The Best State Capitals to Call Home

Capital idea!

A lot happens in a state’s capital city. It’s where the local government governs, but these centers of activity are usually so much more. Most are cities full of opportunity and infrastructure that make an effort to honor local history and culture.

Highlighting the best state capitals in America

Should you shoot for a capital city when thinking about making a move? Maybe. Especially if you’re interested in local politics or want to live in an area that’s guaranteed to have a lot to do, it’s probably worth taking a look.

There is a lot to consider when selecting the best state capitals where you should live, but we’re making the decision a little easier for you. From economic factors such as cost of living and median income to professional considerations like overall business counts and commuting time, we created a formula that looks at all 50 state capitals in the U.S. and measures in terms of overall livability.

We then scored each city to rank the capitals in every state from 1 to 50. Without further ado, we give you the best state capitals to live in our country.

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The 10 best state capitals in the U.S.

While all of the state capitals are the best in their own way, there are 10 that stand out from the pack. These cities are located all across the country — from the Midwest and the Rocky Mountains to the South and from New England all the way to Hawaii (let’s be honest, who wouldn’t love a tropical paradise?).

These state capitals really do have it all, so if you’re considering a move, think about one of these cities that cracked our top 10 list.

They’re truly some of the best state capitals to call home.

10. Honolulu, HI

honolulu hawaii

Long before Hawaii was part of the United States, Honolulu became its capital. In 1850, King Kamehameha III gave the city its status in honor of the previous King, Kamehameha I, who moved his court thereafter conquering Oahu in 1804. However, between the two kings, Russia, Britain and France all occupied the area, each at a different time.

The beauty of Honolulu back then, is still very present today, even among the modern buildings and resorts. That’s thanks to the world-famous Waikiki Beach and Leahi, the 760-foot tuft crater you’re able to climb.

Drawing in the majority of Oahu’s population, this scenic capital city has a business score of 9, which puts it toward the top. Residents also bring in a relatively high median income of $71,247. Top industries in the area include food service, healthcare and retail.

Living in Honolulu will cost you about $1,918 per month for a one-bedroom, which is a nice deal to call this laidback, diverse city home. Where else can you tour Pearl Harbor, walk on an extinct volcano, go surfing and grab an authentic poke meal all in a single day?

9. Des Moines, IA

des moines iowa

When Iowa first became a state, Des Moines wasn’t the capital. That happened 11 years later after over a decade of debate. Originally, the capital was Iowa City, but lawmakers believed the capital belonged in a more central location, which is why in 1857 it moved to Des Moines.

Calling Des Moines home today is a very budget-friendly choice. The city is one of the most affordable in the U.S. Rent averages at about $1,168 per month for a one-bedroom and the overall cost of living here is 12 percent below the national average.

Residents get a lot out of living in Des Moines. As one of the fastest-growing cities in the Midwest, it’s the food, the culture and the natural surroundings that draw in people.

For outdoor enthusiasts, there are over 4,000 acres of parkland and 81 miles of trails to explore. You’ll also find four colleges and universities within the city limits including Drake University and Grand View University.

Working in Des Moines means having the opportunity to dabble in a variety of industries including insurance, government, manufacturing, trade and healthcare. Just remember, if you’re relocating to the city, don’t pronounce the S’s in Des Moines.

8. Columbus, OH

columbus ohio

Named after that famous explorer, Columbus became the capital of Ohio in 1816. This was the third capital city in the state’s history, but thankfully it stuck. Before that, Ohio’s capitals were Zanesville and Chillicothe.

Today, Columbus is a diverse town with lots of fun waiting around every corner. A highly walkable and bikeable city, it’s easy to get around as you check off all the must-see items on your list. These should include trips to the German Village, the Botanical Gardens and the city’s array of cultural and historical museums. There are also plenty of trails and parkland to explore.

With a highly-developed economy, most locals find jobs in education, insurance, banking, fashion and more. The city ranks first in job growth in the Midwest as well. Seventeen Fortune 1000 companies call Columbus home thanks to the affordability of the city. Living here will cost you $1,201 per month for a one-bedroom apartment.

7. Boston, MA

boston massachusetts

With a long history as one of the oldest cities in the country, Boston earned its capital status way back in 1632. This was while Massachusetts was still a colony. Boston would have to wait over 100 years before it became the capital of a state.

History continues to come alive in this city, where you can easily walk from one end to the other in a single day. Along your trip, you can see Paul Revere’s house, tour the graveyard where Sam Adams and Mother Goose lie and revisit the site of the Boston Tea Party. Even the architecture speaks to the history of the city, with beautiful brownstones sitting beside each other on tree-lined streets.

Boston is a busy town with accessible public transportation on top of being easy to walk through. The city’s walk score of 89 puts it at the top of our list. It also means you’ll often see people on foot whether rain or shine. This includes tourists walking through Boston Common, commuters rushing to the office and even children on their way to school.

Although the cost of living here is almost 50 percent higher than the national average, Boston does have the highest median income, $71,834, of our top 10. This comes in handy since rent here is also on the higher side. Expect to pay an average of $3,461 per month to rent a one-bedroom.

5 (tied). Denver, CO

denver colorado

Denver found its way to Colorado’s capital city in 1867, while the state was still a territory. Colorado wouldn’t join the union until 1876, but Denver stuck since it was already where the governor lived and all the important government meetings took place.

The Mile High City has continued to grow and attract more residents since back then. With its proximity to picturesque, snow-capped mountains, and plenty of sunshine, Denver today is an outdoor lover’s dream. There are more than 200 parks within the city limits and 20,000 acres of parkland in the nearby mountains. The city even has its own herd of buffalo.

The largest city in Colorado, Denver serves as a central hub for industry and transportation. Primary businesses include telecommunications and biomedical technology in addition to tourism, mining and construction. It’s also worth mentioning the fast-growing cannabis industry (in the city and the entire state) too.

With plenty of culture and a lot of sports, living in Denver combines natural beauty with plenty of activity. There’s also thriving nightlife and amazing restaurants. To rent a one-bedroom apartment here will set you back about $1,928 per month, on average.

5 (tied). Boise, ID

boise idaho

Location is what made Boise the obvious choice for Idaho’s state capital. Sitting at the crossroads of the Oregon Trail and routes to the Boise Basin and Owyhee mines, it became the capital in 1864. Technically though, it wasn’t the state’s first choice, and the capital moved from Lewiston to Boise after only a year.

Boise is both urban and outdoorsy, with a comfortable cost of living, less than a percentage point below the national average. Renting a one-bedroom apartment here averages out to about $1,340 per month.

Opportunities abound here in technology, manufacturing, food production, energy and outdoor recreation, giving the city a business score of 9, a second-place rank.

Nicknamed The City of Trees, Boise takes a portion of the state’s 4.7 million acres of wilderness for its residents to use. On nice days, you’ll find people out biking, horseback riding, fishing and even skiing. There are plenty of hiking trails, boat docks and more.

Adding to the activities in Boise are the museums, theaters and energetic downtown area. It’s a city with a small-town feel that’s not lacking in any big city amenities.

4. Madison, WI

madison wisconsin

Wisconsin became a state in 1848, the same year Madison got named the capital. The debate over this selection lasted for two days, and even then it wasn’t a unanimous pick. It may seem silly to us now, but locals took their selection seriously. The final vote passed in a close call of 15 to 11.

Locals will tell you Madison is one of the happiest cities in the country — thanks to the weather. Situated between two lakes, Madison enjoys a constant breeze of fresh air. That’ll get you outside quick, but the miles of biking and hiking trails will keep you outdoors. In fact, Madison has the third-highest bike score at 75.

Downtown, you’ll find a centralized hub for both work and play. Primary industries in the city include manufacturing, government and agriculture. Nearly one-sixth of the state’s farms are within the Greater Madison area, and diversified farming is a primary contributor to the local economy. After a long workday, the same area offers up plenty of shopping, culture and restaurants.

Living here mixes the outdoors with urban amenities to fit any agenda. To rent a one-bedroom apartment, you’ll pay an average of $1,223 per month.

3. Cheyenne, WY

cheyenne wyoming

Wyoming set Cheyenne as the state capital in 1869. The city itself got its name from the Cheyenne Indians who lived in the area.

If you’re looking for a city with a solid cost of living and easy commute time, Cheyenne is for you. The cost of living is 8.2 percent below the national average and rent for a one-bedroom apartment averages out at $930 per month.

Getting to work is easy, too. The city has an average commute time of just under 16 minutes, putting it in third place.

Major industries here include light manufacturing, agriculture, military and government and tourism. Sitting in the southeast corner of the state, you’ll find the F.E. Warren Air Force Base here along with plenty of train-centric attractions. After all, Cheyenne is sometimes known as the Railroad Capital of the country.

Many who come to visit imagine a place full of rodeos and cowboys, but really Cheyenne is both a rugged and modern city.

2. Austin, TX

austin texas

A year after Texas’ annexation into the United States, Austin became its capital. Originally, the capital of the state was Houston, but in 1839 it moved to a city named Waterloo. In 1846, that city’s name got changed to Austin in honor of the “Father of Texas,” Stephen F. Austin.

There are plenty of good neighborhoods to call home within the modern city of Austin, many of which surround the University of Texas. Between the college, the rivers and the music and bar scene, there’s a lot to bring people to this state capital.

Austin received the highest business score on our list at 9.3. With the nickname, “Silicon Hills,” the city offers up a lot of opportunities in technology and innovation. You’ll find a lot of startups call Austin home as well. Even Apple is getting in on things, creating a campus in this Texas town.

A mild climate, and about 300 days of sunshine per year, make Austin a great place to have fun both inside and out. There’s also plenty of amazing Tex-Mex to chow down on when the craving for tacos hits.

Living here will set you back about $1,417 per month if renting a one-bedroom apartment but luckily it’s also an affordable city with the cost of living just a touch over the national average and a median income of over $71,500.

1. Salt Lake City, UT

salt lake city utah

Earning the distinction of state capital when Utah joined the union in 1896, Salt Lake City has long had a reputation of acceptance. The city itself was a popular choice for the capital because its ideals aligned with the country at the time — growth, expansion and religious freedoms.

Today, you’ll find Salt Lake City an active community with a lot of potential for professional growth. It earns near-top scores in its walkability, bikeability and business opportunity.

With an urban center invigorated by a buzzing tech scene, the downtown area is where you’ll find a lot of the action. From craft beer to theater, amazing dining to culture, Salt Lake City provides eclectic fun.

The outdoor recreation of the area is also worth mentioning. Living in Salt Lake City, you’re not only close to some incredible skiing, but also within reach of five national parks. The city itself also draws residents outdoors with a festive atmosphere you can walk through all year long.

Calling this part of Utah home means plenty to do and even more to see. It’s a perfect combination of natural beauty and urban design. Renting a one-bedroom apartment here means budgeting for about $1,233 on average, per month.

The best state capitals by rank

We’ve given you a taste of what some of our state capitals have to offer, but see how all 50 of them rank. Check out the complete chart below.

Methodology

To find the best state capitals in America, we used the following data points:

  • Median household income reported by the U.S. Census Bureau
  • Cost of living reported by the Council for Community and Economic Research
  • Average commute times reported by the U.S. Census Bureau
  • Walk Score
  • Bike Score
  • Overall business score determined by the number of variety of business listings in a particular city compared to other cities of similar size across the country

We ranked each city from 1 to 50 (with 1 being the best) in each of these six categories. We allowed ties in these rankings. Then, we added up the rankings for each of the six categories to determine a final score for each city. The cities with the lowest overall score were determined to be the best state capitals.

Rent prices are based on a one-year rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments as of April 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.

The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

Source: rent.com

The History of Federal Student Loan Interest Rates

More than two out of three of recent college students took out loans to help cover the costs of furthering their education—averaging $29,900 per borrower, including private and federal debts.

When it comes to paying back student loans, both the total amount borrowed (i.e., the principal) and the interest rates (i.e., the percentage charged on top of the principal) can shape how much a borrower ends up shelling out over the life of the loan.

And, just as the cost of attending college in the US has changed with the times, the interest rates charged on educational loans have historically fluctuated.

While the cost of attending college has steadily gone up, the history of student loan interest rates shows both ups and downs. For instance, the 2020-2021 federal loan rates for undergraduates are now 2.75%—compared to 4.29% just five years ago.

A wide variety of educational loans are available to eligible students—including subsidized and unsubsidized federal ones and those handled by private lenders.

Interest rates for different loans change over time. The US government plays a major role in shaping the student loan landscape, setting fixed interest rates each year on federal loans, which can impact the total amount a borrower ends up paying back.

To understand the history of student loan interest rates, it can be helpful to zoom out and take a wide-lens view of the student loan landscape in the US.

The US federal government is the major player in student lending—with $1.51 trillion in debt owed by more than 40 million borrowers. (By comparison, private lenders account for $119 billion in student debts).

Below is an overview of how current rates compare to the recent history of student loan rates:

Understanding US Student Debt

Of the around $14 trillion of outstanding household debt, more than $1.7 trillion comes from student debt—that totals more than what Americans owe for cars or credit card debt, respectively.

Besides mortgages, student loan debt accounts for the largest form of household debt. More than 90% of all outstanding student loans are federal student loans, making the student loan interest rate set by the federal government a significant factor for millions of student borrowers.

Whereas private student loans tend to be set according to a combination of prevailing interest rates and the lender’s projection of the student’s ability to pay, federal student loan rates can be shaped, in part, by something even more confusing than the fine print on a financial statement: politics.

Federal student loans are fixed interest (but the rates are adjusted annually), while private lenders often provide both fixed-rate and variable-interest loans.

Here’s an overview of federal student loan rates and some changes they’ve seen:

What Did the Coronavirus Pandemic Change?

Right now represents an exceptional period in student lending. Typically, federal student loan interest rates are set according to a formula established by the US Congress.

However, presently, the rate is set to zero through September 30, 2021. This means interest will not accrue on Direct Loans, FFEL loans, and Perkins loans issued by the Education Department.

Payments due on federally held student loans have also been paused through at least Sept. 30, 2021. Both actions are a result of a presidential executive order that extended benefits first established in the CARES Act—in response to the extraordinary economic situations triggered by the novel Coronavirus pandemic.

Federal Student Loans

Federal student loans represent the lion’s share of student lending. But, there’s more than one type of federal student loan. There are a variety of federal educational loans with different student loan interest rates that, historically, have changed with time—from subsidized to unsubsidized, from undergraduate to graduate.

Current federally owned student loans include Direct Loans, Direct PLUS loans, and Parent Plus Loans.

Direct Loans

“Direct Loans” are responsible for the majority of federal student lending. Issued by the US Department of Education, these loans include both subsidized and unsubsidized student loans.

Subsidized loans are for borrowers who can demonstrate financial need and are exclusively available for undergraduate education, while unsubsidized loans can be used by graduate students. There are also Direct PLUS loans for graduate students and parents of students.

Direct Loans for the 2020-2021 school year have a fixed interest rate of 2.75% for both direct subsidized and direct unsubsidized loans—notably lower than the interest set on federal loans in previous years.

As a point of comparison, Direct Loans for the 2019-2020 academic year were set at 4.53% for subsidized loans and unsubsidized loans. Two years ago (2018-2019), that rate was 5.05%.

Additional Types of Federal Student Loans

The other type of direct loans are PLUS loans and PLUS parent loans. These both carry interest rates determined through a federal government formula. For the 2020-21 school year, the rate on PLUS loans is 5.3%, coming down from 7.08% in 2019-20, and 7.6% two years ago.

For those going to graduate or professional school, the rate for direct loans is now 4.3%. Federal PLUS education loans have a fixed interest rate.

Disused Federal Student Loan Types

The Federal Perkins Loan Program offered fixed-rate loans, at a 5% interest, to qualifying students. This program was aimed at students with exceptional financial need. Schools stopped disbursing Perkins Loans in 2018—after their authority to do so expired under federal law.

How Are Rates Determined?

Traditionally, federal student loan interest rates have been determined in response to laws passed by the US Congress. According to a piece of legislation from 2013 known as the “Bipartisan Student Loan Certainty Act,” the rate on direct loans is determined by a formula pegged to borrowing cost for government debt.

The first year under this formula produced 3.86% rates on direct loans. During the year before, the 2012-2013 academic year, subsidized loans were 3.4% and unsubsidized loans were 6.8%. (A 2007 bill had lowered the subsidized rate to 3.4%, but it was due to expire in 2012 and go back to 6.8%.) The bill, which set up the formula currently governing federal student loan rates, was meant to address this snapback to a higher rate.

Before the legislation passed, Congress directly set the student loan interest rate, with 3.4% rates on subsidized loans and 6.8% on unsubsidized loans for the 2012-2013 school year. The 2013 bill also introduced caps that limit how high interest rates could go on the new formula.

The cap for direct loans to undergraduates was 8.25%, for graduate student loans it was 9.5%, and for PLUS loans, it was 10.5%. Since 2013, the rates have remained well below the legal caps. You can find previous rates for Direct on the Federal Student Aid website .

Politics and Student Loans

Today’s rates are governed by a formula that differs for different types of loans.

For undergraduate loans, the formula is the interest rate on one type of government debt at a certain time of year plus 2.05%. (The extra interest is added to cover the cost of deferrals, forbearance, and defaults). For graduate student loans it’s that same government debt rate plus 3.6%. And, for PLUS loans, it’s that rate plus 4.6%.

Put another way, the cost students pay to borrow money from the federal government is determined by the cost the government pays to borrow money—plus a fixed buffer of extra interest, which is intended to reduce risk to the government of students not being able to pay back their loans.

Since late 2018, government borrowing costs have been coming down and since the coronavirus epidemic slammed the brakes on the world economy, borrowing costs have been especially low. So, since the 2018-19 school year, rates have been falling, from just over 5% to under 3%.

Federal student loan interest rates for the 2020-21 school year dropped considerably, in part due to the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting economic downturn. The interest rate on direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans is just 2.75%, down from 4.53% during the 2019-20 school year.

The Takeaway

The interest rates on federal student loans are set by congress each year and are fixed for the life of the loan. The interest rates are determined based on a formula that the rate on direct loans is determined by a formula tied to borrowing cost for government debt. Federal student loan interest rates for the 2020-21 school year are historically low . The interest rate on direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans is 2.75%.

Millions of students use federal student loans to help them pay for their higher education. These loans come with benefits baked in—including grace periods, income-driven repayment options, forgiveness for public service, and forbearance—that are not guaranteed by private student loans.

But sometimes, federal student aid isn’t enough to cover the cost of tuition and other expenses. For some, a private student loan may help cover the total cost of attending college—including school-certified expenses like, tuition, fees, room and board, and transportation.

Private loans are disbursed by non-government institutions. SoFi, for instance, offers competitive rate in-school loans that come with no fees. And, when a borrower enrolls in autopay, they could get a rate discount.

For those with outstanding student debt, refinancing may be an option to consider. Refinancing student loans may help eligible borrowers pay off their loans faster or lower their monthly payments. (It’s worth noting that refinancing a federal loan with a private lender eliminates federal benefits).

Looking to pay off your student loans? Learn how refinancing with SoFi might help save thousands and lower your interest rate. Check your rate in just two minutes.



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SoFi Private Student Loans
Please borrow responsibly. SoFi Private Student Loans are not a substitute for federal loans, grants, and work-study programs. You should exhaust all your federal student aid options before you consider any private loans, including ours. Read our FAQs.
SoFi Private Student Loans are subject to program terms and restrictions, and applicants must meet SoFi’s eligibility and underwriting requirements. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information. To view payment examples, click here. SoFi reserves the right to modify eligibility criteria at any time. This information is subject to change.

SoFi Student Loan Refinance
IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO REFINANCE FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS PLEASE BE AWARE OF RECENT LEGISLATIVE CHANGES THAT HAVE SUSPENDED ALL FEDERAL STUDENT LOAN PAYMENTS AND WAIVED INTEREST CHARGES ON FEDERALLY HELD LOANS UNTIL THE END OF SEPTEMBER DUE TO COVID-19. PLEASE CAREFULLY CONSIDER THESE CHANGES BEFORE REFINANCING FEDERALLY HELD LOANS WITH SOFI, SINCE IN DOING SO YOU WILL NO LONGER QUALIFY FOR THE FEDERAL LOAN PAYMENT SUSPENSION, INTEREST WAIVER, OR ANY OTHER CURRENT OR FUTURE BENEFITS APPLICABLE TO FEDERAL LOANS. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Notice: SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers such as Income-Driven Repayment plans, including Income-Contingent Repayment or PAYE. SoFi always recommends that you consult a qualified financial advisor to discuss what is best for your unique situation.

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.

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Source: sofi.com

10 Things to Know About Living in Washington D.C.

Washington D.C. is a great place to live with more than 130 distinct neighborhoods, excellent dining and entertainment venues and one of the most diverse population’s in the nation. Many people think that everyone in D.C. is a lobbyist or a bureaucrat. While politics is a prevailing part of the culture, Washington is more than just a government town.

Recognized for its top-notch colleges, non-profit associations, high-tech and biotech companies and healthcare facilities, Washington D.C. offers opportunities and impressive cultural experiences.

1. One of the nation’s strongest job markets

As the capital city, Washington has historically ranked as one of the strongest job markets in the U.S. D.C. area residents typically work for the federal and state governments, universities and hospitals, government and private contractors, information technology companies, law firms, business and finance companies, non-profit organizations, hotels and tourist attractions.

According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, long-term projections predict that the job market will stabilize and continue to grow in the coming years.

2. It is pricey to live here

The cost of living in Washington D.C. is higher than the U.S. average, especially high housing costs. On average, you’ll find a one-bedroom apartment for about $2,400 and a two-bedroom apartment in D.C. for around $3,200 a month depending on the neighborhood. Both of these prices are considerably higher than the national average.

Living in the city is more costly than in the suburbs. When making a decision of where to live, it’s important to consider the stress of commuting and the cost of public transportation. D.C. has a good transit system, but the Metro is one of the most expensive subway systems in the country with prices ranging from $2.25 to $6 for a one-way ride. D.C. sales tax is relatively low at six percent. A beer at a bar will cost $8 while a meal at a sit-down restaurant will set you back $35-50, on average.

Evening traffic overview in Washington D.C. Evening traffic overview in Washington D.C.

3. D.C. has some of the worst traffic in the nation

Traffic has to be one of the more frustrating things about living in Washington D.C. Rush hour lasts for three hours in the morning and three hours in the afternoon. There are too many tourists who don’t know the roads. There are traffic circles that are confusing. But there are also plenty of public transportation options.

However, if you live in the city, it’s pretty easy to get around. Many areas are easily walkable.

4. Washington is bike-friendly

The nation’s capital is one of the most bike-friendly cities in the U.S.

Capital Bikeshare was the first bike-share program in the country and allows people to use a bicycle to easily get around the busy urban areas. In recent years the city has expanded bike lanes across the city. With many parks and green spaces, D.C. residents enjoy bicycling for recreation as well as transportation.

Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.

5. Many free things to do

Washington D.C.’s most famous landmarks are free to visitors. National memorials dedicated to the country’s founding fathers and war heroes are aplenty. The Smithsonian museums and many others exhibit a wide range of historic artifacts ranging from dinosaur fossils to early spacecraft to modern art and technology.

All branches of the armed forces offer free concerts throughout the summer and a variety of festivals are also held throughout the year. In addition, as home to 175 foreign embassies, D.C. has endless opportunities to celebrate cultures from around the world.

6. Diverse population

Washington is much more diverse than the average U.S. city. with a wide variety of people from different ethnic backgrounds, nationalities, religions and economic levels.

Many residents are transplants who moved to the nation’s capital to work for the government, a law firm or a non-profit organization. Most are highly educated and ambitious to get ahead in their field or to make a difference in the community. In recent years, the population has been growing with an influx of young people who enjoy the city lifestyle.

Row houses in Washington D.C. Row houses in Washington D.C.

7. Centrally located on the east coast

Washington D.C. is centrally located on the east coast within an easy drive to cities including Baltimore, Philadelphia and Richmond, the Chesapeake Bay or Atlantic coast or the mountains in western Maryland or Virginia. The region offers a wide range of places to visit and things to do. Getaways are endless.

8. Great live music and theatre

Washington D.C. attracts some of the nation’s top talent to perform at its venues. Theatergoers enjoy performances at the Kennedy Center, the National Theater, the Warner Theatre, Arena Stage, Fords Theatre and other theaters. The Capital One Arena, Constitution Hall, the 9:30 Club and other venues around town hold concerts throughout the year.

In summer, free concerts are held in various neighborhoods throughout the city. The Capitol grounds hosts its annual concerts for Memorial Day, Independence Day and Labor Day. The National Mall is periodically used for special events that include live music.

9. Washington loves its sports teams

D.C. sports fans are dedicated to their home teams. The Washington Nationals are a member of the Eastern Division of the MLB’s National League and have a state-of-the-art ballfield built in 2008. Washington Football plays at FedEx Field and has long had a strong following. The Capitals ice hockey and DC United soccer games are fun to watch at the Capital One Arena.

Washington D.C. Capital Hill at night.Washington D.C. Capital Hill at night.

10. Endless ways to volunteer

People flock to Washington D.C. to make a difference. There are hundreds of non-profit organizations that are in constant need of volunteers to help with fundraising events and the daily operations to help promote their cause.

You’ll find something to love about living in Washington D.C.

Washington D.C. is a great city with endless opportunities to learn new things and take in our nation’s history and culture. Whether you prefer a quiet residential area or a bustling urban community, you’ll find a neighborhood that fits your budget and lifestyle.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Kids & Money: Counterintuitive Advice that Works!

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Growing up, I suspect my parents talked about money more than the average family.

From a young age I knew how much they earned. I knew how much our house was worth (before you could just search prices on the Internet) and I knew that while we weren’t “rich” in the dollars and cents kind of way, my parents felt rich because they followed their own rules and prioritized their money.

While neighboring families may have kept mum on the topic, my Middle Eastern parents chatted casually (and out loud) about their attempts to ask for raises, the cost of everything and the threat of layoffs at my dad’s company.

It’s counterintuitive to the way some might think to raise their kids. After all, it’s not exactly America’s cultural norm to speak openly about money, which is considered more of a taboo topic amongst friends and family than religion or politics.

Fast-forward two decades and I suppose my career choice shouldn’t come as a surprise…and possibly why the real estate section of the NY Times is my favorite thing to read on the weekends.

I’m grateful for the fact that my parents acted outside the box. Sometimes it makes all the difference. Here are some additional counterintuitive strategies for raising money savvy kids I look forward to practicing with my kids – once they’re out of diapers.

Don’t Call it an Allowance

Instead, call it earnings so there’s a linkage between hard work and pay.

And it’s best when the work to exceed the expected duties of just being members of a household. For example, some parents argue that kids should make their beds and wash their dishes without reward. (I agree.)

Instead, offer an allow, er, earnings, when they perform duties outside the normal realm like, say, washing mom’s car on a Saturday, helping to clean out the attic or babysitting a younger sibling. As head of household, you can decide what constitutes an atypical activity.

Take it to the next level and ask your kids to identify a need at home and how they’d like to help address or solve it, and have them negotiate a rate while they’re at it. For example, “Mom, your office is a mess. I’d like to help you organize your paperwork. I charge $5 an hour.” This teaches entrepreneurship at a young age and the importance of being your own financial advocate in the real world.

Say YES to Their Wants

Just because you say yes, doesn’t mean they will receive what they want. Instead, next time your child asks for something that isn’t necessary, ask them to jot it down and add it to their growing list of wants. Rank the wants weekly or monthly and insist that your child come up with ways to afford their wishes. Maybe it means performing more work around the house, saving up their cash gifts that year and/or watching for a sale.

When Mint spoke with Susan Beacham, founder of Money Savvy Generation, she emphasized the importance of having kids keep a list of their wants because it forces kids to stop and reflect on what they really want and value. As Susan said, “We’re teaching how our needs and wants change…We teach them how to prioritize. Children need to gauge, ‘Do I really want this? Will I really use this? If I get it, will I want it tomorrow?’”

Answer Their Awkward Money Questions

“Are we rich?” and “How much do you make?”

While your instinct may be to change the subject (or run) when these tricky money questions come out of your child’s mouth, it helps to first dig into your kid’s line of questioning.

Instead of saying, “It’s none of your business,” try responding gently with your own question like, “Why are your curious?”

You may discover that while your child ponders, “How much do you make?” his or her curiosity actually stems from overhearing a conversation about what a friend’s parent does and earns and how the family is “rich.”

It’s worth it to take a beat to learn more about the context of your child’s question. The good news is, they’re curious about money. The last thing you want to do is to shut them down. It only perpetuates the stigma around money.

Who knows, by asking your child to share more about their money question, it may lead you down an opportune path to discuss what “rich” means to your family and that while everyone makes a different amount, it’s not how much one earns that matters, but how we manage that money.

Then, you can pivot to talking about the importance of saving…and all the while you’ve avoided revealing your salary and bonus!

Don’t Delay Gratification

At least not when you’re trying to entice kids to save money.

When I chatted with Bill Dwight, founder of FamZoo, an online and mobile banking service for parents and kids, he suggested that moms and dad encourage their kids to save by offering a savings return frequently – each week, instead of each year. This way kids can feel better rewarded and more compelled to save habitually.

“Kids operate on a much faster clock. A year is a really long time to a kid,” says Dwight. FamZoo sends a text to your child each time interest accrues. “I would like my kids when they’re very young to get a text message that says, ‘Oh, you just earned $0.25 of interest this week,’ because I want to set that habit that says, ‘Yes, saving is good. My money is working for me.’ A lot of kids don’t even have that concept that money could work for you.”

Have a question for Farnoosh? You can submit your questions via Twitter @Farnoosh, Facebook or email at farnoosh@farnoosh.tv (please note “Mint Blog” in the subject line).

Farnoosh Torabi is America’s leading personal finance authority hooked on helping Americans live their richest, happiest lives. From her early days reporting for Money Magazine to now hosting a primetime series on CNBC and writing monthly for O, The Oprah Magazine, she’s become our favorite go-to money expert and friend.

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Source: mint.intuit.com