Listing Photos: Your Home’s First Showing

A picture is worth a thousand words, and could be worth thousands of dollars when it comes to attracting the right buyers to your home.

Let’s face it, buyers form their first impression of your home based on the online listing. As they say, Web appeal is the new curb appeal.

If you are serious about selling your home, you have to take your listing photo shoot very seriously. If your photos don’t excite buyers, they may not step foot inside.

You should prepare for your photo shoot as much as you would for an open house or private showing. Work alongside an excellent local real estate agent, and follow these tips to make sure your home looks its best.

Never list your home online without photos

Today’s buyers get email and text alerts when a new home that matches their criteria hits the market. There is nothing more frustrating than to see the desired address come across as an alert, only for the listing to be incomplete.

Buyers (and agents) will punish you for jumping the gun. Will they go back later and look again, once you have the photos up? Maybe — but maybe not.

You’re adding an extra step for them, and it comes across like you don’t have your ducks in a row. That’s not a great way to start out with your future customer.

Clean, declutter, organize and remove

You should spend a good amount of time preparing for your photo shoot. This means that you fluff the pillows, put toilet seats down, put Fido’s bowl and toys away, and ensure the home is in impeccable condition.

People can zoom in, zoom out and play with photos in online listings. They’ll notice everything. If your photos don’t show your home well, it sends a message to the buyer that you don’t care, and that you are not a serious seller.

The buyer is your customer. You have a product for sale. Take the time to present it in the best possible light.

Poor photos won’t cut it

Images that are blurry, poorly lit, or distorted are not going to sell your home.

It’s a good idea to hire a professional photographer who will take high-resolution photos, and even bring extra lighting or equipment to enhance their work. They’ll also take dozens of pictures and work tirelessly to show your home in the right light and from the best angles.

Don’t skimp on the number of photos

When it comes to photos, the more, the merrier. You want to make it easy on buyers to get comfortable with and learn more about your home.

Not only are the listing photos their initial impression, but they serve to help orient the buyer after the first or second showing. Once they have been through the home in person, they are better able to relate to the floor plan and how it flows. Going back to the listing photos allows them to make connections and dig deeper. Encourage them to do so by posting plenty of photos.

Ready to put your home on the market? Check out our Home Sellers Guide for more tips and resources.

Related:

Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Zillow.

Originally published February 2, 2016.

Source: zillow.com

Price Premium for Trump Condos Down Since the 2016 Election

December 13, 2019 October 6, 2020 by Dana Anderson

Updated on October 6th, 2020

Real estate agents are less likely to mention “Trump” in online listing descriptions.
In the three years since Donald Trump won the presidential election, the typical “Trump” branded condo sold for an estimated $729,000 nationwide (excluding New York City, where data was unavailable). That’s 20% more than the typical sale price for comparable luxury condos, but down from the 28% price premium Trump-branded condos fetched in the three years preceding the election. The price premium dropped the year after the election and has held steady since.
Luxury condos in the 10 zip codes tracked by Redfin where Trump buildings are located sold for less in the post-election period (November 2016 through mid-November 2019) than before the election (January 2014 through October 2016). The typical sale price for a Trump-branded condo dropped 16% post-election, while comparable luxury condos sold for 10.5% less after the election.
That’s from a Redfin analysis of Trump-branded and comparable luxury condos in the U.S. except New York City, where multiple-listing data was unavailable for transactions of Trump properties. The research compared the properties by sale price, price per square foot and time spent on market, with results controlled for features such as location, size, views and number of bedrooms and bathrooms. The analysis includes sales of Trump-branded condos and other luxury units in cities with Trump properties including Hollywood Beach, FL; Sunny Isles Beach, FL; Honolulu; Chicago; Jersey City, NJ; Stamford, CT; Las Vegas; New Rochelle, NY; Shrub Oak, NY and White Plains, NY

Housing market data for Trump condos and comparable luxury condos, before and after the 2016 presidential election  
Pre-election (Jan. 2014 – Oct. 2016) Post-election (Nov. 2016 – Nov. 2019)
Median sale price of Trump condos $868,750 $729,000
Median sale price of comparable luxury condos $760,000 $680,000
Average price premium (%) for Trump condos 28.1% 20.4%
Median price per square foot for Trump condos $713 $606
Average price-per-square-foot premium (%) for Trump condos 18.6% 8%
Median days on market for Trump condos 95 (versus 67 for non-Trump condos) 86 (versus 57 for non-Trump condos)
Total Trump condos sold 532 542

While the data suggests sellers can still expect to fetch a higher price for a condo in a Trump building than other luxury units, in some areas, the political landscape may work to buyers’ advantage.
“The Trump brand has taken a hit in urban, Democrat-leaning towns like Chicago,” said Daniel Close, a Chicago Redfin agent. “I helped a buyer purchase a one-bedroom condo in Trump Tower last December. It was originally listed for $1.5 million and the price had dropped to $1.29 million by the time we looked at it three months later. We negotiated the price down about $15,000 and the seller threw in $100,000 worth of furnishings and a parking spot originally listed for $70,000.”
“I’ve frequently seen sellers take net losses on homes in Trump Tower. Smaller units especially have not appreciated well over the last few years,” Close continued. “Larger multi-million-dollar units that attract more affluent buyers do tend to fare better.”

Condos listed in Trump-branded buildings are less likely to mention the name “Trump” in 2019 than pre-election

Sixty-five percent of condos listed for sale in Trump-branded buildings mentioned the name “Trump” in online listing descriptions from January through mid-November 2019, down from a high of 81% in 2015, the year before he was elected president. 
Share of online listing descriptions that mention Trump name

Share of online listing descriptions that mention Trump name
“It’s not surprising that sellers and their agents are less likely to identify a home with Trump now that he’s president, as that could limit their buyer pool,” said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. “Marketing to just one side of the aisle—even if it’s just mentioning a politician’s name—could mean half as many potential buyers see a home.”

Methodology

Pre-election data includes sales from January 2014 through the end of October 2016, and post-election data includes sales from November 2016 through November 14, 2019. We found Trump-branded buildings from the real estate portfolio listed here. We then searched condo listings for the applicable dates for addresses listed in the portfolio, excluding the Manhattan properties. There were roughly 530 condo sales in the pre-election period and 540 in the post-election period.
For the non-Trump condo sales, we first found all condo sales in the same zip codes as Trump-branded properties. Within each zip code, the sample of sales was limited to the top tercile of price per square foot in order to compare Trump property condos with comparable luxury properties. About 200 total sales in Trump-branded condos were excluded from the analysis because they were not in the top tercile of price per square foot in their respective zip codes. To calculate the percent premiums, we used a linear regression model to compare sale prices, price per square foot and time spent on the market of Trump condos to comparable non-Trump luxury condos. The results control for many condo features including location, size, views, number of bedrooms and bathrooms, whether the home is on the waterfront, month of sale and whether the home is newly built. 
For the analysis of marketing remarks, we used data from real estate multiple listings services to examine condo listings from January 2014 through November 14, 2019. We pulled the listing descriptions for every property listed in a building owned by Donald Trump, then searched for mentions of “Trump” within each description. After excluding listings with no description, we counted the number of listings containing at least one mention of “Trump” and divided that by the total listings sold that year. Redfin’s analysis of marketing remarks includes sales in Hollywood Beach, FL; Sunny Isles Beach, FL; Honolulu, HI; Chicago, IL; Jersey City, NJ; Stamford, CT; Las Vegas, NV; New Rochelle, NY; Shrub Oak, NY and White Plains, NY. Multiple-listing data was unavailable for transactions of Trump properties in Manhattan, Stamford, CT and outside of the U.S.

Source: redfin.com

Price Premium for Trump Condos Down Since the 2016 Election

December 13, 2019 October 6, 2020 by Dana Anderson

Updated on October 6th, 2020

Real estate agents are less likely to mention “Trump” in online listing descriptions.
In the three years since Donald Trump won the presidential election, the typical “Trump” branded condo sold for an estimated $729,000 nationwide (excluding New York City, where data was unavailable). That’s 20% more than the typical sale price for comparable luxury condos, but down from the 28% price premium Trump-branded condos fetched in the three years preceding the election. The price premium dropped the year after the election and has held steady since.
Luxury condos in the 10 zip codes tracked by Redfin where Trump buildings are located sold for less in the post-election period (November 2016 through mid-November 2019) than before the election (January 2014 through October 2016). The typical sale price for a Trump-branded condo dropped 16% post-election, while comparable luxury condos sold for 10.5% less after the election.
That’s from a Redfin analysis of Trump-branded and comparable luxury condos in the U.S. except New York City, where multiple-listing data was unavailable for transactions of Trump properties. The research compared the properties by sale price, price per square foot and time spent on market, with results controlled for features such as location, size, views and number of bedrooms and bathrooms. The analysis includes sales of Trump-branded condos and other luxury units in cities with Trump properties including Hollywood Beach, FL; Sunny Isles Beach, FL; Honolulu; Chicago; Jersey City, NJ; Stamford, CT; Las Vegas; New Rochelle, NY; Shrub Oak, NY and White Plains, NY

Housing market data for Trump condos and comparable luxury condos, before and after the 2016 presidential election  
Pre-election (Jan. 2014 – Oct. 2016) Post-election (Nov. 2016 – Nov. 2019)
Median sale price of Trump condos $868,750 $729,000
Median sale price of comparable luxury condos $760,000 $680,000
Average price premium (%) for Trump condos 28.1% 20.4%
Median price per square foot for Trump condos $713 $606
Average price-per-square-foot premium (%) for Trump condos 18.6% 8%
Median days on market for Trump condos 95 (versus 67 for non-Trump condos) 86 (versus 57 for non-Trump condos)
Total Trump condos sold 532 542

While the data suggests sellers can still expect to fetch a higher price for a condo in a Trump building than other luxury units, in some areas, the political landscape may work to buyers’ advantage.
“The Trump brand has taken a hit in urban, Democrat-leaning towns like Chicago,” said Daniel Close, a Chicago Redfin agent. “I helped a buyer purchase a one-bedroom condo in Trump Tower last December. It was originally listed for $1.5 million and the price had dropped to $1.29 million by the time we looked at it three months later. We negotiated the price down about $15,000 and the seller threw in $100,000 worth of furnishings and a parking spot originally listed for $70,000.”
“I’ve frequently seen sellers take net losses on homes in Trump Tower. Smaller units especially have not appreciated well over the last few years,” Close continued. “Larger multi-million-dollar units that attract more affluent buyers do tend to fare better.”

Condos listed in Trump-branded buildings are less likely to mention the name “Trump” in 2019 than pre-election

Sixty-five percent of condos listed for sale in Trump-branded buildings mentioned the name “Trump” in online listing descriptions from January through mid-November 2019, down from a high of 81% in 2015, the year before he was elected president. 
Share of online listing descriptions that mention Trump name

Share of online listing descriptions that mention Trump name
“It’s not surprising that sellers and their agents are less likely to identify a home with Trump now that he’s president, as that could limit their buyer pool,” said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. “Marketing to just one side of the aisle—even if it’s just mentioning a politician’s name—could mean half as many potential buyers see a home.”

Methodology

Pre-election data includes sales from January 2014 through the end of October 2016, and post-election data includes sales from November 2016 through November 14, 2019. We found Trump-branded buildings from the real estate portfolio listed here. We then searched condo listings for the applicable dates for addresses listed in the portfolio, excluding the Manhattan properties. There were roughly 530 condo sales in the pre-election period and 540 in the post-election period.
For the non-Trump condo sales, we first found all condo sales in the same zip codes as Trump-branded properties. Within each zip code, the sample of sales was limited to the top tercile of price per square foot in order to compare Trump property condos with comparable luxury properties. About 200 total sales in Trump-branded condos were excluded from the analysis because they were not in the top tercile of price per square foot in their respective zip codes. To calculate the percent premiums, we used a linear regression model to compare sale prices, price per square foot and time spent on the market of Trump condos to comparable non-Trump luxury condos. The results control for many condo features including location, size, views, number of bedrooms and bathrooms, whether the home is on the waterfront, month of sale and whether the home is newly built. 
For the analysis of marketing remarks, we used data from real estate multiple listings services to examine condo listings from January 2014 through November 14, 2019. We pulled the listing descriptions for every property listed in a building owned by Donald Trump, then searched for mentions of “Trump” within each description. After excluding listings with no description, we counted the number of listings containing at least one mention of “Trump” and divided that by the total listings sold that year. Redfin’s analysis of marketing remarks includes sales in Hollywood Beach, FL; Sunny Isles Beach, FL; Honolulu, HI; Chicago, IL; Jersey City, NJ; Stamford, CT; Las Vegas, NV; New Rochelle, NY; Shrub Oak, NY and White Plains, NY. Multiple-listing data was unavailable for transactions of Trump properties in Manhattan, Stamford, CT and outside of the U.S.

Source: redfin.com

We Bought a House Sight Unseen—and It Turned Out To Be a Total Nightmare

I thought I was up to the challenge of a long-distance home purchase during a pandemic. After all, I was moving back to my hometown after only three years away. I knew the area. Family members could fill in the rest. I had a trusted real estate agent from my last house purchase. Plus, I look at real estate listings as a hobby even when I’m not in the market for new property. What could go wrong?

But after purchasing a midcentury modern ranch sight unseen and trekking 1,800 miles across the country to finally get an in-person look at it, my husband and I couldn’t be more shocked.

The front of the house.
The front of the house.

Wendy Schuchart

There were so many shoddy details that hadn’t translated through video and photos. The ceilings were lower and the rooms were narrower than they seemed in photos. The countertops that had looked like granite in photos were actually laminate. Every single counter and bathroom fixture was customized for a short person. After seeing broken fixtures and a layer of grime over everything, it was clear that I would have to cure decades of bad maintenance.

Grime discovered in the kitchen on move-in day.
Grime discovered in the kitchen on move-in day.

Wendy Schuchart

And then there was the constant noise pollution from the nearby interstate. Our ground team thought the sound was minimal, but a month after we moved in, the surrounding trees dropped their leaves and the dull murmur grew to a roar heard through closed windows.

So what were our mistakes?

Don’t depend on listing photos

In general, experts agree that buying a home without setting foot in it can be a dicey proposition at best and a nightmare at worst. And online listing photos, while helpful in narrowing down your property search, won’t give you the full picture of a house’s condition.

“I’ve visited homes only to discover that the yard is steeper than it looked online, the rooms are smaller, and you couldn’t tell there were power lines right behind the house,” says Steve Heard, a Realtor® with The Heard Group in the Sacramento, CA, area.

There were so many deal breakers that I would have noticed had I been able to set foot inside the home instead of relying so heavily on listing photos and videos. Case in point: Visitors at the front door of my new home have a direct sightline to the main bathroom’s toilet.

“Much like anything you buy online, a home’s listing is created to sell, not inform. They’re marketing,” says Shana O’Brien, owner of Cascadia NW Real Estate in Washington and Oregon.

Go beyond standard due diligence

A home inspection is standard operating procedure for anyone buying a home, but a long-distance purchase should always go through rigorous vetting to make sure you’re not buying a money pit.

Typically, the buyer pays for the home inspection during the escrow period. This can cost around $300 to $500, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. But to cover your bases and make sure there aren’t any major system failures before you sign a purchase agreement, experts advise bringing in an additional pair of eyes.

Go to the American Society of Home Inspectors, where you can search by your home’s address for a local inspector who can examine the house on your behalf.

Barton L. Slavin, a senior litigation and transaction attorney on Long Island, NY, advises hiring an experienced licensed and insured engineer to inspect the premises before the purchase.

That would have been great in my own long-distance home purchase. After the home inspection, the seller had “fixed” some conditional electrical work that my home inspector found, but those fixes broke other things, which resulted in an electrician visit on my dime. And on the first cold day, when I turned on the furnace, it failed to heat, which was another big repair bill that would have been covered by a warranty.

In my first two months in this house, I’ve also found faulty plumbing hacks and a massive rodent infestation.

How to beat the odds

“The key to success is extreme buyer due diligence,” O’Brien says. “That means having a team of trusted ‘boots on the ground’ to physically visit and inspect the home.”

In retrospect, my live-video walk-through was fairly quick, less than 15 minutes. At the time, it felt like it was enough, but now I realize it wasn’t nearly long enough.

Our experts advise an extensive live-video walk-through with a long-distance home purchase.

“FaceTime works great,” O’Brien says. If buyers see something they have questions about during the walk-through, the real estate agent can zoom in. They can even take still photos and close-ups, which have better detail than streaming video.

Pay attention off-property, too.

“Walk around the block, video camera on, and capture the neighborhood, the condition of the sidewalks, the level of pride of ownership in the surrounding homes,” says O’Brien. “Is the narrow street jammed with parked cars? Are the sounds from the elementary school super loud at recess? What’s the street traffic and street noise like? The buyer will not know unless their agent does the investigation.”

Be realistic

Despite all of your best efforts, though, there’s still a chance your long-distance home purchase will not be all you bargained for. When that happens, O’Brien suggests taking it all in stride.

“Real estate is almost always a good investment,” she says.

As for me, I’m already planning out my investment strategy and making the best of my midcentury modern surprise fixer-upper.

Source: realtor.com

‘I Bought This House Based on Listing Photos Alone’: Was It Worth the Risk?

The coronavirus has galvanized many die-hard city dwellers to pack up and flee for the suburbs or beyond. But how easy is it to pull off such a drastic move during a pandemic?

Just ask Angela Caban, a former Broadway dancer and decorative painter who, after 28 years of living in New York City, reached her breaking point in April. Quarantined in a cramped apartment in Queens, hearing sirens wailing all night, she decided to buy a house in Charleston, SC, an area she’d grown to love during her frequent work trips there over the years.

Yet since Caban was on lockdown in New York, she had to shop for homes remotely and make offers without seeing places in person. Here’s what it was like to buy a house sight unseen, and the lessons she learned that might inspire other longtime urbanites and first-time home buyers to make the leap themselves.

Angela Caban bought this South Carolina home online just from this listing photo.
Angela Caban bought this South Carolina home online just from this listing photo.

Southern Bell Living

Location: Hanahan, SC
House specs: 1,804 square feet, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, separate barn
List price: $234,000
Price paid: $232,000

How did the pandemic play into your decision to leave NYC?

You give up a lot to live in New York because it has a lot to offer, but when those things go away, you start to question why you’re giving up so much.

Once COVID-19 hit in March, April, and May, I was stuck in my apartment for three months straight with no work. I wasn’t getting unemployment because that hadn’t kicked in. I had no outdoor space to speak of. I just wanted to have some room to roam, be in nature, and not feel desperate. That’s what put me over the edge.

Caban's old apartment building in Astoria, Queens (She lived on the ground floor to the right of the red awning.)
Caban’s old apartment building in Astoria, Queens (She lived on the ground floor to the right of the red awning.)

Google Maps

I felt like no matter how difficult New York had been in the past, this was a whole new ball of wax. I was there for 9/11 and Hurricane Sandy. When other tragedies had hit New York City, people were saying, “We’re in this together.”

When COVID-19 hit, all of a sudden there was suspicion. Everybody was frightened of everyone else.

___

Watch: Listing Agents Answer Our Burning Questions About the ‘Silence of the Lambs’ House

___

The ambulance sirens were nonstop. Plus, my small apartment was directly on the street, with the garbage cans right outside my window. So when I tried to open the windows during the pandemic, there were roaches coming in. I was like, “I can’t do this anymore.”

Caban's new living room is almost the size of her old apartment.
Caban’s new living room is almost the size of her old apartment.

Angela Caban

What made you choose Charleston as your new home?

I’d have work meetings down here, and I had fallen in love with the area. I liked the sense of history, the weather. And financially it was doable. My mortgage now is less than half my rent for my tiny apartment in New York City.

Caban's new spacious kitchen makes her want to cook again.
Caban’s new spacious kitchen makes her want to cook again.

Angela Caban

How did your house hunt go?

I started looking near the end of April. I put an initial offer in on a house that fell through after the home inspector I’d sent to look at it said it would fall down in two years. Then I was in a panic because I’d already given notice on my New York apartment. So basically I had six weeks total to find another house and close on it. 

Caban loves spending time on her new front and back porches.
Caban loves spending time on her new front and back porches.

Angela Caban

What were your biggest challenges?

There was no inventory. Every house I looked at and said, “Oh, that’s a possibility,” would be gone by the time I called. An hour after being listed, the house would no longer be accepting offers!

How did you find the house you eventually bought?

Lucky for me, this house had been on the market for 60 days. I don’t know if it was because the photos were crappy, or the fact that the neighborhood was considered a little dicey. But I’m from New York, so the neighborhood seemed comfortable to me. I put an offer in within 48 hours of losing the other house. 

Wasn’t it scary to buy a house you hadn’t seen in person?

I was emboldened because I could always back out—you have two weeks to do so when bidding on a house. So I got in the car and drove down to look at it two days after my offer was accepted. I literally did it all in one day; it took me 12 hours to drive down. I saw the house and drove around for about two hours, and then I drove back because I had to start packing! I literally didn’t sleep for 26 hours. It’s probably why I have more gray hair now than I should.

Caban is happy to have a fireplace to decorate for the holidays.
Caban is happy to have a fireplace to decorate for the holidays.

Angela Caban

How did the house look once you saw it, compared with the photos online?

It was much better than I thought. There is a lot of detailing, dental molding, wainscoting, and paneling in the living room, along with 16 windows that let in a lot of light. Plus, there’s the barn in the back that is another 600 square feet or so. My eventual plan is to make a workshop and a place to make art and teach.

Caban's Charleston, SC, home has a 600-square-foot barn.
Caban’s Charleston, SC, home has a 600-square-foot barn.

Angela Caban

How was the mortgage process?

It was a nightmare. Nobody wants to give mortgages to a single, female, sole proprietor who does not have pay stubs—especially during COVID-19, when they’re afraid people may default on their loan. They had also enacted new COVID-19 regulations that meant I had a boatload more paperwork. I had to submit letters from clients, proposals for work that was going to happen, invoices for work that I was still waiting to be paid for. … It was insane. I joked with them that I had to give them everything except a bone scan.

Caban's new bedroom—one of four in her Charleston home
Caban’s new bedroom—one of four in her Charleston home

Angela Caban

How did you finally secure the loan?

Thanks to the help of my real estate agent, John Bell of Southern Bell Living, and his mortgage broker, Ethan Lane at Mortgage Network. They were amazing, and I was an absolute basket case: “What else do you want from me? I have no place to go. I’m going to be homeless!”

I look forward to giving them both a hug someday after COVID-19 is under control.

How did you close on the house during the pandemic?

That is a whole additional saga. I was finishing up a painting job in New York when all of a sudden on Friday they said, “You’re closing on Monday,” so I had to get an attorney to attend the closing for me. To get that, I had to get a statement notarized. In the middle of COVID-19! I met the notary on the street, but then I had to have two witnesses! It took me asking 18 strangers to find two people who said they’d help.

Caban painted her new door red and added the bumblebee knocker.
Caban painted her new door red and added the bumblebee knocker.

Angela Caban

How did you pull off a move during the pandemic?

I couldn’t get a truck in New York. So I packed my car and drove down to Charleston, where I dropped off my cats in the new house. Then I rented a U-Haul and drove it back to New York, hired two guys who then met me at my old apartment, packed the truck. Drove it back down to South Carolina, where I hired two more guys to help me unload the truck, and voilà.

Caban's cats adjusting to their new home
Caban’s cats adjusting to their new home

Angela Caban

Was leaving New York hard after living there for 28 years?

Leaving was difficult because you almost feel like it’s a badge of honor that you’re a survivor in New York City. But down here, I finally feel like I can actually live my life instead of just trying to make it from one month to the next. I can think big thoughts and make big things happen, for which I simply didn’t have the energy in New York.

A formal dining room is a luxury that few New Yorkers can afford.
A formal dining room is a luxury that few New Yorkers can afford.

Angela Caban

Now that you’ve lived in Charleston for a few months, how are you feeling?

It’s like I can finally breathe, and I absolutely love it. I sit every morning out on my back patio and watch woodpeckers, blue jays, and cardinals. I have roses that are blooming that I planted.

Caban now loves starting her days watching birds on her back patio instead of exterminating roaches in her New York apartment.
Caban now loves starting her days watching birds on her back patio instead of exterminating roaches in her New York apartment.

Angela Caban

What advice would you give first-time home buyers and others looking to move now?

When you’re looking at homes online, don’t immediately discount a property just by how it looks in its photos. It’s like online dating that way. You need to see how it feels once you’re face to face and interacting with the space. Luckily, though, the minute I saw it in person, I knew I would be very happy here.

Caban says she can finally breathe since leaving New York.
Caban says she can finally breathe since leaving New York.

Angela Caban

Source: realtor.com