11 Steps to Avoid Burnout When Paying off Debt

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The key to avoiding burnout while paying off debt is to reinvigorate your motivation. Here are 11 ways you can stay motivated and energized to avoid burnout when paying off debt.

1. Work With Purpose

The first step to any journey is identifying the destination. It’s no different in becoming debt free. But debt freedom isn’t the destination. It’s an essential stop along the way, but understanding that there’s life after debt is imperative to making it out of debt and staying there.

What’s your purpose for getting out of debt? Ours is to have career and lifestyle freedom. We want to be able to quit or be let go from our jobs and have savings to hold us over until we find something else or create our own career.

When the struggle is real it’s this purpose that will grab you from your whiney tower and pull you back down to reality.

2. Use Time Management Hacks

Do you feel like you need more hours in the day? Maybe you just need better management of those hours.

There are productivity methods you can use to be more efficient and avoid burnout. I’ve been really interested in the Pomodoro method of breaking tasks into 25-minute chunks with 5-minute breaks. Lots of freelancers swear by it.

Start with the tasks you have, do those more efficiently and see if extra time to rest doesn’t pop up right when you need it.

3. Eliminate Tasks

Maybe with the best productivity hacks, you still can’t fit it all in. Between multiple jobs, family, friends, errands, keeping a semi-clean house, cooking, etc, etc, etc; you can’t do everything.

If your time is worth more working than doing simple tasks then you can afford to delegate rather than work less. You can hire someone to clean your house, have your groceries delivered, or buy the precut veggies.

Prioritize the tasks that get you closer to your goal and eliminate the ones that don’t.

4. Give

Giving time or money can feel like you’re connecting to the world even in your gazelle-intense bubble. We do it by volunteering and giving to our church but there’s no shortage of options for you to sacrifice a little to make a big difference in others lives.

I also think giving of your experience is helpful. It’s cathartic, reminds me what I’ve accomplished and helps others learn how to live through my story. You can do it through Facebook, Instagram, or by starting a blog.

I’m obviously an advocate for sharing stories through a blog. The number of people you can reach is huge. It’s also a way to pad your income and lay a foundation for establishing career freedom. You can read my how-to on starting and monetizing a blog here.

5. Exercise

I use exercise to break up the monotony of my day. When I was working three very inactive jobs exercising was the outlet where I could make the stank face I wanted to make all day and no one would ask me what was wrong.

And I don’t need to remind you of the physical benefits exercising has on improving energy, sleep, and motivation — but clearly I will.

I pay big bucks for Crossfit because the community and direction are invaluable to me. But there are plenty of ways to work out for free or cheap if it’s not as high on your priority list.

6. Celebrate Wins

Every time we pay off a loan we have a little celebration. Sometimes it’s as small as texting a ton of emojis back and forth and sometimes it’s having a meal out.

More than once my disdain for cooking has motivated me to put a little extra on a loan to clear it up and go out for dinner. Having fun times to look forward to keeps us motivated and has ultimately helped us get where we are quicker.

7. Stop Being a Perfectionist

Perfectionism is the enemy of progress. Relinquish the need to have a perfect budget, perfect income, or perfect life circumstances.

Emergencies will come up, weaknesses will win, and income may fluctuate but if you drive yourself crazy over every setback you’ll never win!

Embrace the mistakes and “Murphies” and you’ll have a much better time getting through this thing.

8. Track Progress

In our apartment we had a thermometer we’d color in when whenever we made a payment. It got lost in our recent move (RIP thermometer).

People have come up with really cool ways to visually track their debt progress. You can check them out here where I also have a downloadable thermometer pdf you can print off and color yourself!

9. Share Your Successes

I have a friend living 1200 miles away from me who texts me whenever she pays off a debt or makes a substantially good money decision. It allows me to encourage her by telling her how proud I am of her, how great she’s doing and I send lots of bitmojis.

Travis and I do this too. When we do well with money we lift each other up and encourage each other in our strengths.

Hearing from someone else that you’re doing well isn’t fishing for compliments, it’s reassurance that you’re making it! Find someone you can share with. This is really easy with a spouse but a supportive friend works just as well.

10. Keep Good Company

Having friends that are also paying off debt or are supportive of you doing it is clutch. Saying no to spending money can be isolating. Having friends who want to hang out at home or at parks instead of bars and restaurants make the weekends much easier.

Some people don’t care about their financial future right now. It doesn’t make them bad people or even irresponsible.

I repeat: It doesn’t make them bad people or irresponsible.

But you’re in a different place than they are and you need to keep company that’s on the same page or you’ll keep spending and spending because saying no every week is near impossible.

11. Be Real

Don’t be fakin it. If you’re behind on your debt snowball don’t pretend you’re doing fine.

The more you lie about your progress the more backed up you’ll feel which could lead to giving up. When you’re honest with yourself and the people around you, you’ll stay committed to the process and help more people with your story.

I hope these steps will help you avoid burnout and stay committed to this process, because it is worth every sacrifice and every no that comes out of your mouth. And I’ll be here every step of the way to see you through it.

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avoid burnout when paying off debt

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avoid burnout when paying off debt

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Tips to help you payoff a ton of debt without burning out. Tips and tricks from a woman who paid off over $78,000 in under 2 years on average salaries. #debtpayofftips #debtpayoffmotivation #budgetingtips #budgetinghacks #moneytipsformillennials

” data-medium-file=”https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/MF-11-Tips-to-Avoid-Burnout-While-Trying-to-Payoff-a-Ton-of-Debt.jpg?fit=200%2C300&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/MF-11-Tips-to-Avoid-Burnout-While-Trying-to-Payoff-a-Ton-of-Debt.jpg?fit=400%2C600&ssl=1″ loading=”lazy” width=”400″ height=”600″ data-pin-title=”Got a ton of debt to payoff?” data-pin-description=”Tips to help you payoff a ton of debt without burning out. Tips and tricks from a woman who paid off over $78,000 in under 2 years on average salaries. #debtpayofftips #debtpayoffmotivation #budgetingtips #budgetinghacks #moneytipsformillennials” src=”http://www.hanovermortgages.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/11-steps-to-avoid-burnout-when-paying-off-debt.jpg” alt class=”wp-image-4790″ srcset=”http://www.hanovermortgages.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/11-steps-to-avoid-burnout-when-paying-off-debt.jpg 400w, https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/MF-11-Tips-to-Avoid-Burnout-While-Trying-to-Payoff-a-Ton-of-Debt.jpg?resize=200%2C300&ssl=1 200w, https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/MF-11-Tips-to-Avoid-Burnout-While-Trying-to-Payoff-a-Ton-of-Debt.jpg?w=735&ssl=1 735w” sizes=”(max-width: 400px) 100vw, 400px” data-recalc-dims=”1″>

Jen Smith is a personal finance expert, founder of Modern Frugality and co-host of the Frugal Friends Podcast. Her work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Lifehacker, Money Magazine, U.S. News and World Report, Business Insider, and more. She’s passionate about helping people gain control of their spending.

Source: modernfrugality.com

How to Make the Leap From Side Hustle to Full-Time Dream Job

Learn real tips from real side hustlers who are now thriving full time.

For Michelle Schroeder-Gardner it all began with a blog. When she started Making Sense of Cents in 2011, a chronicle of her journey paying off $38,000 in student loans, it was a fun way to make money on the side while maintaining her full-time job as a financial analyst. Fast forward two years and she’s left her day job to focus on the blog exclusively. Fast forward another five years and she’s earning more than $1 million annually from her site.

If you too are looking to turn your side hustle into a full-time job, experiences like Schroeder-Gardner’s prove that just about anything is possible. And you’re not alone. Nation1099, an online resource for freelancers, published a 2018 report to summarize data from various career studies and concluded that approximately 11 percent of the working adult population in the U.S. is working primarily as full-time independent contractors in the gig economy. Gig workers, also known as on-demand workers, function with a non-standard work arrangement and without a long-term employment contract.

Some, like Schroeder-Gardner, have ditched a traditional lifestyle and are working while on the go and whenever they’re most productive (she travels around the world in an RV and sailboat and writes when motivation strikes). Others are logging full-time hours at home or in a coworking office space.

With a thriving gig economy, it could be the right time to turn your side hustle into a full-time job.

Although figuring out how to turn your side hustle into your dream job requires hard work, with patience and persistence, you can succeed.

Learn from the experts themselves and consider these steps for turning your side hustle into a successful business:

Educate yourself

The first step for turning your side hustle into a successful business is building the right skill set so you can stand out in your field. Research industry best practices and in-demand skills, speak to successful professionals and read about others who’ve made the leap from side hustle to full-time job.

The first steps for turning your side hustle into a successful business are doing your research and developing skills to make yourself stand out.

When Jill DeConti, founder of the blog The Luxe Travelers, decided to leave her finance job to devote all of her time to her side hustle as a travel blogger, she knew that knowledge would be instrumental to her success.

“I began researching, reading books, soaking in knowledge,” DeConti says, adding that she also focused on learning marketing best practices and how to generate revenue from her blog.

Reading about the steps for turning your side hustle into a successful business proved useful to DeConti not just for the practical tips she gleaned, but for motivation as well.

“This made me realize that my dreams were actually possible,” she says, “and made me feel less alone in pursuing them.”

“Even though I was earning a good income from my side gig before I turned it into my full-time career, I was terrified to leave my day job.”

– Michelle Schroeder-Gardner, founder of the blog Making Sense of Cents

Take baby steps

Schroeder-Gardner says one of the most challenging parts of turning your side hustle into a full-time job is building a business framework and believing in it.

“Even though I was earning a good income from my side gig before I turned it into my full-time career,” she says, “I was terrified to leave my day job.”

Growing her gig on the side to make sure that it actually worked—and would generate income—helped her gain confidence while she still had the security of her day job’s salary. When she was ready to make her side hustle full time, she knew the framework for a blog that could make money from affiliate marketing was already in place.

“I knew it was time when I was earning enough from my blog to live off of,” Schroeder-Gardner says. “I was earning around $5,000 to $10,000 a month from my side hustle at that time.”

Build an emergency fund

If you’re thinking about how to turn your side hustle into your dream job, be prepared for business—and earnings—to not go exactly as planned.

“Build an emergency fund,” Schroeder-Gardner says. “This way, when you turn your side gig into your dream job, you’ll have money set aside in case you have a not-so-good month.”

Sunny skies are the right time to save for a rainy day.

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You could also dip into your emergency fund to help manage daily expenses and pay your bills while you turn your side hustle into a full-time job. It may also come in handy if you need to finance upfront business costs (new equipment or office supplies, anyone?).

Outside of work, an emergency fund can provide a cushion for other expenses that may not be baked into your budget (think a trip to the doctor’s office or a home repair that came out of nowhere).

As you work on creating an emergency fund as a step for turning your side hustle into a successful business, note that most experts agree that it should include at least six months to a year of expenses.

If you're wondering how to turn your side hustle into your dream job, you'll need an emergency fund to help protect yourself financially.

Invest extra time upfront

You may find that it takes a lot of time to turn your side hustle into a full-time job. There’s networking, promoting your business and accepting new opportunities to build your portfolio—and that’s likely on top of your already packed schedule.

If you’re wondering how to turn your side hustle into your dream job, you may need to carve out time after regular working hours. That was the case for DeConti, whose day job kept her occupied from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In order to get her name out there as she built her travel blog, she looked for freelance social media jobs and worked on her own blog “after work and late into the night and on weekends,” she says.

Putting in the time upfront really paid off. These days DeConti can make her own schedule and work remotely, which is key for someone who has made a career out of her passion for travel.

“I’ve been able to travel to Bali for an extended period of time, spend a month traveling around the Greek islands, swim in the cenotes in Mexico, chase waterfalls around Iceland, eat the best pizza I’ve ever had in Italy, take a camper van around beautiful New Zealand,” she says. “As long as I have my laptop with me, I’m good to go.”

Join the side hustlers who have gone full time

If you’re contemplating how to turn your side hustle into your dream job, take comfort in knowing that you’re in good company. Others are now living their dreams, and you can too with some careful planning and confidence.

So, what are you waiting for?

Source: discover.com

To Spend, or to Cut? 4 Questions to Help You Avoid Unnecessary Expenses

Consider your material and emotional values to decide which expenses belong in your budget.

It’s a universal truth: For most people, budgets only have room for so much. Juggling the cost of that summer vacation you’ve been taking for 10 years with the pressing need to help pay your child’s college tuition, actually use your pricey gym membership or fix your faulty water heater is no easy feat. Sometimes, something’s got to give. But how do you decide which expenditures are worth making and which ones you should cut?

Eliminating unnecessary expenses may depend on your personal priorities.

Figuring out when to spend and when to cut—and how to avoid unnecessary expenses—depends on your personal priorities. But the following four questions will help you weigh each spending decision and choose the best option for you:

1. Is it more than you need?

During a recent family budget meeting at Rosemarie Groner’s house, the hot topic was … wait for it … paper towels. Every week the personal finance blogger’s family sits down to review how they can reduce unnecessary expenses. When their giant pile of paper towels came under scrutiny, Groner, whose blog is called The Busy Budgeter, admits they were skeptical of the wisdom and sanitation of reducing their use of paper towels. They worried about the risk of spreading salmonella and other germs, for one thing.

cut back in other areas to reduce unnecessary expenses. Travel provides the opportunity to explore different places and cultures, experience personal growth and reflection and create long-lasting memories with loved ones—all worthy outcomes.

Let’s say it’s not travel you’re pondering in your quest to avoid unnecessary expenses, but the generous line item in your budget for events like concerts, plays or museum visits. Can these things get expensive? Sure. But you may decide that the enrichment of the arts is valuable enough to continue this spending.

Investing in your education can pay off in the long run, so don't assume it's a cost you can cut to avoid unnecessary expenses.

Likewise, an investment in your education—earning a degree or taking a few classes to boost your credentials and increase your earning potential—might also be a worthwhile expenditure. In 2016, for example, the median weekly earnings for workers with a master’s degree were $1,380, compared to $1,156 for those whose education topped out with a bachelor’s degree, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics—a difference of more than 19 percent. Professional degree earners had a nearly 51 percent pay advantage over those at the bachelor’s level.

3. When’s the last time you used it?

While some experiences are special enough that you wouldn’t want to miss out on them, there might be others you rarely use even though you’re continuing to pay for them. When eliminating unnecessary expenses, watch out for automatically renewable charges on gym memberships, magazine subscriptions and retail subscription services (including for fashion, cosmetics and food preparation kits) that continue even when you no longer want them.

Ditching a gym membership you don't use is one way to reduce unnecessary expenses.

That’s a favorite hack for eliminating unnecessary expenses from Sami Cone, a Nashville-based speaker, author and finance blogger. Cone, who discusses money-saving tips on her website and hosts a radio show called Family Money Minute, recommends putting a reminder on your calendar at either the beginning or end of each month to check your statements for expendable services and subscriptions.

Similar to those subscriptions you haven’t used in ages, are there items you purchase by habit that you or your family no longer want or need? A useful way to avoid unnecessary expenses is to take your spending off autopilot. Possible signs you need to do this stat include: You’re paying for music and dance lessons your children skip more often than they attend; you buy extra phone and data services you never use or premium cable channels you never watch; you’re frequently replacing dietary supplements and cooking spices that have lingered on the shelves past their expiration dates.

4. Will you save later by spending now?

Sometimes the best way to reduce unnecessary expenses in the long run is to invest in what seems like a big expenditure now. Upgrading your home’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning system to a more energy-efficient model, for example, might be a smart way to splurge because it can save you money on your utility bills. According to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Star program, replacing a central AC unit that is more than 12 years old with an Energy Star-certified AC unit could trim your cooling bill by 30 percent.

Another example of a major expenditure that can pay off later is investing in quality home furnishings instead of choosing bargain goods. The higher-end products may save you more in the long run because they are often more durable so you won’t have to replace them as soon. Making healthier, if more expensive, food choices now can also potentially help you avoid medical costs related to illnesses like diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.

Stay motivated to reduce unnecessary expenses

Having a specific financial goal in mind when you set your spending priorities is an important source of motivation when you’re trying to avoid unnecessary expenses. Groner says her family is now out of debt after paying off more than $30,000 from credit cards and car loans with the help of their frugal spending habits.

Stay motivated by keeping track of how far you've come since you first started eliminating unnecessary expenses.

“In the beginning, when we were first trying to reduce our expenses, the reward was the relief to sleep at night without worrying about living paycheck to paycheck,” Groner says. “We kept going even after we left the paycheck-to-paycheck cycle because then budgeting became fun. It wasn’t about deprivation anymore. It was about laying out a path to get whatever we want in life.”

Cone, whose family used plans for a Disney vacation as an incentive to reduce unnecessary expenses, says it’s important to choose an objective that everyone in the family can get excited about. That way, when eliminating unnecessary expenses starts to pinch, you can remind them: “We’re saying ‘no’ now, so we can say ‘yes’ later,” she says.

Source: discover.com

5 Cyber-Security Myths We Need to Ditch

Pick a subject, any subject, and there are myths and pure nonsense that someone will buy into.

  • Birds will die if they eat the uncooked rice flung at newlyweds. (Nope)
  • If you eat Mentos and drink Diet Coke simultaneously your stomach will explode. (Hardly)
  • You only have one credit score. (Wrong)
  • Napoleon was short. (At 5’ 6”, his height was average in his day).
  • “President Obama was the founder of ISIS.” (Oh, come on Donald!)

Cyber-security has its own set of misconceptions as well. Here are five.

1. Software Will Protect You

Say it with me now: “Software alone is not going to stop cyber-crime, even a little.”

There is no more harmful notion than the one that leads people into doing whatever they want on their computers or smartphones because they downloaded a software update. While software has its benefits, they often have to do with containing damage, not stopping an attack.

The false sense of security fostered by the idea that software can protect anyone from the kinds of daily mutating, highly sophisticated attacks out there today is dangerous.

  • I just watched a documentary on the dark web, and I will never feel safe using my credit card again!

  • Luckily I don’t have to worry about that. I have ExtraCredit, so I get $1,000,000 ID protection and dark web scans.

  • I need that peace of mind in my life. What else do you get with ExtraCredit?

  • It’s basically everything my credit needs. I get 28 FICO® scores, rent and utility reporting, cash rewards and even a discount to one of the leaders in credit repair.

  • It’s settled; I’m getting ExtraCredit tonight. Totally unrelated, but any suggestions for my new fear of sharks? I watched that documentary too.

  • …we live in Oklahoma.

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2. Cyber-Crime Is Mostly About Credit Card Fraud

The idea that cyber-crime is just about credit card fraud is a pernicious misconception that, ironically, can lead to credit card fraud and other forms of credit-related crimes.

There is no right answer to the question regarding the most prevalent forms of cyber-crime. But by far the majority of the capers out there are focused on grabbing colossal amounts of personal identifying information from organizations that do business with millions of people or, alternately, stealing confidential business information that can be sold to the highest-bidding competitor. Sure, there are other forms of attack, some of them very much on the rise, such as ransomware schemes, but by and large the focus among cyber-criminals is on sellable information and making a lot more money than can be had from a credit pump-and-dump.

That said, the ways that stolen information can be used leads back to consumers and can very easily result in credit fraud, since stolen data can be easily purchased by identity thieves for next to nothing on the dark web.

3. Cyber-Crime Is Only About Making a Buck

If cyber-crime were only about making money, we’d all be a lot safer than we are right now.

Let that sink in.

Make no mistake, there are hordes of hackers out there driven by ideology. Many are far less interested in making money than in making money disappear or taking down the electrical grid or rigging an election. For them, mere monetary reward is not a motivation unless it is needed to facilitate an attack.

This is the stuff of nightmares and blockbuster Hollywood films, and there isn’t a thing most of us can do to stop any of it from happening.

In a world where the Stuxnet worm that was used to attack Iran’s nuclear program is quaint technology and detonating a hydrogen bomb would inflict less casualties than a cyber-attack that shuts off the power grid, having our credit ruined by a pajama-wearing identity thief is the least of our worries.

4. Cyber-Criminals Don’t Target Small Businesses

The myth that cyber-criminals don’t focus on businesses that aren’t at the top of the food chain can be debunked with one name: Target. The company was hacked by one remove. The criminals managed to get malware on a far-flung point-of-sale system by coming in the side door. They merely had to compromise a smaller HVAC vendor.

No matter how small the enterprise, it must have serious security protocols and a meaningful cyber-defense plan, lest it suffer an extinction-level event and potentially bring down a whole lot of other folks with it.

5. There Is No Way to Stop a Cyber-Attack

This is the biggest myth out there, in my opinion. Except, of course, that in the final analysis it is true: There is no way to stop every single cyber-attack.

That said, for many attacks, PEBCAK is the answer. Unfamiliar with this approach? It’s an oldie but goodie that anyone in IT will recognize, the letters forming an acronym that neatly states why countless attacks are successful. PEBCAK stands for Problem Exists Between Chair and Keyboard.

While it is true that cyber-threats abound, the only way to contain the pandemic and meaningfully push back is if everybody does what they are supposed to do. That is a big “if.” But one can hope, and while fixing the human problem is a Herculean task, it’s a worthy goal.

If you’re concerned you’ve been a victim of identity theft, it’s important to keep an eye on your credit as new accounts in your name or a sudden drop in credit scores indicate fraud has occurred. You can view two of your free credit scores, updated monthly, by visiting Credit.com.

This story is an Op/Ed contribution to Credit.com and does not necessarily represent the views of the company or its partners.

Image: PeopleImages

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Source: credit.com

This Fab Beverly Hills Home is the Epitome of Modern Cali Living, and It Can Be Yours for $10M

If you’ve ever dreamed of sharing a zip code with your favorite music and movie stars, this is your chance to make that dream come true. There’s a fabulous home for sale in Beverly Hills that embodies all the glamour and luxury of Hollywood, and it comes with a $9,995,000 price tag (and a 90210 address).

The home itself is no stranger to celebrities; past news reports identify the owner as media exec Andy Schuon, who co-founded music-focused cable network Revolt Media & TV alongside hip-hop artist and entrepreneur Sean “Diddy” Combs.

The fabulous property, featured in the LA Times as their Home of the Week, has four bedrooms, five bathrooms, and comes with a long list of cool amenities. One of them is the fact that Elton John lives nearby, so you’ll be in good company should you move here. But this property has a lot more to offer other than just proximity to your favorite celebrities. 

Luxury home for sale in Beverly Hills, CA. Image credit: Adrian Van Anz / Douglas Elliman

The 5,300-square-foot home lies on a massive, 20,711-square-foot lot, and it was carefully built to make the most of the sweeping ocean and city views. The effort has definitely paid off, as the views are simply breathtaking. 

The 1961-built home sits on its very own promontory, which covers nearly half an acre, and is decked out with state-of-the-art amenities inside and out — some likely hand-picked by the media executive himself, particularly on the tech side of things.

The house has 42 custom Fleetwood doors and windows, and comes with a plethora of smart home technologies. These include property-wide audio, video, and lighting systems; a hospital-grade HEPA and UV air purification system; a three-car garage with two electric car rapid charges; drought-tolerant landscaping; and solar-powered electricity throughout. 

Besides the ultra-modern smart home features, this Beverly Hills abode also comes with a long list of classic luxurious amenities. There’s a gourmet eat-in kitchen with marble countertops, Thermador appliances, and a large island that flows into the living room. Here, you’ll find natural colors, beautiful high ceilings, and a cozy fireplace to snuggle up to on cold nights. 

Luxury home for sale in Beverly Hills, CA. Image credit: Adrian Van Anz / Douglas Elliman
Luxury home for sale in Beverly Hills, CA. Image credit: Adrian Van Anz / Douglas Elliman
Luxury home for sale in Beverly Hills, CA. Image credit: Adrian Van Anz / Douglas Elliman

The kitchen, living room and dining room boast floor-to-ceiling glass windows that open to the gorgeous backyard. Here, you’ll find an outdoor dining area, a beautiful lounge area, and an infinity pool. It’s basically the perfect place to spend summer evenings, either relaxing with family or entertaining guests. 

Luxury home for sale in Beverly Hills, CA. Image credit: Adrian Van Anz / Douglas Elliman
Luxury home for sale in Beverly Hills, CA. Image credit: Adrian Van Anz / Douglas Elliman

The master bedroom features new hardwood floors, a home office, spacious dual closets, as well as a home gym with glass walls overlooking the city and ocean (which sounds like the perfect motivation to finally start working out).

Luxury home for sale in Beverly Hills, CA. Image credit: Adrian Van Anz / Douglas Elliman
Luxury home for sale in Beverly Hills, CA. Image credit: Adrian Van Anz / Douglas Elliman

All of the four bedrooms inside this Beverly Hills home are en-suite, and feature marble baths with Waterworks faucets and fittings. There’s also a library with a bar, a den, and a family room. 

Everything has been carefully thought out both inside and outside this home. Each room is impeccable from an interior design standpoint, boasting a fresh, modern, yet timeless decor. The spaces are airy and flooded with natural light, and the views are magnificent from all angles. 

The property is listed with Juliette Hohnen of Douglas Elliman Real Estate.

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Source: fancypantshomes.com