Wedding Registry for Apartment Dwellers

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Infused Water Recipes To Help You Hydrate & Detox In The New Year

We all know that living in an apartment means less space. When you are living alone, this isn’t a big deal, but throwing a spouse into the mix is a different story. Creating your wedding registry should be an exciting experience, don’t let apartment living hold you back. There are a variety of items that should be put on your apartment wedding registry that will make the both of you feel at home. From nesting end tables to hand-held vacuums, we’ve got you covered on all of the must-haves for your apartment wedding registry!

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Source: blog.apartminty.com

19 Purchases That Buyers Almost Always Regret

a shopper regrets a purchase
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There are certain purchases that buyers tend to regret.

No, that doesn’t mean everyone: There are plenty of happy boat and hot tub owners out there, and surely more than a few people count their timeshare property as a true delight.

But when faced with one of the potential purchases listed here, it’s a good idea to take a breath and think seriously about whether to buy it.

1. DVDs

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Movie-watching has moved online, with streaming and downloadable films that are easier to manage and watch than ever. You can buy or rent movies on demand from streaming services like Redbox or Amazon’s Prime Video.

What’s for sure is, you don’t have storage space for hundreds of DVDs. You’re not Blockbuster Video, and besides, look what happened to them.

2. Extended warranty

Extended Warranty
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You’ve bought the product, but the sales pitch isn’t over: Now your clerk is gunning to sell you an extended warranty, just in case the brand-new product falls apart.

Research the product you’re buying. Extended warranties can be complicated. We explain the ins and outs in “Should I Buy an Extended Car Warranty?” and “Are Extended Warranties Worth It?”

Whatever you do, first check whether you have coverage through other sources, such as a manufacturer’s warranty or through your credit card. You may not even need to fork out for extra coverage.

3. Boats

Motorboat
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There’s an old saying: The two best days of owning a boat are the day you buy it and the day you sell it.

Owning a boat is a lot of work. If you live on a lake and have plenty of room for it, and are willing to spend the money needed to keep afloat, then ship ahoy! But most of us can get by with an occasional boat rental, or wait until our friend Gilligan invites us over for a sail.

For more options, check out “4 Ways to Go Boating Without Buying a Boat.”

4. Timeshare

Virginia Beach, Virginia
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Timeshares, which give you a partial share of ownership in a vacation property, are probably one of the most stereotypically regretted purchases — and for good reason.

You may love vacations, but do you always want to vacation in the exact same spot? Yes, you can exchange your timeshare with others, but booking a hotel or resort is more flexible.

Those are a few reasons why Money Talks News founder Stacy Johnson says, “I’d chop off my own foot with a dull ax before buying a timeshare.”

5. An extravagant wedding

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A wedding lasts one day, and then it’s all photos and memories.

You’ll be just as legally married in a $100 gown as in a $5,000 one, and you’ll have a lot more money left over. You can pull off a wedding elegantly without going into debt in the process.

Learn how: “Your Own Royal Wedding: 20 Classy Ways to Save on the Big Day.”

6. Pricey engagement ring

Diamond ring
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And speaking of weddings, consider whether a whopping diamond ring is really the best way to tie the knot.

Modern jewelers offer more price-conscious alternatives that are just as lovely. Your hard-earned dollars can bring more satisfaction if they’re used for a down payment on a home. So, consider lab-grown diamonds — not only are they cheaper, they’re more environmentally friendly.

7. Desktop computer

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Desktop computers once were an amazing innovation, but few people need that kind of computing power these days. A tablet or laptop gives you the flexibility to move your home office around and travel with your computer if you wish.

Think different, a la Apple’s motto. And when it comes to home computing, don’t think big — think small.

8. Giant tent or other expensive camping gear

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For hardcore campers, owning a nuclear-fueled camp stove, a three-bedroom tent, an enormous inflatable mattress or a kit specifically made for roasting s’mores might make sense.

But for those of us who camp maybe only once every year or two, a small tent and standard sleeping bag work just as well. And you can always just toast marshmallows on sticks, which are still free.

9. Camcorder

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Most of us carry smartphones these days, and their video capabilities keep getting better and better. Hauling around a camcorder, storing it and getting the videos off of it is a chore few of us need.

10. Home printer

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Even those who run a home business are finding fewer and fewer opportunities to use gigantic printers, since so many documents can be filled out, signed, sent and received electronically.

Printers take up a ton of space and require replacement ink cartridges that can cost as much as a new printer.

Those in major cities who need a printer for a one-time use can make the occasional trek to the public library or local business offering printing services.

11. Pedometer

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Counting steps to keep yourself moving is trendy again, but it’s not pedometers that brought it back. Instead, it’s wrist-worn fitness trackers and smartphones and smartwatches.

You have to plan to wear a pedometer. With a smartphone or smartwatch, you can track your steps almost without thinking.

12. Home exercise equipment

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There likely have been days when you wished you didn’t have to make the trek to the gym to work out. At those times, buying exercise equipment seems like a no-brainer.

But the equipment is huge and bulky, and storing it takes up precious space in your home. Did we mention that it’s also seriously expensive?

13. Single-purpose kitchen gadgets

Woman making fruit juice with a juicer
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Some kitchen appliances make solid sense: Coffeemakers and toasters earn their keep every day. But appliances that are super-specific and can perform only one rarely needed task? They’re rarely worth the money.

Will you really use a juicer, a bread maker, a hot-dogger, a food dehydrator? Maybe once or twice, but it is unlikely to earn the space it takes up on your kitchen counter.

14. Pools and hot tubs

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Sure, some people swim every day. And some of us can’t imagine gloomy winters without a hot tub.

But for many people, there’s only a short period of time when a pool or hot tub is used enough to earn its keep. After that, it becomes a huge bowl of water that needs to constantly be cared for and cleaned.

15. Piano

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If you’re on Facebook, head to the online shopping section to see how many people are desperately trying to give away pianos for free. Few things take up more space and are more difficult to move than a piano.

If you truly have a junior Beethoven in your house, you may genuinely need a piano. But if your kid hasn’t even learned where middle C is, you can start with a borrowed portable keyboard and see if music lessons hit the right note.

16. Fine china

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Once, fine china was on every couple’s wedding registry and was broken out regularly for dinner parties and family holidays. Ours is a more casual world now, for good or for ill. Few engaged couples want 12 place settings of Royal Doulton china.

If china appeals to you, check with the older generations in your family. They may be happy to give you theirs.

17. Collectibles

Toy Collection
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Face facts: Beanie Babies that were the rage in the 1990s are never going to make you rich.

The same goes for most collectibles, from Franklin Mint collector plates to Department 56 Snow Village buildings.

If it makes you happy to buy a spoon or shot glass from each country or state you visit, have your fun. But don’t collect with the expectation that you’ll make money from the collection one day.

18. Baby gadgets

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New moms and dads don’t need half of the things on many baby registries. Diapers and clothes, sure. Burp cloths and bassinets? Go for it. But a diaper wipe warmer?

If you’re giving a present to a new parent, consider a gift card.

19. Giant desserts

Man eating giant sundae
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Many restaurants have one on the menu — the giant, jumbo, lollapalooza, monster-sized dessert. But eat one, and you’ll quickly regret it.

Unless you have a soccer team or hungry family to help you eat the giant treat, skip it.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

The Best Time to Buy a TV, Mattress and More: Here’s Your Guide

Some purchases are tough to plan: car repairs, patches for a leaky roof, a working furnace right before the big snowstorm hits.

But more often than not, you can plan ahead for life’s necessities — and some non-necessities, too.

Before you let an impulse buy drain your bank account, consult our handy calendar of the best time to buy absolutely everything. You might be surprised at the deals each new season brings!

Our Guide to the Best Time to Buy Everything

Be a smart shopper and plan your purchases according to this calendar, which plots the best deals, month by month.

What to Buy in January

Kick off the new year with big savings.

TVs

Retailers know that the newest TVs and other electronics are revealed at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in January. This makes January the best time to buy a TV, thanks to major discounts — as long as you don’t covet the new, fancy models too much.

Calendars

No need to rush to the bookstore in December to get a new wall or desk calendar. Buy one in January to get a discount.

Gym Memberships and Home Fitness Equipment

The pandemic may have kept you out of the gym, and you might still be hesitant to return. But gyms are known to offer big incentives to sign up and get fit in the New Year. Home gym equipment also goes on sale in January, as do scales, according to Consumer Reports. Here’s some guidance on what equipment you need for a good, affordable home gym.

Linens

The yearly tradition of hosting a white sale dates back to the 1870s, when linens were only available in white. But modern white sales include linens and home goods in every color of the rainbow.

Don’t be swayed by sheets with super-high thread counts — you probably don’t know what different thread counts feel like.

Christmas Gear

I know, you have an entire 11 months until you get invited to your next ugly sweater party. But my Goodwill intel reports that January is the best time to find a truly hideous sweater for way cheap. Other Christmas supplies are also on sale in January, including holiday cards and decorations.

What to Buy in February

Fall in love with these deals during February.

Mattresses

Presidents Day is a good time to buy a mattress because it gives you a long weekend to shop with your partner for an item you should both agree on before buying.

That’s why retailers use the holiday to post sales on pricy items many people have put off buying or replacing for a while. Take advantage.

Jewelry

One of the best times to buy jewelry is in February — but only after Valentine’s Day.

Look for deep discounts after retailers remove their rose-colored glasses. It’s not worth paying the “love tax” to celebrate with your sweetheart, anyway.

Also look for discounts on other Valentine’s Day goods, such as cards and chocolate after the holiday itself.

Winter Coats

Winter coats take up a ton of room in your closet and just as much room in stores. Help retailers clear ’em out this month, and you’ll get a big discount.

What to Buy in March

Spring forward by making these smart purchases in March.

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Luggage

Don’t wait until a week before your big family vacation to get a new suitcase. March is the best time to buy luggage, as it’s on sale to entice shoppers who are desperate to be done with their snowy, dreary winters and who crave a little spring break.

Just don’t forget where you put it when it’s time to pack.

What to Buy in April

The smart shopper always plans ahead.

Tools

You don’t have to wait until Father’s Day to find excellent prices on tools and home improvement gear.

If you’re eager to start your home DIY projects in the spring, go ahead and shop now.

Sneakers

Everyone’s finally going outside again. Let sporting goods stores make it easier for you to keep up with your New Year’s resolution (remember that?) by discounting those new kicks.

What to Buy in May

Is your refrigerator running? If not, May is a great time to get a new one.

Baby Gear

I understand you’re not going to time your baby’s birth to get the best deal on all their accoutrements.

But if your kiddo needs a new stroller or high chair, May is a good time to shop, according to Consumer Reports — especially if you can grab the Memorial Day deals.

Refrigerators

New refrigerator models debut in the summer. Shop in May to get last year’s model at a better price.

You can’t tell the difference between last year’s refrigerator models and this year’s, right? Didn’t think so.

Also look for deals on other necessities like freezers, oven ranges and air conditioners, according to Consumer Reports.

What to Buy in June

Here come the… deals?

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Vacation Tickets

Hopefully 2021 proves to be a better year for travel. Planning a summer vacation? Travel early or late in the summer instead of during peak times. And you’ll pay less for airfare if you can travel midweek.

Outdoor Gear

Now that summer is in full swing, outdoor gear — like tents, backpacks, lanterns and even fitness gear — is marked down.

Cookware and China

June is typically peak wedding season, and stores hope you’ve planned ahead to buy wedding registry gifts.

Now is when those items are discounted, and it’s the perfect time to replace or upgrade what’s in your own cabinets.

What to Buy in July

Don’t sweat these savings.

Furniture

New styles hit stores in February and August, so retailers spend much of July clearing out old stock, especially over Fourth of July weekend — making this the best time to buy furniture.

Dehumidifiers

July means humidity. Pick up an older version of a much-needed dehumidifier in July or August, according to Consumer Reports.

What to Buy in August

The dog days of summer offer some amazing bargains.

Computers (Except Apple Products)

Computer manufacturers typically release their new models in the summer, so back-to-school sales are a great time to buy last season’s model. The specs probably won’t be different enough for you to notice, unless you’re a hardcore gamer or designer.

Apple products, however, typically get announced in the fall, so hold off to get that new MacBook.

Grills

Grilling season doesn’t stop at the stroke of Labor Day. Buy at the tail end of summer to enjoy your grill until almost Thanksgiving (OK, depending on where you live).

What to Buy in September

Back to school? More like back to the checkout lane.

Thanksgiving Flights

Generally, September is the best month to buy Thanksgiving flights.

Swimsuits

Even though your local pool might be closed for the season, you should think about stocking up on swimsuits for next year.

A House

This might not be a frequent purchase, but if you’re in the market for a new home, it can help to hold off past the busy spring and summer buying seasons.

Your costs typically drop a few percentage points at the end of September (after the kids have gone back to school), making this the best time to buy a house.

What to Buy in October

There’s a joke about spooky deals in here, but I won’t make it.

Denim

Jeans typically get discounted in October, after back-to-school sales have ended and families are stocked up on fall attire.

Patio Furniture

Goodbye summer, hello savings.

It’s worth checking out the patio furniture if you don’t mind storing it over the winter. When that first warm spring day hits, you’ll be ready to bask in the sunshine.

Leaf Blowers

October means fall leaves — and they are likely covering your yard. Pick up a leaf blower, and while you’re at it, get ready for the snowy days ahead with a snow blower, according to Consumer Reports.

What to Buy in November

The days get shorter, but the deals get bigger.

Small Appliances

This time of year is ripe with rock-bottom prices on giftable small appliances.

If you’re looking for a blender, food processor, coffee maker or anything else that’ll proudly take up space on your kitchen counter, it’s worth waiting until Black Friday sales begin in stores and online.

A woman gets her wedding gown fastened in the back.
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Wedding Gowns

Bridal shops are slow before the proposal rush during the holiday season, so the few weeks before Thanksgiving is a good time to start trying on gowns.

Ask about sample sales and last year’s styles that may be priced to move.

What to Buy in December

Celebrate the season… by shopping smart, obviously.

Swimming Pools

If your family’s been begging for a backyard pool, December is the best time to have one installed. It might be chilly, but pool pros would rather avoid working on 90-degree days!

Plus, when their workload slows in the winter, many contractors are willing to lower their prices.

Toys

Toy deals stick around after those Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales in November.

Even if you’re done with holiday shopping for your little ones, consider picking up their favorite character and activity toys while they’re still discounted to stash away for birthdays.

Lisa Rowan is a former staff writer and producer at The Penny Hoarder.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

Money Etiquette: How to Politely Ask for a Honeymoon Fund

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Have you been to a wedding that used Honeyfund or similar registry in place of traditional gifts? These new-age registries are becoming more and more popular and a variety of reasons has lead to the sudden increase. Couples are more likely to live together before marriage and are moving to smaller apartments in big cities.

Either way, a honeymoon fund – commonly referred to as a honeyfund – is a great option for those who want to take a grand vacation after their wedding but need a little help. But, what is the polite way to ask for this kind of gift?

How to Spread the Word

The best place to spread the word is your wedding website. Most templates come preloaded with a page specifically for registries, making it easy to add the link to your honeymoon fund there. You can also add a small story, or give some context, to why you are choosing a honeymoon fund over traditional registries. When my husband and I were engaged we did just this. We explained we were about to move to NYC, a city notorious for tiny apartments and were only moving with the bare minimum. We told our guests that coming to our destination wedding was a gift itself! But, if they still wanted to gift us something we had a honeymoon fund set up.

You can also choose to add a small registry card to your main wedding invitation. This is very popular as well and an easy way to reference your honeymoon fund and your wedding website.

Setting up Your Honeyfund Account

Setting up an account with Honeyfund, the most popular of the honeymoon fund websites, is extremely easy. Once you register, you create a profile adding your wedding details and honeymoon dreams. You can then design custom gifts for your guests to choose from. Money for airline tickets, hotel upgrades, spa visits, excursions. All of these are created by you, so the sky’s the limit! Do be aware if a guest gifts you $100 towards airline tickets you don’t have to use the money on airline tickets. The gifts are in name only.

Fees on Honeymoon Funds

There are actually very few fees that are associated with most online honeymoon funds. If guests gift you via gift cards bought through the web services or offline they pay zero fees. Any credit or debit gift is charged a small fee between 1-3%.

Other Registries Besides Honeyfund

While Honeyfund was the first and most well known of the new-age registries, there are a couple other choices that all offer different advantages. Check out Zola, Blueprint Registry, or Travelers Joy for other options.

Bottom Line

At the end of the day if you still feel weird, remember that all wedding registries used to be considered tacky and these new registries are becoming much more common. Just don’t forget to send out thank you cards!

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