fixed mortgages jumping 375 basis points overnight. The average rates for all loan types surpassed 3%, and stopping at 3.083% after holding steady all week. If you’re considering refinancing an existing home, check out what refinance rates look like:

  • 30-year fixed-rate refinance: 3.375%, Up from 3.000%, +0.375
  • 20-year fixed-rate refinance: 3.375%, Up from 3.000%, +0.375
  • 15-year fixed-rate refinance: 2.500%, Up from 2.375%, +0.125

Rates last updated on February 26, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

A site like Credible can be a big help when you’re ready to compare mortgage refinance loans. Credible lets you see prequalified rates for conventional mortgages from multiple lenders all within a few minutes. Visit Credible today to get started.

Current mortgage rates

Mortgage interest rates continue to soar, with the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate up to 3.125%, which surpasses highs not seen since June 2020. Averages rates across all loan types continue to push toward 3%.

Current 30-year mortgage rates

The current interest rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is 3.125%. This is up from yesterday.

Current 20-year mortgage rates

The current interest rate for a 20-year fixed-rate mortgage is 3.125%. This is up from yesterday.

Current 15-year mortgage rates

The current interest rate for a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage is 2.500%. This is up from yesterday.

You can explore your mortgage options in minutes by visiting Credible to compare current rates from various lenders who offer mortgage refinancing as well as home loans. Check out Credible and get prequalified today, and take a look at today’s refinance rates through the link below.

Rates last updated on February 26, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

How mortgage rates have changed

Today, mortgage rates are up compared to this time last week.

  • 30-year fixed mortgage rates: 3.125%, up from 2.750% last week, +0.375 
  • 20-year fixed mortgage rates: 3.125%, up from 2.750% last week, +0.375
  • 15-year fixed mortgage rates: 2.500%, up from 2.125% last week, +0.375

Rates last updated on February 26, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

If you’re trying to find the right rate for your home mortgage or looking to refinance an existing home, consider using Credible. You can use Credible’s free online tool to easily compare multiple lenders and see prequalified rates in just a few minutes.

How to get low mortgage rates

Current mortgage and refinance rates are affected by many economic factors, like unemployment numbers and inflation. But your personal financial history will also determine the rates you’re offered.

If you want to get the lowest possible monthly mortgage payment, taking the following steps can help you secure a lower rate on your home loan:

It’s also a good idea to compare rates from different lenders to find the best rate for your financial goals. According to research from Freddie Mac, borrowers can save $1,500 on average over the life of their loan by shopping for just one additional rate quote — and an average of $3,000 by comparing five rate quotes.

Credible can help you compare current rates from multiple mortgage lenders at once in just a few minutes. Are you looking to refinance an existing home? Use Credible’s online tools to compare rates and get prequalified today.

Mortgage interest rates by loan type

Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer shopping for a 30- or 15-year mortgage, or you’re looking to refinance an existing home, Credible can help you find the right mortgage for your financial goals.

Before you fill out your mortgage application, check out these loan rates, which you’ll be able to compare by annual percentage rate (APR) as well as interest rate:

Mortgage refinance:

Home purchase:

Source: foxbusiness.com

Today’s mortgage rates rise — refinance before they go even higher | February 23, 2021 – Fox Business

Our goal here at Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, referred to as “Credible” below, is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we do promote products from our partner lenders, all opinions are our own.

Check out the mortgage rates for February 23, 2021, which are trending up from yesterday. (iStock)

Based on data compiled by Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, mortgage rates have risen since yesterday.

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: 3.000%, Up from 2.875%, +0.125
  • 20-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.875%, Up from 2.750%, +0.125
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.250%, Unchanging

Rates last updated on February 23, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

To find the best mortgage rate, start by using Credible, which can show you current mortgage and refinance rates:

Browse rates from multiple lenders so you can make an informed decision about your home loan.

Looking at today’s mortgage refinance rates

Today’s mortgage refinance rates have remained largely unchanged since yesterday. Mortgage and refinance rates continue to move away from record lows, with 30- and 20-year rates holding firm at or above 3%. If you’re considering refinancing an existing home, check out what refinance rates look like:

  • 30-year fixed-rate refinance: 3.000%, Unchanging
  • 20-year fixed-rate refinance: 3.000%, Unchanging
  • 15-year fixed-rate refinance: 2.375%, Unchanging

Rates last updated on February 23, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

A site like Credible can be a big help when you’re ready to compare mortgage refinance loans. Credible lets you see prequalified rates for conventional mortgages from multiple lenders all within a few minutes. Visit Credible today to get started.

Current mortgage rates

The spike in mortgage interest rates today marks a new high, with 30-year rates reaching 3.000% for the first time in 143 days. The average rate across all loan types also set a new record, topping 2.708%.

Current 30-year fixed-rate mortgages

The current interest rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is 3.000%. This is up from yesterday.

Current 20-year fixed-rate mortgages

The current interest rate for a 20-year fixed-rate mortgage is 2.875%. This is up from yesterday.

Current 15-year fixed-rate mortgages

The current interest rate for a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage is 2.250%. This is the same as yesterday.

You can explore your mortgage options in minutes by visiting Credible to compare current rates from various lenders who offer mortgage refinancing as well as home loans. Check out Credible and get prequalified today, and take a look at today’s refinance rates through the link below.

Rates last updated on February 23, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

How mortgage rates have changed

Today, mortgage rates are up compared to this time last week.

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: 3.000%, up from 2.750% last week, +0.250 
  • 20-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.875%, up from 2.500% last week, +0.375
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.250%, up from 2.125% last week, +0.125

Rates last updated on February 23, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

If you’re trying to find the right rate for your home mortgage or looking to refinance an existing home, consider using Credible. You can use Credible’s free online tool to easily compare multiple lenders and see prequalified rates in just a few minutes.

The factors behind today’s mortgage rates

Current mortgage and refinance rates are affected by many economic factors, like unemployment numbers and inflation. But your personal financial history will also determine the rates you’re offered.

Larger economic factors

  • Strength of the economy
  • Inflation rates
  • Employment
  • Consumer spending
  • Housing construction and other market conditions
  • Stock and bond markets
  • 10-year Treasury yields
  • Federal Reserve policies

Personal economic factors

  • Credit score
  • Credit history
  • Down payment size
  • Loan-to-value ratio
  • Loan type, size, and term
  • Debt-to-income ratio
  • Location of the property

How to get your lowest mortgage rate

If you want low mortgage rates, improving your credit score and paying down any other debt could secure you a lower rate. The size of your down payments also affects mortgage rates, with a low down payment likely to yield you a higher rate.

It’s also a good idea to compare rates from different lenders to find the best rate for your financial goals. According to research from Freddie Mac, borrowers can save $1,500 on average over the life of their loan by shopping for just one additional rate quote — and an average of $3,000 by comparing five rate quotes.

Credible can help you compare current rates from multiple mortgage lenders at once in just a few minutes. Are you looking to refinance an existing home? Use Credible’s online tools to compare rates and get prequalified today.

Mortgage interest rates by loan type

Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer shopping for a 30- or 15-year mortgage, or you’re looking to refinance an existing home, Credible can help you find the right mortgage for your financial goals.

Be sure to check out these loan rates, which you’ll be able to compare by annual percentage rate (APR) as well as interest rate:

Mortgage refinance:

Home purchase:

More resources on getting a home loan

Want to learn more about how to get a mortgage? Take a look at the following articles:

Source: foxbusiness.com

Today’s mortgage refinance rates move higher | February 12, 2021 – Fox Business

Our goal here at Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, referred to as “Credible” below, is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we do promote products from our partner lenders, all opinions are our own.

Check out the mortgage refinancing rates for February 12, 2021, which are up from yesterday. (iStock)

Based on data compiled by Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, current mortgage refinance rates increased compared to yesterday’s. Though 20-year rates bumped up by 250 basis points today, 15-year rates have not budged from 2.125% in four consecutive days.

  • 30-year fixed-rate refinance: 2.750%, Unchanging
  • 20-year fixed-rate refinance: 2.750%, Up from 2.500%, +0.250
  • 15-year fixed-rate refinance: 2.125%, Unchanging

Rates last updated on February 12, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

If you’re thinking of refinancing your home mortgage, consider using Credible. Whether you’re interested in saving money on your monthly mortgage payments, or considering a cash-out refinance, Credible’s free online tool will let you compare rates from multiple mortgage lenders. You can see prequalified rates in as little as three minutes.

Current 30-year fixed-rate refinance

The current rate for a 30-year fixed-rate refinance is 2.750%. This is the same as yesterday.

Current 20-year fixed-rate refinance

The current rate for a 20-year fixed-rate refinance is 2.750%. This is up from yesterday.

Current 15-year fixed-rate refinance

The current rate for a 15-year fixed-rate refinance is 2.125%. This is the same as yesterday.

You can explore your mortgage refinance options in minutes by visiting Credible to compare rates and lenders. Check out Credible and get prequalified today.

Rates last updated on February 12, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

How mortgage refinance rates have changed

Today, mortgage refinance rates have risen compared to this time last week.

  • 30-year fixed refinance: 2.750%, the same as last week
  • 20-year fixed refinance: 2.750%, up from 2.625% last week, +0.125
  • 15-year fixed refinance: 2.125%, up from 1.875% last week, +0.250

Think it might be the right time to refinance? To understand just how much you could save on monthly mortgage payments by refinancing now, crunch the numbers and compare rates using Credible’s free online tool. Within minutes, you can see what multiple mortgage refinance lenders are offering.

Rates last updated on February 12, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

The factors behind today’s refinance rates

Current refinance rates, like mortgage interest rates in general, are affected by many economic factors, like unemployment numbers and inflation. But your personal financial history will also determine the rates you’re offered when refinancing your mortgage.

Larger economic factors

  • Strength of the economy
  • Inflation rates
  • Employment
  • Consumer spending
  • Housing construction and other market conditions
  • Stock and bond markets
  • 10-year Treasury yields
  • Federal Reserve policies

Personal economic factors

  • Credit score
  • Credit history
  • Down payment size
  • Loan-to-value ratio
  • Loan type, size, and term
  • Debt-to-income ratio
  • Location of the property

How to get your lowest mortgage refinance rate

If you’re interested in refinancing your mortgage, improving your credit score and paying down any other debt could secure you a lower rate. It’s also a good idea to compare rates from different lenders if you’re hoping to refinance, so you can find the best rate for your situation.

Borrowers can save $1,500 on average over the life of their loan by shopping for just one additional rate quote, and an average of $3,000 by comparing five rate quotes, according to research from Freddie Mac. Credible can help you compare multiple lenders at once in just a few minutes.

If you decide to refinance your mortgage, be sure to shop around and compare rates from multiple mortgage lenders. You can do this easily with Credible’s free online tool and see your prequalified rates in only three minutes.

Credible also has a partnership with a home insurance broker. You can compare free home insurance quotes through Credible’s partner here. It’s fast, easy, and the whole process can be completed entirely online.

Mortgage rates by loan type

Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer shopping for mortgage loans, or you’re seeking lower monthly payments on an existing home, Credible can help you keep an eye on current mortgage rates and find the right loan for your financial goals.

Be sure to check out these loan rates, which you’ll be able to compare by annual percentage rate (APR) as well as interest rate:

More resources on mortgage refinance

Want to learn more about refinancing your home loan? Take a look at the following articles:

Source: foxbusiness.com

AimLoan Review: You Can Check Their Rates and Fees 24/7

Posted on February 22nd, 2021

Today we’ll take a look at American Internet Mortgage, more commonly known as “AimLoan,” which is a streamlined discount mortgage lender that focuses mostly on conforming loans.

Doing so allows them to do what they do best, and ideally offer lower mortgage rates to their customers by running more efficiently and keeping costs low.

At the time of this writing, they were offering the lowest APR for both a 30-year fixed and a 15-year fixed mortgage for a sample loan scenario on the Zillow Mortgage Marketplace.

So they appear to offer competitive interest rates and reasonable lender fees. Let’s find out more about them.

AimLoan Fast Facts

  • Direct-to-consumer mortgage lender that offers home purchase and refinance loans
  • Founded in 1998, headquartered in San Diego, California
  • Funded roughly $1.3 billion in home loans last year
  • Most active in the states of California, Arizona, and Texas
  • Licensed to do business in all 50 states and D.C.

AimLoan is a proper veteran in the mortgage industry, having been around since 1998. Not many companies last that long without being acquired or going out of business.

The San Diego, CA-based direct mortgage lender was founded by Vince Kasperick, who continues to serve as the company’s president.

Since that time, they’ve funded more than $23 billion in home loans, with nearly $1.3 billion originated last year.

Their bread and butter product is the mortgage refinance, whether it’s a rate and term refinance or a cash out refinance. But they also offer home purchase loans too.

They tend to stick to plain vanilla loans, meaning straightforward stuff that can easily be sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac shortly after funding.

AimLoan operates as a direct-to-consumer mortgage lender, meaning it’s a call center you can’t visit in person. So you’ll be working with a loan officer and processor remotely.

The company appears to be most active in their home state of California, which accounts for more than a quarter of total loan volume.

They also do a lot of business in nearby Arizona and Texas, along with Florida and Georgia.

At the moment, AimLoan is licensed to lend in all 50 states nationwide, along with the District of Columbia.

How to Apply for a Mortgage with AimLoan

  • They offer the so-called AimLoan 6-Step Process
  • It starts with a digital mortgage application powered by Ellie Mae
  • Then your loan is run through their automated underwriting system
  • Once approved you can manage your loan via the online borrower portal and upload any required conditions

It’s easy to apply for a home loan with AimLoan. Simply visit their website and click on “Apply Now.”

From there you’ll need to provide personal and financial information, then your application will be run through their automated underwriting system.

Assuming you receive a conditional loan approval, you’ll be given the opportunity to lock or float your rate at your desired fee/credit combination.

A human loan officer and loan processor will also assist you along the way and provide you with a list of any conditions that need to be met.

During that time, a home appraisal will be scheduled if necessary and third-party items like title and escrow will be set up.

Speaking of, you will be asked to submit an appraisal fee at the time you lock your rate, which kind of acts like the application fee, though it covers the appraisal if and when you fund.

All in all, they appear to make it pretty simple to apply, lock, and close your loan.

If you don’t want to use their self-service option, you can also call them up directly and connect with a loan officer before beginning the application.

Loan Programs Offered by AimLoan

  • Home purchase loans
  • Rate and term refinances
  • Cash out refinances
  • Conforming loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
  • VA loans
  • Fixed-rate mortgages: 30-, 25-, 20-, 15-, and 10-year terms available
  • They lend on primary residences, second homes, and investment properties (1-4 units)

As alluded to, AimLoan is a streamlined mortgage lender that likes to keep its product menu short and sweet.

Doing so allows them to offer lower rates and superior customer service. But it also means you may not be able to get what you’re looking for.

While they offer all the usual stuff, like home purchase loans and mortgage refinances, along with conforming loans and VA loans, several items appear to be missing.

Those include jumbo loans, which exceed the conforming loan limit, along with FHA loans and USDA loans. If you’re in need of one of these loan types, you may need to go elsewhere.

Additionally, while you can get a fixed-rate mortgage in a variety of loan terms, they aren’t offering adjustable-rate mortgages at the moment.

Or at least not displaying them on their website because they say they’re currently pricing higher than fixed rates, which tends to be true.

AimLoan Mortgage Rates

One advantage to using AimLoan is the fact that you can see their mortgage rates online. And you don’t need to sign up or speak to someone first.

Additionally, you can compare a variety of rates all at once tailored to your own unique loan scenario, instead of simply looking at promotional rates that make a bunch of assumptions.

To get started, simply head to the AimLoan website and start filling out the instant rate quote form on the homepage. It’s easy to complete and you should see a variety of rates in about a minute.

In terms of fees, they appear to charge a flat $995 origination fee, which can often be offset by a lender credit.

They say their pricing model differs from other lenders because their profit is mostly from that flat fee.

As such, they can pass on the savings to consumers by not marking up the pricing they receive on the secondary market.

Anyway, once you click on a given mortgage rate, it will show you a full fee breakdown including their fees and third-party costs like appraisal and title insurance.

You can also get an idea of cash to close by inputting your estimated property taxes and current loan balance if it’s a refinance.

If you like what you see, simply click on “Apply Now” or “Talk to a Loan Officer” to get started on your application.

AimLoan Reviews

On Zillow, they have a 4.15-star rating out of 5 from nearly 400 customer reviews, which is good but not excellent. There are some mixed reviews that seem to be dragging down their overall score.

On Google, they have a 4.3-star rating from nearly 300 reviews, and on Bankrate a 4.4-rating from almost 200 reviews with an 84% recommend score.

AimLoan has a more inferior 3.5-star rating on Yelp from about 300 reviews.

They also list a bunch of customer reviews on their own website, though it’s unclear if they provide much value.

Lastly, they have a 4.61/5-star rating with the Better Business Bureau and an ‘A+’ rating based on complaint history.

They’ve been an accredited business since 2015 and were awarded the BBB Torch Award for Ethics, which goes to businesses with “the highest standards of leadership character and organizational ethics.”

To sum it up, AimLoan is probably best suited for an existing homeowner looking to refinance their mortgage to a lower rate, who doesn’t have a complicated scenario.

I’m talking someone with good credit, a steady W-2 job, and nothing out of the ordinary to ensure the loan process moves along smoothly.

Those who have more complex loan scenarios or need more hand-holding may want to consider other lenders.

AimLoan Pros and Cons

The Good Stuff

  • Can apply for a mortgage directly from their website
  • Offer a digital application powered by Ellie Mae (ICE)
  • View mortgage rates online without providing contact info
  • Offer 60-day rate locks standard
  • Licensed to do business in all 50 states and D.C.
  • Mostly good customer reviews
  • A+ BBB rating, accredited since 2015
  • Free mortgage calculators and mortgage glossary on site

The Perhaps Not

  • Do not appear to offer FHA, jumbo, or USDA loans
  • Typically do not allow FICO scores below 620
  • Do not finance co-ops or manufactured/mobile homes
  • No physical locations

(photo: Ann Oro)

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

Here’s How To Refinance A Mortgage (And Know If It’s Right For You)

Over the past decade, mortgage refinancing has grown in popularity. Not that big of a surprise, considering we’ve seen a sizable drop in mortgage rates during this time. At the height of the housing crisis in 2008, rates averaged about 6% for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage .

Currently, the average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage is about 3.26% , which gives some folks the opportunity to save some serious moola by lowering their interest payments. If you signed on for a higher rate years ago or your financial situation has improved, refinancing is worth considering.

Refinancing a mortgage might not be right for every homeowner, but starting to look at rates and terms could be the first step to being able to save for other financial goals. Here’s everything you need to know about refinancing a mortgage from how to start the process, to figuring out if it’s right for you.

How much does it cost to refinance a mortgage?

Since you’re essentially applying for a new loan, there will most likely be fees if you choose to refinance. Because of this, it’s important to consider those costs compared to the potential savings. A good rule of thumb is to be certain you can recoup the cost of the refinance in two to three years—which means you shouldn’t have immediate plans to move.

Refinancing will generally cost from 3% to 6% of your loan’s principal value, though you should be sure to shop around to make sure you’re getting the best deal.

There are helpful online calculators for determining approximate costs for a mortgage refinance. Of course, this is only an estimate and all lenders are different. The lender will provide final closing cost information alongside a quote for your new mortgage rate.
When you refinance, you also have to consider closing costs. Some lenders may not have origination fees, but instead charge the borrower a higher interest rate.

If you have a great borrowing history and a strong financial position, there are some lenders, like SoFi, that reward such borrowers by offering competitive rates and no hidden fees.

Mortgage RefinancingMortgage Refinancing

What are the steps in the mortgage refinancing process?

The first (and arguably most important) step is to determine what you want to get out of your mortgage loan refinance. There are several mortgage loan types, but “rate and term” and “cash out” are the two most common.

Just as the name implies, a “rate and term” refinance updates the interest rate, the term (or duration) of the loan, or both. You can also switch from an adjustable rate to a fixed rate and vice versa.

It is important to understand that not every refinance will save you money on interest. For example, if you extend the loan terms, you may end up paying more money over the course of your loan.

to boost your credit score. 1
2. Research your home’s approximate value. Check comparable sale prices—not just listing prices—in your neighborhood to get an idea of what your house is worth. If the value of your home has gone up significantly and improves your loan-to-value ratio (LTV), this will be helpful in securing the best refinancing rate.
3. Compare refinance rates online. Don’t forget to ask about all costs involved. Most financial institutions should be able to give you an estimate, but the accuracy can depend on how well you know your credit score and LTV ratio.
4. Get your paperwork together. The process will move faster if you have your pay stubs, bank statements, tax filings, and other pertinent financial information ready to go.
5. Have cash on hand. You may have to pay some up-front costs, like property taxes and insurance.
6. The lender will (mostly) take it from here. They will send an appraiser for a home inspection. After the loan documentation and appraisal are submitted, loan officers determine the interest rate and create the loan closing documents. The closing is then scheduled with the refinancing company, mortgage broker, and real estate attorney.

How long does a mortgage refinance take?

The process can take anywhere from 30 to 90 days, depending on your diligence, the complexity of the loan, and the efficiency of the lender or broker.

If you want the process to move fast, look for mortgage lenders who are looking to disrupt the traditional mortgage process by offering a more streamlined service and a better customer experience.

If you’re like most people, you’ve got a life to live and don’t want your mortgage refinance to drag on for months. Keep this in mind while looking for a lender to refinance with.

Ready to check out your mortgage refinance rates with a competitive lender that values your time? SoFi can give you a quote (that won’t affect your credit score! 2) in as little as two minutes.



1. Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website on credit.
2. To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.

SoFi Lending Corp. is licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Financing Law, license number 6054612. NMLS #1121636.
The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
SoFi Mortgages not available in all states. Products and terms may vary from those advertised on this site. See SoFi.com for details.

MG18103

Source: sofi.com

Get a no-closing-cost mortgage and a low rate, too

Out-of-pocket mortgage fees are optional

Mortgages always have closing costs, whether you’re buying a home or refinancing. But you don’t always have to pay them out of pocket.

You get to choose how your home loan is structured.

You could take your lowest rate and pay closing costs on your own dime. Or you can ask your lender to cover closing costs and pay a slightly higher interest rate.

These “no-closing-cost” mortgages aren’t always a good deal because a higher rate means you pay more in the long run.

However, today’s mortgage rates
are so low that many borrowers can get the lender to cover their fees and still
get an ultra-low rate.

Find a no-closing-cost mortgage (Feb 19th, 2021)


In this article (Skip to…)


What is a no-closing-cost mortgage?

A no-closing-cost mortgage or no-closing-cost refinance isn’t exactly what it sounds like. There are still closing costs. You just don’t pay them yourself.

What a no-closing-cost mortgage really means is that the lender covers part or all of your closing costs. In exchange, you pay a higher interest rate. The lender’s extra profit from your higher rate repays your closing costs in the long run.

Lenders can cover some or all of your closing costs in most cases, including loan origination fees, appraisal fees, title search and title insurance fees, and prepaid taxes and insurance.

Depending on the lender, a no-closing-cost mortgage loan can also be called a:

  • Zero-cost mortgage
  • No-cost mortgage
  • Lender credits
  • Rebate pricing
  • Lender-paid closing costs

All these terms refer to the same arrangement, where you’ll pay a higher interest rate in order for the lender to cover closing costs.

This is no free lunch — if you keep the loan for a long time, you could end up paying more via the higher interest rate than you would have paid in upfront closing costs. So you should think about how long you plan to keep your new loan before deciding on a no-closing-cost refinance or home purchase loan.

However, if you’re ready to buy a home or refinance but don’t have the upfront cash, a zero-cost mortgage can be a smart way to lock in at today’s low rates without having to wait and build your savings up.

Check no-closing-cost mortgage rates (Feb 19th, 2021)

Types of no-closing-cost home loans

There are several ways to
structure a no-closing-cost loan. A lender might cover all your
upfront fees or only select closing costs.

The amount and type of closing
costs your lender absorbs will affect your interest rate, so it’s important to
compare offers on equal footing.

To compare zero-cost offers,
make sure each lender covers the same items. For example:

  • The mortgage lender covers lender fees but not the third-party expenses or prepaid items (upfront property taxes and homeowners insurance)
  • The lender covers lender fees and third-party charges, but not prepaid items
  • The mortgage lender absorbs everything, including loan costs and prepaid expenses

A lender that covers all
three parts of your closing costs will likely charge a higher rate. Conversely,
a lender that charges a lower rate is likely only covering its own fees, not
fees from the appraiser, title company, or escrow service.

No-closing-cost mortgage example

For example, your
various rate and fee options might look like this:

  • 2.750% rate — The borrower pays all closing costs, including lender fees, third party fees, and prepaid costs
  • 2.875% rate — The borrower pays no lender fees, but does pay third party costs and prepaid costs
  • 3.250% rate — The borrower pays no lender or third party charges, only prepaid costs
  • 3.50% rate — The borrower pays nothing out of pocket whatsoever

None of these options are
good or bad. Borrowers should understand that lower rates cost more upfront,
and higher rates cost less upfront.

To be able to pay your
closing costs, lenders increase your interest rate and use the extra profit
from the loan to pay your costs.

It’s up to you to decide if the upfront savings are worth the higher interest rate and payment.

No-closing-cost refinancing

A no-closing-cost refinance can be a particularly good idea because it eliminates the one big drawback to refinancing — the upfront cost.

For this to work, however, your new interest rate needs to be low enough that you can accept a slight rate increase and still see your desired savings.

A higher interest rate will result in a higher monthly payment and a bigger long-term cost. So before using a no-cost refinance, you should check the numbers and determine:

  • Will your monthly payments still be reduced at the no-closing-cost mortgage rate?
  • How long do you plan to keep the mortgage before moving or refinancing again?
  • How much more will you have paid in interest by the time you sell or refinance? Is this amount higher or lower than paying closing costs upfront?

The point at which the added interest cost starts to outweigh your savings is the “break-even point.”

With a no-cost mortgage refinance, you’ll likely want to move or refinance again before you hit the break-even point.

Of course, if you need lower mortgage payments because your monthly budget is too tight, the higher long-term cost might not matter as much. You might be happy with the month-to-month savings and lack of upfront fees.

As always, the right mortgage refinance strategy depends on your current loan and your personal finances.

When you’re shopping around, you can ask lenders for offers both with and without closing costs to compare your potential interest rates and long-term costs.

No-closing-cost vs. ‘rolled’ closing costs

A zero-cost loan isn’t the only way to eliminate closing costs when you refinance. Most homeowners also have the option to roll closing costs into their new loan balance.

Rolling closing costs into your loan is not the same as a no-closing cost refi.

By rolling in closing costs, you increase your mortgage amount, which means you’ll pay more interest in the long run. But your actual interest rate stays the same.

Compare that to a no-closing-cost mortgage refinance, which keeps your loan balance the same but increases your rate.

There are pros and cons to each strategy.

Keeping your lower interest rate by rolling closing costs into the loan might save you more on interest. But it also increases your loan-to-value ratio (LTV), which could impact your refinance eligibility or your ability to cancel private mortgage insurance (PMI).

Your refinance options also depend on the type of loan you have.

For instance, FHA and VA Streamline Refinance loans only allow borrowers to include upfront mortgage insurance fees in the loan amount. All remaining closing costs need to be paid out of pocket. 

Note, including closing costs on the loan balance is only an option when you refinance — not when you buy a home. But you can get a no-closing-cost loan with a higher interest rate when you purchase real estate.

The right no-cost option depends on your particular mortgage.

You can compare both options when you’re shopping for refi offers to see which makes more sense for your financial situation.

Compare no-closing-cost mortgages (Feb 19th, 2021)

Getting a zero-closing-cost loan from a
mortgage broker

A no-closing-cost loan looks a
little different with a mortgage broker than it does when you’re working
directly with a lender. That’s because the broker is an intermediary; they can
help you negotiate the rate and terms of your loan, but they don’t control the
end lender’s pricing.

However, a no-cost loan is still
possible via a mortgage broker. You just need to know how they work.

Mortgage brokers collect a
yield spread premium, or YSP, as payment to work on your loan.

The end lender pays this fee
to the mortgage broker for delivering your loan. The YSP is the mortgage
broker’s profit.

Knowing this, you can request
that the broker use the YSP to engineer your no-cost home loan.

For instance, a broker
getting paid a 1% YSP by the lender need not charge the borrower an origination
fee. In this case, the YSP can save you one percent of your loan amount in
out-of-pocket costs. A broker getting 2% YSP can cover even more of your
closing costs.

When comparing no cost loans
between mortgage lenders and brokers, ask for the same structure
from each.

In other words, ask them all
for offers with no lender fees. Third party costs like appraisal, credit
report, title and escrow and recording fees should be fairly similar. Your taxes
and insurance should be the same regardless of which lender you choose.

This allows you to look at just one variable: the interest rate.

Mortgage rates with no closing costs

The downside to a no-closing cost mortgage is that you’ll pay a higher interest rate. Even a slight increase in your rate can cost you thousands more over the life of the loan.

However, you should consider the interest rate increase in perspective.

Today’s rates are at historic lows. And that means many borrowers can accept a slightly higher rate while still ‘saving’ compared to homeowners who bought or refinanced a year ago or more.

Imagine you’re offered a 30-year fixed mortgage rate of 2.875%. Your lender is willing to cover closing costs but will increase your rate to 3.5%.

That’s a big increase compared to your original rate offer. But 3.5% is still less than half the historic average for 30-year rates — and it’s less than most borrowers would have paid any year prior to 2020.

Yes, you should get the lowest rate you can to save money in the long run. But if a no-closing-cost loan is your only route to homeownership or refinancing, it’s not a bad deal.

The important thing is that you’re aware of the tradeoff between zero upfront costs and bigger long-term costs so you’re certain you’re making the right decision.

Tips to lower your no-cost mortgage rate

The lower your initial mortgage rate is, the lower your no-closing-cost mortgage rate will be.

To get a no-cost mortgage loan and a low rate, try to present a strong mortgage application. You’ll typically get a lower interest rate if you have:

  • A credit score above 720
  • A clean credit report with no late payments
  • A debt-to-income ratio (DTI) below 43%
  • A loan-to-value ratio (LTV) below 80% (meaning you have at least 20% home equity)

Additionally, refinancing with at least 20% equity (or buying a home with 20% down) can help you avoid private mortgage insurance (PMI) or FHA mortgage insurance premiums (MIP).

Eliminating mortgage insurance costs can go a long way toward reducing your monthly payment and making up for the increased interest rate on a no-cost loan.

But perhaps the most powerful way to lower your rate is to let lenders compete for your business. Get two or three quotes. Send the quote with the lowest rate and fee combination to one of the other lenders. See if that lender can beat it.

You may end up getting much of your closing costs paid for and get close to the full-closing-cost rate.

What are today’s mortgage rates?

Purchase and refinance rates are still at historic lows. Many home buyers and homeowners can get the lender to cover their upfront costs and still secure a great interest rate.

Make sure you compare no-cost offers from a few different lenders if you want to go this route. Check that each one is covering the same closing costs so you can make an apples-to-apples comparison of upfront costs and interest rates.

Verify your new rate (Feb 19th, 2021)

Compare top lenders

Source: themortgagereports.com

Today’s mortgage rates bump up again | February 12, 2021 – Fox Business

Our goal here at Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, referred to as “Credible” below, is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we do promote products from our partner lenders, all opinions are our own.

Check out the mortgage rates for February 12, 2021, which are trending up from yesterday. (iStock)

Based on data compiled by Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, mortgage rates have risen since yesterday.

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.625%, Unchanging
  • 20-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.500%, Up from 2.375%, +0.125
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.000%, Unchanging

Rates last updated on February 12, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

To find the best mortgage rate, start by using Credible, which can show you current mortgage and refinance rates:

Browse rates from multiple lenders so you can make an informed decision about your home loan.

Looking at today’s mortgage refinance rates

Today’s mortgage refinance rates have risen since yesterday. Though 20-year fixed mortgages bumped up by 250 basis points today, 15-year rates have not budged from 2.125% in four consecutive days. If you’re considering refinancing an existing home, check out what refinance rates look like:

  • 30-year fixed-rate refinance: 2.750%, Unchanging
  • 20-year fixed-rate refinance: 2.750%, Up from 2.500%, +0.250
  • 15-year fixed-rate refinance: 2.125%, Unchanging

Rates last updated on February 12, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

A site like Credible can be a big help when you’re ready to compare mortgage refinance loans. Credible lets you see prequalified rates for conventional mortgages from multiple lenders all within a few minutes. Visit Credible today to get started.

Current mortgage rates

Mortgage interest rates are on the rise again today, with 15-year rates bumping up to 2.500%.

Current 30-year fixed-rate mortgages

The current interest rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is 2.625%. This is the same as yesterday.

Current 20-year fixed-rate mortgages

The current interest rate for a 20-year fixed-rate mortgage is 2.500%. This is up from yesterday.

Current 15-year fixed-rate mortgages

The current interest rate for a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage is 2.000%. This is the same as yesterday.

You can explore your mortgage options in minutes by visiting Credible to compare current rates from various lenders who offer mortgage refinancing as well as home loans. Check out Credible and get prequalified today, and take a look at today’s refinance rates through the link below.

Rates last updated on February 12, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

How mortgage rates have changed

Today, mortgage rates are down compared to this time last week.

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.625%, the same as last week 
  • 20-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.500%, the same as last week
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.000%, down from 2.500% last week, -0.500

Rates last updated on February 12, 2021. These rates are based on the assumptions shown here. Actual rates may vary.

If you’re trying to find the right rate for your home mortgage or looking to refinance an existing home, consider using Credible. You can use Credible’s free online tool to easily compare multiple lenders and see prequalified rates in just a few minutes.

The factors behind today’s mortgage rates

Current mortgage and refinance rates are affected by many economic factors, like unemployment numbers and inflation. But your personal financial history will also determine the rates you’re offered.

Larger economic factors

  • Strength of the economy
  • Inflation rates
  • Employment
  • Consumer spending
  • Housing construction and other market conditions
  • Stock and bond markets
  • 10-year Treasury yields
  • Federal Reserve policies

Personal economic factors

  • Credit score
  • Credit history
  • Down payment size
  • Loan-to-value ratio
  • Loan type, size, and term
  • Debt-to-income ratio
  • Location of the property

How to get your lowest mortgage rate

If you want low mortgage rates, improving your credit score and paying down any other debt could secure you a lower rate. The size of your down payments also affects mortgage rates, with a low down payment likely to yield you a higher rate.

It’s also a good idea to compare rates from different lenders to find the best rate for your financial goals. According to research from Freddie Mac, borrowers can save $1,500 on average over the life of their loan by shopping for just one additional rate quote — and an average of $3,000 by comparing five rate quotes.

Credible can help you compare current rates from multiple mortgage lenders at once in just a few minutes. Are you looking to refinance an existing home? Use Credible’s online tools to compare rates and get prequalified today.

Mortgage interest rates by loan type

Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer shopping for a 30- or 15-year mortgage, or you’re looking to refinance an existing home, Credible can help you find the right mortgage for your financial goals.

Be sure to check out these loan rates, which you’ll be able to compare by annual percentage rate (APR) as well as interest rate:

Mortgage refinance:

Home purchase:

More resources on getting a home loan

Want to learn more about how to get a mortgage? Take a look at the following articles:

Source: foxbusiness.com

4 reasons mortgage rates could drop further this year – Fox Business

As mortgage rates decline, there’s more incentive to buy or refinance a home loan. (iStock)

While the coronavirus pandemic has financially sideswiped millions of Americans, there is something of a silver lining: current mortgage rates are declining — and homeowners and home buyers alike can save big.

Mortgage interest rates have hovered near historic lows for much of 2020 thanks to Federal Reserve policies designed to bolster the economy. If you’re a prospective home buyer or a homeowner who’s interested in a refinance loan, a rates drop can translate to significant savings (and lower monthly payments).

You can visit Credible to compare mortgage rates from different mortgage lenders, without affecting your credit. And you can also visit Credible to learn more about mortgage refinancing options.

In the meantime, here’s a closer look at why the lower interest rates trend may continue this year.

Today’s mortgage rates

According to Freddie Mac data for the week of October 22nd, mortgage rates are on a flattening trend, with very little change from the previous week.

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage: 2.8%
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: 2.33%.
  • 5/1 Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) rate: 2.87%. 

Year-over-year, mortgage rates are down 0.95 basis points for 30-year fixed-rate loans, 0.85 basis points for 15-year fixed-rate loans, and 0.53 basis points for 5/1 ARM loans. The current rate trend could be chalked up to a slowdown in the economic recovery.

If you’re looking to take advantage of low refinance rates to lower your monthly payments and cut the life of your home loan, then use a rate-shopping site like Credible to compare mortgage lenders before you refinance your mortgage.

RENT OR BUY? HOW THE FED’S MORTGAGE RATE CHANGES CAN HELP YOU DECIDE

Will mortgage rates keep dropping?

Here are some key reasons why you could continue to see below average rates for mortgages and refinance loans in the coming months:

  1. Consumer debt is shrinking
  2. Bank deposits are increasing
  3. Adverse market fee delayed
  4. The Federal Reserve is committed to keeping rates low 

MORTGAGE RATES DROP, HOUSING MARKET REMAINS ‘STRONG’ AMID CORONAVIRUS CRISIS

1. Consumer debt is shrinking

One reason the mortgage rates decline could be here to stay for the short-term has to do with borrower demand. If Americans are inclined to borrow less, that could be an incentive to keep rates low to encourage new mortgages and other loans.

According to Federal Reserve data, total household debt declined for the first time since 2014 during the second quarter of 2020. Americans are making a dent in balances for credit cards, student loans, car loans and other debts, which may help curb mortgage rates through the fall.

Credible can help you compare lenders and save on interest without impacting your credit score. You can complete the entire origination process — from comparing loan rates up to closing — all in one place.

GET THE BEST MORTGAGE RATES BY FOLLOWING THESE 5 STEPS

2. Bank deposits are increasing

While Americans are paying off debts, they’re also stashing more of their money in the bank. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) reported increased bank liquidity levels through the first and second quarters of 2020, with bank deposits increasing by more than $1 trillion.

That means banks have more capital to lend to borrowers who are looking to get a home loan right now. If you have a strong credit history and credit score, you could reap the benefits of that by cashing in on low mortgage rates.

SHOULD YOU PAY POINTS TO LOWER YOUR MORTGAGE RATE?

3. Adverse market fee delayed

Earlier this year, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) announced it would implement an adverse market fee on new mortgage refinance loans. While mortgage lenders are responsible for the fee, it’s been suggested that the fee could be passed on to homeowners in the form of higher refinance rates. The Mortgage Bankers Association estimated it would increase the average cost of refinancing by $1,400.

The fee, which was set to take effect September 1, has been delayed to December 1, giving you more time to refinance your mortgage if you already own a home. That means banks have less incentive to raise mortgage rates until the fee takes effect.

18M HOMEOWNERS MISSING OUT ON MORTGAGE REFINANCE SAVINGS, STUDY SAYS

4. The Federal Reserve is committed to keeping rates low 

The Federal Reserve sets the federal funds rate doesn’t affect conventional mortgage rates directly but banks can take their cue from the Fed when it comes to deciding whether to lower interest rates.

When inflation is low, as it is now, banks can cut mortgage rates to encourage borrowing. In an October speech at the National Association for Business Economics Virtual Annual Meeting, Fed chairman Jerome Powell reiterated his decision to keep the federal funds rate low for the time being. Earlier this year, Powell suggested that rates could remain low for at least another two years into 2023.

If you’re a homeowner, compare mortgage rates with Credible to see if you can save, but don’t forget about closing costs, which could neutralize any savings you gain from a lower monthly payment.

IS NOW A GOOD TIME TO REFINANCE YOUR MORTGAGE?

How to take advantage of low mortgage rates

With a mortgage rates decline likely to stick around for a while, that could be an opportunity to get a great deal on a home loan if you’re tired of renting and ready to buy. If you haven’t checked your credit history and credit score lately, you may want to do that first. From there, you can use an online mortgage calculator to estimate your monthly payments.

You can also run the numbers through a mortgage refinance calculator to determine how much you could save with a refinance loan.

Whether your financial goals include buying a home or refinancing your mortgage, it helps to work with a professional. Connect with Credible’s experienced loan officers today to get all of your home buying and refinancing questions answered.

Source: foxbusiness.com

How to Refinance Your Mortgage with Bad Credit

Refinancing your mortgage can provide you with a lot of financial benefits. You can cash out on some of your home’s equity when you need a large sum of money.

signing refinance papers

You can also take advantage of lower interest rates to save on your monthly payments. It’s also possible to get rid of your private mortgage insurance if you have enough equity in your home.

If your credit has taken a dive since you first bought your house, it may be difficult to refinance. After all, you’ll essentially be taking out a new home loan and will have to go through the entire application process with a mortgage lender.

However, you’re not left without any options. Learn how to make sure refinancing is the right move for you and how you can refinance your mortgage with bad credit.

Make Sure Refinancing Makes Financial Sense

Before applying to refinance your house, analyze the total cost of the transaction to ensure it’s the right move.

Yes, you might save money on your monthly mortgage payments with a lower interest rate, but remember that you also have to pay closing costs and other fees to get a new loan.

Refinancing Usually Extends Your Loan Term

Also, consider that your newly refinanced loan usually extends the length of your loan back to 30 years, regardless of how long you have been paying down your current loan. That means it will take longer to pay off your house and you’ll also be paying that interest for longer.

If you’ve been paying on your home for 10 years, that’s a long time to add back onto your mortgage, especially while making additional interest payments. Before you refinance, make sure you consider all of the financial implications, not just your new monthly mortgage payment.

Your lender can help you estimate what expenses you’re likely to incur so have an in-depth conversation before making a decision.

Refinance a Mortgage with Bad Credit

Credit scores and interest rates go hand in hand. As with all loans, a higher credit score results in lower interest rates, saving you money every month. This really adds up on mortgages because you’re paying the loan off for so long. And even if you don’t have excellent credit, you still might be able to get approved for a home loan.

Shop Around

Start off by shopping around for lenders. You’re under no obligation to use the same lender as your initial mortgage, and it’s good to compare several offers.

Refinanced home loans can be structured in any number of ways and some may work for you better than others. For example, you might want to roll closing costs into the loan rather than paying them in cash up front.

Mortgage Points

If you plan on staying in your home for a long time, it may be worth paying an extra point at closing in order to get a better interest rate. Think about what your goals are in refinancing and talk to each lender about the different ways you can achieve them.

A good lender can also help you prepare to get approved for a mortgage refinance, even with lower credit scores. If you can, demonstrate that you have strong cash reserves by putting extra money in the bank.

You’re more likely to be approved for a loan if you have money on hand that is accessible because it shows that you’ll be able to pay for your loan even if your monthly budget is tight at times.

Pay Off Debt

Another helpful move is to strategically pay down some of your debt. Although each lender’s exact requirements vary, most like to see a debt to income ratio of less than 41%.

That means the number of recurring debt payments you make each month (like your new mortgage, your credit card minimums, and any personal loans), should only take up 41% of your monthly pre-tax income.

For example, let’s say your monthly income amounts to $5,000 before taxes and health insurance are taken out, and you pay $2,000 a month on credit cards and a car loan.

Divide 2,000 by 5,000 and you’ll get 0.4. Multiply that by 100 to find the percentage of your debt to income. In this case, it’s 40%, which is less than most lender’s required minimum.

To strengthen your application, consider making a few extra payments to lower your debt amount even more. It may take a few months for those numbers to be reflected on your credit report, so ask your lender to perform a rapid rescore if you’re in a hurry.

Getting a Co-signer

If a bad credit score is still holding you back from refinancing a mortgage, you also have the option of adding a co-signer to the loan.

This basically means that someone else with better credit can help get you approved without having to be an owner of the property title. They’ll be responsible for the loan until they’re removed, which can only be done through another refinance or selling the home.

The catch with having a co-signer is that they are also financially responsible for paying the mortgage. So if for some reason you can’t make the payments, your co-signer’s credit will also suffer — even if the loan gets all the way to foreclosure.

You definitely want a strong and trusting relationship with a co-signer and talk about what would happen in a worst-case scenario. Would the co-signer help make payments or be ok with having their credit diminished? Have an honest conversation to make sure you’re both comfortable with every possible scenario.

Required Documents

Once you’re ready to apply, you’ll need to supply the lender with similar documentation as you did when you first applied for a mortgage. This could include pay stubs, tax returns, and bank statements so they can determine your ability to repay the loan.

Another important part of the process if the home appraisal where a professional appraiser comes to your house and assesses its current value.

You’ll need to have at least 20% of the home’s value paid off, whether through mortgage payments or equity earned. So if your outstanding loan is $150,000 and the appraised value of the home is $200,000, you have 25% equity in your home and the appraisal should be good to go.

Federal Refinancing Programs

If you can’t get approved to refinance through a traditional lender, check to see if you qualify for one of these government-sponsored programs.

These options for refinancing a mortgage are specifically aimed to help people with bad credit. Each mortgage refinance option has different requirements, so read carefully before proceeding. If you qualify, you might be able to take advantage of significant savings.

Harp 2

This program is specially designed to benefit homeowners whose mortgage is greater than the value of the home, so there are no restrictions on the loan-to-value. However, you do have to meet some basic qualifications to take advantage of this program.

First, your loan has to be owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac and must have been delivered to one of those entities by June 1, 2009. FHA loans don’t qualify and you can’t have already refinanced using Making Home Affordable Refinance Program (Harp 2’s predecessor).

FHA Rate and Term Refinance

If you already have an FHA mortgage, you may be able to qualify for an FHA Rate and Term Refinance. This option allows you to change the terms of your current FHA mortgage and replace them with more favorable terms. The minimum credit score to qualify is 580.

FHA Streamline Refinance Loans

If your current mortgage is not an FHA loan, you may be able to refinance your mortgage with an FHA Streamline Refinance. The minimum credit score is also 580. An FHA streamline refinance can help lower your interest rate, and you sometimes can get approved without having an appraisal performed, so it’s a speedy process.

FHA Cash-Out Refinance Loans

You can also do an FHA cash-out refinance have a minimum credit score of at least 620. The cash-out refinance allows homeowners with equity in their house to receive a lump sum of cash by increasing the principal mortgage amount (and, consequently, monthly payments).

VA Interest Rate Reduction Refinance Loan (VA IRRRL)

If you have an existing home loan backed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and you want to reduce your monthly mortgage payments, an interest rate reduction refinance loan (IRRRL) may be a good option for you. You can also move from a loan with an adjustable or variable interest rate.

Basically, a VA Interest Rate Reduction Loan lets you replace your current loan with a new one under different terms.

Improve Your Credit Score Before Refinancing

Whether your application to refinance was denied or you want to qualify for even lower interest rates, sometimes it’s worth taking the time to raise your credit score. Start by paying all of your monthly bills on time and in full. If you do that for long enough, you’ll start to see your credit score go up steadily.

You can also increase your credit card limit — as long as you don’t spend extra, you can quickly bump up your credit score.

Hire a Credit Repair Company

For people with a lot of negative items on their credit reports, a credit repair agency may be helpful in disputing those items and getting them removed altogether. Check out our reviews of the leading credit repair companies.

Credit scores are often categorized into five different ranges, from bad to excellent. If you can increase your credit score enough to boost yourself into the next category, you could automatically qualify for better refinance rates.

Don’t give up on your goal of refinancing your mortgage. There’s always room for improvement which means there’s always a way to get a better rate — even if it takes a bit of time.

Source: crediful.com