15 Technical Indicators for Stock Trading

Using technical analysis to research stocks is a common strategy to profit from short-term movements in security prices. While some stock analysis tools are fundamental in nature, technical stock indicators typically seek patterns in past price and volume data to give investors and traders insights about how a stock might move in the future.

Naturally, every stock indicator has its pros and cons. Technical indicators can be used by traders to analyze supply and demand forces on stock price, to help investors to understand market psychology, or to manage risk. But while stock indicators and trading tools can help with buy and sell points, false signals can also occur.

For that reason, although technical indicators can assist with trend identification, it’s best to combine different indicators when conducting your stock analysis.

Learn more about the pros and cons of using the following 15 trading tools in your strategy.

Table of Contents

How Do Stock Technical Indicators Work?

Technical analysis uses various sets of data and indicators, such as price and volume, to identify patterns and trends. It does not use fundamental analysis to look at the underlying companies, their industries, or any macroeconomic trends that might drive their success or failure.

Rather, technical analysis solely analyzes a stock’s performance. Technical indicators are often rendered as a pattern that can overlay a stock’s price chart to predict the market trend, and whether the stock would be considered “overbought” or “oversold.”

One of the basic tenets of technical analysis is that history tends to repeat itself. By examining certain patterns in light of past outcomes, analysts can make an educated guess about where stock prices might be headed. That said, past performance is never a guarantee of future stock price movements, so traders must bear this in mind.

Knowing many of the most popular trading tools might benefit your investing strategy with easier to spot buy and sell signals. You don’t have to know every single technical indicator, and there are many ways to analyze stocks, but using multiple stock indicators may improve trading results. You can also use these stock indicators to help you manage risk when you are actively trading.

Trend indicators are some of the most important technical trading tools since identifying a security price’s trend is often a first step to forming a strategy. Long positions are often initiated during uptrends, while short sale ideas can occur when prices are in an established downtrend.

Volume technical indicators are also helpful to gauge the power or conviction of an asset’s price move. Some believe that the higher the stock volume on a bullish breakout or bearish breakdown, the more confident the move is. Higher volume could signal a lengthier trend continuation.

Two Types of Technical Indicators

Technical indicators generally come in two flavors: overlay indicators and oscillators.

Overlay Indicators

An overlay indicator typically overlays one trend onto another on a stock chart, often using different colors to distinguish between the lines.

Oscillator Indicators

On a technical analysis chart, an oscillator tracks the distance between two points in order to gauge momentum. The moving average is a common oscillator; it’s considered a lagging indicator as it measures specific intervals in the past.

An oscillator indicator can help traders determine support and resistance in certain price trends, so they can decide whether to sell or buy.

Oscillator indicators can be leading or lagging:

•   A leading indicator tracks current market movements to anticipate where the trend is headed next.

•   A lagging indicator is based on recent history and seeks patterns that will indicate potential price movements.

Top 15 Stock Indicators for Technical Analysis

It’s important to remember that these trading tools were developed based on the belief that mathematically derived patterns may be valuable as predictors of stock movements. Past performance, however, is not a guarantee of future results. So while it can be useful to employ stock technical indicators, they are best used in combination before deciding on a potential trade.

Also, many of these trading tools are lagging indicators, which can lead to an inaccurate reflection of current and future market conditions.

Following are 15 of the most common technical stock indicators, along with their advantages and disadvantages.

1. Moving Averages (MA)

A moving average (MA) is the average value of a security over a given time. The MA can be Simple Moving Average (SMA), Exponential Moving Average (EMA), and Weighted Moving Average (WMA).

A moving average smooths price volatility and is taken as an indicator of the direction a price may be headed. If the price is above the moving average, it’s considered an uptrend versus when the price moves below the MA, which can signal a downtrend. Moving averages are typically used in combination with each other, or other stock indicators, to identify trends.

Pros

•   Using moving averages can filter out the noise that comes from price fluctuations and focus on the overall trend.

•   Moving average crossovers are commonly used to pinpoint trend changes.

•   You can customize moving average periods: common time frames include 20-day, 30-day, 50-day, 100-day, 200-day.

Cons

•   A simple moving average may not help some traders as much as an exponential moving average (EMA), which puts more weight on recent price changes.

•   Market turbulence can make the MA less informative.

•   Moving averages can be simple, exponential, or weighted, which might be confusing to new traders.

2. Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD)

The Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) also helps investors gauge whether a security’s movement is bullish or bearish, but it uses two different MAs to do so. Often, a 26-period exponential moving average is subtracted from a 12-period EMA to spot trading signals. Then a signal line, based on a shorter period EMA, is plotted on top of the MACD to help reveal buy and sell entry points.

Traders use the convergence or divergence of these lines to identify when bullish or bearish momentum is high.

Pros

•   The MACD, used in combination with the relative strength index (below) can help identify overbought or oversold conditions.

•   The MACD can be used to indicate a trend and also momentum.

•   Can help spot reversals.

Cons

•   May provide false reversal signals.

•   Responds mainly to the speed of price movements; less accurate in gauging the direction of a trend.

3. Relative Strength Index (RSI)

RSI is a tool that identifies bullish vs. bearish price momentum. The relative strength index is an oscillator — a tool that builds a trend indicator based on the price movement between two extreme values. It ranges from 0 to 100. Generally, above 70 is considered overbought and under 30 is thought to be oversold.

Pros

•   Can help investors spot buy or sell signals.

•   May also help detect bull market or bear market trends.

•   Can be combined with moving average indicators to spot breakout trends or reversals.

Cons

•   The RSI can move without exhibiting a clear trend.

•   The RSI can remain at an overbought or oversold level for a long time, making this tool less useful.

•   It does not give clues as to volume trends.

4. Stochastic Oscillator

The stochastic oscillator has two moving lines, or stochastics, that oscillate between and around two horizontal lines: The primary “fast” moving line is called the %K, while the other “slow” line is a three-period moving average of the %K line.

A signal is generated when the “fast” %K line diverges above the “slow” line or vice versa. The stochastic oscillator uses a 0 to 100 value range.The two horizontal lines are often pre-set at 30 and 70, indicating oversold and overbought levels, respectively, but can be modified.

Pros

•   Since it’s plotted on a 0 to 100 scale, it’s possible to gauge overbought and oversold levels.

•   Traders can adjust time frame and range of prices to reduce market fluctuation sensitivity.

•   Can be used by day traders.

Cons

•   A security can remain overbought or oversold for long periods as the range of oscillations is not always proportionate to a security’s price action.

•   It can be useful for implementing an overall strategy, but not for gauging the overall market sentiment or trend direction.

5. Williams %R

Similar to the stochastic oscillator, above, the Williams %R (a.k.a. the Williams Percent Range) is also a momentum indicator — but in this case it moves between 0 and -100 to identify overbought and oversold levels and find entry and exit points in the market. The Williams %R compares a stock’s closing price to the high-low range over a specific period, typically 14 days.

Readings between 0 and -20, which are in the top 20% of price during the look-back period, are considered overbought. Readings between -80 and -100, which are in the lowest 20% of price during the look-back, are considered to be oversold.

Pros

•   You can combine different short and long time periods to compare trends.

•   Identifies overbought and oversold levels.

Cons

•   False signals can happen if price strength or weakness leads to a brief movement in the Williams %R above 70% or below 30%.

•   There is no volume analysis with the Williams %R.

6. Bollinger Bands

Bollinger Bands are a set of three lines that help measure the relative high or low of a security’s price in relation to previous trades. The center line is the Simple Moving Average (SMA) of the stock price. The other two trendlines are plotted two standard deviations away from the SMA (one positively, one negatively). These can be adjusted.

The upper and lower lines show the high and low boundaries of the security’s expected price movement (90% of the time). The middle line shows real-time price action moving between those bounds as it fluctuates day-to-day.

Pros

•   Helps traders identify volatility.

•   Can help point to trading opportunities.

Cons

•   Large losses are possible when volatility surges unexpectedly.

•   Does not identify cycle turns quickly enough at times.

7. On-Balance Volume (OBV)

OBV is a little different from the other indicators mentioned. It primarily uses volume flow to gauge future price action on a security or market. When there’s a new OBV peak, it generally indicates that buyers are strong, sellers are weak, and the price of the security will likely increase. Similarly, a new OBV low is taken to mean that sellers are strong and buyers are weak, and the price is trending down.

The numerical value of the OBV isn’t important — it’s the direction that matters. Declining volume tends to indicate declining momentum and price weakness, while increasing volume tends to indicate rising momentum and price strength.

Pros

•   Volume-based indicator gauges market sentiment to predict a bullish or bearish outcome.

•   OBV can be used to confirm price action and identify divergences.

Cons

•   Hard to find definitive buy and sell price levels.

•   False signals can happen when divergences and confirmations fail.

•   Volume surges can distort the indicator for short-term traders.

8. Accumulation / Distribution Line (ADL)

The ADL is a momentum indicator that traders use to detect tops and bottoms and thus predict reversales. It does this by using volume versus price data to identify divergences and thereby show how strong a trend might be. For example: If the price rises but the ADL indicator is falling, then the accumulation volume may not actually support a true price increase and a decline could follow.

Pros

•   Traders can use the AD Line to spot divergences in price compared with volume that can confirm price trends or signal reversals.

•   The ADL can be used as an indicator of the flow of cash in the market.

Cons

•   Doesn’t capture trading gaps or factor in their impact.

•   Smaller changes in volume are hard to detect.

9. Average Directional Index (ADX)

The Average Directional Index (ADX) also helps investors spot asset price trends and to quantify the strength of those trends. ADX shows an average of price range values that indicate expansion or contraction of prices over time — typically 14 days, but it may be calculated for shorter or longer periods. Shorter periods may respond quicker to pricing movements but may also have more false signals. Longer periods tend to generate fewer false signals but may cause the indicator to lag the market.

The ADX uses positive and negative Directional Movement Indicators (DMI+ and DMI-). ADX is calculated as the sum of the differences between DMI+ and DMI- over time. These three indicators are often charted together.

Pros

•   Can help identify when price breakouts reflect a solid trend.

•   Can send signals to traders to watch the price and manage risk (e.g. thru divergences).

Cons

•   Can generate false signals if used to analyze shorter periods.

•   Can’t be used as a standalone indicator.

10. Price Relative / Relative Strength

Relative Strength should not be confused with the Relative Strength Index (above). Relative Strength is more of an investment strategy than a specific indicator. It involves comparing one asset to another or the broader market and helps traders find securities that are trending on a relative, not absolute, basis.

Pros

•   A stock indicator that helps compare one security’s price to another to find which is outperforming.

•   Can plot one stock versus a competitor or market benchmark.

Cons

•   Does not provide exact buy and sell levels.

•   False breakouts and breakdowns can happen.

•   Mean reversion can lead to losses for momentum traders.

11. Relative Volume (RVOL)

RVOL relays to traders how near-term volume compares to historical volume. The higher RVOL is, the more other traders might be paying attention to and trading the asset. Think of it as the stock being “in play.” Stocks that have a lot of volume have more liquidity and tend to trade better than stocks with low relative volume. The RVOL is displayed as a ratio.

So if it is showing 2.5 relative volume, that means it is trading at 3.5 times its normal volume for that time period.

Pros

•   Can offer clues to identify unusually powerful price moves.

•   High and low volume is easily detected by use of being above or below a value of one (1).

Cons

•   While volume is important, it does not give exact buy and sell price levels.

•   Volume surges can be fickle — like around an earnings date.

12. Rate of Change (ROC) and Momentum

ROC is just what it sounds like — the speed at which a stock is moving compared to its trend. The indicator measures a stock’s percentage price change compared to how it moved in recent periods. Like many of the tools mentioned, it can be used to spot divergences.

Pros

•   Works better in trending markets.

•   When used with other trading tools can help traders spot strong momentum.

•   A technical trading tool that can identify overbought and oversold levels.

•   Ideal for spotting divergences.

Cons

•   False signals can happen when the indicator suggests a price trend reversal will take place.

•   Does not give higher weight to more recent price action.

13. Standard Deviation

An asset’s standard deviation is a fundamental statistical tool to get a sense of volatility. It uses historical volatility to arrive at a percentage that is used to reflect how much a security moves. While volatility can indicate potential risk, it can also signal the potential for opportunity.

Pros

•   Mathematically captures the volatility of a stock’s movements, i.e. how far the prices moves from the mean.

•   Provides technicians with an estimate for expected price movements.

•   Can be used to measure expected risk and return.

Cons

•   Does not provide precise buy and sell signals.

•   Must be used in conjunction with other indicators.

14. Ichimoku Cloud

Ichimoku clouds are used to show support and resistance areas on a price chart in an extra-illustrative manner. An Ichimoku Cloud is comprised of five separate calculations that examine multiple averages, and uses the difference between two of the lines to create a shaded area (the cloud) that aims to predict support and resistance levels. It is also employed to identify momentum and trend. It is thought to provide more data than a simple candlestick chart.

Pros

•   A leading indicator of price.

•   Indicates support and resistance areas.

•   Useful for gauging the direction and intensity of a price trend.

Cons

•   Can give many false signals in trendless markets.

•   Can be confusing to traders given its complexity.

15. Fibonacci Retracements

Fibonacci Retracements are based on the golden ratio discovered by mathematician Leonardo Pisano in the 13th century. At its core, a Fibonacci retracement is a mathematical measurement of a particular pattern. The Fibonacci sequence and ratio are used to form support and resistance lines on a price chart.

Pros

•   Offers clues about where a stock might find support and resistance.

•   Helps define exit and entry levels.

•   Can be used to place stop-loss orders.

Cons

•   The use is subjective.

•   Some say Fibonacci Retracements are simply a self-fulfilling prophecy: if many traders are using these ratios, then outcomes will reflect this.

•   No logical proof of why it should work.

The Takeaway

Technical analysts use past price and volume data to help traders identify price trends and make buy and sell decisions. It’s important to know that technical analysis does not use fundamentals to assess the underlying companies, their industries, or any macroeconomic trends that might drive their success or failure. Rather, technical analysis solely analyzes a stock’s performance.

Technical indicators are often rendered as a pattern that can overlay a stock’s price chart to predict the market trend, and whether the stock would be considered “overbought” or “oversold.” There are countless stock technical indicators in existence, and it can quickly become overwhelming to learn them all. It might be more useful to focus on a handful of the most popular trading tools so you can execute a strategy that works for you.

To start trading stocks and gain a hands-on understanding of how technical indicators work, you can open a brokerage account online with SoFi Invest®. You can trade stocks, fractional shares, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), IPO shares, and cryptocurrencies right from your laptop or phone. As a SoFi member, you will have access to many online resources — including financial professionals who can guide you in your financial journey. Get started now!


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.

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Source: sofi.com

How to Navigate an Apartment Lease Takeover Like a Pro

If you’ve got to leave your apartment mid-lease, finding a qualified person to step in and take over your lease goes a long way to making the process go smoothly.

You gone.

Or, at least you need or want to go. But you’ve got this lease on your apartment that’s not up yet. You don’t want to break your lease because that’s got some consequences that may linger. You’ve got some other options, such as a lease takeover or a sublet. Here’s how you go about getting out in the best way possible.

What’s the difference between a sublet and a lease takeover?

In a sublet, a new person comes in to finish up your lease. They pay you and you continue to pay rent to the landlord. Three things to remember: Make sure your lease agreement allows you to sublet your apartment, let your landlord know you’ll sublet and you’re on the hook if the subletter doesn’t pay the rent.

An apartment lease takeover (a.k.a. lease transfer or lease assignment) is when a new renter agrees to take over your lease and has a separate, formal agreement with the landlord. That person would then be the lessee (the person taking over the lease). You still have to find out of your lease allows this, but a lease takeover is more of a clean break than a sublet.

Lease agreement

Lease agreement

Getting started

Transferring your lease may seem like traffic has parted and you’re ready to hit the gas, but first, you’re going to adjust your mirrors and check that you’ve got a full tank. Full stop on the driving metaphors, but you’ve got work to do.

Read your lease agreement

The lease may state you can’t sublet or otherwise transfer your lease to anyone else. And, if you’re allowed to sublet or do a lease transfer, you may have to pay a processing or transfer fee. You might have to let go of your security deposit or your last month’s payment.

Contact your landlord

Get it in writing that your landlord or property manager is on board with a lease takeover. Find out what your responsibilities will be. For example, do you have to find the lessee? Will you still be on the hook for rent if the lessee doesn’t pay? You may have to get your landlord to specify in writing that unpaid rent is not your burden.

Ready to do the lease takeover

You’re not done yet. The easier you make life for your landlord or property manager, the smoother your lease takeover process will be.

Find someone to take over the lease

You may not have to do this, but it will help your case.

It should go without saying that the person should have good credit and be able to pay the rent on time. The potential lessee will have to fill out a rental application and provide all the documents and background information you had to do when you began renting the apartment. Be prepared for your landlord to say no to your candidate. Have a backup person. And then another one just in case.

If you’ve made your case for your lessee candidate and your landlord is being difficult or unreasonable, you may need to find a lawyer. Look for someone who specializes in your state’s landlord-tenant laws.

Start your lessee search early

Just because it seems like everyone you know is looking for a place to live doesn’t mean they’re actually ready to find a place or put down money on something. Remember the months of scrimping, saving and organizing you had to do before you rented your place?

Word of mouth is great, particularly among friends, family, co-workers and others that you may already know. But you can also use social media to find someone. If you’re having trouble, you might think about offering to cover the first month’s rent or paying the utility bill for a couple of months.

Take good photos of your apartment

Take good photos of your apartment

Create an apartment listing

Write a description and take some great photos of your apartment. (A picture is worth a thousand words, they say.) Three to five images (kitchen, living room, bathroom, bedroom, common space) are probably enough. You don’t need a fancy camera to take them. Make the rooms look cozy and inviting. Clear the clutter, let in as much natural light as possible and add some flowers.

Done deal

Once you’ve got your landlord’s approval, you’ll need to create an official document of the lease transfer outlining everything you all agreed to. (You can find a lease takeover template at wonder.legal.) You, your landlord and the new tenant will all have to sign the document.

You’re free to go now

Once you’ve found the perfect person to take over your lease, and they’ve signed on all the dotted lines, you are good to go.

Now, you can floor the gas and head into your new adventure.

Source: rent.com

How to Invest in Agriculture

Many people think of investing in agriculture as owning farmland and operating a farm. Many investors overlook this business area when deciding where to put their money because they don’t see themselves toiling the land. But there are various options to invest in agriculture without being a farmer.

Farmland investing is just one way to invest in agriculture. Additionally, investors can invest in farming-related exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and real estate investment trusts (REITs) or trade commodities to take advantage of the agricultural markets.

What Are Agriculture Investments?

Investing in agriculture is more than just owning some farmland and working the land. Agriculture can be an alternative investment that diversifies an investor’s portfolio. Investors can get exposure to agriculture and farming by investing in businesses involved in the whole farming process, from the seeds in the ground to the distribution of products to grocery stores.

4 Ways to Invest in Agriculture

1. Agriculture Stocks

Investors can put money into various publicly-traded companies that provide services in the farming industry. These agribusiness firms range from those involved in actual crop production — though many crop producers are privately held — to companies in the farming support businesses. The farming support businesses include companies that make fertilizer and seeds, manufacture farming equipment, and process and distribute crops.

Companies in the agriculture industry include, but are not limited to:

•   Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM): A large food processing and commodities trading firm

•   Deere & Company (DE): Known as John Deere, this company manufactures agricultural machinery and heavy equipment

•   Corteva, Inc. (CTVA): An agricultural chemical, fertilizer, and seed company

•   The Mosaic Company (MOS): A large company that produces fertilizer and seeds

•   AppHarvest Inc (APPH): A small-cap company involved in indoor farms and crop production

2. Agriculture ETFs and Mutual Funds

Investors who don’t want to pick individual stocks to invest in can always look to mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that provide exposure to the agricultural industry. Agriculture-focused mutual funds and ETFs invest in a basket of farming stocks, commodities, and related assets, allowing investors to diversify farming exposure.

3. Farm REITs

Farm and agricultural real estate investment trusts (REITs) own farmland and lease it to tenants who do the actual farming. REITs that invest in farmland can be a good option for investors who want exposure to farmland without actually owning a farm.

This type of investment can provide investors with various benefits. For example, a REIT is a type of liquid asset, meaning an investor can quickly sell the investment on the stock market. In contrast, if an investor were actually to own farmland, trying to sell the land could be a drawn-out and complex process. Other benefits include regular dividend payments and geographical and crop diversification.

Recommended: Pros and Cons of Investing in REITs

4. Commodities

Agricultural commodities are the products produced by farms, like corn, soybeans, and wheat.

Trading commodities can be a profitable, though risky, endeavor. Investors who trade commodities look to take advantage of the market’s volatility for short-term gains. Usually, this is done by trading futures contracts, though large investors may actually purchase and sell the physical commodities.

Commodity trading can be risky, especially for a novice investor. ETFs with exposure to commodities may be better for investors with lower risk tolerance.

Recommended: Why Is It Risky to Invest in Commodities?

Benefits and Risks of Investing in Agriculture

Benefits

One of the significant benefits of agriculture investments is that people always need to eat, so there will usually be some demand support for businesses in the industry. Because of this, some investors view the sector as somewhat recession-proof and a good way to diversify a portfolio.

Another benefit is that farmland REITs and certain agriculture stocks can provide passive income through regular dividend payouts. Additionally, farmland investments can provide a hedge against rising inflation.

Risks

The agricultural and farming sector can be fickle, as it’s subject to various risk factors that can impact investments. Uncertainties stemming from weather to government policies to the global commodities markets can cause volatile swings in prices and income that affect investments in the sector.

Here are some risks facing agricultural investments:

•   Production risk: Major weather events, crop diseases, and other factors can affect the quantity and quality of commodities produced.

•   Market risk: The global markets for commodities can affect farming and agricultural business as prices can swing wildly, making crop production and agribusiness demand uncertain.

•   Financial risk: Farms and related businesses often use debt to fund operations, so rising interest rates and credit tightening can hinder companies in the industry.

•   Regulatory risk: Changes in taxes, regulations, subsidies, and other government actions can impact agricultural businesses and investments.

Are Agriculture Investments Right for You?

It might seem like agriculture investments are risky, but with that risk comes reward. If an investor’s risk tolerance allows for it, agricultural investments can provide diversification in a portfolio.

The Takeaway

Fortunately for investors who want to put money into the agriculture sector, they don’t necessarily need to buy a farm. Several investment vehicles can fit their needs to get exposure to farming. Farmland REITs, agribusiness stocks, and farming and commodity ETFs can be options to build wealth in the farm business.

Investing in agriculture doesn’t have to be as hard as owning a farm and working the land. Investors can start investing in agriculture by trading stocks and ETFs for as little as $5 with SoFi Invest®.

Check out how to start investing with SoFi today.

FAQ

Is agriculture worth investing in?

Agricultural investments can help diversify a portfolio. Depending on what areas of the agriculture business you invest in, the assets can produce steady income and long-term capital gains.

How much should I invest in agriculture?

Determining how much you should invest in any asset class depends on your financial goals and personal risk tolerance. It would be best if you didn’t put too much of your money into the agriculture sector; you want a diversified portfolio.

How do I invest in a farm?

Buying a farm can be difficult; you would need a lot of capital for a down payment, just like any other piece of real estate. If you want exposure to farmland, agriculture and farm-related REITs can be a good option, especially for retail investors.


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.

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Source: sofi.com

Margin Trading vs Futures: Compared and Explained

Trading crypto on margin in the spot market is different from using futures to control crypto positions. Margin trading involves using money borrowed from a broker to go long or short crypto. With futures, traders can post margin as collateral to take on large long or short positions on contracts with a specific delivery date. Another type of crypto futures contract, perpetual futures, does not come with a delivery date, but it comes with daily fees.

It’s important for crypto investors to understand the fundamental concept of margin vs. futures. Though there are key differences between trading margin vs. futures, there are also similarities between them, and pros and cons to consider. If you recognize how futures vs. margin trading operates, then you can better decide which of these investing strategies — margin vs. futures — to use when building a cryptocurrency portfolio.

Margin vs Futures

Margin vs. futures feature many similarities, but there are also differences to consider. Analyzing both can help you know if these trading techniques could work with your investing style and tolerance for risk. You might decide to have a margin or a futures account, one of each, or neither.

Similarities

Futures vs. margin trading share some characteristics. For one thing, both methods would allow you to control more of a crypto position than would trading the cash, or spot market, using only your equity. The futures market and a margin account simply go about it differently. Both might entice prospective market participants with potentially big quick gains, but losses can be dramatic too.

It is important to remember that cryptocurrencies are usually much more volatile than stock market indexes. So if you trade with margin or futures, you could expect to see fast movements (either up or down) in your profit and loss numbers.

Differences

As we said earlier, identifying the differences between trading with margin vs. futures could help determine the best investing strategy for your risk tolerance and return objectives. For starters, futures trading requires a good faith deposit to access contracts, often with quarterly maturity, while a crypto margin account lets you leverage the spot market. The futures market might require that you pay closer attention to liquidity — that is, how easily you can trade while still receiving a competitive price.

With a crypto margin account, liquidity is generally not a problem in the spot market; knowing how much you can borrow might be the greater issue to consider. Because the spot market is perpetual, you also must determine for how long you want to own a coin. With futures, by contrast, expiring contracts set a limit on how long you can hold a position; however, you may bypass this by using perpetual futures.

It’s also important to analyze is the premium over the spot price that you are paying or are being paid. Further, trading on an unregulated platform or one with a sketchy reputation could result in possible liquidity failures or liquidation.

Similarities Differences
Margin and futures offer the chance to trade large positions with a small amount of capital Using margin requires paying a broker interest on your loan
Both can result in large and fast losses Futures trading requires a good-faith deposit
With perpetual futures, you can keep an open position indefinitely, similar to how the spot market works, but you also might owe The futures crypto market can experience premiums to spot prices

Margin vs Futures Trading in Crypto

Knowing the differences between margin and futures, as well as the similarities, goes a long way toward protecting yourself from unforeseen risks when trading crypto. You can find out more about crypto trading specifically in SoFi’s Guide to Crypto for Beginners. What’s more, you can learn about other ways that margin trading and futures differ and overlap in the crypto world. For now, here are several key points to consider:

Trading Crypto With Margin Trading Crypto With Futures
Incurs daily expenses via interest owed on borrowed funds Quarterly futures contracts can avoid fees and might be better for long-term holders
Liquid spot prices help ensure a fair price when buying and selling Futures’ basis can fluctuate
It is common to trade with between 3x-to-0x leverage Often higher leverage is employed than with margin trading

Investing and Trading Crypto With SoFi

Trading cryptocurrency on margin, and using futures contracts (including perpetual futures) to control crypto positions are commonly used, through advanced, trading methods.

Each has its own advantages and risks. While crypto margin trading offers exposure to the spot market using borrowed funds, trading with crypto futures lets investors deposit margin as collateral to control large positions for future delivery.

All it takes is at least $10 to buy and sell crypto on SoFi. You can earn a bonus of $10 in Bitcoin by doing so. A benefit of cryptocurrencies is that you can trade outside of standard stock market hours, as the crypto market is open 24/7. SoFi takes security seriously and uses a variety of tools to keep investors’ crypto assets safe.

Start trading crypto today on SoFi Invest.

FAQ

Are margin trading and futures the same?

Margin trading and futures trading are two different trading techniques. It’s key to understand both approaches before using them because they are considered advanced. Margin accounts usually involve traders opening crypto positions with borrowed money. You can control more capital with your portfolio, which allows you to leverage positions. You can experience amplified gains and losses with margin trading, so it is riskier than trading without leverage.

Futures contracts work differently in that they are binding agreements where you agree to buy or sell an underlying asset at a pre-specified price in the future. You can go long or short futures depending on your directional wager. With crypto trading, futures are often quarterly or perpetual contracts.

Do you need margin to trade futures?

You need margin to trade futures. Margin in futures trading refers to a good faith deposit used as collateral to open positions. It does not involve borrowing money from a broker, so there is nothing to repay, but you might owe funding rate fees when you own perpetual futures. Your futures account collateral also represents your maintenance margin — a minimum amount of equity needed to continue trading.

What are futures contracts and how do they work?

While margin traders participate in the spot crypto market, futures traders place trades on assets to be delivered in the future. You can think of futures vs. margin as a difference in the price of crypto in the spot market versus futures prices at some point later. Participants in the crypto futures market speculate on the future price of a coin.

You can use leverage in the futures market — some exchanges allow a leverage ratio of as much as 125:1 — using margin as collateral to open positions. Crypto futures might trade at a large premium to the spot market, and it might take a long time to exit a futures position at a competitive price.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
Crypto: Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies aren’t endorsed or guaranteed by any government, are volatile, and involve a high degree of risk. Consumer protection and securities laws don’t regulate cryptocurrencies to the same degree as traditional brokerage and investment products. Research and knowledge are essential prerequisites before engaging with any cryptocurrency. US regulators, including FINRA , the SEC , and the CFPB , have issued public advisories concerning digital asset risk. Cryptocurrency purchases should not be made with funds drawn from financial products including student loans, personal loans, mortgage refinancing, savings, retirement funds or traditional investments. Limitations apply to trading certain crypto assets and may not be available to residents of all states.
*Borrow at 2.5% through 5/31/22 and 5% starting 6/1/22. Utilizing a margin loan is generally considered more appropriate for experienced investors as there are additional costs and risks associated. It is possible to lose more than your initial investment when using margin. Please see SoFi.com/wealth/assets/documents/brokerage-margin-disclosure-statement.pdf for detailed disclosure information.
SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.
Photo credit: iStock/FG Trade
SOIN0322018r

Source: sofi.com

Mom Knows Best: 11 Moms Share Their Best Apartment Advice

Mom knows best — so take her apartment advice!

Whether you’re moving across the country for college or just across town into your own apartment, moving out on your own is a huge step towards adulthood. To help you prepare for living on your own, we asked Moms to share their best apartment advice. Here’s what 11 real moms had to share:

1. Think ahead

apartment knick knacks.

apartment knick knacks.

“Start picking up new decor items before you move, especially if you can find things on sale,” says Chelsy at Motherhood+Mayhem. “This way, you won’t spend a ton of money furnishing your apartment and making it feel like home. Plus, you’ll already have some amazing items as soon as you move in!”

2. Add personal touches wherever you can

Wall decor in an apartment.

Wall decor in an apartment.

“My best apartment advice for a first apartment is to hang up your favorite photos and artwork,” says Amy Smith from Amy & Rose. “The quickest way to make a space feel like yours is to decorate it with your favorite things. Hang up your best photos and add some personal touches, such as artwork you’ve created or knick-knacks you’ve collected over the years — they’ll add personality without even trying very hard at all.”

3. Prioritize your closet organization

Clean, organized closet.

Clean, organized closet.

“My apartment advice is to make sure that you invest in ways to organize your closets,” says owner and editor of Teach Workout Love, Jennifer O’Shea. “Closets are key in apartments for storage so having baskets, shelving, containers, etc. would be helpful in saving space. Anywhere that you can maximize storage whether it’s under the bed, in the closet or organizing drawers — use it!”

4. Add some greenery

Flowers and plants in a small apartment space.

Flowers and plants in a small apartment space.

“Purchase some easy-care plants such as bamboo stalks or cactuses and spread them throughout your apartment to add a fresh, homey feel to your first place,” says Whitney Fleming, ParentingTeensandTweens.com. “You can even add a few artificial plants or succulents. Also, splurge on a few fresh flowers every once in a while to perk up your kitchen counter and add some color.”

5. Opt for multi-purpose furniture

Dining room area in a first apartment.

Dining room area in a first apartment.

“Choose your furniture wisely — in addition to looking good, make sure that it’s comfortable and easy to maintain!” says Lauren Webber of Dainty Mom. “If your apartment is small, go for space-saving and multipurpose pieces.”

6. Identify a purpose for your space

Plants and a couch in a small apartment.

Plants and a couch in a small apartment.

“Think about the place where you spend the most time,” says Ingrid Read, the founder of Working Momkind. “Is it the couch, where you binge-watch your favorite shows or the bed, where you find yourself hitting snooze too many times to stay in there a little longer? Maybe it’s the kitchen where you enjoy making every meal from scratch? Once you’ve identified your space, you can comfortably splurge on that and whatever is within reachable distance of it. If it’s the couch, get the one you think about sinking into all day, an ottoman or coffee table and a nice end table for your favorite book, remotes and phone charger. Once that space is complete, everything else will fall into place, becoming your home.”

7. Don’t be afraid to incorporate pops of color

Colorful apartment with pops of color.

Colorful apartment with pops of color.

“I am no interior designer by any means, but I am very good at rooting and uprooting and making places homes,” says Domiana, retired pro athlete turned 2x bestselling author coach and healer.

“My biggest tip is to add pops of color. For example, my color is yellow, which is the color that I embody. So, find something that expresses your personality and makes you feel comfortable in order to really make your place feel like a home. Those pops of color can come from throw blankets. You can never go wrong with those. Therefore, finding cool colors that make you feel comfortable and cozy in your new space is so important. Lastly, plants make everything better. Just that greenery around you.”

8. Prioritize the essentials

Kitchen with essentials like a coffee maker and coffee.

Kitchen with essentials like a coffee maker and coffee.

“My best apartment advice is to prioritize your essentials before moving,” says Mommy Sigrid of Lovingly Mama. “For me, having a bed and mattress (with pillows), clean sheets, towels, bath products and coffee with a coffee maker are moving day essentials. These are the things I would need to take a good bath after moving in, a good night’s rest after unpacking, cleaning and arranging. Plus, the coffee will help you face the new day in your new apartment. All three: bath, sleep and coffee are my necessities for sanity.”

9. Choose your roommates wisely

Roommates.

Roommates.

“My motherly apartment advice is to interview potential roommates thoroughly,” says Jacqueline Pinchuk. “Make sure you’re a good fit for each other. Find out how clean they are, how often their significant other spends the night, preference for communal food vs. individual, division of shared bills and household responsibilities. Small things, like not having toilet paper when it’s your roommate’s turn to buy, become an important part of enjoying your new home.”

10. Work with your walls

Artwork in a dining room area.

Artwork in a dining room area.

“In order for your apartment to feel like your own — you need the walls to reflect you,” says Kathleen Tomasewski from Mom on the Go in Holy Toledo. “This doesn’t mean that you have to go spend a lot of money on expensive wall coverings. Get creative with it. Take some of your favorite book covers, book jackets, magazine covers and/or pages from calendars and frame them in white or black inexpensive frames. This will provide for a cohesive collection of some of your favorite things that reflect you and make you feel more at home in your new apartment.”

“You could always take it a step further and only include covers or images that contain a particular color scheme, say red, pink and white or navy and black. But again — remember the covers or images you choose need to reflect you, your interest and your personality. It is your space, after all!”

11. Nourish yourself

Cooking in an apartment.

Cooking in an apartment.

“My go-to apartment advice for when you’re ready to move out on your own is to make sure you have a decent set of pots and pans,” says Heather Wells, founder of The Single Mom Blog & Podcast. “Eating out is great but being able to cook a nice meal will not only make it feel more like home but it will help you save money.”

Because Mom said so

Whether you follow some of this motherly apartment advice or you follow all of it, just know these mom-approved recommendations will help your first apartment feel like home in no time!

Source: rent.com

Why Are Bitcoin and Other Cryptos So Volatile?

Bitcoin’s most defining feature might well be that its price always seems to be rising.

In reality, however, the price of Bitcoin doesn’t always go up. To get these screaming vertical price increases, there needs to be some death-defying falls as well. Bitcoin’s very volatility makes this popular crypto a tempting investment for some, and a quite dangerous one for others. Trading in cryptocurrencies might not be for all investors — especially those with a low tolerance for risk.

Bitcoin Price Volatility

There’s no denying that cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin, are volatile. For instance, in the first half of 2021, Bitcoin doubled in value, reaching a record-breaking high price of $64,000. But it tumbled back to less than $30,000 during the summer months. Then in November, Bitcoin’s price soared again; this time to $68,000 (for another all-time high) only to slip to below $35,000 in January 2022.

And this is just one example. Since its launch in 2009, Bitcoin has posted an impressive price history, and experienced more than a few conspicuous crashes.

Volatility is essentially a given across all types of cryptocurrencies, given the general air of legal, political, institutional, and technological uncertainty that floats around them. But it’s more noticeable with Bitcoin. Bitcoin was the very first cryptocurrency created. Not only is it the most expensive crypto, but likely the most visible, and has become a flagship for the entire crypto/blockchain space. Arguably, Bitcoin could be the coin that led the government, the public, and traditional financial services companies to take cryptocurrencies seriously. Increasingly, millions of ordinary people view Bitcoin as a vehicle for investing, trading, and saving. But before investing in cryptocurrency, an investor would want to consider its volatility seriously.

Why Does Cryptocurrency Volatility Matter?

There’s a reason that nearly anyone who’s well-versed in cryptocurrency would caution novice investors to invest no more than you’re willing to lose. With a highly volatile asset like cryptocurrency, an investor’s overall portfolio value could suddenly shoot much higher or much lower than they would expect, or are prepared for, based on big changes in its price.

Bitcoin is not the only cryptocurrency to experience big price swings that can lead to large gains or losses for investors. Volatility does not play favorites, and most crypto coins, even more familiar assets, like plain vanilla stocks, can experience the phenomenon of volatility. From the second-largest crypto, Ethereum — and popular established coins like Dogecoin, Uniswap, and Filecoin — to crypto projects you might not know, all have experienced price volatility.

Is Bitcoin Particularly Volatile?

There are at least a few reasons why Bitcoin’s price is so unstable.

Liquidity

In financial markets, liquidity is a concept that relates how much a given purchase or sale of an asset will move its overall price. Liquidity, in general, supports overall asset values. Say you have an item that costs $500 but when you go to sell it, there’s no one to buy it; In that case, the $500 price tag is not very meaningful. Low liquidity may be rendering the price of Bitcoin unstable.

A particular concern with Bitcoin is that a huge portion of all the Bitcoin circulating in the world — at this writing, more than 18.5 million bitcoin — will never be bought or sold by anyone. This could be because the coin is stranded in wallets for which the private keys have been forgotten or because they’re held by investors who will never sell, no matter the price. Moreover, Bitcoin’s existence is finite; no more than 21 bitcoin will ever be mined.

By shrinking the amount of Bitcoin in circulation beyond the limits built into the system, Bitcoin’s liquidity could dry up. This means that movements to buy or sell could quickly influence its price, driving it up or down violently.

Speculation

One of the biggest debates surrounding cryptocurrencies is, what’s it for, exactly? Why are people buying it? For individuals who live in countries with unstable or despotic governments, Bitcoin can be a lifeline of stable value. But for many, it is not an especially convenient payment mechanism compared to the fiat currency of existing banking systems.

And yet, many people are buying Bitcoin and willing to pay ever-higher prices for it. The main reason seems that they expect the price to get even higher in time. Some people think the price will go up because Bitcoin is protected against inflation because of its 21-million cap on coin. Some expect wider adoption of Bitcoin as a payment protocol. And some expect it to become widely used by financial services institutions as a store of value.

The FOMO Factor

Essentially, interest in Bitcoin is generated by the idea that other people are going to buy it in the future, at a higher price than it’s selling for today. This expectation is fed by regular headlines about a company or celebrity buying into Bitcoin and the massive profits people are generating from Bitcoin they bought years — or even weeks — ago. In the crypto community, this behavior is known as fear of missing out (FOMO). Speculative investing like this often leads to volatility, because the price can turn down as sharply as it turns up.

At this time, many analysts believe that the questions surrounding cryptocurrency, as well as FOMO, are precisely what are keeping Bitcoin’s prices high. An asset’s price likely would swing if a large portion of investors are trying to get in front of buyers who come in later. Those who buy a crypto immediately when it comes to market could dump the coin just as quickly. This could happen if an investor made a profit, or they no longer believe that more investors will buy into the crypto.

The Takeaway

Bitcoin’s volatility is based on at least two factors: its potentially low liquidity, and the plethora of unanswered questions about crypto, a still-new asset class. Investors and anyone who follows the news are aware of shocking highs and lows in Bitcoin’s value.

Interested in trading crypto? With SoFi Invest® crypto trading, members can buy and sell popular coins like Bitcoin, Filecoin, and Ethereum. With the convenient mobile app, you can trade crypto 24/7 – even on weekends, holidays, middle of the night.

Find out how to get started with SoFi Invest today.

FAQ

In general, are cryptocurrencies more volatile than stocks?

Yes. Investing in the stock market has been a mainstay of the U.S. economy since the late 1700s. Stocks are also regulated, subject to oversight by the SEC, and other government agencies. Cryptocurrencies as an asset class are quite new, not fully regulated, and do not yet have a proven track record in U.S. markets. As we discussed, crypto is considered a speculative investment. Complex assets — like high-yield bonds, options, mortgage-backed securities, and other derivatives, including crypto — are subject to greater volatility than are plain vanilla stocks.

Which cryptocurrency is the most volatile?

The answer: It changes every day. And, volatility is not selective. Popular coins, like Bitcoin (BTC) and Ethereum (ETH), take their turns at being “most-volatile” just as often as do the tiny cryptos you might not have heard of . Cryptocurrency’s volatility has spawned a number of reliable indexes that track and report its daily price fluctuations, including Yahoo Finance and Shufflup .

Is volatility a good thing for crypto?

Volatility is neither good nor bad. Rather, it’s a phenomenon that exists in all financial markets for a mix of reasons. Cryptocurrency skeptics might see crypto’s volatility as a danger sign, a reason to stay away. However, sometimes volatility can benefit a new fast-growing asset, like crypto.

This is happening currently, with profit-seeking traders and wealthy venture capitalists streaming toward crypto. Venture capital funding can help seed new start-ups and advance technical innovation. And new money flowing into a sector often brings heightened liquidity, which makes for healthy financial markets.

The FOMO factor, which we discussed above, and just plain curiosity also can have a positive effect on crypto. For example, some large traditional financial services (TradFi) institutions that were prior crypto-naysayers are now showing an interest in the crypto sector.


Crypto: Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies aren’t endorsed or guaranteed by any government, are volatile, and involve a high degree of risk. Consumer protection and securities laws don’t regulate cryptocurrencies to the same degree as traditional brokerage and investment products. Research and knowledge are essential prerequisites before engaging with any cryptocurrency. US regulators, including FINRA , the SEC , and the CFPB , have issued public advisories concerning digital asset risk. Cryptocurrency purchases should not be made with funds drawn from financial products including student loans, personal loans, mortgage refinancing, savings, retirement funds or traditional investments. Limitations apply to trading certain crypto assets and may not be available to residents of all states.
Disclaimer: The projections or other information regarding the likelihood of various investment outcomes are hypothetical in nature, do not reflect actual investment results, and are not guarantees of future results.
SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.
Stock Bits
Stock Bits is a brand name of the fractional trading program offered by SoFi Securities LLC. When making a fractional trade, you are granting SoFi Securities discretion to determine the time and price of the trade. Fractional trades will be executed in our next trading window, which may be several hours or days after placing an order. The execution price may be higher or lower than it was at the time the order was placed.

Photo credit: iStock/MixMedia
SOIN0322033

Source: sofi.com

The Best College Towns in California

From ocean-side towns to urban and metro cities, California has hundreds of college towns for students and residents alike to select from and call home. Check out our report card to learn what California college towns have to offer.

California is home to more than 700 public and private universities and community colleges. That means the Golden State has a variety of great California college towns.

So, what are some of the best college towns in California and what makes them so desirable? We’ve done our homework and put together a report card of the best California college towns to live in. Extra credit — people other than students can live in these areas, too!

10 best California college towns

Whether you’re a freshman just starting school or looking to relocate with your family, these college towns in California offer something for just about everyone.

1. Los Angeles

UCLA in los angeles

UCLA in los angeles

You may not immediately think of Los Angeles as a college town, but the city is home to 63 colleges. Some of the most well-known schools include the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the University of Southern California (USC) and Loyola Marymount College. These are just some of the great schools with diverse student populations.

In addition to having several colleges to choose from, there’s so much life in the city of L.A. What’s not to love about living in Los Angeles? You’ll have access to world-class entertainment, countless restaurants and bars, great shopping and hundreds of outdoor parks. L.A. is the center of entertainment so you might even spot a celebrity walking the sunny streets of L.A.

People love L.A. for the year-round, mild climate. There are great hiking trails — like Runyon Canyon Loop or Griffith Park Trails — and outdoor parks to enjoy. Also, you’re also close to beaches like Santa Monica or Long Beach.

Los Angeles is a city that gives you a little bit of everything. You have access to one of the largest cities in the world so you can get your fix of city life while also escaping to the beach or trails. There are many neighborhoods and apartments in Los Angeles, so college students and other renters have plenty of options when looking for their next home.

Renters can expect to pay between $2,700 and $3,600 for a one or two-bedroom apartment.

2. Palo Alto

palo alto, a california college town

palo alto, a california college town

While not technically an Ivy League school, Stanford University is a prestigious, private school that’s comparable to an Ivy League. Located near the city of Palo Alto, Stanford itself is actually the town in Santa Clara county. Home to roughly 16,000 students, Stanford is one of California’s best college towns. Living here, you’ll enjoy mild weather and have access to a variety of great outdoor activities. This entire area is known as the “birthplace of Silicon Valley,” so you’ll be surrounded by tech and innovation.

When you’re living in Palo Alto, you’ll want to check out some of the sights like Hoover Tower or Cantor Arts Center. You can also enjoy the Palo Alto Baylands Natural Preserve. Once you’ve settled into Palo Alto and hit the major spots, ease into hikes, explore the neighborhoods and walk around Stanford Campus on your evening walks. You’ll be a local in no time.

The neighborhoods are beautiful and the climate is great but the rent is steep. Students and renters living near Stanford in Palo Alto will enjoy a great college town but should know that rent here is much higher compared to other cities in California. For instance, rent ranges between $3,700 and $4,300 depending on the size of the apartment. However, if you’re the next Steve Jobs and are ready to change the world with your tech start-up, this is the college town to live in.

3. Riverside

riverside, a california college town

riverside, a california college town

Riverside is home to UC – Riverside, a college that’s part of the 10 University of California schools. With roughly 21,500 students attending each year, this is a great school for students in the Palm Desert area of California. Riverside is one of the best college towns in California for its diverse student population, dedicated researchers and abundance of activities for students and their families.

People like living in the city of Riverside as it’s a vibrant community with mountains, deserts and coastal areas close by. It’s less expensive compared to other Southern California cities, yet you get the perks of California with the rolling hills and close access to beaches in this city.

Riverside is home to the citrus industry, so if you like navel oranges, you’re in luck. If that’s not your thing, don’t worry. Riverside is a sprawling urban area within 60 miles of L.A. Students and residents alike will enjoy the lower cost of living in this city while still having access to everything that makes sunny California great.

The cost of rent averages $1,800 for a one-bedroom apartment and approximately $2,000 for a two-bedroom apartment.

4. Berkeley

berkeley, california

berkeley, california

The college town of Berkeley seems to have it all — a diverse population, great bars and restaurants, a thriving nightlife, great schools from Kindergarten on up, dedicated students and a variety of housing options. Renters are within close proximity to the University of California, Berkeley campus, which is a public land grant university.

People like Cal Berkeley for the diverse higher education programs offered. From liberal arts education to STEM-based degrees, the school offers it all. Renters in Berkeley will love this college town that has a healthy blend of student-related activities near campus and a thriving city apart from the college itself.

Ranked one of the healthiest cities in the nation, Berkeley has great food, fun shops and restaurants and a vibrant live music scene. There are plenty of bike-friendly trails so you can cycle yourself from place to place. It’s a liberal, easy-going area that residents love to call home.

Rent ranges anywhere from $1,850 to $5,100 but rent has decreased by 22 percent overall year-over-year in this college town.

5. Orange

orange california

orange california

Chapman University is in the city of Orange, California. This is a small, private school in a college town located only 15 miles from the beach. The school itself has approximately 10,000 students enrolled but the city of Orange has 139,000 residents. If you live in this California college town, you’ll live near a school dedicated to liberal arts (they’re famous for their film school!) while also getting to enjoy a bigger city atmosphere.

Ninety-two percent of students live on campus during their first year, so as a student, you’re sure to make friends with your dorm buddies. However, if you move off campus you’ll have plenty of rental options and will love living in this vibrant Southern California beach city.

Whether or not you’re a student, residents alike can meander through Hart’s Park or catch a ball game at Angels Stadium. All public schools are highly rated, so it’s a great city for families to settle down. You’ll have access to great parks and the neighborhoods are family-friendly. A lot of young families and professionals settle down here as there are good job prospects, relatively affordable cost of living and easy access to fun things to do.

Rent averages $2,100 to $2,400 for studios, one-bedrooms or two-bedroom apartments.

6. Malibu

malibu, california

malibu, california

Pepperdine is a very small, private university with 9,000 students enrolled annually. Malibu itself is fairly small when compared to other California towns, with 13,000 residents. Pepperdine is a great college town because of the proximity to amenities in Malibu and the tight-knit community on campus. The Pepperdine student community is strong and students can live on or near campus and participate in a variety of student-led activities.

Outside of the campus itself, the city of Malibu is a glamorous Southern California city known for its beaches, amazing climate and frequent celebrity sightings. If you’re a renter looking for a mix of student life nearby and picturesque California glam, Malibu is the college town for you.

Keep in mind that Malibu is as expensive as it is glamorous. Rent is between $4,900 and $5,500 a month. While you’ll pay a pretty penny to live here, residents all love it. There are ample beaches to enjoy, safe neighborhoods with low crime rates and an amazing school system.

7. San Francisco

san francisco, ca

san francisco, ca

The University of San Fransisco is one of the colleges located in this famous tech city. Students and renters will enjoy calling San Francisco their college town while having access to campus life, too. San Fran is known for its liberal and diverse population and the university prides itself on its commitment to inclusiveness, equality and social justice.

Other benefits of living in this college town are your access to the San Francisco Bay, Golden Gate Bridge and the amazing downtown scene. You’ll enjoy cooler weather and more foggy days but also have sunny days to enjoy the outdoors. This big college town offers everything from outdoor adventures to downtown life.

San Fran residents love this area. You have a metro downtown with amazing restaurants and shops. There’s access to world-class destinations like the Golden Gate Bridge. You can enjoy an afternoon at Golden Gate Park and then head to the city for dinner that night.

San Fransisco is one of the most expensive cities in the world, though, so keep that in mind before deciding to settle in this California college town. You should plan to budget anywhere from $3,400 to $4,500 to live in the Bay Area.

8. Santa Barbara

santa barbara, a college town in california

santa barbara, a college town in california

Located on the coast, UC Santa Barbara is a college town in — drumroll please — Santa Barbara, CA! The school itself has nearly 24,000 students enrolled each year, making it a large public school in the state. It’s one of the top-rated universities in the country and has produced several Nobel Prize winners.

Not only is it a great college, but the city of Santa Barbara is also top-notch. Renters will enjoy amazing beaches, breathtaking cliff-side views, endless trails and walking paths and good weather almost all year long.

People living in Santa Barbara talk about the sense of community they feel living here. You’ll enjoy a close-knit community in one of the most gorgeous beach-side cities in California. Rent ranges from $2,400 to $3,200 in Santa Barbara.

9. San Diego

san diego, california

san diego, california

San Diego State University is a public university located in San Diego. The school population is large with more than 35,000 students. Living in this college town near campus, you’ll be surrounded by students who are eager to learn and cheer on the basketball team, the Aztecs. Another college located in this city is the University of San Diego.

Living in San Diego comes with perks, too. You’ll be located near the beach and can visit the famous San Diego Zoo. If that’s not your thing, you can enjoy great seafood, try a new coffee shop or go whale watching, hiking or biking. Renters can expect to pay between $2,300 and $3,400 in rent, but prices may vary for on-campus housing. San Diego is one of the best places to live in California.

10. Claremont

homes in claremont, california

homes in claremont, california

Claremont is a great California college town and is home to Pomona College, a small, liberal arts college. With a small student body of 2,000 students, residents of Claremont can live close to the college campus without having the overwhelming number of students that other state schools have.

Living in Claremont you’ll have a suburban feel and are friendly with your neighbors, but L.A. is only 35 miles away so you have quick access to a big city, too. Claremont is great for parks, fine arts and food. Rent ranges from $1,600 to $1,900 for one and two-bedroom apartments.

Living near a college town

Like all things, living near a college town has its pros and cons. Pros include lots of housing options, a younger population of eager students, several restaurants and bars and a thriving nightlife. Depending on your perspective, cons can include too many young students and party-goers and potentially worn-down housing from college students residing in them.

However, we can all agree that living in California near a college town, you’ll enjoy the perks of California weather, good food, friendly people and a variety of housing options that fit your needs and budget.

Source: rent.com

7 Reasons Never To Sneak a Pet into Your Apartment

Sneaking an animal into your rental home can have serious financial and emotional consequences.

Whether your pet is a cat, a dog, a bunny or a bird, it’s never a good idea to sneak an unauthorized pet into your apartment if there’s a no pets policy in place. Getting caught by neighbors or during routine maintenance visits can give you several negative consequences to follow. If you want a companion animal as a renter, there are several apartment communities that are pet-friendly.

If you’re eager to adopt a new pet but happen to live in an apartment that does not allow pets, it’s probably best that you start searching for a new property that caters to animals and renters alike. As tempting as it is to quietly sneak the pet into your apartment, it’s never worth the risk.

We’ll highlight all of the reasons why sneaking an unauthorized pet into your rental home is a very bad idea. We don’t want to scare you but we do want to illustrate why it’s best for you and the pet to follow the rules outlined in your lease agreement.

Cute puppy

Cute puppy

Understanding pet rent and pet deposit fees

Some apartment communities allow pets if you pay certain fees. Other apartment complexes strictly forbid pets. If you’ve found a pet-friendly apartment, it’s important to understand the difference between all the fees.

Pet rent

A non-refundable fee that you owe each month on behalf of your pet. The landlord will charge you rent on behalf of your animal. Typically, this ranges between $50 and $100 per pet each month.

Pet deposit fee

A one-time payment is usually collected by the landlord when you sign the lease. Like a security deposit, it’s collected as insurance in case your animal ruins the floors, walls or doors.

These different pet payments will vary and the property manager has the discretion on how much to charge. These are applicable for pet-friendly or pet-tolerant apartments. However, if your apartment complex does not allow any animals, it’s a different story.

Reasons to never sneak a pet into an apartment

When you sneak a pet into the apartment, you’re violating the lease and risking everything from hefty penalties to eviction. Even if you’re tricky and do a great job hiding your pet, if you get caught, you’re in for a world of trouble.

Having an unauthorized pet is not worth the risk for you or the pet itself. Here are some of the things that can happen to tenants who have an unauthorized pet in their home.

Letter charging fines

Letter charging fines

1. You could be charged expensive fines

Depending on the lease agreement, you may owe a fine for sneaking a pet into your place. The landlord can charge tenants a hefty sum, as outlined in the lease. While shelling out unnecessary money isn’t fun, this is one of the less severe consequences of having a cat or dog in your place when the lease doesn’t allow pets.

2. You may lose your security deposit

You may lose some or all of your security deposit if an unauthorized pet damages the structure of the property. For example, if you sneak a dog into your property and the dog scratches the front door, pees on the carpet and chews the walls, you’ll lose your security deposit upon the final inspection. Again, this is a small consequence of having an unauthorized pet on the property.

3. You’re in breach of the contract

When you rent property from a landlord and sign the lease, you’re signing a legally binding agreement. You agree to follow the terms and conditions outlined in the lease. When you disregard the lease, you’re breaking the contract you signed, which can have legal consequences.

If you signed a lease that explicitly stated a no-pet policy, you can’t bring in a dog or other pet into your home, even if you’re just pet-sitting for a family member or friend. Depending on the lease and your landlord, you may owe a fine or face eviction because you breached the contract.

This will also hurt your credibility when it comes to renting future spaces. You don’t want your current landlord to tell a future landlord that you violated the lease. That will never look good on your record or work in your favor.

4. You may have to re-home your pet

You love your new dog dearly and were looking forward to bringing him home with you. But then, Rover wouldn’t stop barking and the neighbors turned you into the landlord for having a pet. If you’re not in a place to switch complexes, your landlord may force you to re-home your pet. That’s a terrible situation for both you and your dog.

Sneaking a pet into your home might cost you your pet. However, you should know that a landlord can’t take your pet from you, but they can evict you if you don’t re-home the animal.

5. You could have to switch apartments quickly

If you’re unwilling to re-home your animal or get a family member to take it, you might have to switch apartments quickly. With short notice, finding a new rental property is expensive, difficult and stressful. You’ll likely be charged fines from your current place and your future landlord will want rental application fees along with the first and last month’s rent. If you’re not in a financial situation to take on these extra expenses, don’t risk it. Also, you’ll be lucky if you’re simply being asked to switch apartments. Some places might even evict you.

Eviction notice

Eviction notice

6. You could potentially be evicted

No renter wants to face eviction. This is a death sentence for renters for several reasons. First, you’ll have to immediately find a new property to rent. Second, eviction looks terrible on your rental and credit report and may make it difficult to even find a new place to call home. And third, you may still have to dole out monthly rent for the old place if you signed a year lease. If you break the terms of the rental agreement, your landlord has the legal right to evict you.

7. You could be sued for unpaid rent

If you broke the rental agreement and are therefore evicted, you could still be legally responsible for unpaid rent. Rental management may sue you for the remainder of your unpaid rent. For example, if you’re evicted six months into your 12-month rental agreement, you could legally be on the hook for those last six months’ worth of rent. On top of legal fees, this could cost you a hefty sum.

How to bring your pet into your apartment the right way

If you’re an animal person and want a pet, then make sure you bring your cat or dog into the apartment the right way. As an animal lover and renter, make sure you’re searching for pet-friendly apartments and that you fully understand the terms of your lease agreement so you aren’t in violation of it. You can have your pet (and walk it, too) by talking to your landlord and following the rules.

Source: rent.com

The Cheapest Neighborhoods in New Orleans for Renters in 2022

The French Quarter is great and all, but these neighborhoods won’t break the bank.

New Orleans is an exciting place to live. A major tourist destination, you can probably guess which neighborhood is the most expensive — but where are the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans and what makes them special?

Check out the cheapest neighborhoods and apartments in New Orleans.

What is the average rent in New Orleans?

The average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in New Orleans is $2,311.

The 10 most affordable neighborhoods in New Orleans

Gorgeous and varying styles of architecture, rich culture and location are all major amenities of NOLA’s least expensive neighborhoods.

Though a few of these neighborhoods are completely new to non-residents, the neighborhoods below are some of the most distinct and historical in the city.

10. Medical District

Medical District

Medical District

SOURCE: RENT.COM/CANAL
  • Average 2-BR rent: $2,861
  • Rent change since 2021: +0.06%

The Medical District is in the heart of NOLA. Galleries and museums are a short distance away for culture-lovers, and some of the best restaurants in town are in this neighborhood.

The Medical District is where the Tulane University Medical School, School of Public Health and Louisiana State University are all located. There are various other medical institutions in the neighborhood, too, making it ideal for medical students, staff and professionals.

The Medical District has condos and high rises, but gorgeous brick buildings, as well. Many have beautiful detailing and quirky features that give the area a refreshing personality.

Lured by the fantastic location, you’ll find more than those who work in the medical industry in the area, however. Located within walking distance of the French Quarter, Superdome and Smoothie King Center, apartments in the Medical District are near the best nightlife and events.

9. Central Business District

Central Business District, one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

Central Business District, one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

SOURCE: RENT.COM/FOUR WINDS NOLA
  • Average 2-BR rent: $2,848
  • Rent change since 2021: -0.58%

Central Business District is the city’s “Downtown,” as this is the area where glass skyscrapers and office buildings are. That being said, the Central Business District (CBD) does have its share of architecture from the 19th century that’s well-preserved.

There are endless options for entertainment in CBD, matching the energetic and exciting vibe of the neighborhood. For kids, the Louisiana Children’s Museum and the Audubon Insectarium are instant favorites. Adults can enjoy Broadway shows and concerts hosted at the Saenger, while Orpheum provides more innovative and unique performances.

If there’s one thing it’s impossible to do in the Central Business District, it’s to eat at every restaurant. Foodies might give it a try, but the sheer amount of delicious eateries on one block is staggering.

Perfect for high-energy families, professionals and kids, Central Business District apartments are close to everything you need.

8. Faubourg Lafayette

Faubourg Lafayette

Faubourg Lafayette

SOURCE: RENT.COM/THE MUSES APARTMENT HOMES
  • Average 2-BR rent: $2,592
  • Rent change since 2021: N/A

If you’re looking for an up-and-coming neighborhood with tons of amenities, look no further. Centrally located, Faubourg Lafayette connects to some of the most popular neighborhoods, has accessible public transit and is only a 10-minute walk to the Superdome.

One of the great African American neighborhoods in the city, the Ashe Cultural Arts Center is a great place to learn about the arts of the African diaspora. Along St. Charles Avenue, you’ll find some of the most delicious Mexican, Southern and seafood dishes.

Non-profits and cultural arts are revitalizing the neighborhood, drawing young professionals and families to its lively streets. With all the interest and development this neighborhood is quickly becoming one of the hippest places to live in the area, but for now, apartments in Faubourg Lafayette are still some of the most affordable.

7. Central City

Central City, one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

Central City, one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

SOURCE: RENT.COM/1643 JOSEPHINE
  • Average 2-BR rent: $2,592
  • Rent change since 2021: N/A

Located smack in the middle of the Central Business District and Garden Districts, when you live in Central City, you can do just about everything on foot.

The neighborhood is a hodgepodge of architecture, though seemingly odd is actually Central City’s rich history on full display. You’ll find shotgun homes — built for an influx of migrant workers — in every direction, architectural gems next to vacant lots and 20th-century apartments in Central City.

Oretha Castle Haley Blvd is a major area of the neighborhood and is where the Central City Festival takes place. It also has some of the best restaurants and cafés to visit, not to mention the art centers and museums. As more investment returns into the neighborhood, the growth will continue to attract new people.

It’s no surprise if you haven’t heard of Central City — many tourists haven’t — but that hasn’t stopped this neighborhood, and the interest in it, from continuing to thrive.

6. Lower Garden District

Lower Garden District

Lower Garden District

SOURCE: RENT.COM/DELANEAUX
  • Average 2-BR rent: $2,485
  • Rent change since 2021: +1.91%

Famous for Magazine Street, the Lower Garden District is known for having a million things to do. Whether you’re hanging out at the trendiest new bar or taking in an art exhibit, the options are endless.

Despite the number of boutiques, restaurants and shops located in the Lower Garden District, it’s a neighborhood above all else. This historic area is an eclectic community that features some of the best architecture New Orleans has to offer. From mansions to condos and townhouses, there’s something for families, professionals, couples and everyone else.

Lower Garden District is also great if you love the outdoors. Coliseum Square, a park known for its beautifully preserved and vast amount of green space, is at the center of the city.

A neighborhood that’s full of culture, interesting neighbors and spellbinding old streets, architectural gems aren’t the only thing you’re sure to find here.

5. Mid-City

Mid-City, one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

Mid-City, one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

SOURCE: RENT.COM/AMERICAN CAN APARTMENTS
  • Average 2-BR rent: $2,254
  • Rent change since 2021: -5.03%

Not only is Mid-City one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans, but it’s also one of the coolest, too. Without as many tourist attractions as other areas, Mid-City’s economic livelihood relies heavily on local clientele, giving the neighborhood a unique identity.

Mid-City, once the swampy back part of town, now attracts younger people with its diversity, an array of bars and restaurants and quirky local feel. Residents live in historic homes, many of which still have cypress cabinetry and other original architectural features.

Public transit goes throughout the neighborhood, connecting to Uptown and Gentilly, as well as the Canal Street streetcar. Centrally located, when you live in Mid-City, you’re only 10–15 minutes away from everything in New Orleans.

With quick access to outdoor recreational spaces and major commercial corridors that attract residents throughout the city, apartments in Mid-City provide a fusion of spacious Uptown living and the urban vibes of downtown.

4. Fairgrounds

The Esplanade at City Park

The Esplanade at City Park

SOURCE: RENT.COM/THE ESPLANADE AT CITY PARK
  • Average 2-BR rent: $1,831
  • Rent change since 2021: +3.6%

Fairgrounds is famous to tourists for the Fair Grounds Race Course — the namesake of the neighborhood — and the New Orleans Jazz Festival, but only true NOLA locals know how much it has to offer.

Predominantly a residential neighborhood, Fairgrounds oozes with the laid-back NOLA charm its long been known for, yet, surprisingly, bursts with life. Residents living in Fairgrounds apartments enjoy easy access to City Park and the New Orleans Museum of Art, as well as a central location within the city.

Bordered by the waterway, Bayou St. John, residents have access to a variety of outdoor activities along the bayou, as well as many local bars, restaurants and boutiques to explore. Designed for travel, the neighborhood’s streets are pedestrian- and biker-friendly, making a day out in the neighborhood fun and easy.

As one of the cheapest places to live in New Orleans, you’ll get much more from this area than you imagined.

3. Gert Town

Gert Town, one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

Gert Town, one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

SOURCE: RENT.COM/PARKWAY APARTMENTS
  • Average 2-BR rent: $1,788
  • Rent change since 2021: -1.11%

Often overlooked, Gert Town is a diverse slice of New Orleans quietly tucked away near the heart of the city. A blend of urban and academia, Gert Town is home to the sprawling campus of Xavier University and the Coca-Cola Bottling Plant. As more and more people have found their way to one of the most affordable neighborhoods in New Orleans, the secret has gotten out.

The neighborhood is now going through its own Renaissance of sorts, with developers adding new retailers, homes and apartments in Gert Town. The old Blue Plate building is now filled with artist lofts, and specialty businesses — including a craft brewery, wine shop and chocolatier that now call Gert Town home.

In addition to the converted industrial buildings and new shopping, renters get to enjoy some of the most delicious and diverse bakeries and restaurants, too. As the community continues to steadily redevelop and reengage the community, Gert Town’s hidden treasures will soon be city favorites.

2. Algiers

Algiers

Algiers

SOURCE: RENT.COM/RIVERVIEW VILLA
  • Average 2-BR rent: $1,292
  • Rent change since 2021: +1.31%

Algiers is a tight-knit community with a suburban feel — perfect for those who enjoy a slower pace and knowing their neighbors’ names. Sitting on the Mississippi River’s West Bank, this historical neighborhood is the second oldest in the city and one of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans.

Residents enjoy walking or biking the levee paths and taking in the gorgeous sunsets along the river, but residents can also head to the Lakewood Golf Course or Park Timbers for tennis.

While walkability isn’t its strong suit, renters living in Algiers have larger apartments and yards, stylish architecture and are only a ferry ride from the French Quarter, where all the action in the city takes place. Thanks to strong interest, the neighborhood is developing quickly with restaurants, cafés, bars and grocery stores popping up.

One of the cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans, apartments in Algiers offer similar amenities and quality of living found in Uptown but with an unmatched community appeal.

1. Old Aurora

Old Aurora, the cheapest neighborhood in New Orleans.

Old Aurora, the cheapest neighborhood in New Orleans.

Source: Rent.com/Forest Isle Apartments
  • Average 2-BR rent: $1,292
  • Rent change since 2021: +1.31%

There’s getting away from the hustle and bustle of the city, and then there’s Old Aurora. Tucked further inland on the other side of the Mississippi River, Old Aurora is not the fastest commute to the French Quarter’s nightlife, but the residents that call this neighborhood home like it that way.

It’s easy to forget you’re in the Big Easy when you walk Old Aurora. With streets lined with oak trees, friendly neighbors and the distinct sound of quiet, the neighbors love it for its residential feel, diverse population, good schools and safety. Old Aurora is ideal for retirees, couples and raising kids.

Compared to other neighborhoods, apartments in Old Aurora are more spacious and come with a smaller price tag. Along with some of the most affordable rent prices, you’ll also have brilliant views of NOLA’s skyline and river-front shopping, outdoor activities and nightlife.

The most expensive neighborhood in New Orleans

NOLA’s crown jewel, the French Quarter, is world-famous for intoxicating tourists with its alluring charm and picturesque streets. For residents living in the center of the action, however, the French Quarter is about convenience.

Bourbon Street is iconic for its music venues, bars and nightlife in general. It’s also home to elite fine dining establishments that keep tourists packing the neighborhood’s streets.

The rent for a two-bedroom apartment in the French Quarter is $3,242 with a 5.91 percent increase in rent over the past year.

If you’ve fallen in love with this neighborhood and want to live here, finding parking may drive you crazy, but you can reach some pretty amazing places by foot or bike.

Find an affordable neighborhood for your next apartment

Affordable, stylish apartments for rent in New Orleans are easy to find once you know where to look. The cheapest neighborhoods in New Orleans offer great amenities, walkability and history that only add to the city’s already welcoming atmosphere.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory as of January 2022. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets. The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

Source: rent.com