FreeWill Review: Pros & Cons

FreeWill Review: Pros & Cons – SmartAsset

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FreeWill is an online estate planning tool that allows you to create or update a legally binding will in as little as 20 minutes. It offers products such as the ability to document funeral wishes, create a durable financial power of attorney, advance healthcare directives (living wills) and give charitable contributions from your retirement or stock brokerage account. As the company’s name implies, FreeWill’s services are completely free. Funding comes from FreeWill’s partnership with more than 100 nonprofit organizations who sponsor these services. You can access the service online, giving users the ability to change or download their will at any time without needing to create a new one.

If you’d rather have a professional personally help you with your entire estate plan, consider working with a local financial advisor.

FreeWill Overview
Pros
  • Fairly robust service for free
  • Online access – Once you create you can update at any time
Cons
  • No live support
  • Relatively smaller range of products
Best For
  • Cost (free)
  • Charitable giving

FreeWill: Services & Features

For a completely no-cost service, FreeWill’s offerings are fairly robust.

First, it can cover an individual’s most important needs for a last will and testament. The website offers a questionnaire via an easy-to-use interface, asking basic information as well as other pertinent details such as current income, family information and whether users have any children or pets that they’d like to cover in their will.

For users who need to create an advance healthcare directive (also known as a living will), filling out the form will involve answering questions about some personal information, selecting a preferred physician and hospital for end-of-life care as well as selecting an agent or healthcare proxy. Then users can share what they need to about the values they wish to be upheld and other specific instructions, before finalizing with signatures and any further instructions specific to their state.

For a durable financial power of attorney, individuals will need to provide some personal information and also select an agent or agents to make financial decisions for them if they become unable to do so. Then users can choose the powers that any agent(s) will be allowed to exercise, list any specific limitations and provide other important details (i.e. compensation, monitors, guardians, revocation and how documents will be executed).

Additionally, in keeping with its commitment to charitable giving, FreeWill offers individuals ways to give a charitable contribution from a retirement account or a stock brokerage account.

FreeWill: Pricing

FreeWill’s Fee Structure
Membership Tiers
  • $0 / Free for individuals
Extra Features

FreeWill’s pricing model is straightforward, as it is free to use for individuals. As an individual user, you can draft your will, durable financial power of attorney or advanced healthcare directive via the website.

Funding comes from FreeWill’s partnership with more than 100 nonprofit organizations who sponsor these services. Nonprofit organizations can learn more about a range of tools that FreeWill offers – like a Bequest Tool, a Qualified Charitable Distributions (QCD Tool) and a Stock Gifts Tool – in order to make gifts easier for both supporters to give and organizations to receive.

FreeWill: User Support

FreeWill’s website offers a streamlined design that’s fairly easy to use. For a last will and testament, its questionnaire form is divided into parts and users can track their progress so that they know how many sections remain to fill out. For services such as advance healthcare directives and durable financial power of attorney, the site outlines the form sections and the information you’ll need to gather before you begin.

If you’re looking for immediate support from customer support representatives, FreeWill unfortunately does not provide this kind of a feature. It does, however, have a contact page as well as a help center page where users can find the answers to some frequently asked questions addressing troubleshooting and technical issues.

Thanks to insight from experts around the country, FreeWill makes sure that a user’s will complies with each state’s specific legal requirements. Of course, FreeWill makes it clear that it is not a law firm and therefore cannot provide legal advice. If you need to enlist the services of a professional attorney or even a professional financial advisor, you should do so separately.

FreeWill: Online Experience

FreeWill does not have any further mobile or online platforms available through its service, as all the final documents will be available to users once they finalize the questionnaire process on the site. There is no app or other software that a user would need to download. Given the company’s no-cost pricing model, this is probably to be expected.

How Does FreeWill Stack Up?

Comparing FreeWill to Other Services
Service Pricing Features Accessibility
FreeWill
  • $0 / Free for individuals
  • Last will & testament, durable financial power of attorney, advance healthcare directive, charitable contributions
  • No legal services or support
TotalLegal
  • $14.95 – $19.95 for legal documents
  • TotalLegal Plan subscription $89/year or $9.95/month
  • Create documents
  • With subscription: Legal services from attorneys
  • With subscription: Document storage vault service
Tomorrow app
  • Mobile app free for families
  • Free for employees covered by employers who buy Tomorrow Plus plans
  • $39.99/year for Tomorrow Plus plan not through employer
  • Mobile creation of estate planning documents, such as will, trust, healthcare directive, power of attorney
  • App allows users to connect with family members and make decisions together
  • No legal services or support
  • Mobile app

The biggest differences FreeWill has over competitors is its emphasis on charitable giving and its free services as a result of that.

Bottom Line

Overall, FreeWill is an easy-to-use website that helps those who are looking to have an official last will and testament the ability to create a simple one using their online forms. The service – including certain other end-of-life planning forms such as a durable financial power of attorney or a living will – is free to use for individuals, with an emphasis on charitable giving driving the company’s ethos and business model. While 24-hour support or live customer representative or legal support is not available with free will, its website allows users to create an account, begin and have their specific forms in just minutes – and also allows them to log in, update and download forms again at any time.

Estate Planning Tips

  • If you’re seeking more detailed advice instead of or in addition to your own estate planning steps, consider reaching out to a financial professional. Finding a financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool connects you with financial advisors in your area in five minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors, get started now.
  • Estate planning is all about looking ahead and mapping out your plan as best as possible. If you’re going the DIY route, make sure you’re aware of the possible financial consequences. Read more about the dangers of DIY estate planning and five estate planning mistakes you can’t afford to make.

Photo credit: FreeWill

Nadia Ahmad, CEPF® Nadia Ahmad is a Certified Educator in Personal Finance (CEPF®) and a member of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW). Her interest in taxes and grammar makes writing about personal finance a perfect fit! Nadia has spent ten years working as a seasonal income tax assistant, researching federal, state and local tax code and assisting in preparing tax returns. Nadia has a degree in English and American Literature from New York University and has served as an instructor/facilitator for a variety of writing workshops in the NYC area.
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Source: smartasset.com

UGMA vs. UTMA Account – Which Is Better to Save for My Child’s College?

For many people, a college education is crucial for their career prospects. Yet college is an expensive endeavor. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, for the 2016 – 2017 academic year, undergraduate tuition, fees, room, and board were estimated to run $17,237 at a public institution, $44,551 at a private nonprofit institution, and $25,431 at a private for-profit institution. For that reason, many parents start saving for their child’s college education while that child is still in diapers.

There are several ways to save for education. People often think of 529 plans when it comes to saving for college, but you can also use Uniform Gift to Minors Act (UGMA) and Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA) accounts. Each account has different benefits and drawbacks. Before choosing how to save for your child’s education, learn more about how these accounts work and what features they offer.

529 Plan, UGMA, & UTMA Defined

Before delving into the pros and cons of these accounts, it pays to understand what each account is.

529 Plan

A 529 savings plan is a tax-advantaged account named after Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code. These accounts help you save for education. Money in the account accumulates tax-free, and distributions are tax-free as long as you use the money for qualified education expenses.

Qualified expenses include:

  • Required tuition and fees
  • Books, supplies, and equipment
  • Computers, peripheral equipment, software, and Internet access
  • Room and board for students who are enrolled at least half-time

Initially, 529 plan beneficiaries could only use the money for higher education expenses. But in 2017, the government expanded the definition of qualified expenses to include up to $10,000 annually in K-12 tuition.

UGMA & UTMA Accounts

In most states, children under the age of 18 don’t have the right to contract, so they can’t own investments. At one time, that meant parents who wanted to transfer assets to a child for their college education had to hire an attorney to establish a trust.

The UGMA and UTMA made these transfers a lot easier. The UGMA established a simple way for minors to own securities such as stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. The UTMA is similar but also allows minors to own other property types, such as real estate, fine art, patents, and royalties.

Now, parents, grandparents, and other family members can open a UGMA or UTMA custodial account at a bank or brokerage. When they open the account, they have to provide the name and Social Security number of the minor and appoint a custodian who is in charge of managing the money in the account until the child reaches the age of majority (typically 18 or 21, depending on the state).


Differences Between 529 Plans & UGMA or UTMA Accounts

UGMA and UTMA accounts as well as 529 plans provide ways for parents and other adults to help save for a child’s education, but there are several differences.

Use of the Account

You can only use 529 plans for saving for education. You can always withdraw money in the account for other purposes. But if you don’t use the funds for qualified education expenses, you’ll face some tax consequences: You can withdraw the amount you contribute tax-free, but the earnings portion of the distribution is taxable at your ordinary income tax rates. You’ll also owe a 10% penalty.

But you can use funds in a UGMA and UTMA for other purposes.

Tax Advantages

A 529 plan has an advantage over UGMA and UTMA accounts when it comes to tax-advantaged growth.

In a 529 plan, you don’t have to worry about paying taxes on earnings within the account since the funds grow tax-free.

In a UGMA or UTMA account, you may have to pay taxes on earnings, even if you don’t withdraw money from the account. You don’t have to worry about paying taxes if the child’s income is $1,050 or less. Above that amount, the IRS taxes income between $1,050 and $2,100 at the child’s tax bracket and income above $2,100 at the rate for trusts and estates, which could be a lot higher than the child’s tax rate.

For 2019 through 2025, the tax brackets for trusts and estates are:

If taxable income is: The tax is:
$2,600 or below 10% of taxable income
$2,601 to $9,300 $260 + 24% of the amount over $2,600
$9,301 to $12,750 $1,868 + 35% of the amount over $9,300
$12,751 and above $3,075.50 + 37% of the amount over $12,750

Tax Filing Requirements

One challenge parents often run into with UGMA and UTMA accounts is tax return filings. With a 529 plan, the plan’s earnings don’t impact either the parent’s or child’s tax return since the account is allowed to grow tax-free. Once you start taking money from the account, as long as you use it for qualified education expenses, you simply report those nontaxable distributions on your annual return.

UGMA and UTMA accounts can be a little more complicated. For most people, these accounts are hassle-free during the saving years, as they rarely generate enough interest and dividends to necessitate filing a tax return for the child. If the earnings within the account are over $1,050 for the year, the parents may be able to report the child’s income on the parents’ return by attaching Form 8814 to their Form 1040.

The parents can make this election as long as the child meets all the following conditions:

  • The child is under age 19 (or under age 24 and a full-time student) at the end of the year
  • The child had only interest and dividend income
  • The child’s gross income was less than $10,500
  • The child doesn’t file a joint return with a spouse
  • The child didn’t make any estimated tax payments, have federal income tax withheld, or have an overpayment from a prior year applied to the current year

The truly complicated part comes when the child needs funds from the account to pay for college expenses. At this point, they need to sell investments in the account to withdraw funds. That generates capital gains. Parents can’t elect to report capital gains on their own returns, so they typically have to file a separate tax return for the child.

Ownership & Control of the Funds

When it comes to ensuring the child uses the money for educational purposes, 529 plans also have an advantage.

With a 529 plan, the account owner keeps control of the funds no matter the beneficiary’s age. If you save for your child’s education and your child decides not to go to college or doesn’t need all the money, you can switch the account over to another beneficiary or withdraw the money yourself (and pay taxes on the distribution).

With a UGMA or UTMA account, ownership and control over the funds go to the child once they reach the age of majority. At that point, they can spend the money however they’d like. If the child doesn’t need the money to pay for their education, you can’t transfer the account to a different beneficiary.

Contributions & Investment Options

UGMA and UTMA accounts have the advantage when it comes to the flexibility of contributions and investment options. You can fund UGMA and UTMA accounts with cash, investments, real estate, art, patents, royalties, and more. You also have wide latitude when it comes to investing assets in the account.

With a 529 plan, you can only contribute cash, and investment options are limited to those allowed by the particular plan.

You can contribute as much as you want to a 529 plan, but the amount you contribute to the plan each year goes toward your annual gift tax exclusion amount. For 2019, the annual gift tax exclusion amount is $15,000 ($30,000 for a married couple who elect to split their gifts), meaning if you give more than that amount to any one beneficiary’s 529 plan, you must file a gift tax return that year. However, there’s one exception. The IRS allows you to give five years of contributions all at once without paying gift taxes. For 2019, that would be $75,000 for a single person or $150,000 for a married couple.

Impact on Student Aid Eligibility

For financial aid purposes, assets in a UGMA or UTMA account are considered assets of the student. That means they have a significant impact on student aid eligibility calculations — federal financial aid formulas consider 20% of the money in a UGMA or UTMA account as money available to pay for college.

On the other hand, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) treats funds in a 529 plan as assets of the parent, so it has a lower impact on financial aid eligibility. The FAFSA formula considers a maximum of 5.6% of the money in a 529 plan to be available to pay for college.

If you already have assets in a UGMA or UTMA account and you’re worried about the impact on financial aid awards, you can cash out and reinvest the proceeds into a 529 plan. But before you do, talk to your financial advisor or accountant for help calculating the taxes you’ll pay on any capital gains.


Final Word

If you want to give your child a leg up on saving, which account should you choose? It comes down to your goals. If the primary purpose of your savings is education, a 529 plan offers better tax advantages. If you or your child aren’t sure whether they plan to use the funds for education, buying a home, or any other purpose, you can contribute to a UGMA or UTMA account.

Are you saving for your child’s education? Which type of account are you using?

Source: moneycrashers.com

5 Expenses Homeowners Pay That Renters Don’t

Thinking about buying? Be sure to include these five items in your calculations.

Homeownership may be a goal for some, but it’s not the right fit for many.

Renters account for 37 percent of all households in America — or just over 43.7 million homes, up more than 6.9 million since 2005. Even still, more than half of millennial and Gen Z renters consider buying, with 18 percent seriously considering it.

Both lifestyles afford their fair share of pros and cons. So before you meet with a real estate agent, consider these five costs homeowners pay that renters don’t — they could make you reconsider buying altogether.

1. Property taxes

As long as you own a home, you’ll pay property taxes. The typical U.S. homeowner pays $2,110 per year in property taxes, meaning they’re a significant — and ongoing — chunk of your budget.

Factor this expense into the equation from the get-go to avoid surprises down the road. The property tax rates vary among states, so try a mortgage calculator to estimate costs in your area.

2. Homeowners insurance

Homeowners insurance protects you against losses and damage to your home caused by perils such as fires, storms or burglary. It also covers legal costs if someone is injured in your home or on your property.

Homeowners insurance is almost always required in order to get a home loan. It costs an average of $35 per month for every $100,000 of your home’s value.

If you intend to purchase a condo, you’ll need a condo insurance policy — separate from traditional homeowner’s insurance — which costs an average of $100 to $400 a year.

3. Maintenance and repairs

Don’t forget about those small repairs that you won’t be calling your landlord about anymore. Notice a tear in your window screen? Can’t get your toilet to stop running? What about those burned out light bulbs in your hallway? You get the idea.

Maintenance costs can add an additional $3,021 to the typical U.S. homeowner’s annual bill. Of course, this amount increases as your home ages.

And don’t forget about repairs. Conventional water heaters last about a decade, with a new one costing you between $500 to $1,500 on average. Air conditioning units don’t typically last much longer than 15 years, and an asphalt shingle roof won’t serve you too well after 20 years.

4. HOA fees

Sure, that monthly mortgage payment seems affordable, but don’t forget to take homeowners association (HOA) fees into account.

On average, HOA fees cost anywhere from $200 to $400 per month. They usually fund perks like your fitness center, neighborhood landscaping, community pool and other common areas.

Such amenities are usually covered as a renter, but when you own your home, you’re paying for these luxuries on top of your mortgage payment.

5. Utilities

When you’re renting, it’s common for your apartment or landlord to cover some costs. When you own your home, you’re in charge of covering it all — water, electric, gas, internet and cable.

While many factors determine how much you’ll pay for utilities — like the size of your home and the climate you live in — the typical U.S. homeowner pays $2,953 in utility costs every year.

Ultimately, renting might be more cost-effective in the end, depending on your lifestyle, location and financial situation. As long as you crunch the numbers and factor in these costs, you’ll make the right choice for your needs.

Related:

Originally published August 18, 2015. Statistics updated July 2018.

Source: zillow.com

Pros and Cons of using Gas Credit Cards

The choice on whether to go for gas credit cards or use other financial tools at the pump is not an easy one. This cashless system is marketed as a convenient and easy way to fuel your car. That said; there are high rates and other limitations to contend with. To help you make an informed decision, here are the pros and cons of using gas credit cards.

Pros

Discounts on Purchases

Gas Credit CardsGas Credit CardsOne of the driving factors of having a gas credit card is the discounts associated with their use. With most of these cards you get to pay less per gallon than the fuel pump price. Considering the ever increasing gas prices, this cash backs can go a long way in saving you money which can go towards other purchases.

These programs are structured in a way that you get larger discounts during the first few months after card issuance. For example, the ExxonMobil fuel card offers 12 cents off per gallon for the first 2 months and 6 cents off thereafter.

Accumulating Reward Points

Another incentive to using a fuel card is the reward program. These are points per gallon that you accumulate with each gas purchase. A typical reward of 1 point per gallon gives the average American driver about 540 points yearly. This calculation is based on an estimate of 25 Miles/Gallon and 13,476mi which is the average annual miles per driver. Reward points can be redeemed once they accumulate to 100 and over. These can be used for gas or other needs like snacks and carwashes at select businesses.

A Hassle-free and Convenient Payment System

When using cash, one has to line up at the till to pay for gas. This can lose you precious time from your busy life. However with a gas card, all you need is to pull up at the gas station, fuel and swipe at the pump and in a few minutes you are back on the road.

Another plus on using a gas card is the convenience that it offers. This comes in handy because you may not always have cash to fuel your car. Just like other credit cards, you get billed at the end of the month for your purchases. This helps you in keeping track of your gas bill; essentially making you stick to your budget.

Cons

High Interest Rates

One of the major disadvantages of using a gas credit card is the high interest rates that they attract. On average they charge 24% on interest. That is 9 percentages points more than the average rate for all credit cards which is currently at 15% APR. A card whose balance is not cleared at the end of the month can end up accruing a sizable debt. This may be much more than the discounts and rewards can make up for.

Simply put, continued misuse of the card can lower your credit score. One of way to mitigate this is going for cards with a 0% introductory offer. This will at least cushion you for a few months as you get your gas budget in order.

Ease of Spending

When using cash, you can’t gas your car with more than what is in your wallet. A gas card on the other hand eliminates this ‘inconvenience’. However the card can lead to uncontrollable spending with total disregard to your budget.

Think of it this way; without gas money, you will probably have to do with public transport. This will unconsciously save you money when you are cash-strapped. But why would you go through the hassle if that small plastic card can fill up your tank?

Usage Limitations

If you depend on your credit card for all your fueling, you may find yourself with fewer options on where to buy. This is because the cards are mostly issued by gas stations to be used in their own branded outlets. This puts you at a disadvantage if you move or drive to a state where the brand doesn’t operate, or has few outlets.

Bottom Line

Gas credit cards are a convenient way of fueling your car. They come with reward points and can save you money via their discount programs. The advantages can however be diminished by high interest rates and the danger of overspending. It is therefore advisable to weigh both the pros and cons before you make your decision.

Source: creditabsolute.com

7 Super Small-Cap Growth Stocks to Buy

Stocks with smaller market values are outperforming by a wide margin so far this year, and strategists and analysts alike say small caps should continue to lead the way as the economic recovery gains steam.

“The U.S. economy is currently trending toward high-single digit GDP growth in 2021 as COVID-19 vaccine distribution expands and we gradually emerge from the pandemic,” says Lule Demmissie, president of Ally Invest. “That environment favors small-cap names, which tend to have a more domestic focus than larger multinational firms.”

Small caps tend to outperform in the early parts of the economic cycle, so it should come as no surprise that they are clobbering stocks with larger market values these days.

Indeed, the small-cap benchmark Russell 2000 index is up 13.6% for the year-to-date through April 8, while the blue chip Dow Jones Industrial Average added just 9.5% over the same span.

Keep in mind that small-cap stocks come with heightened volatility and risk. It’s also important to note that it can be dangerous to chase performance. But small-cap growth stocks – particularly in this environment – can offer potentially much greater rewards. 

Given the increased interest in these securities, we decided to find some of analysts’ favorite small caps to buy. To do so, we screened the Russell 2000 for small caps with outsized growth prospects and analysts’ highest consensus recommendations, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence.

Here’s how the recommendation system works: S&P Global Market Intelligence surveys analysts’ stock recommendations and scores them on a five-point scale, where 1.0 equals a Strong Buy and 5.0 is a Strong Sell. Any score below 2.5 means that analysts, on average, rate the stock as being Buy-worthy. The closer a score gets to 1.0, the stronger the Buy recommendation.

We also limited ourselves to names with projected long-term growth (LTG) rates of at least 20%. That means analysts, on average, expect these companies to generate compound annual earnings per share (EPS) growth of 20% or more for the next three to five years. 

And lastly, we dug into research, fundamental factors and analysts’ estimates on the most promising small caps. 

That led us to this list of the 7 best small-cap growth stocks to buy now, by virtue of their high analyst ratings and bullish outlooks. Read on as we analyze what makes each one stand out.

Share prices are as of April 8. Companies are listed by strength of analysts’ consensus recommendation, from lowest to highest. Data courtesy of S&P Global Market Intelligence, unless otherwise noted.

1 of 7

Q2 Holdings

Digital banking technologyDigital banking technology
  • Market value: $5.7 billion
  • Long-term growth rate: 150.0%
  • Analysts’ consensus recommendation: 1.68 (Buy)

Q2 Holdings (QTWO, $103.06) provides cloud-based virtual banking services to regional and community financial institutions. The idea is to make it so that smaller firms – which are sometimes small caps themselves – can give account holders the same kind of top-flight online tools, services and experiences as the industry’s big boys.

To that end, Q2 recently announced the acquisition of ClickSWITCH, which focuses on customer acquisition and retention by making the process of switching digital accounts easier. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. 

Q2’s business model and execution has Wall Street drooling over the small cap’s growth prospects. Indeed, analysts expect the software company to generate compound annual earnings per share growth of 150% over the next three to five years, according to data from S&P Global Market Intelligence. 

“In the last year, the pandemic has accelerated the digital transformation efforts and investments of the financial services industry, and we believe Q2 Holdings is well positioned to support and grow its customer base,” writes Stifel equity research analyst Tom Roderick, who rates the stock at Buy. 

Of the 19 analysts covering Q2 tracked by S&P Global Market Intelligence, 10 call it a Strong Buy, five say Buy and four rate it at Hold. Their average target price of $152.25 gives QTWO implied upside of almost 50% over the next 12 months or so. Such high expected returns make it easy to understand why the Street sees QTWO as one of the best small-cap growth stocks.

2 of 7

BellRing Brands

A man drinking a protein shakeA man drinking a protein shake
  • Market value: $962.8 million
  • Long-term growth rate: 21.6%
  • Analysts’ consensus recommendation: 1.60 (Buy)

BellRing Brands (BRBR, $24.37), which sells protein shakes and other nutritional beverages, powders and supplements, is forecast to generate unusually healthy EPS growth over the next few years. 

Stifel equity research, which specializes in small caps, says BellRing offers a “compelling growth opportunity” thanks to its positioning in the large and fast-growing category known as “convenient nutrition.”

U.S. consumers are increasingly turning toward high-protein, low-carbohydrate foods and beverages for snacks and meal replacement, Stifel notes, and BellRing Brands, spun off from Post Holdings (POST) in late 2019, is in prime position to thrive from those changing consumer tastes. 

After all, the company’s portfolio includes such well-known brands as Premier Protein shakes and PowerBar nutrition bars. 

In another point favoring the bulls, BellRing’s “asset-light business model requires limited capital expenditures and generates very strong free cash flow,” notes Stifel analyst Christopher Growe, who rates the stock at Buy.

Most of the Street also puts BRBR in the small-caps-to-buy camp. Of the 15 analysts covering BRBR, eight call it a Strong Buy, five say Buy and two have it at Hold. Their average price target of $28.33 gives the stock implied upside of about 16% over the next year or so. 

With shares trading at just a bit more than 25 times estimated earnings for 2022, BRBR appears to offer a compelling valuation.

3 of 7

Rackspace Technology

Cloud technologyCloud technology
  • Market value: $5.3 billion
  • Long-term growth rate: 21.8%
  • Analysts’ consensus recommendation: 1.50 (Strong Buy)

Rackspace Technology (RXT, $25.61) partners with cloud services providers such as Google parent Alphabet (GOOGL), Amazon.com (AMZN) and Microsoft (MSFT) to manage its enterprise customers’ cloud-based services. 

And make no mistake, this sort of expertise is much in demand.

The pandemic accelerated many industries’ migration to cloud technology. As such, plenty of firms have discovered they need all the help they can get when it comes to transitioning and managing their operations – often with more than one cloud service provider.

“The prevalence of a multicloud approach has created integration and operational complexity that require expertise and resources most companies lack,”  writes William Blair analyst Jim Breen, who rates RXT at Outperform (the equivalent of Buy). “This creates an opportunity for a multicloud services partner to enable businesses to fully realize the benefits of cloud transformation.”

Breen adds that research firm IDC forecasts the managed cloud services market to grow 15% a year to more than $100 billion by 2024.

As the leading company in the field of multicloud services, bulls argue that Rackspace stands to benefit disproportionately from all this burgeoning demand. 

Speaking of bulls, of the 10 analysts covering the stock tracked by S&P Global Market Intelligence, five rate RXT at Strong Buy and five call it a Buy. The bottom line is that Rackspace easily makes the Street’s list of small-cap growth stocks to buy.

4 of 7

Chart Industries

Cryogenic technologyCryogenic technology
  • Market value: $5.3 billion
  • Long-term growth rate: 34.2%
  • Analysts’ consensus recommendation: 1.50 (Strong Buy)

Shares in Chart Industries (GTLS, $146.76), which manufactures cryogenic equipment for industrial gasses such as liquefied natural gas (LNG), are riding the global secular trend toward sustainable energy.

The market certainly likes GTLS’ commitment to greener energy. The small-cap stock is up more than 410% over the past 52 weeks – analysts expect a torrid pace of profit growth over the next few years to keep the gains coming. Indeed, the Street forecasts compound annual EPS growth of more than 34% over the next three to five years.

Analysts say the company’s unique portfolio of technologies gives it an edge in a growing industry. To that end, they applauded its $20 million acquisition of Sustainable Energy Solutions in December because it bolsters the company’s carbon capture capabilities.

“In the context of the decarbonization megatrend, Chart is a one-of-a-kind play on the global shift to more gas-centric economies,” writes Raymond James analyst Pavel Molchanov in a note to clients. “There is upside potential from large liquefied natural gas projects. Notwithstanding the lingering headwinds from the North American energy sector, we reiterate our Outperform [Buy] rating.”

Stifel, which chimes in with a Buy rating, says GTLS deserves a premium valuation given its outsized growth prospects. 

“With potentially a decade or more of high single-digit to low double-digit revenue growth, more recurring revenue, accelerating hydrogen opportunities, and the potential big LNG surprise bounces, we expect shares could trade north of 30 times normalized earnings,” writes analyst Benjamin Nolan.

The stock currently trades at nearly 30 times estimated earnings for 2022, per S&P Global Market Intelligence. Small caps to buy often sport lofty valuations, but with a projected long-term growth rate of more than 34%, one could argue GTLS is actually a bargain.

Raymond James and Stifel are very much in the majority on the Street, where 12 analysts rate GTLS at Strong Buy, four say Buy, one has it at Hold and one says Sell.

5 of 7

NeoGenomics

Lab equipmentLab equipment
  • Market value: $5.5 billion
  • Long-term growth rate: 43.0%
  • Analysts’ consensus recommendation: 1.33 (Strong Buy)

NeoGenomics (NEO, $47.87), an oncology testing and research laboratory, is still coming out from under the pressure of the pandemic, which led to the cancellation of legions of procedures.

But there’s been quite a lot of activity at the company, nevertheless, and analysts still see it as one of the better small-cap growth stocks to buy.

In February, the company said longtime Chairman and CEO Doug VanOort would step aside to become executive chairman in April. He was succeeded by Mark Mallon, former CEO of Ironwood Pharmaceuticals (IRWD). The following month, NeoGenomics announced a $65 million cash-and-stock deal for Trapelo Health, an IT firm focused on precision oncology. 

All the while, shares have been lagging in 2021, falling more than 11% for the year-to-date vs. a gain of 13.5% for the small-cap benchmark Russell 2000.

Although COVID-19 has been squeezing clinical volumes – and bad winter weather is always a concern – analysts by and large remain fans of this small cap’s industry position. 

“We continue to find the company’s leading market share in clinical oncology testing and expanding presence in pharma services for oncology-based clients to be a very attractive combination,” writes William Blair equity analyst Brian Weinstein, who rates NEO at Outperform. 

Of the 12 analysts covering NEO tracked by S&P Global Market Intelligence, nine call it a Strong Buy, two say Buy and one says Hold. With an average target price of $63.20, analysts give NEO implied upside of about 32% in the next year or so. That’s good enough to make almost any list of small caps to buy.

6 of 7

Lovesac

A Lovesac storeA Lovesac store
  • Market value: $917.3 million
  • Long-term growth rate: 32.5%
  • Analysts’ consensus recommendation: 1.14 (Strong Buy)

The Lovesac Co. (LOVE, $62.47) is a niche consumer discretionary company that designs “foam-filled furniture,” which mostly includes bean bag chairs. 

Although it operates about 90 showrooms at malls around the country, revenue – thankfully – is largely driven by online sales. That’s led to a boom in business as folks, stuck at home, shop online for ways to spruce up their living spaces.

Shares have followed, rising about 45% for the year-to-date and more than 1,000% over the past 52 weeks. And analysts expect even more upside ahead, driven by a long-term growth rate forecast of 32.5% for the next three to five years, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. 

Stifel, which says LOVE is among its small caps to Buy, expects the consumer shift to buying furnishing online to persist, and even accelerate, once the pandemic subsides.

“Lovesac is well positioned for continued share gains in the furniture category with its strong product, omni-channel capabilities and enhancements to the platform, many of which were initiated during the pandemic,” writes Stifel’s Lamont Williams in a note to clients.

The analyst adds that LOVE has a long ramp-up opportunity thanks to a new generation of home buyers.

“As the housing market remains healthy there is the opportunity to capture new buyers as more middle- to upper-income millennials become homeowners and increase spending on [the company’s] category,” Williams writes. 

Of the seven analysts covering the stock tracked by S&P Global Market Intelligence, six rate it at Strong Buy and one says Buy. That’s a small sample size, but the bull case for LOVE as one of the better small-cap growth stocks to buy still stands.

7 of 7

AdaptHealth

An elderly person using a walker during home rehabAn elderly person using a walker during home rehab
  • Market value: $4.3 billion
  • Long-term growth rate: 43.0%
  • Analysts’ consensus recommendation: 1.11 (Strong Buy)

AdaptHealth (AHCO, $37.61) comes in at No. 1 on our list of small caps to buy thanks to their outsized growth prospects. The bull case rests partly on demographics and the aging of baby boomers. 

AdaptHealth provides home healthcare equipment and medical supplies. Most notably, it provides sleep therapy equipment such as CPAP machines for sleep apnea – a condition that tends to increase with age and weight.

With the majority of the boomer cohort of roughly 70 million Americans hitting their 60s and 70s, home medical equipment for sleep apnea and other conditions is increasingly in demand.

Mergers and acquisitions are also a part of the company’s growth story, notes UBS Global Research, which rates AHCO at Buy. Most recently, in February, the company closed a $2 billion cash-and-stock deal for AeroCare, a respiratory and home medical equipment distributor. 

“AdaptHealth exits 2020 with material themes of accelerating growth,” writes UBS analyst Whit Mayo. “In each quarter of 2022, we assume that AHCO acquires $35 million in annual revenues, closing these deals at the middle of the quarter. This drives estimated acquired revs from yet to be announced deals of $70 million.”

Small caps have been rallying in 2021, but not AHCO, which is essentially flat for the year-to-date. Happily, the Street expects that to change sooner rather than later. With an average target price of $47.22, analysts give the stock implied upside of about 25% over the next 12 months or so.

Of the nine analysts covering AHCO tracked by S&P Global Market Intelligence, eight rate it at Strong Buy and one says Buy. As noted above, they expect the company to generate compound annual EPS growth of 43% over the next three to five years.

Source: kiplinger.com

The Pros and Cons of Only Using One Bank for all Your Finances

In a bid to get the best financial services, you may find yourself considering the idea of trying several banks. However, you might want to consider a one-stop shop for all your banking services. It can prove to be a more convenient option especially if you choose a bank that caters for your specific financial needs. To help you make an even better decision, here are the pros and cons of only using one bank for all your finances.

Pros;

It is easier to ensure the security of your accounts in one bank

The levels of security in banks are different; the higher the security, the more the measures required from you. You may be required to have customer ID, password, pin and secret questions among other things. If you choose a bank with exceptional security, you can put all the necessary measures to ensure that your money is secure.

These may include; limiting the amount of money per withdrawal, maintaining the confidentiality of your account details, getting alerts on any account activity etc. It will be a bit hectic to take this personal responsibility for the safety of your money with multiple banks.

Only Using One BankOnly Using One Bank

Your loyalty is rewarded with personalized service

If you do all your banking with one bank, your relationship with them grows with time and so does the treatment you receive. This leads to a better understanding of your account activity in terms of expenditure, loan payments, credit card payments and other financial transactions.

The bank is able to make a more personalized decision in situations like over draft extension, credit rating, saving interests and account fees. With a good standing, you are entitled to better products, prompt response and you never know, a little bending of the rules at a time when you really need it.

It is easier to keep track of your money

Dealing with one bank comes in handy especially when you have a lot going on in your life financially. You can keep track of expenditures like alimony, child support, student and other loan repayments, standing orders etc. as well as debits form your various sources of income.

In a nut shell, a visit to your bank or a request of a bank statement will show you all your account’s(s’) activity for a period of time. This is much easier when you are dealing with one bank.

You can have FDIC cover for up to $250,000 for each account

You do not need more than one bank just because you have more than$ 250,000 individually or $500,000 jointly. You can actually put your money in several eligible FDIC accounts in the same bank.  These include; Negotiable order of withdrawal (NWO) accounts, Savings accounts, money market deposit account and certificates of deposit (CDs).

Other options can be investing your money manually or automatically when it reaches a certain limit. This ensures that you don’t have all that money sitting in your account without earning you some interest.

Cons;

You lose opportunity for better rates or terms

No particular bank offers the best of all as a package. However, you can choose to opt for the best that each bank has to offer. When you use one bank only, you miss out on what others can give. Online banks for example are known to offer better interest rates compared to traditional banks. The latter on the other hand provide better checking accounts.

Increase risk of losses

In case someone gets hold of your account information or in a case of identity theft, your account can be swept clean. This is even worse if your accounts are linked to cover each other when credit is low.

You may lose out on FDIC cover

If you happen to have more money than can fit into FDIC eligible accounts, you may lose cover for the extra amount. This can lead to losses in case the bank goes under. Spreading it among different banks ensures that it is secure.

In conclusion

Using only one bank for your finances has both its advantages and disadvantages. Your unique needs and preferences should guide you to make an informed decision on where to maintain you accounts. The above information gives you a place to start.

Source: creditabsolute.com

Do You Need Renters Insurance for Your Apartment? Pros & Cons

It’s increasingly common for landlords to require tenants to carry renters insurance coverage. That’s understandable, as renters insurance limits landlords’ liability for potentially costly mishaps, like a building visitor landing in the hospital after sustaining an injury on the premises. It may absolve them of any financial responsibility for tenant possessions damaged or lost to fire, water leaks, vandalism, and certain other events covered by the policy.

Even when it’s not mandatory, renters insurance has direct benefits for tenants. But it isn’t free. A starter policy with high deductibles and relatively low coverage limits costs in the neighborhood of $150 to $200 per year. Higher-end coverage costs $300 to $500 or more per year, according to Insurance.com. For frugal, careful renters whose landlords don’t demand coverage, that cost might be too much to bear.

Before rushing to purchase a policy you might not need or writing off renters insurance as unnecessary, take a few minutes to consider the benefits and drawbacks.

Pros of Renters Insurance

Renters insurance has some clear advantages, including possible protection from liability, discounts for bundling it with other types of insurance policies, and limited protection from negligent landlords.

1. It’s Not Limited to the Possessions in Your Apartment

When you hear the term “renters insurance,” you probably envision a policy that reimburses you for personal belongings that are lost, damaged, destroyed, or stolen within the confines of your apartment.

This is a key function of renters insurance, but it’s not all it entails. Renters insurance has three distinct components:

  1. Content Coverage. Virtually all renters who carry insurance hold a content insurance policy (also known as personal property coverage) that covers TVs, stereos, computers, furniture, and other valuable items that stay in the rental unit. Content insurance also covers items you keep in your car, provided the vehicle is registered in your name and at your address. If your car is burglarized overnight or while you’re out of town, your policy may reimburse you for the theft of any covered items within it.
  2. Liability Coverage. Renters insurance also protects you from liability issues that may arise in the course of your tenancy. If a guest sustains an injury during a fall or as a result of an accident at your home, your renters insurance policy’s liability coverage may cover the cost of a potential lawsuit, associated legal fees, and/or the guest’s medical bills. Likewise, your policy may cover the cost of fire or water damage sustained by other tenants in your building due to faulty plumbing, outdated wiring, leaky floorboards, and other hazards that originate in your unit.
  3. Loss of Use Coverage. Finally, your policy should cover (or at least provide you with the option to cover) temporary relocation and living expenses you may incur if your apartment becomes unlivable due to fire, flood, or structural damage. This is known as “loss of use” coverage.

Comprehensive renters insurance policies typically include all of these components, while lower-cost policies may exclude relocation coverage.

2. You Can Save by Bundling It With Other Insurance Policies

Your apartment likely isn’t the only thing you’d like to protect. For example, if you own a car, you’re legally obligated to carry auto insurance on it. These days, you’re also required to hold a health insurance policy. Depending on your age and family situation, you may have life insurance as well. And if you own particularly valuable items, like precious jewelry or original artwork, you may need customized policies to cover them.

The good news is that a renters insurance policy can be (and often is) bundled with other insurance types at a significant discount. Virtually every major insurer offers a multipolicy discount, or a premium discount for carrying more than one insurance policy with the same company. Since many renters also own cars, bundling rental and car insurance policies is common.

The discounts can be impressive. For instance, Liberty Mutual claims applicants can save upward of $800 when they bundle home and auto insurance policies. Other insurers offer similar discounts on a case-by-case basis.

3. It Protects You From Landlord Negligence

Imagine this: You head home from work, looking forward to a relaxing evening of eating takeout and binge-watching Netflix. But as you approach your apartment building, you realize something isn’t right. Fire trucks and cop cars surround the entrance, and a thin cloud of smoke rises from the roof.

Eventually, investigators determine that a decades-old circuit shorted out, triggering a chain reaction along some old faulty wiring that caused a fire on your floor. The building isn’t destroyed, but your apartment has been ruined by smoke and heat. Your electronics are useless, and your furniture is irreparably damaged.

Time to put your life on hold? Not if you have renters insurance. Even though this incident is clearly the fault of your landlord, you’d be on the hook for the cost of replacing your damaged possessions without sufficient renters insurance coverage. Your landlord’s insurance covers the unit’s structural components and appliances — and furniture if the place came furnished — but it doesn’t extend to anything you own.


Cons of Renters Insurance

Renters insurance has some notable drawbacks, including higher costs to cover valuable items and significant restrictions on coverage without purchasing add-ons (riders) at an additional expense.

1. Collections or Specific Valuables May Require Additional Coverage

Renters insurance covers the cost of replacing everyday personal property and equipment, but it always comes with a coverage limit. This limit may be as low as $5,000 or as high as $500,000, and it generally doesn’t cover novel or valuable possessions.

For example, if you store multiple pieces of jewelry in your apartment, your renters policy might not cover them (even a regular old engagement ring might not fit the bill). If you have extensive collections of records, stereo equipment, shoes, artwork, or even rare books, you might also be out of luck.

You can still cover these items, but it will cost you. You’ll need to purchase a rider — a supplementary policy covering specific items — or a separate, specialized property insurance policy for high-value items like jewelry. For instance, Allstate offers a scheduled personal property insurance rider that allows you to exceed its standard per-item coverage limit of $1,500 for specific named items with higher intrinsic or replacement value.

2. There Are Coverage Limits and Exclusions

If you’ve ever been in a car accident that wasn’t covered by your auto insurance policy, you know that simply carrying insurance doesn’t necessarily free you from financial or personal liability. Depending on your deductible size, you must make some out-of-pocket payments before your coverage kicks in.

Before you take out your renters insurance policy — and for as long as you keep it — you need to expend some effort to maximize the chance it will deliver when the time comes.

First, take a careful look at your coverage limits and exclusions. According to State Farm Insurance, the average renter owns personal property (property not covered by their landlord’s insurance policy) worth about $35,000. If you’re “average” in this regard, you’ll need at least this much coverage to insulate you against a total loss. It might also be a good idea to take on additional coverage if you anticipate making big purchases in the near future.

It’s crucial to mind coverage limits on specific product categories as well. You shouldn’t expect standard rental insurance policies to cover high-value items, such as $5,000 rings and $10,000 stereo systems. The cost of riders or scheduled property protection can add up quickly. To minimize the cost of a rider or supplemental policy, purchase it at the same time — and through the same insurer — as your main renters insurance policy to qualify for bundling discounts.

It’s also critical to understand what renters insurance doesn’t cover. Like homeowners insurance, rental insurance is stingy about paying for flood damage and sewer problems. If you live in an area that’s prone to flooding, ask your insurer whether you’d be covered in the event of a flood. If you won’t, look into supplemental flood insurance policies, which may be subsidized by state or federal programs.

For example, if you occupy a ground-floor or basement apartment that’s prone to flooding or damage from sewer backups, your renters policy may not cover associated cleanup costs. Your insurer should offer supplemental “sewer and drain” coverage. Ultimately, however, you’re reimbursed for a specific insurance claim may turn on events that aren’t wholly within your control.

3. “Replacement Value” Coverage Can Be Costly

When you take out your renters insurance policy, you must choose between a “replacement value” policy and an “actual cash value” policy. In the event of an accepted claim, a replacement value policy reimburses you for each lost or destroyed item’s value at the time of purchase (so be sure to save your receipts). An actual cash value policy, meanwhile, reimburses you for each item’s depreciated value.

Depreciation calculations are complex and difficult to generalize. But as a rule of thumb, electronics such as computers and TVs tend to lose most of their value within three to five years. More durable items like couches, tables, and jewelry may retain their value for longer.

4. Credit Issues Could Increase Your Insurance Costs

One of the lesser-known consequences of a bad credit score is the potential for higher rates for auto and property insurance. Renters who have solid credit scores (about 660 to 680 and up) generally pay less for comparable policies than those with suboptimal scores.

This can be a problem for renters required to carry property insurance or who seek the peace of mind that comes with coverage. Of course, you’re free to reapply for coverage as your credit score improves, but in the meantime, you’re stuck paying more.

5. Potential Caps on Reimbursements for Temporary Living Expenses

Many insurance companies place a dollar cap or time limit on reimbursements for temporary living expenses. Suppose it takes four months after a fire to restore your apartment to a livable condition, and your renters insurance policy only covers relocation expenses for two months. In that case, you’ll need to pay out of pocket for the other two months of living expenses.

In other words, it’s probably best to assume your renters insurance policy won’t cover every single expense that arises out of an unfortunate circumstance. Having a healthy emergency fund saved up is one way to keep unexpected costs like this from derailing your finances.


Final Word

Choosing to purchase or forgo renters insurance is not a decision to make lightly. Nor is it a decision to agonize over and blow out of all proportion. If your renters insurance cost-benefit analysis has you at an impasse, consider this: You stand to save far more each year by moving to a more affordable city for renters than by doing without renters insurance.

In the grand scheme of things, peace of mind is relatively inexpensive.

Source: moneycrashers.com

This Often-Overlooked Way to Fund Your Roth IRA Has Many Advantages

A Roth IRA is a uniquely powerful retirement savings tool, because you won’t pay taxes on the money you withdraw during retirement. An annuity is a way of generating guaranteed income. Put them together, and you have a powerful retirement protection tool that can provide guaranteed income for life, with a big plus: It’s completely tax-free.

Anyone may roll over part or all of an existing Roth to a Roth annuity.  You may transfer all or part of the funds in an ordinary Roth to a Roth annuity. While there are income and contribution limits for new money going into a Roth IRA, they don’t apply to rollovers — including rollovers to a Roth annuity.

Different types of annuities accomplish different things and have distinct pros and cons — like the Swiss army knife of personal finance. Since they’re so varied, one type or another can work well for a Roth IRA.  Investment choices, fees and contract provisions vary, so work with an annuity agent who will educate you about your choices and clearly lay out the pros and cons.

What kind of annuity works for a Roth? It depends on which stage of your financial life you’re in. In the accumulation stage, you’re building wealth for retirement. In your decumulation stage, you’re retired and receiving income from your savings.

Here’s how Roth annuities can work in each stage.

Building wealth for those approaching retirement

One attractive option is a fixed indexed annuity. With the stock market continuing to break records, it may be vulnerable to a major long-term downturn. When you’re young, you can ride out the ups and downs. But if you’re in your 50s or 60s, you may want to get growth potential without taking the risk of losing Roth money you’ll need during retirement. If so, an indexed annuity might be a good choice for you.

It pays interest based on an underlying market index, such as the S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average. While the interest earnings are locked in, up to a stated cap (you may not get all of the upside) each year, you’ll never lose money when the index declines.

While indexed annuities are linked to one or more underlying market indexes, their value does not vary from day to day. Instead, they pay a varying amount of interest that is credited and locked in each year on the anniversary date of the contract. Since equity markets can be volatile, indexed annuities are designed to be held long-term, whether yoked to a Roth IRA or not.

A fixed-rate annuity — also called a multi-year guarantee annuity, or MYGA — is a more conservative choice. It works like a bank CD, paying a set interest rate for a set period. Fixed-rate annuities these days pay much more than CDs of the same term. As of April 2021, you can earn up to 2.90% a year on a five-year fixed-rate annuity and up to 2.25% on a three-year contract, according to AnnuityAdvantage’s online rate database. The top rate for a five-year CD is 1.25% and 1.05% for a three-year CD, according to Bankrate. 

Fixed-rate annuities can play a key role in asset allocation. Let’s say you decide to split your Roth assets up 50-50 between equities and fixed income. A fixed-rate annuity can give you a much higher rate of interest than you’d get today with safe fixed-income alternatives, such as CDs and Treasury bonds.

For current annuity rates, see this online annuity database. Interest is paid and compounded annually.

How to get tax-free lifetime income during retirement

Other than a traditional employer pension or Social Security, an income annuity is about the only vehicle that can guarantee an income for as long as you live. And by combining an income annuity with a Roth, that income is tax-free.

If you need income from your Roth very soon, consider an immediate income annuity. You can open a Roth annuity with a single payment (such as a tax-free rollover from an existing Roth IRA) to an insurance company. The insurer in turn guarantees you a stream of income. You can choose how long the payments will last — for instance, 15 years. Most people, however, choose lifetime payments as “longevity insurance.”

You can receive your first monthly income payment a month after your annuity contract is issued.

If you’re married, consider the joint-income option. With it, your spouse will receive regular monthly income payments for the remainder of his or her life too. Payments to a surviving spouse are always tax-free.

If you don’t need income right now, consider a deferred income annuity. Here, your income stream will begin at a future date you choose. By deferring payments, you let the insurer credit more interest over the years on your behalf, and you’ll ultimately get more monthly income. For instance, by delaying lifetime annuity payments from age 65 to 75, you’ll get about 85% to 90% more each month. On the other hand, you and/or your spouse won’t receive the deferred payments as long.

Another option is an indexed annuity with an income rider. The rider guarantees a certain income regardless of the performance of the annuity. It provides income like a deferred income annuity, plus the potential upside of an indexed annuity. It’s sometimes called a “hybrid” annuity.

The downside is cost. The rider typically costs about 1% of the annuity value annually. The insurer deducts this amount from your policy.

The advantage is retaining your money. Unlike an income annuity, which typically has no cash surrender value, an indexed annuity with an income rider lets you keep your money while guaranteeing lifetime income, starting on a date you choose.  You thus have flexibility. If you need the money, it will be there for you to withdraw or annuitize. (Wait until the surrender period is over to avoid any penalties.)  If you don’t need the money, you can pass on any remaining value to your heirs.

Is the extra cost worth it?  It all depends on your situation and goals and your desire to leave money to your heirs.

Whether you’re saving for future retirement or are currently retired or soon will be, annuities offer a range of often-overlooked strategies for the Roth IRA and amplify its advantage of tax-free retirement income.

A free quote comparison service with interest rates from dozens of insurers is available at https://www.annuityadvantage.com or by calling (800) 239-0356.

CEO / Founder, AnnuityAdvantage

Retirement-income expert Ken Nuss is the founder and CEO of AnnuityAdvantage, a leading online provider of fixed-rate, fixed-indexed and immediate-income annuities. It provides a free quote comparison service. He launched the AnnuityAdvantage website in 1999 to help people looking for their best options in principal-protected annuities.

Source: kiplinger.com