Tips for Navigating Night Classes

When the sun is setting, happy hour consists of a stiff caffeinated drink or two for some. Their brains are still on the job.

More on liquid stimulants later, but add that sort of choice to the list when it comes to getting an education: Commute or live on campus, study full time or part time, and pick a major, to name but a few.

Once you’ve landed on a college and enrolled, it’s time to sign up for courses and plan your schedule. In many cases, schools offer courses throughout the day and evening to accommodate a broad range of students and their different schedules.

Night classes may be a convenient option for students who have to balance work and school. Given the cost of education, this is a large share of the student body. In 2018, 43% of full-time students and 81% of part-time students were employed during their studies.

Taking night classes can be an adjustment from studying during the traditional 8-to-5 window. Staying focused after a long day of work or rewiring your brain to study at night can be challenging.

Whether you’re gearing up for a degree’s worth of night school or a one-off evening class, take a look at these tips to survive night classes.

Nocturnal Animals

Generally speaking, night classes take place between 5 and 10 p.m. College night classes typically follow the traditional semester schedule, though there may be shorter timelines for special-interest topics or certificate programs.

Because night classes are geared toward nontraditional students with family and work obligations, they typically occur once a week for two to four hours, but it depends on the course credits and subject matter.

Although this condensed format may mean fewer trips to campus, it can also make for much longer days. Students may want to keep the following issues in mind.

Controlling Caffeine Cravings

When feeling tired, it may be a natural inclination to grab a cup of coffee or other caffeinated beverage to get a boost of energy and keep going. While this may help a student get through a night class or hammer out an assignment at the last minute, it can disrupt sleeping patterns, creating further fatigue the next day.

Caffeine can last up to 12 hours in the system after consumption. Even for night owls, a coffee or a Red Bull® or a Monster® after lunch could keep them awake well beyond when they want to go to bed.

If cold turkey seems like too drastic a change, you might want to try experimenting with less caffeinated beverages, such as tea. Everyone is different, and the goal is finding the sweet spot between staying awake and engaged during night classes and not losing precious sleep later on.

Staying Nourished and Hydrated

Staying focused during night classes can take practice and preparation. Packing healthy snacks and water is one way to maintain energy and feel comfortable as class discussions and lectures progress into the later evening hours.

If a professor doesn’t permit eating in the classroom, a student can likely squeeze in a quick bite beforehand or during break time.

Remaining Active

Between work, studying, class time, and other obligations, exercising may seem like a luxury that there isn’t enough time for. This can feel especially true on days when a full day at work is followed by a three-hour night class.

The Department of Health and Human Services recommends that adults complete at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise a week. Broken down over the whole week, that’s about 20 minutes of exercise a day.

If you’re really in a pinch, fitting in a brisk walk before night classes start or during the midway break in a three-hour seminar can help with your energy and work toward meeting the 150-minute threshold.

Befriending Classmates

Night classes can draw a more diverse student body than traditional college classes. For discussion-oriented classes, this can enrich the conversation with more perspectives.

It is also an opportunity to network and find a study buddy or two. Because night classes usually meet only once a week for a 15-week semester, even one absence could lead to falling behind or missing out on critical information. Classmates can be a resource for sharing notes and staying in the loop on what happened in class.

Also, becoming friends with classmates could make lengthy night classes more fun and add motivation to keep up strong attendance.

Creating a More Flexible Work Schedule

Even full-time students can expect to have at least one or two nights free from scheduled classes. If you have a flexible work schedule, you’re already in a position to craft an ideal balance of work, school, and social life.

However, if you’re working some version of the standard 9-5 schedule five days a week, the days with back-to-back work and class can feel like a marathon. Getting an education takes work, but you may not get the most out of it if it becomes something you dread.

Redistributing work hours to accommodate your night class schedule might prevent burnout. For instance, being able to come in an hour later on mornings after night classes and make them up later in the week can spread out the workload and help in catching up on sleep.

Talking to supervisors may feel intimidating, but if your college night classes are providing skills and knowledge to perform better at your job, you can make a case for getting some wiggle room at work while you finish school.

Avoiding Procrastination

As school traditionally runs from morning to early afternoon, conventional wisdom dictates completing homework and assignments the night before, at the latest. With night classes, the window to procrastinate can be extended later in the day.

Planning can help a student avoid a situation that requires picking between going to work or completing an assignment for class. Mapping out assignment due dates at the onset of the semester is one method to stay on track.

Managing Time

Between exams and papers, college classes often have a steady stream of readings and assignments to keep up with from week to week. Setting aside specific time frames to study for each class may counteract an urge to slack off between major assignments. Repetition can also improve knowledge retention, compared with cramming at the last minute.

After taking care of other responsibilities, such as an internship, job, or team practice, it may be difficult to recall readings and information at the end of a long day. Finding a moment before night class to review your notes could better prepare you to participate in discussion or ace a quiz. Creating a brief study guide covering key themes and topics for each week could help if you’re pressed for time.

Pacing Yourself

Before going full steam ahead with a full course load, you can consider testing the waters with one or two night classes. Education is a financial and career investment, and figuring out what’s right for your work-life balance could be the difference between burning out and graduating.

Keep in mind that whether you study full time or part time could affect financial aid or scholarships.

Exploring Night Class Options

Night classes are offered at community colleges and four-year universities alike. Researching multiple options could help a student find an ideal balance of cost, reputation, student body demographics, and campus environment.

Online courses are another option to consider. Synchronous courses may still have online lectures and discussions but allow students to participate from the comfort of home.

Paying for Night Classes

Education comes at a cost. Beyond tuition, taking night classes may require buying textbooks, paying for a parking pass, and other associated fees.

Work-study programs, scholarships, and grants could cover all or part of these expenses, but some students take out loans to pay the remaining cost for their degree or night classes.

Federal loans can come with protections, flexible repayment benefits, and loan forgiveness in certain cases.

When federal loans and other aid aren’t enough, private student loans are an option to consider. Students enrolled full or half time may qualify for a loan from SoFi, whose no-fee private student loans offer flexible repayment plans, helping students find an option that best meets their needs.

SoFi is here to help you reach your educational goals. It takes only minutes to find out what you’re prequalified for.



SoFi Private Student Loans
Please borrow responsibly. SoFi Private Student Loans are not a substitute for federal loans, grants, and work-study programs. You should exhaust all your federal student aid options before you consider any private loans, including ours. Read our FAQs.
SoFi Private Student Loans are subject to program terms and restrictions, and applicants must meet SoFi’s eligibility and underwriting requirements. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information. To view payment examples, click here. SoFi reserves the right to modify eligibility criteria at any time. This information is subject to change. SoFi Lending Corp. and its lending products are not endorsed by or directly affiliated with any college or university unless otherwise disclosed.

SoFi Private Student Loans
Please borrow responsibly. SoFi Private Student Loans are not a substitute for federal loans, grants, and work-study programs. You should exhaust all your federal student aid options before you consider any private loans, including ours. Read our FAQs.
SoFi Private Student Loans are subject to program terms and restrictions, and applicants must meet SoFi’s eligibility and underwriting requirements. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information. To view payment examples, click here. SoFi reserves the right to modify eligibility criteria at any time. This information is subject to change.

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp (dba SoFi), a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law, license # 6054612; NMLS # 1121636 . For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal.

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
Third Party Brand Mentions: No brands or products mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

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Source: sofi.com

Tips for Settling In: A Post-Move Checklist

Once the movers bring all of your belongings to your new apartment, you still have some important details to sort through before you can truly feel at home.

Here’s a motivating thought: when the work is done, you can really enjoy your new home!

Follow this post-move checklist for tips on how to settle in to your space. We’ve also created a downloadable checklist that you can print and reference as you go.

Move-in day

  • Check to make sure all your utilities are turned on:
    • Water
    • Power
    • Gas
    • Cable
  • Inspect your furniture to make sure that nothing has been damaged during the move.
  • Count your boxes to make sure none of your inventory has been lost.
  • If you have used professional movers and anything has been lost or damaged during the move, report it right away.
  • Inspect your apartment to see if there are any marks or broken items that were there before you moved in. Report these to your apartment management team so you are not on the hook for the damages when you move out.
  • Unpack your priority box or any box with items you will need right away.
  • If you have children, let them pick one box of theirs to open so they can have a favorite toy or security item to help them transition to their new apartment.
  • Unpack linens and towels so you can make beds and shower.
  • Unpack enough clothes to get you through the next few days.

The first week: Inside your apartment

  • Check the level of cleanliness in your apartment. It was likely cleaned thoroughly before you moved in, but if not, you might want to give the space a once-over before you unpack.
  • File all your moving paper work, including your bill of lading and any receipts.
  • Arrange your furniture to maximize the flow of your apartment.
  • Begin unpacking in earnest. Decide on a manageable amount to unpack each day so you don’t feel overwhelmed.
  • As you unpack, you can set up certain rooms in your apartment. The living room, your bedroom and the kitchen all have their own sets of stuff.
  • Remove boxes and trash from your apartment as you unpack so you don’t end up with a mass of clutter!

The first week: Outside your apartment

  • Check your mail to make sure that it is being forwarded correctly.
  • Visit the DMV to update your license or apply for a new one.
  • Register to vote with your new address.
  • Change your address/contact information with your bank.
  • Map out the best commute to work. Test out a few routes against morning traffic.
  • If you have not already, register your children at their new school.
  • Begin your search for a new primary care doctor (and a veterinarian, if you have pets.)

The first month in your new home

  • If at all possible, finish unpacking within the first month. You don’t want to be stuck a year later with a box you still haven’t opened!
  • Check in with your friends online and let them know about your move.
  • Moving into an apartment is a great time to think “new” and “different.” Decorate not only with items you have brought with you, but also new items you buy for your space. Here’s a chance to try a new decorating theme, for instance.
  • Celebrate your move with an apartment-warming party. You have done a lot of work, you deserve to have some fun! A get-together is a great way to get to know your new neighbors, as well.
Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

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Source: apartmentguide.com

10 Cities Near New York To Live in 2021

New York City is one of the most exciting places on the planet. But big-city life often comes with significant stressors — not to mention a hefty price tag. Luckily, there are plenty of cities near New York that are great alternatives.

Read on to learn about our favorites, from urban streets to the bucolic countryside. Plus, these cities are all within 50 miles of Manhattan, so commuters and students have easy access to the Big Apple.

Below, we’ll share what life is like in the following cities:

  • Jersey City, NJ
  • Hoboken, NJ
  • Fort Lee, NJ
  • Elizabeth, NJ
  • Montclair, NJ
  • New Rochelle, NY
  • White Plains, NY
  • Ossining, NY
  • Yonkers, NY
  • Stamford, CT

Jersey City, NJ. Jersey City, NJ.

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 3.4 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,742 (down 8.4 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,839 (down 7.5 percent since last year)

Jersey City is on the Hudson River, just a few miles away from Midtown Manhattan. It’s the second-most populous city in New Jersey, with a bustling restaurant scene, great shopping and beautiful riverfront parks.

Jersey City residents can enjoy the perks of big-city living while also savoring extra space, more affordable rent and other benefits of the suburbs.

Jersey City is also home to numerous mass transit options, making it easy to get around without a car. Light rail systems, bus lines and water ferries connect you to New York City and other parts of New Jersey. For residents who choose to drive, easy access to the Holland Tunnel and New Jersey Turnpike will make commuting a breeze.

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Hoboken, NJ. Hoboken, NJ.

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 3.9 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $3,027 (down 15.1 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,906 (down 13.9 percent since last year)

Hoboken is just north of Jersey City, which means that people here also enjoy stunning waterfront views and a short, easy journey to Manhattan. However, Hoboken is a smaller city with a friendlier, more suburban feel.

Hoboken is also home to a thriving art scene, proving that culture doesn’t just exist in the bigger cities. With the Barsky Gallery, Mile Square Theatre and Hoboken Historical Museum in your backyard, you’ll never run out of things to explore.

Families love Hoboken because it’s safe, easy to navigate and full of excellent schools.

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Fort Lee, NJ. Fort Lee, NJ.

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 12.4 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,456 (down 21.7 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,248 (down 16.7 percent since last year)

Fort Lee is another great option for people who want a big-city feel without the big-city inconveniences. This city lies just south of the George Washington Bridge, which connects to Upper Manhattan and provides easy access to the Bronx. Fort Lee is known for its many high rises, some of which offer beautiful views of the Hudson River or the New York City skyline.

History buffs will also love Fort Lee, which is older than America itself. The borough was originally a Revolutionary War encampment and served as headquarters for General George Washington.

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Elizabeth, NJ.Elizabeth, NJ.

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 14.7 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,466 (up 24.9 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,500 (up 6.4 percent since last year)

Elizabeth is a lively, diverse and historic city located south of Newark.

The fourth-largest city in New Jersey, it’s also the state’s most densely populated. As a result, people here live a more urban lifestyle. There are plenty of shops and restaurants to keep residents busy, plus a very active nightlife scene.

The city’s central location is great for commuters and travelers. Elizabeth is accessible via the New Jersey Transit and is at the crossroads of several major highways, including the New Jersey Transit. Traveling outside the tri-state area? Newark International Airport is just a few miles away.

Elizabeth has lots of affordable housing options, making it a great choice for city-dwellers on a budget.

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montclair njmontclair nj

Photo source: The Montclair Gardens
  • Distance from downtown NYC: 17.7 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,387 (down 7.3 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,203 (down 2.7 percent since last year)

Montclair is near several big cities, including Jersey City, Newark and, of course, New York City. However, Montclair’s green scenery, rolling hills and historic homes make this city feel worlds away from the concrete jungle.

Montclair offers a laid-back and suburban feel, which is perfect for those looking to escape city life. However, there is still plenty to do here. Visit the Montclair Art Museum or the Montclair History Center for your dose of culture, or spend the day shopping and dining in the charming downtown area.

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yonkers nyyonkers ny

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 19.5 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,388 (down 3.8 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,304 (down 4.5 percent since last year)

Yonkers lies on the Hudson River, just above the Bronx, serving as a great alternative for those looking for city living. It’s an urban environment with a distinctly “young” feel, unlike some of the other suburbs on our list, which are more attractive to families.

Yonkers has a very active nightlife scene, where residents can enjoy everything from nightclubs to craft cocktail lounges.

However, Yonkers also has plenty of opportunities to get out in nature. Untermyer Park and Gardens is one of Yonkers’s key attractions. The park is on the National Register of Historic Places and offers 150 acres of landscaping, Grecian-style stonework and Hudson River views.

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New Rochelle, NY. New Rochelle, NY.

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 22.2 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,422 (down 0.3 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,770 (down 2.0 percent since last year)

New Rochelle lies at the southern tip of Westchester County, giving residents easy access to New York City, neighboring Connecticut and upstate New York.

It’s long been a popular commuter town as it directly connects to Manhattan via the Metro-North railway. Interstate 95 also runs through New Rochelle, which offers drivers direct city access at multiple points.

Like many parts of Westchester County, New Rochelle also has a wealth of historical sites dating back to the Revolutionary War.

New Rochelle is known for having great public schools and plenty of green spaces, making it a popular destination for city residents looking to settle down and start families.

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White Plains, NY. White Plains, NY.

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 29.1 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,431 (down 9.2 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,351 (down 16.5 percent since last year)

White Plains is another popular city in Westchester County. Like its neighbor New Rochelle, White Plains offers Metro-North railway service and multiple highways for an easy commute to Manhattan.

However, White Plains is more than just a bedroom community. It’s also a bustling city in its own right, with a busy downtown area that serves as a hub for Westchester commerce. Residents can enjoy concerts, sporting events and more at the Westchester County Center or simply relax in one of the numerous parks. Whether you prefer urban adventures or suburban relaxation, White Plains has something for you.

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ossining new yorkossining new york

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 37.4 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,514 (up 4.2 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,325 (up 3.6 percent since last year)

Ossining might be close to New York City, but this peaceful community feels like it’s worlds apart.

This village is right on the Hudson River, offering residents a friendly, coastal community with an abundance of waterfront activities. It also boasts a historic downtown area with plenty to do and see.

Ossining is on Metro-North’s Hudson line, which provides easy access to both the city and the country. An express train from Ossining takes travelers to Grand Central Station in less than an hour. However, the train can also be taken farther upstate to towns like Peekskill and Cold Spring, where some of the Hudson Valley’s best hiking awaits.

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Stamford, CT. Stamford, CT.

  • Distance from downtown NYC: 39.5 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,283 (down 6.3 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,926 (down 5.8 percent since last year)

Stamford is one of the largest cities in Connecticut, making it another great NYC alternative. This city provides a nice balance of urban and suburban and is popular with young professionals and families.

Metro-North offers direct train service to Manhattan every 30 minutes. Passengers will reach Harlem in under 45 minutes, or they can continue to Grand Central Station, which is just a few more minutes away.

Stamford is close to other charming Connecticut towns, such as Greenwich, Darien and New Canaan.

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Make one of these cities near New York your next home

New York state, New Jersey and Connecticut offer great alternatives to New York City. Our interactive search tools and apartment hunting tips make it easy to explore the best cities near New York.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

The Cost of Living in Atlanta in 2021

It’s hard to resist Atlanta’s charm, food and culture — but how does it stack up against your budget?

Atlanta is widely known for its busy airport, pollen counts, mild weather and most recently, for lending itself as the background for several Hollywood movies.

Despite being a big city, Atlanta’s southern charm remains intact as it welcomes many transplants every year. It’s hard to resist a move to Georgia capital with its diversity and robust culture, but what does that entail from a budget standpoint?

While others look to more expensive hubs like Los Angeles and New York City, Atlanta’s cost of living remains significantly more affordable while still providing a thriving economy and amenities.

Right now, for example, Atlanta rents are 49.23 percent lower on average than in New York. However, while its cost of living is 1.1 percent above the national average, this is quickly changing as housing demand increases with newcomers. Get to know the cost of living in Atlanta, from transportation to goods and services.

Housing costs in Atlanta

Atlanta’s housing market — whether you’re renting or buying — is not for the faint of heart. The average rent in Atlanta has gone up 0.11 percent to $1,655 per month for a one-bedroom in the past year. This average rent fluctuates dramatically per neighborhood and amenities offered.

Midtown, Old Fourth Ward and Buckhead are among the most expensive neighborhoods with average rents between $2,180 and $2,500 per month for a one-bedroom. Neighborhoods close to the average rent in Atlanta include Morningside, Westside, Home Park, Kirkwood, Edgewood and Lindbergh.

But if you’re looking to stay inside the city and save a little, you can find an apartment in Ormewood Park for $1,382 a month on average or Embry Hills at $1,260 per month.

The average home price in Atlanta at this time is $380,418. However, this is mainly dependent on the neighborhood. As of March 2021, home prices are up 7.7 percent compared to last year, according to Redfin. Most homes sell in less than 30 days.

cost of living in atlanta - brunch

Food costs in Atlanta

We can’t talk about Atlanta without food. The city currently houses incredible chefs across every cuisine, thanks to its diverse population. You can find anything from Southern fare to authentic Thai, Malaysian, Filipino, Mexican and more locally.

Atlanta’s cost of living for groceries is about 5 percent above the national average. Expect to see eggs for $1.25, ground beef for $4.61 a pound and bread for $3.65.

Utility costs in Atlanta

In the South, we love porch weather. Thanks to Atlanta’s mild winters, you get to enjoy the outdoors most of the year.

But, the city didn’t get its nickname “Hotlanta” for nothing, so know that in the summer, your energy bill will go up.

Thankfully, Atlanta’s utility prices are 15.3 percent below the national average. You can expect your total energy costs to be around $120.82 each month.

For the internet, the city has a limited amount of providers, but your bill will hover around $67.49 a month.

Atlanta skyline.

Transportation costs in Atlanta

Yes, the rumors are true — Atlanta’s infamous traffic is real. The city takes a spot on the worst traffic listicles year after year. The average commute is 35 minutes, according to a recent study. However, once you’re off the highway, the stress tends to diminish as you have more options to get out of your car and get around.

Hop on MARTA, Atlanta’s public transportation system, and use the rail and bus system to navigate the city. The options amount to a 49 transit score. It’s not as expansive as the subway in New York, but it makes your commute a little easier to Buckhead, Midtown, the airport and OTP (outside the perimeter).

MARTA allows frequent riders to save by offering a 7-day pass for $23.75 and a monthly pass for $95.

MARTA also connects with the Atlanta Streetcar that navigates the downtown and Edgewood neighborhoods with 12 stops. A round-trip Breeze card will cost $5 (with up to four transfers), and one ride on the Streetcar costs $1 (with no free MARTA transfers).

Atlanta’s bike score is 46, but some neighborhoods are more bike-friendly than others. Midtown, Old Fourth Ward, Inman Park and Cabbagetown have bike lanes all over that quickly drop you on the Atlanta BeltLine Eastside Trail. The BeltLine loop connects all of the city’s 45 neighborhoods. With a walk score of 55, you can also get to know the City in a Forest via foot.

If you decide to drive, motorists are wasting up to $1,043 annually and 50 hours searching for parking. You’ll also spend on average $2,233 a year on gasoline.

All in all, the cost of living for transportation in Atlanta is about 2 percent above the national average.

Atlanta skyline in Piedmont Park.

Healthcare costs in Atlanta

Whether it’s a routine check-up or a more serious health mishap, navigating healthcare systems is never easy. Since everyone’s health situations are different, it’s difficult to come up with overall healthcare spend in Atlanta, but here are some cost guidelines.

In Atlanta, you have access to quality healthcare at Emory University and Grady Memorial Hospital. Atlanta healthcare costs are 2 percent above the national average.

A regular doctor visit costs $119.80 on average while a prescription drug can set you back $459.02 on average (without insurance of some kind). You can pick up ibuprofen at your local pharmacy for $8.71 on average.

Goods and services costs in Atlanta

Beyond essential bills, Atlanta remains on par with the national average across different categories. You’ll goods and services will hover around 2.3 percent above the national average.

Atlanta’s neighborhoods are very pet-friendly, so if you get a pup to walk around the city with you, vet services cost $56.23 per visit on average.

More a movie buff? A ticket to a new release on average costs $14.15.

For exercise, you have plenty of choices from pilates, yoga studios, kickboxing and even 24/7-access facilities. A yoga class will average more than $17, but many luxury apartments in the city include a small gym as an amenity if you’re looking to stay on budget.

Luckily, you can have a great time for free as well around the city with plenty of outdoor opportunities at city parks like Piedmont Park and the Atlanta BeltLine.

Ponce City Market in Atlanta, cost of living in atlanta

Taxes in Atlanta

Understanding what county and part of the city you live in will make it easier to decipher your taxes. In Atlanta, the sales tax rate is 8.9 percent — that’s 7 percent for DeKalb and Fulton counties and 1.90 percent additional for the city of Atlanta. In this case, if you spend $100 shopping at Ponce City Market, you’ll pay $8.90 in sales tax.

The state has two sales tax holidays a year, including a back-to-school event. Georgia does not tax grocery items. However, prepared food, alcoholic beverages, dietary supplements, drugs, over-the-counter drugs and tobacco all require taxes applied to purchases. The state’s income tax rate is 5.75 percent for the highest bracket currently.

How much do I need to earn to live in Atlanta?

Most financial advisors recommend keeping your rent payment at 30 percent of your gross income or less. You would need to make at least $66,200 annually to afford a one-bedroom apartment on average in Atlanta. Currently, a one-bedroom costs $1,655 per month on average.

For perspective, an average Atlanta resident makes around $69,000 a year. Want to know where you stand with your current budget? Use our rent calculator to get a high view of how it would change after moving to Atlanta.

Living in Atlanta

Everyone says come to Atlanta in the fall for its beautiful autumn colors, crisp 70-degree weather and outdoor hiking. Yes, it’s not always “Hotlanta.” The cost of living in Atlanta offers access to big city amenities while still finding small corners for recreation and the outdoors. The city’s technology, supply chain and other industries are quickly growing for more job opportunities.

Find great apartments for rent or homes to buy in Atlanta today.

Cost of living information comes from The Council for Community and Economic Research.
Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments in April 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

Source: rent.com

City vs Suburbs: Which Location is Right for You?

One decision can majorly impact your day-to-day life — whether to live in a city vs. the suburbs.

Both have their own unique spate of benefits and drawbacks to consider, so give it more thought than you may give to what type of wine to order with dinner (although that’s still important).

City vs. suburbs: What’s the difference?

Cities and suburbs vary widely by size and scope.

Cities are territories inside an urbanized area that are also inside a principal city, like Los Angeles or Atlanta. Of course, some cities aren’t as big as those, so whether or not it’s a small, midsize or large city depends on the population.

Suburban areas, however, are the territories outside a principal city, but that are still inside an urbanized area. Suburbs also range in size. For context, a small suburb is under 100,000 population, but a large suburb is greater than 250,000.

Suburbs are also considered lower-density areas. So they might have a similar population to that of a city, but it’s spread out over more land. Commercial and residential zones are thus separated, unlike in cities, where they can literally be one on top of the other.

People walking over a crosswalk in a city. People walking over a crosswalk in a city.

Pros and cons of renting in a city

There are a lot of songs devoted to singing the praises of city life, and many people would shudder at the thought of relocating to the ‘burbs.

Although the ability to get a churro at 2 a.m. might not make our list of the top three perks, it’s still way up there. However, it’s not all sunshine and roses, so check out these pros and cons of living in a city vs. a suburb.

City pro: Closer to the action

The convenience factor is huge for city slickers, especially if you live, work and play there. Although cities do have their fair share of chains, restaurants are often locally owned and operated. Thus, they are more unique.

Entertainment, from bars and clubs to museums and other cultural amenities, is also more varied than in the suburbs. There are more employers (that density thing, again), so you’re more likely to find or keep work nice and close to home.

City pro: Tons of variety

Life in the city comes with an abundance of choices. Whether it’s deciding between three amazing local pizzerias or three amazing local hospitals for that upcoming surgery, city areas simply have more options than the suburbs.

Cities are also more culturally diverse than their suburban counterparts, a trend that’s likely to continue since 70 percent of U.S. cities are more racially diverse now than in 2010. So if you wish to surround yourself with a wide variety of people and cultures, city life is probably the way to go.

Subway system. Subway system.

City pro: Transportation benefits

People who don’t want to waste away their lives commuting through gridlock highway traffic often opt for a city residence.

Although some people prefer to have their own wheels, in certain cities public transportation options are so great that it’s not even necessary to own a car! So whatever premium you pay on an in-town apartment is offset at least somewhat because you save on a car payment, gas and insurance.

Incidentally, the best cities for public transportation are New York City, San Francisco and Boston.

City con: Noise levels

All those people crammed in a relatively small land area can make it pretty loud. Traffic noise is the biggest culprit, with 80 percent of urban noise pollution due to cars, trucks, emergency vehicles and the like.

As electric and hybrid vehicles become more affordable and common, however, hopefully, this will start to taper off. But don’t count on it.

City con: More expensive

Rent prices are usually (but not always) higher in the city versus the suburbs. A 2017 Forbes report found an average price difference of $600 per month, with some major cities even more than that! That’s a pretty big chunk of change for most people.

Even though some of that is offset if you don’t need a car, there’s still the cost of public transportation to consider.

City con: Air pollution

Air pollution in cities poses a major health hazard, especially for sensitive groups like those with allergies or asthma. Poor air quality is also linked to an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and lung cancer. This is particularly a problem in low-income cities.

Suburban street. Suburban street.

Pros and cons of renting in the suburbs

The suburbs catch a bad rep sometimes, but there are millions who swear by life in (comparatively) wide open spaces. Suburbanites do enjoy some pretty significant perks that evade city residents, but there are tradeoffs, too.

Suburbs pro: More space

Everything’s bigger in the suburbs. There’s simply more land to go around per person, so as a result, apartments, houses, restaurants, roadways, green spaces and much more are larger, more plentiful and often better.

If you’ve ever navigated an SUV down a city side street you’ll appreciate this distinction.

Suburbs pro: Less crime

Cities are notoriously higher in crime than the suburbs, although activity in both types of areas is thankfully on the decline.

In 2014, rates of violent victimization for women and men, respectively in urban areas was 9.4 and 9.3 per one thousand people. This, compared with 7.8 (men) and 6.0 (women) in the suburbs. Property theft and other types of crime are also more common in cities versus the suburbs.

Suburbs pro: Your dollar goes further

There’s nothing to say that you won’t still spend just as much money in the suburbs versus living in the city, but you will get more bang for your buck. Most things usually cost less the further you get from the principal city, such as gasoline, food, taxes and rent.

If you’re okay with paying more with less to show for it (other than convenient city access), city life is just fine. Otherwise, the suburbs are a better choice.

Traffic in the evening. Traffic in the evening.

Suburbs con: Commute time

A long and weary commute is often the price people pay for living in the suburbs. Unless you’re lucky enough to find a job nearby, the city (or closer to it) is where employers are.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average commute time is 26.9 minutes, or nearly an hour both ways. Sure, some areas are less than that, but many are actually higher. Yikes!

Suburbs con: Less eclectic

A lot of suburban neighborhoods are pretty cookie-cutter in nature. They feature a lot of the same home/apartment styles, businesses, restaurants and so on. Although suburbs are becoming increasingly more diverse, culturally speaking, they’re still no match for cities.

Suburbs con: Car required

You might be able to walk to a place or two safely from your apartment, but the vast majority of the suburb will be out of reach without a car. This means a working vehicle, insurance and funds to maintain/gas up the car are not only advised but mandatory.

City vs. suburbs: The choice is yours

As long as you clearly understand your own situation and priorities, the choice between city vs. suburbs will be clear. Don’t worry about other people’s opinions, either. Everyone’s circumstances are different, so make the decision that’s right for you!

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Source: apartmentguide.com

How Important Should Parking Be in Your Apartment Search?

Parking can be key to your apartment search, especially if you’re expecting a commute. A good parking situation can be a huge bonus when you finally nab the right apartment. The last thing you want is to circle your block hunting for a spot every day. And even if you do get designated parking, it can sometimes be pricey.

At the same time, your lifestyle, location and budget might make parking less relevant. If you’re moving to a new place, how will you figure out if you even need to worry about it? To determine the importance of parking in your search, answer the following questions.

1. Do you own a car?

This is easy. If you own a car, parking should absolutely factor into your apartment search.

Want some less obvious advice? If you don’t have one yet, consider if you might ever own a car. Your set of circumstances is liable to change from year to year. If you stay in the same place long enough, you may just have to purchase your own vehicle.

At the very least, parking is something to consider, even if you currently depend on public transportation. You might end up taking a new job in the middle of your lease at an office located an hour outside the city, for instance. Take stock of your present plans and goals and be considerate of your future needs.

2. Will you pay extra?

Some apartments charge a rent premium for parking garages, an additional cost to consider when weighing your options. You’ll pay more for these residential properties than those without the same amenities, so if you don’t need a space, you should look elsewhere.

The U.S. is a car-friendly nation, and that puts parking costs at a bit of a premium. That means apartments without solid options are likely to charge less. If you’re willing to sacrifice convenience, you might add more flexibility to your monthly budget.

If parking is a premium amenity for you, you can still make sure you know what you’ll pay. Meet with the landlord and have a discussion over what they charge for a space, what kind of security is available and any other concerns you have before you sign a lease.

3. Are there other options?

You have choices in how you get from place to place, and while car ownership is attractive, there are alternatives you can turn to. Dockless bike-sharing programs have seen increasing popularity in many cities, with bicycle commuting up more than 60 percent since the turn of the century.

Many of these cyclists don’t want the additional responsibilities associated with vehicle maintenance, and city traffic is often challenging to navigate. Bike sharing, scooter sharing and ride sharing options provide freedom from these anxieties, and these are friendly on both the environment and the wallet.

These alternatives are usually located in bustling cities, so they might not be available in your area. If they do catch your interest, research different properties and browse around. If living without a car seems freeing, it may even change up where you decide to focus your apartment search.

Parking is always going to be a major concern for most renters, but your situation might be unique. Things are always changing, too, and the next time you’re looking for a place to live, there might be even more transportation options out there. Rethinking your priorities can help you find the apartment that meets all your needs.

Photo by John Matychuk on Unsplash

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The Best Places to Live in Georgia in 2021

Georgia, also known as the Peach State, features everything from fun city amenities like a thriving nightlife and the latest art openings to outdoor opportunities right in your suburban backyard.

It’s no surprise that Georgia has plenty of options for great places to live.

Atlanta’s growing economy with Coca-Cola, Home Depot and Delta Air Lines at the helm entice any visitor to move to the city. Farther south in Macon and Savannah, you can enjoy a growing music scene and fresh seafood, respectively, too.

Georgia provides a full spectrum of experiences for those visiting and considering moving here. Seriously, there are more than 100, just in Atlanta.

To help your search for your next home, here are the best places to live in Georgia, arranged in alphabetical order:

Alpharetta, Georgia.

  • Population: 67,213
  • Median household income: $113,802
  • Average commute time: 29 minutes
  • Walk score: 30
  • Studio average rent: N/A
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,635
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,052

The Atlanta suburb of Alpharetta continues to make the best places to live lists, thanks to its vibrant culinary spots, shopping districts like Avalon, thriving tech and manufacturing industries and of course, education.

The city offers easy access to the airport, only 35 miles south via GA-400. You can head on your way to your next business trip or vacation in no time.

If you’re looking for the outdoors, you’re also less than 45 minutes from the North Georgia Mountains and cabin towns like Blue Ridge and Ellijay.

Downtown Alpharetta offers a walkable experience with boutiques, breweries and fine dining establishments lining the streets. Every weekend, the city comes down to stock up on local offerings at the Alpharetta Farmer’s Market.

With a one-bedroom average rent of under $1,700, you can find an affordable place with good schools nearby in Alpharetta.

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Athens, Georgia.

  • Population: 126,913
  • Median household income: $38,311
  • Average commute time: 19.4 minutes
  • Walk score: 35
  • Studio average rent: $712
  • One-bedroom average rent: $739
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,259

Sure, when you hear Athens, you think of the University of Georgia and the accompanying football tailgating. However, the city has more to offer than college fun.

While Athens is a small city, it does come with a great perk — affordability. You can rent a one-bedroom for $739 a month on average.

You also have access to arts and entertainment, thanks to Athens’ thriving music scene. Check out your favorite entertainer at the Georgia Theatre or discover a new one at the intimate 40 Watt Club.

The State Botanical Garden of Georgia and Sandy Creek Park offer opportunities to enjoy the mild Georgia weather and nature. End your weekend with a pint from local brewery Creature Comforts — yes, the one you saw in Thor’s hand during the last “Avengers” movie.

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Atlanta, GA.

  • Population: 506,811
  • Median household income: $59,948
  • Average commute time: 27.2 minutes
  • Walk score: 55
  • Studio average rent: $1,605
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,655
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,140

From Fortune 500 companies to good music and food, Atlanta has plenty to offer as one of the best cities to live in Georgia. With more than half a million residents, the city has a diverse community that provides everything from an indie clothing store to large coffee chains.

Atlanta’s 45 neighborhoods all have their unique personality. You can find a luxury condo in Midtown or a charming craftsman home in Grant Park — just minutes from each other. Depending on the neighborhood, your walk score may improve, but you’ll have access to city parks and local dining options that range from Mexican to Italian and Ethiopian.

With those city amenities come high rent prices — you can find a studio on average for $1,605 a month. Keep in mind that easy access to MARTA rail and the bus line can help you skip long commutes at the end of the day.

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Augusta, Georgia.

  • Population: 197,888
  • Median household income: $42,592
  • Average commute time: 21.1 minutes
  • Walk score: 33
  • Studio average rent: $1,000
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,013
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,153

While many know Augusta for the annual Masters golf tournament, its residents enjoy a rich history, a charming downtown and a growing economy year-round. The walk along the Savannah River in downtown Augusta indeed shows the beauty of the city.

The Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art and the Augusta Museum of History give you a glimpse of this Southern city’s history. The Summerville neighborhood has some of the most beautiful historic homes, preserved thanks to a local ordinance, with large columns and manicured lawns.

On the weekends, you can explore Broad Street and its small boutiques and restaurants on foot. During the warm months, the Augusta Market brings local artisans to the Savannah River’s River Walk park.

From tapas to nightlife, you can find it all here.

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Columbus, Georgia.

  • Population: 195,769
  • Median household income: $46,408
  • Average commute time: 20.6 minutes
  • Walk score: 35
  • Studio average rent: $553
  • One-bedroom average rent: $833
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $983

For those looking into affordable living, Columbus tops our list of best places to live in Georgia. You can get a two-bedroom apartment in the city for under $1,000 per month on average.

Only 90 minutes from Atlanta, Columbus is an outdoor lover’s paradise with the Chattahoochee River flowing nearby. The river provides incredible opportunities to whitewater one of the country’s longest courses and even zipline across it.

Elsewhere in the city, you can find a farmers market, artists market and free concert series set up in the downtown area.

The Springer Opera House features some of the best talents throughout annual performances and leads one of the most prominent theatre programs in the Southeast.

The city is also home to Fort Benning and the National Infantry Museum, the only one of its kind in the U.S.

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Decatur, Georgia.

Photo source: Agnes Scott College
  • Population: 25,696
  • Median household income: $106,088
  • Average commute time: 27.3 minutes
  • Walk score: 39
  • Studio average rent: $1,323
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,403
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,587

The city of Decatur is only about five square miles, but it packs a lot of goodness. With three MARTA rail stations and a robust bike lane program, you can easily navigate the city without a car.

Agnes Scott College, an acclaimed women-only liberal arts college, provides interesting arts programming for residents to enjoy.

Only a few miles from downtown Atlanta and high-quality schools, Decatur’s housing is highly sought out. You can find a two-bedroom on average for $1,587 per month.

However, you’ll have access to some of the best restaurants in Georgia, like Kimball House, Leon’s Full Service and Brush Izakaya, along with regular community events in the square.

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Macon, Georgia.

  • Population: 153,159
  • Median household income: $41,334
  • Average commute time: 21.3 minutes
  • Walk score: 35
  • Studio average rent: $610
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,050
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,172

Right at the heart of the Peach State and only two hours from Atlanta, Macon is a hub of job opportunities, higher education options like Mercer University and, of course, entertainment on the weekends.

Warner Robins, 20 miles away, offers job opportunities at the Robins Air Force Base as one of the state’s largest employers. Plus, your average commute time hovers around 20 minutes.

Downtown Macon features new, cool boutiques as well as iconic places that have regulars. Listen to the latest tunes at Fresh Produce Records and then hop to the Tubman Museum, an essential visit.

To learn more about Macon’s music history, The Little Richard House and Otis Redding Museum are both must-see stops for music lovers.

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Marietta, Georgia.

  • Population: 60,867
  • Median household income: $57,452
  • Average commute time: 28.5 minutes
  • Walk score: 31
  • Studio average rent: $1,018
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,162
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,426

One of Cobb County’s gems, Marietta, offers good schools, a tight-knit community and rich history. Marietta City Schools hosts a diverse student body with high rankings in the state.

Near Marietta Square, a hub for most community events, you can find the Marietta Museum of History in a preserved 1845 warehouse building. There are a few other historical sites within the city center like the William Root House Museum & Garden and Kennesaw Mountain.

Not too far, at Truist Park, you can cheer on the Atlanta Braves and enjoy a meal at The Battery.

While Atlanta’s infamous traffic can keep you on I-75 for longer than you want, the average person commutes nearly 30 minutes to work.

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Sandy Springs, Georgia.

  • Population: 109,452
  • Median household income: $78,613
  • Average commute time: 26.1 minutes
  • Walk score: 44
  • Studio average rent: N/A
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,630
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,007

Sandy Springs’ proximity to downtown Atlanta, Buckhead’s business district and the outdoors makes it one of the best places to live in Georgia. You’ll also have to the public transportation via the MARTA rail to avoid the 26-minute average commute.

The Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area and 16 city parks offer plenty of opportunities to get outside, explore new trails and even go on a kayak or two. You can also find Vickery Creek Falls nearby in Roswell.

For those into nightlife, you can check out Battle & Brew as well as plays at the City Springs Theatre Company and Act 3 Productions.

You can find a one-bedroom in the area for $1,630 a month on average.

If you’re looking for close proximity to the action while keeping a little quiet at home, this is the place for you.

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Savannah, Georgia.

  • Population: 144,464
  • Median household income: $43,307
  • Average commute time: 20.5 minutes
  • Walk score: 46
  • Studio average rent: $1,244
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,197
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,346

Home to River Street and the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah’s Spanish moss-lined streets take you back to the past. The city’s downtown grid street system makes it incredibly walkable and easily enjoyable.

Despite all of the ghost stories and dark past, the city has plenty to offer delicious dining options, museums and outdoor opportunities. You can both enjoy fresh oysters on River Street next to the water and not too far, walk around the area that inspired the “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil” book.

The Port of Savannah played an essential role in local cotton and tobacco industries following its opening in 1744. These days, the port is a historic landmark and one of the fastest-growing ports in the country.

If you want a hop and a skip from Tybee Island, you can find a two-bedroom apartment for $1,346 a month on average.

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Find your own best place to live in Georgia

Georgia’s four seasons, affordability and growing economy have attracted people from all over. It’s no surprise that the Peach State has several great cities to pick from.

Whether you’re looking to relocate with your job or just looking for a new city to love, Georgia’s Southern charm and delicious food will reel you in.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments in March 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
Other demographic data comes from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

Source: rent.com

10 Cities Near Seattle To Live in 2021

With its natural beauty and laid-back culture, there are many excellent reasons to move to the Seattle area. But the city has seen rapid population growth in recent years, along with an increased cost of living — causing a drawback for some. Fortunately, there are plenty of cities near Seattle that offer fantastic alternatives for every lifestyle.

Whether you’re looking for a safe suburb to raise a family in, a home base for outdoor excursions or a hip neighborhood with a thriving nightlife, there’s a city that offers what you’re looking for, all without traveling more than 30 minutes or so outside downtown Seattle. Consider adding the following places to your list.

Kirkland, WA. Kirkland, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 11.1 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,069 (down 3.1 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,521 (up 5.8 percent since last year)

Located on the Northeastern shore of Lake Washington, Kirkland offers easy proximity to downtown Seattle combined with a wooded, suburban feel. Many families find Kirkland appealing as an alternative to Seattle. They can find more space, excellent schools and the opportunity to live close to an urban center.

The city of Kirkland is on the waterfront. Its popular public parks on the lake offer opportunities for boating, swimming and beach volleyball. It also showcases a picturesque collection of restaurants and shops, perfect for an evening out.

Commuters to Seattle will enjoy a short drive into downtown, or you can choose the excellent public transit connections.

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Redmond, WA. Redmond, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 15.3 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,141 (down 7.3 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,712 (down 5.8 percent since last year)

Redmond is perhaps best known as the home of Microsoft. A resulting concentration of tech talent has attracted other tech companies as well as their employees, creating a diverse community of young professionals and families.

Redmond is sprawling and spacious, with wide sidewalks and plenty of trees. Many streets have bike lanes and paved bike paths connect to other nearby cities.

The city is in a beautiful natural setting and is home to Marymoor Park, which hosts outdoor concerts and features dozens of sports fields and a climbing wall.

Redmond also has excellent schools and a pleasant, walkable downtown core with many shops and restaurants.

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Des Moines, WA. Des Moines, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 14.9 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,425 (down 1.4 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,767 (down 1.8 percent since last year)

Des Moines is a quiet, affordable waterfront city located midway between Seattle and Tacoma along the Interstate 5 corridor. The municipality stretches along the water, with many options for stunning views of Puget Sound.

The small downtown includes some great restaurants and waterfront walks, with plenty of nearby trails and parks that offer hiking, biking and even camping.

Des Moines is on a rapid transit line that makes it easy to access nearby SeaTac and the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport or commute south to Federal Way or Tacoma.

The city will appeal to families and young professionals seeking an affordable option without sacrificing livability.

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Issaquah, WA. Issaquah, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 17.2 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,013 (down 13.0 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,389 (down 14.7 percent since last year)

The city of Issaquah spreads from the Sammamish Highlands down across the valley and into the hills known as the Issaquah Alps. Homes on these hills have beautiful views of the valley, while those in the lowlands are close to the quaint downtown core, which offers restaurants, cafes and many shopping options.

A dispersed, suburban city with an excellent school system, Issaquah has long been a popular choice for families. Recent development has also added housing choices for young, single professionals seeking an option outside the city.

There are plenty of outdoor recreation opportunities in the area, including hiking and mountain biking trails at the popular Tiger Mountain. Close enough to the wilderness for the occasional cougar sighting, Issaquah is also near enough to Seattle for an easy commute along Interstate 90.

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Sammamish, WA. Sammamish, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 21 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,665 (up 1.0 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,945 (down 2.5 percent since last year)

The Sammamish Plateau is known for world-class golf courses, but that’s not all it has to offer. This city to the east of Seattle frequently appears on best-of lists for livability, yet it is still more affordable than many similar cities nearby.

Some areas of Sammamish have an almost rural feel, while others are much denser. It’s possible to find a home that feels tucked in among the woods or an urban apartment, all in the same city.

In addition to golf, outdoor enthusiasts will enjoy the bike path around nearby Lake Sammamish and the proximity to wooded trails in the mountains.

Families will appreciate the above-average schools and quiet, safe streets.

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Snoqualmie, WA. Snoqualmie, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 28.5 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,699

If you’ve chosen to live in the Pacific Northwest for the outdoor adventure opportunities, Snoqualmie has a lot to offer. Just under 30 miles east of Seattle along I-90, Snoqualmie is perhaps best known for the iconic Snoqualmie Falls, which are not only a scenic tourist attraction but also power generators that provide electricity to the town.

Natural beauty surrounds Snoqualmie, with plenty of opportunities to get out and explore the surrounding Cascade foothills in all seasons.

While it has become increasingly popular as a bedroom community for Seattle, Snoqualmie retains its own identity and small-town feel. It has a vibrant arts community, restaurants and shopping options.

In 2019, it was rated the safest city in Washington.

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Everett, WA. Everett, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 28.6 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,570 (down 6.1 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,758 (up 3.6 percent since last year)

For those looking for an urban feel at an affordable price, Everett offers a great alternative to Seattle.

With an economy historically based on manufacturing for companies such as Boeing, Everett retains a blue-collar sensibility that does not prevent it from offering a vibrant art and culture scene, as well as many interesting restaurants and bars.

Sports fans can cheer on the Everett Aquasox, the local minor league baseball team, and for hockey enthusiasts, there is the Everett Silvertips. The Angel of the Winds Arena is one of the major sports and concert venues in the region, offering plenty of entertainment options.

With Puget Sound to the west and the Snohomish River to the East, Everett, like many nearby cities, has a deep, natural beauty that adds to the appeal.

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North Bend, WA. North Bend, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 29.3 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,014 (up 12.9 percent since last year)

North Bend is the ultimate destination for outdoor enthusiasts. Its location amid the Cascade mountains’ foothills puts you close to hiking trails, mountain biking and winter skiing opportunities.

Popular local hikes, such as Mount Si and Rattlesnake Ridge, are just minutes away. Even for those who are less inclined to search for adventure, picturesque peaks provide a gorgeous backdrop for everyday life.

Famous as the filming location of the TV show Twin Peaks, North Bend has a genuine small-town feel, with a quaint downtown featuring cafes, restaurants, boutiques and breweries.

North Bend has grown rapidly in recent years, with many of its 7,423 residents choosing it for its rural location. Despite the remote vibe, it is just over 30 minutes from Seattle along I-90, making it a popular choice for commuters.

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Tacoma, WA. Tacoma, WA.

  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 33.9 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,734 (up 11.2 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,978 (up 13.1 percent since last year)

Tacoma is a city with a lot to offer at an affordable price.

The historic downtown faces Puget Sound, with gorgeous waterfront views. You’ll find great restaurants and shopping options. The downtown area is compact and walkable, but you can also get around easily by bus and rapid transit.

In the downtown core, you’ll encounter young professionals and students from the University of Washington Tacoma campus.

Up the hill, you’ll find residential neighborhoods, each with its own unique feel. Families enjoy good schools and quiet neighborhood streets.

Anyone who has driven through the city will have seen the Tacoma Dome, an event space that hosts events from car shows to concerts. Those in search of culture will also enjoy the Tacoma Art Museum and the Museum of Glass.

On the waterfront, Point Defiance Park is a popular destination for hiking, boating or picnicking with a view.

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Lake Stevens, WA. Lake Stevens, WA.

Photo source: City of Lake Stevens, WA / Facebook
  • Distance from downtown Seattle: 36.6 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,500 (up 22.5 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Located on the lake for which it’s named, Lake Stevens is a growing community that is particularly popular among families with children.

With more affordable prices than many surrounding cities due to its slightly longer drive time to Seattle, Lake Stevens has a small-town feel with an emphasis on community. The city is a good option for those looking for a calm, quiet location well outside of Seattle.

Lake Stevens is a popular boating destination in the summer, and the town and its surroundings are full of natural beauty.

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Make one of these cities near Seattle your next home

Find a home that’s right for you in one of these Pacific Northwest cities. Your next apartment near Seattle awaits.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory pulled in April 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

The Best Places to Live in Illinois in 2021

There is more to Illinois than Chicago, although the largest city in the state is home to almost three million people.

When thinking about some of the best places to live in Illinois, you probably immediately consider Chicago and its densely populated suburbs. While these are all great places to live, there are hidden gems all throughout Illinois that you should consider.

So, whether you’re seeking an affordable apartment in Chicago or a quiet tree-lined city downstate, you have a number of great options from which to choose.

Here are the best places to live in Illinois.

Aurora, IL, one of the best places to live in illinois

  • Population: 199,687
  • Average age: 37
  • Median household income: $71,749
  • Average commute time: 35.9 minutes
  • Walk score: 45
  • Studio average rent: $1,142
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,344
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,590

The second-largest city in Illinois with almost 200,000 residents, Aurora offers a mix of options that appeal to everyone from young and single professionals to families.

During the first Friday of each month, food trucks serve up dishes along Benton Street Bridge. In addition, the revitalized downtown district has a great range of restaurants, from steakhouses to coffeehouses, and the area also has destination shopping outposts.

Plus, Aurora is nestled along Fox River, so nature-lovers will appreciate the opportunity to kayak and explore other activities nearby.

Bloomington, IL.

  • Population: 78,023
  • Average age: 39.8
  • Median household income: $67,507
  • Average commute time: 20.3 minutes
  • Walk score: 47
  • Studio average rent: N/A
  • One-bedroom average rent: $827
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $865

Bloomington often shares the limelight with its neighboring city, Normal, since it’s the home of Illinois State University.

While Bloomington lies in the heart of Illinois, at the junction of Interstates 55, 39 and 74, and within a few hours from Chicago and St. Louis, there is plenty to do in Bloomington.

Residents enjoy great restaurants, shopping and visiting attractions such as the historic Ewing Manor, named Sunset Hill by the Ewing family, or the David Davis Mansion which delights history buffs and garden lovers alike.

Bloomington is also the headquarters for State Farm Insurance and COUNTRY Financial.

Champaign, IL, one of the best places to live in illinois

Photo source: Visit Champaign County / Facebook
  • Population: 85,008
  • Average age: 36.5
  • Median household income: $48,415
  • Average commute time: 19.9 minutes
  • Walk score: 61
  • Studio average rent: $435
  • One-bedroom average rent: $629
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $947

Like Bloomington, Champaign is often associated with its neighboring city, Urbana, since the cities share the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus.

Champaign has a thriving arts scene, award-winning restaurants and great outdoor spaces. It’s a mix of rural and urban, giving residents options, whether they want a more quiet rural setting or a bustling urban environment.

Chicago, IL, one of the best places to live in illinois

  • Population: 2,721,615
  • Average age: 40.2
  • Median household income: $58,247
  • Average commute time: 43.4 minutes
  • Walk score: 84
  • Studio average rent: $1,796
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,287
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $3,150

There is no shortage of things to do in the largest city in Illinois. Chicago is a city of neighborhoods and like any major metropolitan city in the country, it’s home to award-winning restaurants, world-class museums and Cloud Gate, the bean-like sculpture in Millennium Park also known as “The Bean” among locals.

In addition, the lakefront and the many parks throughout the city offer its residents a place to rest and enjoy their surroundings.

Rental rates vary based on the neighborhood but, in general, the closer to the downtown district and Lake Michigan, the higher the rental rates. Also, depending on where you live, it’s entirely possible to live in Chicago without needing a car since public transportation is pretty robust and accessible.

Evanston, IL.

Photo source: City of Evanston Illinois / Facebook
  • Population: 75,574
  • Average age: 41.4
  • Median household income: $78,904
  • Average commute time: 39.1 minutes
  • Walk score: 82
  • Studio average rent: $1,720
  • One-bedroom average rent: $2,141
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,974

Evanston borders the northern part of Chicago and while it’s a northern suburb, parts of it feel very much like a busy metropolitan city.

Northwestern University calls Evanston home so part of the north and east part of Evanston is home to students as well as established families who live in older and grand single-family homes.

Residents love their tree-lined and quiet streets and easy access to the beaches along Lake Michigan.

The city is large enough to have a few distinct shopping districts, including downtown Evanston, which has been completely transformed over the past decade with a large movie theater and larger retail establishments, while Central Street has more independent boutiques.

Naperville, IL, one of the best places to live in illinois

  • Population: 144,752
  • Average age: 41.3
  • Median household income: $125,926
  • Average commute time: 41.6 minutes
  • Walk score: 46
  • Studio average rent: $1,286
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,483
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,828

The original home of the fictional Byrde family before they moved to the Ozarks, Naperville is a picturesque western suburb of Chicago.

The Naperville Riverwalk curves along the banks of the DuPage River and features independent boutiques, restaurants, bars and hotels with river views.

The DuPage Children’s Museum has fun hands-on exhibits that attract both residents and visitors to the area. In addition, the Naper Settlement is a family-friendly, 13-acre outdoor history museum that traces the history of Naperville.

Oak Park, IL.

  • Population: 52,227
  • Average age: 42.1
  • Median household income: $94,646
  • Average commute time: 43.1 minutes
  • Walk score: 84
  • Studio average rent: $1,427
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,651
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,707

Oak Park is a tree-lined suburb just west of Chicago.

The Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) Green Line includes several Oak Park stops, making it particularly convenient for those who want to live in a suburb but still have easy access to Chicago.

Even so, Oak Park is a bustling city with an active downtown full of restaurants and independent boutiques, strong schools and active community members. It’s also home to the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, which attracts thousands from around the world to see the architect’s prairie-style home.

Peoria, IL, one of the best places to live in illinois

  • Population: 114,615
  • Average age: 40.8
  • Median household income: $51,771
  • Average commute time: 22 minutes
  • Walk score: 44
  • Studio average rent: $678
  • One-bedroom average rent: $771
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $954

Peoria is a laid-back city and most residents work for one of the major employers: Caterpillar (which still employees thousands despite its corporate move to Chicago), OSF Healthcare Saint Francis Medical Center or the school district.

Nestled along the Illinois River, it’s located between St. Louis and Chicago, which is approximately a two-and-a-half-hour drive. There is a mix of things to do in the city, from hiking outdoors to enjoying a cocktail at one of the many restaurants, bars or casinos.

In mid-2014, Peoria began offering bus route service on Sundays, something it hadn’t been offering since 1970, making it easier to get around town for those without a car.

Rockford, IL.

  • Population: 148,485
  • Average age: 41.9
  • Median household income: $44,252
  • Average commute time: 25.6 minutes
  • Walk score: 46
  • Studio average rent: N/A
  • One-bedroom average rent: $714
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,070

There is no shortage of outdoor entertainment options for those living of visiting Rockford. There are pools to swim, a river to kayak and nature preserves to hike.

The Klehm Arboretum and Botanic Garden as well as the Anderson Japanese Garden attract thousands of garden lovers.

Residents can choose between downtown lofts to quieter tree-lined streets in historic neighborhoods. Each Rockford community is active in its own way, with great restaurants, museums and shops located throughout the fifth-largest city in the state.

Springfield, IL, one of the best places to live in illinois

  • Population: 115,968
  • Average age: 43.2
  • Median household income: $54,648
  • Average commute time: 22.2 minutes
  • Walk score: 47
  • Studio average rent: N/A
  • One-bedroom average rent: $665
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $749

Home to the Illinois State Capitol, Springfield is a mix of those who serve the legislative and executive branches of the government during sessions as well as residents who live in the city full-time.

It’s also home to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum which honors and documents the life and work of the 16th U.S. President, Abraham Lincoln so the area gets a lot of tourists year-round.

Springfield feels a bit like living in a suburban setting but also has plenty of bars, restaurants and parks to keep locals and visitors entertained.

Choose among the best cities in Illinois

With world-class attractions, sprawling rural towns to fast-paced urban cities, Illinois has something for everyone. If you’re thinking about moving to the Land of Lincoln, we hope this list of the best places to live in Illinois helpful.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments in March 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
Other demographic data comes from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

Source: rent.com

10 Cities Near Dallas To Live In 2021

Dallas is the largest inland metropolitan area in the U.S., which probably seems daunting if you’re considering a move. Luckily, there are plenty of great suburbs and nearby cities that let you take advantage of everything the Big D offers from a lower-key base camp.

No matter what reason you have your sights set on the area, the following 10 cities near Dallas should also be on your radar.

Richardson, TX.Richardson, TX.

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 12.8 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,442 (down 1.9 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,763 (down 7.3 percent since last year)

With a population of just over 120,000, Richardson has a tight-knit community feel with big-city amenities.

The University of Texas at Dallas is in Richardson, and within the city, there are very desirable public and private schools. It makes living here attractive to young families.

There are excellent city services and fun community programs, including farmer’s markets, festivals and events.

The recreational facilities are top-notch and include gyms, aquatic centers, over 35 parks, playgrounds and nature preserves.

Richardson’s location is perfect — it’s bordered by Dallas and Plano and also provides access to four different DART (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) stations, which can get you to downtown Dallas in 20 minutes.

farmers branch txfarmers branch tx

Source: Apartment Guide / The Luxe at Mercer Crossing
  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 14.1 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,343 (down 0.5 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,993 (up 7.2 percent since last year)

Farmers Branch is one of the fastest-growing cities near Dallas and a great place to call home. Over 4,000 companies and more than 250 corporate headquarters are in Farmers Branch, making it Texas’s third-largest business center.

Its restaurant and entertainment scene have fully blossomed, and the area is now in high demand for families especially. The neighborhoods are safe and the schools are both excellent while the recreational facilities are state-of-the-art.

Farmers Branch is known as “The City in the Park” because it’s so green with over 30 award-winning parks, a community garden, rose gardens, walking trails and a 104-acre nature preserve.

Addison, TX. Addison, TX.

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 14.3 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,533 (down 13.4 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,181 (down 17.1 percent since last year)

If you’re looking for a cool city near Dallas to work and live in, Addison fits the bill.

Many perks include free membership to the Addison Athletic Club, a front-row seat to the famous firework show called Kaboom Town and easy access to the plethora of shopping and dining options.

There are more than 180 restaurants within the 4.4 square miles that make up Addison, ranging from fine dining to family-style establishments.

Addison is a small town in terms of numbers, but it doesn’t feel far from the action. It’s just 20 minutes from Dallas’s downtown with easy access off the tollway.

Plano, TX.Plano, TX.

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 18.3 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,764 (up 12.8 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,372 (up 12.5 percent since last year)

Plano is a highly desirable city to live in near Dallas. It’s just a short commute north of Dallas’s downtown and is home to some large corporations like J.C. Penney Company, Frito-Lay and Toyota, to name a few.

Plano is a great place to live and work. It takes on a life of its own with a small-town vibe even though it’s anything but small. Plano stands out because it has a charming historic downtown area with trendy shopping and dining, excellent schools and a strong sense of community.

There is no shortage of recreational activities in this city either with over 70 parks to explore, including hiking and bike trails.

carrollton txcarrollton tx

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 18.6 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,312 (up 4.4 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,660 (up 4.7 percent since last year)

A precious gem tucked into the Dallas metro area is Carrollton. Residents enjoy a high quality of life with top schools, safe neighborhoods and lots of recreational parks.

In this city, slightly northwest of downtown Dallas, you’ll find beautiful, spacious homes to fit a relaxed lifestyle. Carrollton real estate is some of the most expensive in Texas but proves to appreciate in value faster than neighboring cities.

The pristine Indian Creek Golf Club, a 36-hole golf course, is in Carrollton. You can also find many hiking and biking trails, picnic areas and playgrounds scattered throughout the city.

Additionally, there are more than 250 restaurants in Carrollton — so much variety, your tastebuds will thank you.

Grapevine, TX.Grapevine, TX.

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 22.2 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,419 (down 3.3 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,966 (down 3.5 percent since last year)

Located in between Dallas and Fort Worth is the city of Grapevine. Home to DFW International Airport, the third-largest airport in the world, this city offers accessibility like no other.

Living in Grapevine provides major conveniences with a suburban feel. There are plenty of restaurants, boutiques, wineries, art galleries, jewelry stores and more in the Historic Main Street District, a hot destination.

The beautiful Lake Grapevine offers 8,000 acres for outdoor recreation like fishing, stand-up paddleboarding, boating and hiking, making this an exciting place to live.

As the name Grapevine might hint, you’ll find many wineries linked by the city’s Urban Wine Trail. There’s even a multi-day annual wine festival called GrapeFest.

Rockwall, TX.Rockwall, TX.

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 23.4 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,472 (down 5.3 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,750 (down 1 percent since last year)

Rockwall is one of DFW’s best-kept secrets. The city has much to offer its residents, making it an attractive place to live near Dallas. Rockwall Parks and Recreation offers year-round events and classes for kids, as well as summer music events and movie nights in the park.

It’s a great city to raise a family and combine work with play. There are a few large employers in Rockwall, including many manufacturing companies and Texas Health Hospital Rockwall, which employs more than 600 people.

One of North Texas’s largest lakes, Lake Ray Hubbard, is in Rockwall and is great for fishing, skiing and recreational boating. Overall, Rockwall is a fun and relaxing place to live.

Allen, TX.Allen, TX.

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 24.2 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,330 (up 1 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,648 (down 3.7 percent since last year)

Allen is a booming suburb and a great place to live near Dallas. It’s known for premium shopping, excellent attractions, safe neighborhoods and a highly-ranked school system.

Some of the best shopping destinations in Allen are Allen Premium Outlets, which has over 120 outlet designer and name-brand stores, and Watters Creek at Montgomery Farms, a scenic, resort-style shopping center and entertainment destination.

Another perk of living in Allen is the number of recreational offerings. You can head to Don Rodenbaugh Natatorium, which offers an indoor water park, a competition-sized swimming pool and a rock-climbing wall, or try wakeboarding at Hydrous at Allen Station. Meanwhile, skaters can enjoy the Edge at Allen Station Skate Park, the largest outdoor skatepark in Texas.

Frisco, TX.Frisco, TX.

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 26.4 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,624 (up 17.3 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $2,269 (up 22.1 percent since last year)

Frisco has so much to offer — in 2018 Money magazine put it at number one on the “Best Places to Live in America” list. The city has undergone extreme growth in the last couple of decades and is an ideal place to raise a family.

Frisco is safer than surrounding areas, with a crime rate of 86 in 2019, which is 3.1 times lower than the U.S. average. Families also appreciate the excellent education opportunities. The school district is known for academic excellence and innovative programs.

Frisco is additionally becoming the epicenter for football fans since it’s the site of the Dallas Cowboys’ 91-acre campus, known as the Star.

McKinney, TX.McKinney, TX.

  • Distance from downtown Dallas: 30.8 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,277 (down 4.7 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,704 (up 1.5 percent since last year)

McKinney is an excellent option if you’re looking to live near Dallas but crave a slower-paced feel.

This blend of big-city and small-town culture is one of the many reasons young professionals and growing households move to the area. The historic downtown square draws visitors from all over with its unique locally-owned boutiques, gift stores, art exhibits, restaurants and coffee shops.

There are a few breweries in McKinney which add to the life of the city. There’s also a plethora of picturesque parks and the eight-mile Erwin Park Hike and Bike Trail for residents to enjoy.

Make one of these cities near Dallas your next home

If you’re looking for the amenities of a metropolis but prefer a more laid-back vibe, you’re bound to find it in these 10 great cities near Dallas. No matter where you decide to hang your hat, there are some things you’ll need to know before living near the Big D.

Get the 411 on living in Dallas and start preparing for your move today.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory pulled in April 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

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Source: apartmentguide.com