What is a Good Entry Level Salary?

Recent grads — or even just those starting a new career midstream — may wonder what sort of offer to expect when negotiating a starting salary. While it’s unlikely an early-stage hire will outearn senior management from the get-go, it can be key not to accept a pittance below the going market rates.

Since pay can vary greatly based on location or line of work, there’s no one answer to the question, “What is a good entry level salary?” The size of the paycheck will differ based on where someone lives, the industry they work in, the hiring institution or company, and other hard-to-tabulate variables.

So, how might a job seeker figure out a good entry level salary before sitting down with the new boss or an HR representative to talk pay? Here are some helpful resources to get a handle on entry level rates across the US, including tips for negotiating compensation:

Understanding Entry Level Salaries?

Entry level salary information changes on a regular basis, but many job-focused websites offer insights into the going rates. For instance, ZipRecruiter, a well-known American employment marketplace, lists the average U.S. entry level salary by state , which ranges, at the time of this writing, from $12.61 per hour or $26,219 per year in North Carolina to $17.09 per hour or $35,750 per year in New York.

Still, even state-by-state averages don’t show the whole picture. Although more than half of US states have minimum wage requirements higher than the federal minimum wage, which remains set at $7.25 per hour, the amount an early-career hire might expect can also vary by county and city within the same state.

According to Glassdoor, the average entry level salary in the Jacksonville, FL area is $14 per hour, whereas the average in the Miami-Fort Lauderdale area is significantly higher at $16 per hour.

Along with location, the industry one works in can play a big role in what kind of starting salary a new hire might expect. For instance, a data scientist at a tech company might be able to earn as much as $95,000 right out of the gate, while a newly minted journalist might expect something closer to $30,000.

(Psst: early-stage college students might want to align their eventual courses of studies with one of these high-paying entry level jobs.)

One way to grasp what sort of salary that might be expected is targeted research on the specific industry, location, and even position and company.

Researching a Good Entry Level Salary

Recent grads wanting to understand if they’re being offered current market rates for a particular job (or location) can turn to the internet to research details. Some sites that might offer resources for those job seekers include:

Payscale , for example, allows employees to create custom “pay reports” based on their job title, years of experience, and city.

Salary.com offers a similar feature, allowing job seekers to search for positions by keyword and compare them accordingly.

Glassdoor is another well-known web resource that publishes employee-generated information on salary by specific company and position. It also hosts reviews by current and former employees, which may help a job applicant learn more about what it’s, actually, like to work there. (In some cases, Glassdoor lists interview specifics that could help future interviewees better understand what’s expected from them).

After researching average pay by role, location, and company, job seekers might also next want to mull over how to negotiate an acceptable offer.

Negotiating a Higher Offer

So, what can a job seeker do if their dream job doesn’t (initially) come with a dreamy paycheck? What are some tips for negotiating?

While it’s not always possible to eke precious water from a parched stone, coming to the negotiating table prepared to negotiate can help job applicants angle for a more generous compensation package.

Negotiating a salary can be scary, especially for a recent grad who’s not used to the salary tango. Nevertheless, negotiating an offer up front can have a significant effect on one’s paycheck (and, by extension, one’s long-term earnings).

One Glassdoor press release estimated that the average US employee could be earning 13.3% more—if they negotiated.

Preparing to Negotiate

How might a new hire negotiate a higher-paid entry level salary? Well, having a well-researched entry level salary forecast in mind is one place to start.

Of course, it’s not likely that early-career hire can simply negotiate up to a data scientist’s $95,000 salary if that’s not the norm for the role or location they’ve applied for.

But, it’s still possible to make the case to hiring managers for why a higher rate is merited. When making this case, it could be helpful to give concrete examples of how a worker’s current skills might benefit the company. In these conversations, it may be possible to push an offer up a few percentage points (especially when the skills required are in high demand).

Glassdoor suggests that job seeker’s practice their negotiating pitch. Doing so ahead of time can help some to hone a confident delivery style. What’s more, knowing why a higher salary is being requested could also allow some new hires not to sell themselves short. Adopting negotiation tactics might help some new grads or career changers to meet their salary goal (or inch closer to it).

On top of baseline salary, it’s also possible in some roles and industries to negotiate for other valuable forms of compensation—such as, fitness stipends, work-from-home time, funding for continued education, and more.

Of course, negotiating a good entry level salary is not necessarily an easy undertaking. The Harvard Business Review warns soon-to-be negotiators to prepare for tough questions, especially where salary is concerned. Interviewers may put candidates on the spot, asking if they’re considering other offers or if the position is their top choice.

In an already uncomfortable situation, some candidates may stumble or misspeak if they don’t know how to justify what they’re asking for.

One simple place to start is asking whether it’s possible to negotiate the offer in the first place. Candidates may also inquire about future career growth and promotion potential, which could lead to a bigger salary later down the road.

Navigating Post-College Life, Financially and Beyond

Navigating life after college can be exciting and challenging. Trying to make ends meet on an entry level salary might be particularly tough, especially when on the hook to pay back student loans—as 54% of young adults who went to college took on some debt , including student loans, for their education.

A flexible and adaptable approach to finances and where one lives could make the transition to post-college life more manageable.

For instance, recent graduates who are in a position to choose a new place to live, might opt to move to one of the top cities for college grads. Cities like Houston or Nashville (to name just two) have boasted strong economies, affordable rent prices, and low unemployment rates.

Learning how to make a budget can also go a long way toward covering common expenses—even when one’s starting salary leaves a few zeroes to be desired. That said, there’s only so much instant ramen to eat or cups of coffee to skip out on.

For those feeling weighed down by student loans while earning an entry level salary, additional options exist. Those with outstanding federal student loans, for example, may qualify for income-driven repayment plans, loan forgiveness for public service, or deferment.

Refinancing educational debt with a private lender is one extra option that could save money each month—or help the borrower pay off student loans faster.

Student loan refinancing may allow recent grads to make lower monthly payments toward their existing debt, freeing up some extra cash. Or, it could help a borrower to save money on interest paid on the loan as a whole, allowing them to pay off the debt total faster.

It’s important to note that refinancing with a private lender causes borrowers to forfeit certain guaranteed federal benefits, like income-driven repayment (IDR).

SoFi refinances both federal and private student loans, offering no application fees and no prepayment penalties. Those who refinance their student loans through SoFi get access to a wide range of exclusive member benefits, including career coaching, financial advice, and more—at no additional cost.

Checking your refinance rate won’t have an affect on your credit score and could be the first step toward saving thousands of dollars—or making more affordable monthly student loan payments.

Interested in student loan refinancing? Applying with SoFi might be a smart money move for you.



SoFi Student Loan Refinance
IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO REFINANCE FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS PLEASE BE AWARE OF RECENT LEGISLATIVE CHANGES THAT HAVE SUSPENDED ALL FEDERAL STUDENT LOAN PAYMENTS AND WAIVED INTEREST CHARGES ON FEDERALLY HELD LOANS UNTIL THE END OF SEPTEMBER DUE TO COVID-19. PLEASE CAREFULLY CONSIDER THESE CHANGES BEFORE REFINANCING FEDERALLY HELD LOANS WITH SOFI, SINCE IN DOING SO YOU WILL NO LONGER QUALIFY FOR THE FEDERAL LOAN PAYMENT SUSPENSION, INTEREST WAIVER, OR ANY OTHER CURRENT OR FUTURE BENEFITS APPLICABLE TO FEDERAL LOANS. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Notice: SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers such as Income-Driven Repayment plans, including Income-Contingent Repayment or PAYE. SoFi always recommends that you consult a qualified financial advisor to discuss what is best for your unique situation.

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.

SOSL20020

Source: sofi.com

21 Side Hustles for Teachers In and Out of the Classroom

Educators are the ones that ignite a love of learning inside each of us and help mold us for future success in life. They’re essential to student growth, invaluable in their communities, work countless hours preparing lessons, and care for their students. Despite all of their dedication and responsibility, it’s a well-known fact that educators are often underpaid, and many turn to side hustles to make ends meet. 

If you’re a teacher looking for a way to supplement your income, there are many part-time opportunities that can fit your schedule and skillset. Whether you’re looking for work through the summer, or an extra gig for nights and weekends, we’ve put together this complete guide of side hustles for teachers. 

Jobs to Keep You Teaching

Jobs Online and On Apps

Jobs to Get You Outside

DIY Work From Home 

Jobs to Keep You Teaching

Educating others is part of who you are. If you’re interested in a fulfilling side hustle that will allow you to continue teaching, these jobs may work great for you. 

Illustration of a teacher at her desk with the stat that 12% of a teacher's yearly income comes from a summer job.

1. Tutoring

Tutoring is an excellent option to keep teaching while earning extra cash. You can focus your tutoring by age or subject, or narrow your focus for high school SAT and ACT prep. Tutoring naturally falls in your free time after school, and can be done in groups, one-on-one, or online.

  • Pay: Private tutors earn an average $17.53 an hour, though it varies widely by experience and specialty.
  • Get started: Register online to become a tutor through sites like TutorMe, Tutor.com, and VaristyTutor, or set your own price and let parents at your school know you’re available.

2. Standardized Test Administrator

While test administrator requirements will vary across states and school districts, it’s needed everywhere there are schools. Administrators ensure that all testing procedures are followed, that no test materials are taken from the site, and that all tests are collected and submitted securely for grading. As schooling moves online, there are also plenty of opportunities to proctor exams from home. 

  • Pay: Test administrators earn between $32,500 and $43,500 on average for full-time work, and can earn as little as $24,000 a year.
  • Get started: Find your state testing service’s site to learn more and apply to become a test administrator. You can also apply to become a proctor with online proctoring companies like ProctorU.

3. Teach English Abroad 

Do you dream of traveling the world? Teaching abroad during the summer months is a great way to strengthen your skills as a teacher and experience other cultures. There are great options for short-term teaching jobs abroad, or you can teach foreign classrooms from home.  

  • Pay: This varies by region, but reaches as high as $5,000 a month. Keep in mind that some gigs cover room and board, while others require you to budget your own living costs.

4. Adjunct Community College Professor 

More people are opting for community college to save on tuition, and there’s an increased demand for teachers in these programs. While some colleges may require a Master’s degree for employment, others only require a Bachelor’s and relevant teaching experience. Becoming an adjunct professor or teacher at a community college is a great way to continue teaching and change lives in a meaningful way. 

  • Pay: Adjunct faculty make a median of $2,700 per three-credit-hour course, though this varies between institutions and experience.
  • Get started: Check out the education requirements at your local colleges to see where your experience would be accepted. Then, decide what you want to teach, meet with a few other professors, and apply. 

5. Babysitting or Nannying 

Parents are always looking for someone responsible to watch after their little ones, and who better to trust than a teacher? Babysitting and other forms of childcare on nights and weekends is a flexible option that allows you to continue spending time with children while earning some under-the-table cash. 

  • Pay: Pay varies significantly by experience and location, so use this babysitting rate calculator to determine a fair price for your services.
  • Get started: Contact families you know for a smooth start to babysitting, or use sites like Care.com to match with families. You’ll likely need a background check to find nanny gigs online. 

Jobs Online and On Apps

Most Profitable Side Hustle Apps

85% of gig workers make under $500 each month

Company Average Monthly Earnings
1. Airbnb >$924
2. TaskRabbit $380
3. Lyft $377
4. Uber $364
5. DoorDash $229
Source: Earnest

Earning a supplemental income is in the palm of your hands. Some of your favorite apps that you likely use on a regular basis offer opportunities for side hustles, and there are many ways to earn money online too. 

6. Drive for a Rideshare Service

Rideshare services are hugely popular side hustles with plenty of flexibility and the opportunity to earn quick cash. While you can make quite a bit of money working peak hours, you should also consider the costs of car maintenance, insurance, cleaning, and gas. 

  • Pay: Drivers can make upwards of $20 an hour, though it’s not consistent. Gridwise provides pay averages for major cities as well as other costs you should consider.
  • Get started: The first step is to download the app of your choice, then collect and submit the company’s required information. For example, Lyft requires:
    • At least one year of licensed driving experience
    • Pass both a DMV and criminal background check
    • Have your car inspected by a licensed mechanic
    • Drive an approved vehicle model

7. Delivery Services

If you’re not comfortable driving strangers, then you may want to consider delivery or shopping services instead. You can choose to deliver packages for companies like Amazon Flex, or deliver food and groceries as people need them. 

  • Pay: The average worker makes around $200 a month, though it’s heavily dependent on tips, location, and company.
  • Get started: Decide what you want to deliver, then choose the app that works best for you.

8. Rent Out Your Extra Space 

If you have a spare room or apartment, you can rent it out for long- or short-term stays through services like Airbnb. This process is extra simple as you just have to set the dates and keep a clean and desirable place to stay. Just make sure you have updated insurance to cover any potential damages. 

Airbnb has over 7 million listings worldwide and has served over 750 million guests.

Even if you don’t have a room or home to rent, you can rent out parking spaces, lawns, swimming pools, and more. 

  • Pay: Airbnb hosts can make an average of $924 a month — the highest income of all gig economy services.
  • Get started: Register your space for free after deciding your rates, rules, and available hours. You can also check out these other sharing gigs to consider:

9. Virtual Assistant 

While a virtual assistant (VA) likely has some level of administrative work to do, they offer a number of different services including customer support, human resources, bookkeeping, and more. Most VAs are required to have experience in some type of administrative role. 

  • Pay: Virtual assistants make an average $15.77 an hour, but the pay can reach $27 an hour depending on experience and job needs.
  • Get started: A virtual assistant is their own boss, so you’ll want to follow some of the basic steps to building a business. Checkout Dollarspout’s guide to get started. 

10. Online Surveys

Online surveys may not be the most lucrative side hustle, but the money can add up. They’re convenient, quick, easy, and there are plenty of platforms to use online and on your phone. It’s a good option if you’re just looking for a little extra spending money. 

  • Pay: Each survey pays anywhere from $.10–$3, and there’s usually a minimum earned amount to reach before you can cash out. 

Jobs to Get You Outside

Sometimes you just need a breath of fresh air. Try these side hustles to get outside and moving all year long.

Illustrated dog walker with the stat that U.S. dog owners spend $1,380 a year on basic expenses.

11. Dog Walking 

Dog walking is a great option to spend time with man’s best friend and a good way to get some exercise into your routine. While it may be tough to find a dog-walking job during the school year, as most families want walkers during the day, you can enjoy your summers with a furry friend getting fresh air. 

  • Pay: Hourly rates start at $15, but your location will affect prices. If you walk dogs for another company then you’ll have to pay them a cut, too.
  • Get started: Reach out to friends and neighbors to work independently, or join a service like Wag or Rover.

12. Tour Guide

If you live in a historic city or neighborhood, there may be an opportunity for you to offer walking tours of your area to summertime visitors. It’s a great opportunity to look at your city through a new lens and teach others about the area you love. Plus, being a guide will allow you to practice your public speaking skills, and you can use your knowledge of the area for future lesson plans! 

  • Pay: Tour guides make anywhere from $10–$20 an hour with an average of $24,343 a year base pay.
  • Get started: Jump right in as a peer-to-peer guide with Tours by Locals and Shiroube, or reach out to local organizations and attractions to see who’s hiring.

13. Summer Camp Counselor 

Relive your childhood memories of playgrounds, arts and crafts, and water balloon fights, not to mention spend all day in the gorgeous summer sun. You’ll be accustomed to the responsibility that comes with watching children all day, and you can let loose and have fun as a camp counselor.

  • Pay: Day camp counselors earn an average $10 an hour, and managers can make up to $20. Overnight camps pay a couple dollars more at an average of $13.
  • Get started: Local church, YMCA, and Parks and Recreation organizations often host summer and school break camps. You can also search other cities and overnight camps for a more unique camp experience.

14. Lifeguard

There’s nothing better than spending the summer in the sun, and lifeguarding is a great way to do that while protecting others. The American Red Cross offers lifeguard and water safety courses year-round, which will help you earn the necessary certifications and skills for the job.

  • Pay: Lifeguards earn an average of $12 an hour, though job experience may earn you a boost.
  • Get started: Once you complete your lifeguard training, you can apply to be a lifeguard at local pools, beaches, or even your school.

15. Coaching Local Youth Sports

If you were a competitive athlete or just love fitness, you may be able to make money as a youth sports coach. You’ll make the most as a private coach or by starting your own business. This way you can set your price and schedule, but it will be a lot of work in the beginning. 

  • Pay: You can set your own price, but most coaches earn around $14 an hour.
  • Get started: Start with coach training, then reach out to local organizations and meet other coaches in your area for opportunities and recommendations.

16. Lawn and Garden Care

Have a green thumb? You could earn some extra money in the summer months by going old-school and offering to mow lawns and tend to gardens. 

  • Pay: Landscapers earn around $14 on average with the opportunity to earn up to $20 an hour.
  • Get started: If you have your own equipment, advertise to your neighbors through Nextdoor and Facebook groups. Or you can work part-time for an established company.

DIY Hustles From Home

Starting a DIY business from home is a great way to unwind, manage your own schedule, and get creative with your part-time job.

Illustrated shopping cart with the stat that home and living (25%) and art and collectibles (21%) are the most popular Etsy shopping categories.

17. Flip Furniture

Reduce, reuse, and recycle old or neglected furniture to make something beautiful. People pay top dollar for refurbished finds and vintage treasures, and you can feel great saving items from landfills.

  • Pay: Your profit depends 100 percent on the value of the pieces you flip and you’ll learn to determine estimated profits as you go.
  • Get started: Determine what you can flip with the tools you have and start searching online marketplaces, thrifts, and yard sales to find great deals. Then, refurbish your finds and sell in all the same places. 

18. Sell Your Crafts

If you have a craft you love, consider monetizing it. Everything from cross stitch patterns to polymer clay earrings are sellable, and many are easy to pick up. The trick is finding a popular market and making something unique. So if you see resin and glitter earrings are popular, consider making new shapes with dried flowers instead. 

  • Pay: This entirely depends on your product and advertising. Check out similar stores on Etsy to get an idea for product pricing.
  • Get started: Research what’s selling and come up with your own twist! Perfect the product, then launch through an online service like Redbubble, or sell independently at markets and on social media. 

19. Farm for Cash

If you have the space and a green thumb, then consider selling food for cash. Garden vegetables and herbs can sell well on their own, or you can use them to make homemade sauces and salsas. Other products like eggs, honey, and flowers are also popular farmers market staples you can produce at home. Plus, your side hustle can double as a biology lesson.

  • Pay: Your product affects your price, but startup costs for selling at the market and purchasing basic booth needs are under $500.
  • Get started: Once you choose a product, plant it and get your business plan and certifications nailed down while they grow!

20. Begin Blogging

Blogging is a form of infopreneurship where you share your knowledge, build a professional reputation, and earn money. As a teacher, you can sell your lessons and resources, or write an e-book on effective classroom management. If you want a break from the classroom, share your experiences with gardening, business, or family instead. Once you build an audience, you can earn money through advertising or by selling your expertise as a speaker or writer. 

  • Pay: Bloggers earn an average $33,428 a year, but many make closer to $20,000.
  • Get started: Plan your blog topics and study up on how to market your blog, then get started writing. WordPress is a go-to for websites, but you can start out on simpler systems like Wix

21. Sell Stock Photos

If you dabble in photography, consider posting your photos on stock photo sites. You can make quite a bit from high-quality and desirable photos, but it’s becoming highly competitive. If you’re new to photography, then you may not make a lot, but if you’re already shooting then you might as well try to earn some money as you learn the basics. 

  • Pay: Stock photography can range from $.10–$80 a photo, and some sites charge you to post on them.
  • Get started: Start taking pictures that aren’t just pretty, but offer a story and context to them. Read up on royalties, then post your photos on sites like Alamy and Shutterstock

Many teachers and educators see side hustles or part-time work as a necessity to supplement their income. On the bright side, there are so many options these days that teachers can choose what works best for their schedule or lifestyle. Once you have a side hustle plan, set some savings goals and learn to budget your extra cash appropriately to get you there. 

Sources: Fortunly | Earnest | NEA | Statista 

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