Repossession Credit Scores: What You Need to Know

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One of the harsh truths of secured loans is that your asset can be repossessed if you fail to make the payments. In the words of the FTC, “your consumer rights may be limited” if you miss your monthly payments, and when that happens, both your financial situation and your bank balance will take a hit.

On this guide, we’ll look at what can happen when you fall behind on your car payments, and how much damage it can do to your credit score.

What is a Car Repossession?

An auto loan is a loan acquired for the sole purpose of purchasing a car. The lender covers the cost of the car, you get the vehicle you want, and in return you pay a fixed monthly sum until the loan balance is repaid.

If you fail to make to make a payment or you’re late, the lender may assume possession of your car and sell it to offset the losses. At the same time, they will report your missed and late payments to the main credit bureaus, and your credit score will take a hit. What’s more, if the sale is not enough to cover the remainder of the debt, you may be asked to pay the residual balance.

The same process applies to a title loan, whereby your car is used as collateral for a loan but isn’t actually the purpose of the loan.

To avoid repossession, you need to make your car payments on time every month. If you are late or make a partial payment, you may incur penalties and it’s possible that your credit score will suffer as well. If you continue to delay payment, the lender will seek to cover their costs as quickly and painlessly as possible.

How a Repossession Can Impact Your Credit Score

Car repossession can impact your credit history and credit score in several ways. Firstly, all missed and late car payments will be reported to the credit bureaus and will remain on your account for up to 7 years. They can also reduce your credit score. 

Secondly, if your car is repossessed on top of late payments, you could lose up to 100 points from your credit score, significantly reducing your chances of being accepted for a credit card, loan or mortgage in the future. 

And that’s not the end of it. If you have had your car for less than a couple of years, there’s a good chance the sale price will be much less than the loan balance. Car repossession doesn’t wipe the slate clean and could still leave you with a sizable issue. If you have a $10,000 balance and the car is sold for $5,000, you will owe $5,000 on the loan and the lender may also hit you with towing charges.

Don’t assume that the car is worth more than the value of the loan and that everything will be okay. The lender isn’t selling it direct; they won’t get the best price. Repossessed vehicles are sold cheaply, often for much less than their value, and in most cases, a balance remains. 

Lenders may be lenient with this balance as it’s not secured, so their options are limited. However, they can also file a judgment or sell it to a collection agency, at which point your problems increase and your credit score drops even further.

How Does a Repo Take Place?

If you have a substantial credit card debt and miss a payment, your creditor will typically take it easy on you. They can’t legally report the missed payment until at least 30-days have passed and most creditors won’t sell the account to a collection agency until it is at least 180-days overdue.

This leads many borrowers into a false sense of security, believing that an auto loan lender will be just as forgiving. But this is simply not true. Some lenders will repo your car just 90-days after your last payment, others will do it after 60 days. They don’t make as many allowances because they don’t need to—they can simply seize your asset, get most of the money back, and then chase the rest as needed.

Most repossessions happen quickly and with little warning. The lender will contact you beforehand and request that you pay what you owe, but the actual repo process doesn’t work quite like what you may have seen on TV. 

They’re not allowed to break down your door or threaten you; they’re not allowed to use force. And, most of the time, they don’t need to. If they see your car, they will load it onto their truck and disappear. They’re so used to this process that they can typically do it in less than 60-seconds.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re at home or at work—you just lost your ride.

What Can You Do Before a Repo Hits Your Credit Score?

Fortunately, there are ways to avoid the repo process and escape the damage. You just need to act quickly and don’t bury your head in the sand, as many borrowers do.

Request a Deferment

An auto loan lender won’t waste as much time as a creditor, simply because they don’t need to. However, they still understand that they won’t get top dollar for the car and are generally happy to make a few allowances if it means you have more chance of meeting your payments.

If you sense that your financial situation is on the decline, contact your lender and request a deferment. This should be done as soon as possible, preferably before you miss a payment.

A deferment buys you a little extra time, allowing you to take the next month or two off and adding these payments onto the end of the term. The FTC recommends that you get any agreement in writing, just in case they renege on their promise.

Refinance

One of the best ways to avoid car repossession, is to refinance your loan and secure more favorable terms. The balance may increase, and you’ll likely find yourself paying more interest over the long-term, but in the short-term, you’ll have smaller monthly payments to contend with and this makes the loan more manageable.

You will need a good credit score for this to work (although there are some bad credit lenders) but it will allow you to tweak the terms in your favor and potentially improve your credit situation.

Sell the Car Yourself

Desperate times call for desperate measures; if you’re on the brink of facing repossession, you should consider selling the car yourself. You’ll likely get more than your lender would and you can use this to clear the balance. 

Before you sell, calculate how much is left and make sure the sale will cover it. If not, you will need to find the additional funds yourself, preferably without acquiring additional debt. Ask friends or family members if they can help you out.

How Long a Repo Can Affect Your Credit Score

The damage caused by a repossession can remain on your credit score for 7 years, causing some financial difficulty. However, the damage will lessen over time and within three or four years it will be negligible at best.

Derogatory marks cease to have an impact on your credit score a long time before it disappears off your credit report, and it’s the same for late payments and repossessions.

Still, that doesn’t mean you should take things lightly. The lender can make life very difficult for you if you don’t meet your payments every month and don’t work with them to find a solution.

What About Voluntary Repossession?

If you’re missing payments because you’ve lost your job or suffered a major change in your financial circumstances, it may be time to consider voluntary repossession, in which case there are no missed payments and you don’t need to worry about repo men knocking on your door or coming to your workplace.

With voluntary repossession, the borrower contacts the lender, informs them they can no longer afford the payments, and arranges a time and a place to return the car. However, while this is a better option, it can do similar damage to the borrower’s credit score as a voluntary repossession, like a traditional repossession, is still a defaulted loan.

Missed payments aside, the only difference concerns how the repossession shows on the borrower’s credit report. Voluntary repossession will look better to a creditor who manually scans the report, but the majority of lenders run automatic checks and won’t notice a difference.

Summary: Act Quickly

If you have student loan, credit card, and other unsecured debt, a repo could reduce your chances of a successful debt payoff and potentially prevent you from getting a mortgage. But it’s not the end of the world. You can get a deferment, refinance or reinstate the loan, and even if the worst does happen, it may only take a year or so to get back on track after you fix your financial woes.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Paying Taxes as a Freelancer – Lexington Law

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Paying taxes as a freelancer can be a bit more involved—and expensive—than paying taxes as a W-2 employee. When you’re a freelancer, you’re the boss. That’s great if you want some flexibility, but it also means you’re self-employed, so you are responsible for both the employer and employee parts of employment taxes.

When you work for someone else, your paycheck amount is your pay minus all appropriate deductions. That includes deductions for federal and state income taxes as well as Medicare and Social Security contributions.

But what you might not realize is that your employer covers part of the Medicare and Social Security amounts. As a self-employed individual, you have to pay the total amount yourself. That’s 12.4 percent for Social Security and 2.9 percent for Medicare—a total of 15.3 percent of your taxable earnings, not including federal and other income taxes.

When Do I Have to Start Paying Taxes as a Freelancer?

According to the Internal Revenue Service, if you earn $400 or more in a year via self-employment or contract work, you must claim the income and pay taxes on it. The threshold is even lower if you earn the money for church work. If you earn more than $108.28 as a church employee and the church employer doesn’t withhold and pay employment taxes, you must do so.

What Tax Forms Should I Know About?

Freelancers report their income to the IRS using a Form 1040, but they may need to include a variety of Schedule attachments, including:

  • Schedule A, which lists itemized deductions
  • Schedule C, which reports profits or losses from their freelancer business
  • Schedule SE, which calculates self-employment tax

These are only some of the forms that might be relevant to a freelancer filing federal taxes. Freelancers must also file a tax form for the state in which they live as well as with any local governments that require income tax payments.

If you’re planning to do your taxes on your own as a freelancer, it might be helpful to invest in DIY tax software. Look for options that cater specifically to home and business or self-employment situations. These software programs typically walk you through a series of questions designed to determine which forms you need to file and help you complete those forms correctly.

Six Tips for Doing Your Taxes as a Freelancer

As a freelancer, chances are you spend a lot of your time attending to clients and getting production work done. You may not have a lot of time for business organization tasks such as accounting. But a proactive approach to paying taxes as a freelancer can help you prepare to do your taxes and pay what can be a surprisingly big bill each year.

Here are six tips for handling taxes as a freelancer.

1. Keep Track of Your Income

Track your income so you know how much you may need to pay in taxes every year. Keeping track of your numbers also helps you understand whether your business is profitable and how you’re doing with income compared to past years.

You can track your income in a number of ways. Apps and software programs such as QuickBooks and Wave let you manage your freelance invoices and track income and expenses. Some also help you generate financial reports that might be helpful come tax time.

Alternatively, you can track your income in an Excel spreadsheet or even a notebook, as long as you’re consistent with writing everything down.

2. Set Money Aside in Advance

It’s tempting to count every dollar that comes in as money you can use. But it’s wiser to set money aside for taxes in advance. Depending on how much you earn as a freelancer, you could owe thousands in federal and state taxes by the end of the year, and if you didn’t plan ahead, you might not have the money to cover the tax bill.

That can lead to tax debt that comes with pretty stiff penalties and interest—and the potential for a tax lien if you can’t pay the bill.

3. Determine Your Business Structure

Make sure you know what your business structure is. Many freelancers operate as sole proprietorships. But you might be able to get a tax break if you operate as an LLC or a corporation. Talk to legal and tax professionals as you set up your business to find out about the pros and cons of each type of organization.

4. Know About Relevant Deductions

As a freelancer, you may be able to take certain federal tax deductions to save yourself some money. Tax deductions reduce how much of your income is considered taxable, which, in turn, reduces how much you owe in taxes. Here are a few common deductions that might be relevant to you as a freelancer.

Home Office

You can take the home office deduction if you’ve set aside a certain area of your home for use by the business. The IRS does have a couple of stipulations.

First, you have to regularly use the space for your business, and it can’t be something you use regularly for other purposes. For example, you can’t claim your dining room as a home office just because you sometimes work from that location.

Second, the home has to be your principal place of business, which means it’s where you do most business activity. You can’t claim the deduction if you normally work outside the home but sometimes answer work emails while you’re in the living room.

Equipment and Supplies

You can also deduct the cost of equipment and supplies that you buy for your business. That includes software purchases and relevant subscriptions, such as if you pay monthly for Microsoft 365 or annually for a domain name.

Make sure you have backup documentation for any business expenses you deduct. That means keeping receipts that show what you purchased so you can prove that the expenses were for business. You also have to be careful to keep business and personal expenses separate—art supplies for your child’s school project, for example, wouldn’t typically be considered valid business expenses.

Travel and Meals

Meals and travel expenses that are related to your business may be tax deductible. If you stay in a hotel, book a flight or incur other travel expenses that are necessary for the running of your business, you can claim them as a deduction. The same is true for 50 percent of the value of meals and beverages that you pay for as a necessity when doing business.

The IRS does set an “ordinary and necessary” rule here. For example, if you’re traveling to meet with a client and you need to eat lunch, that is likely to be considered necessary. But if you opt for a very lavish meal for no other purpose than to do so, it might not be allowed under the “ordinary” part of the rule.

Business Insurance

If you carry liability or similar insurance for your business, you can deduct it as a cost of doing business. You may also be able to deduct the cost of other insurance policies if they are necessary for your trade.

5. Estimate Your Taxes Quarterly

The IRS offers provisions for estimating your employment taxes on a quarterly basis. Self-employed individuals, including freelancers, can make these estimated tax payments, too. Paying as you go means you won’t owe a large sum every April, and if you overestimate, you may get a tax refund.

Quarterly payments are due in April, June, September and January. They can be mailed or made online. Depending on how much you earn, you may need to make quarterly estimated tax payments to avoid a penalty at the end of the year.

6. Consult a Tax Professional

As you can see just from the basic information and tips above, paying taxes as a freelancer can get complicated quickly. Consider talking to a tax professional to understand what all your obligations are and how best to reduce your tax burden using legal deductions. You might be missing a major deduction every year that could save you a lot of money.

And remember that as a freelancer, you’re running your own small business. That means paying attention to all your finances, including your credit report. If you ever want to take out a business loan or seek other funding to grow your business, you might need to rely on your good credit score.

Check your credit score, and if you find inaccurate negative information making an impact on your score, contact Lexington Law to find out how to get help disputing it.


Reviewed by Cynthia Thaxton, Lexington Law Firm Attorney. Written by Lexington Law.

Cynthia Thaxton has been with Lexington Law Firm since 2014. She attended The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia where she graduated summa cum laude with a degree in International Relations and a minor in Arabic. Cynthia then attended law school at George Mason University School of Law, where she served as Senior Articles Editor of the George Mason Law Review and graduated cum laude. Cynthia is licensed to practice law in Utah and North Carolina.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

How to Lower Your Credit Card Interest Rate in 4 Steps

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

As an educated consumer and a responsible borrower, you may be wondering how you can lower your hefty credit card interest rates. After all, a few years have probably passed since you first applied, and perhaps your credit score has gone up since then. Luckily, it’s very possible to score a reduced rate by following these steps:

  1. Work to improve your chances of getting approved by following good credit habits and ensuring you have a solid history of on-time payments.
  2. Research your current interest rate and how it stacks up to what competing credit card companies are offering.
  3. Call your credit card issuers to negotiate a lower interest rate, explaining why you deserve it.
  4. If you’re rejected, try again and ask to speak to a different person, or consider alternative options.

1. Improve Your Chances of Getting Approved

Since interest charges are a big moneymaker for credit card issuers, a reduced rate is a big ask. Credit card companies will likely only be willing to bend for their best customers, so you’ll first want to do everything you can to set yourself up for success.

This means ensuring your credit score is in tip-top shape—specifically, a “good” FICO rating or better. Aim for a FICO score of at least 670 before you ask for an interest rate reduction, although you may want to aim for 740 to bump yourself up to the “very good” bracket.

You’ll also want to ensure you have a reliable history of on-time payments. If you’ve had a shaky history of missed or late payments, you may want to focus on making on-time payments for a year before you ask for a reduced interest rate.

Improving your credit standing, especially if you’ve previously struggled with negative items, is a process that takes time. Rather than looking for a quick-fix solution, focus on building good habits—it can only help when it comes time to ask for a reduced interest rate.

2. Do the Research

Now that you’ve worked to improve your credit standing, you’ll want to do some research before calling your credit card issuer. First, check what your current interest rate is. You can find this on your monthly credit card statement. How does your rate compare to what’s considered “good?” How does it stack up to rates competitors are offering?

What’s a Good Interest Rate on a Credit Card?

As of September, the average credit card APR charged is 16 percent. If your interest rate is even a few percentage points below this number, that could be considered a good rate, and negotiations to go any lower may be unsuccessful.

On the flip side, if your interest rate is substantially higher than average, you may have more wiggle room to negotiate—especially if you’ve improved your financial standing and credit score since you first applied.

What Are Competitors Offering?

Credit card companies need to offer competitive interest rates in order to stay in business. They know it’s a competitive industry and that losing customers is expensive. If you can find comparable cards with lower interest rates, this can be ammunition in your plea for a lower rate.

Look at other available cards and their terms and interest rates. Take note of the card name, credit card company and interest rate. Keep this handy for when it’s time to call your credit card issuer. The more specific you can be, the better.

In a 2019 study, 81% of those who asked for a reduced interest rate received one. The average reduction was approximately 6 percentage points. Source: CompareCards.com

3. Ask Your Credit Card Issuers

Once you’ve researched the competition and worked to improve your chances of getting approved for a lower interest rate, it’s time to begin calling your credit card issuers.

If you have multiple credit cards, you’ll want to call all of the issuers. You may want to start with the card you’ve had the longest, because you’ve had time to build up a track record as a loyal customer.

Alternatively, you could start with the card that carries the highest interest rate. A reduction here could help you save more money, but keep in mind that you won’t necessarily be able to leverage your long history as a reliable customer.

Start by explaining who you are and why you deserve consideration for an interest rate reduction. Make sure to mention your credit score and how many years you’ve been a customer. Consider the following script:

“Hi, my name is ____, and I’ve been a customer since ____.

I’ve always made on-time payments, and I have a [good/excellent] credit score of ____.

I’m calling because I’d like to lower my interest rate, which is currently __percent.”

Do: Research beforehand, have specific numbers and know your worth as a customer.

Don’t: Go into a call unprepared or without knowing exactly what you’re asking for.

How to Ask for a Lower Interest Rate: Hi, my name is ____, and I’ve been a customer since ___. I’ve always made on-time payments, and I have a [good/excellent] credit score of ___. I’m calling because I’d like to lower my interest rate, which is currently __%. Source: Debt.org

Then, explain the reason you want an interest rate reduction. Maybe you’ve recently faced furlough or wage cuts or you need to pay off expensive medical bills. Or maybe you’re just trying to improve your credit score and would like to pay down your debt.

Do: Be factual and explain your situation.

Don’t: Be rude, demanding or entitled.

This is also a great time to bring up competitors. If you prepared for the call, you will be aware of competitors and what those other companies are offering. Be specific—mention other credit card companies and their APR offers, and suggest that if you aren’t able to reach an agreement, you’ll consider taking your business elsewhere for more competitive rates.

Do: Be specific about what other competitors are offering and see if they will match rates.

Don’t: Cancel your card if you don’t get a reduced rate, as this may hurt your credit score.

If you score a lower rate—congratulations! Now move on to the next credit card issuer. If you receive a “no,” or a compromised rate that is still higher than you’d like, try again in a few weeks and ask to speak to someone different.

Do: Be diligent about following up or speaking to a supervisor if things aren’t faring well.

Don’t: Give up after the first try. Ask for the reasoning behind a “no” so you can change your situation to get the rate you want.

Does Asking for a Lower Interest Rate Affect Credit Score?

The only way asking for a lower interest rate could hurt your credit score is if it requires the creditor to pull a hard inquiry. Credit card companies may do this to look at your credit report to see if you qualify for a lower interest rate.

A hard inquiry may cause your credit score to drop a few points—however, it can only affect your credit score for up to 12 months. That said, if you successfully score a lower interest rate, it may indirectly help increase your credit score since paying off your debt will be less costly.

Remember that credit card interest rates aren’t reported to credit bureaus since they don’t directly affect your credit score, so a hard inquiry is the only scenario that would hurt your score.

4. Consider Alternative Options

If your credit card issuer won’t budge on your interest rate, it may be time to consider other ways to lower your credit card interest rate. These are typically temporary solutions while you work to pay down your debt, and they don’t result in long-term reduced rates.

Balance Transfer

If you’re unhappy with your current interest rate, a balance transfer allows you to transfer your current account balance to a different card with a lower interest rate. You then make payments to your new account, saving money in interest charges.

Keep in mind that balance transfer interest rates, while low, are usually temporary. This means your introductory rate will likely increase after the promotional period is over. Aim to pay off the majority of your debt before this happens to make the most of your balance transfer.

Debt Consolidation

With debt consolidation, you can take multiple high-interest credit card balances and combine them into a single loan with a potentially lower interest rate. Just keep an eye out for fees and penalties. Additionally, you’ll want to review the loan terms and restrictions to see if the repayment timeline is suitable for your needs.

Long-Term Benefits of a Lower Interest Rate

It’s no secret that a lower interest rate is favorable. It saves you money when you’re paying off credit card debt. However, for those with significant credit card debt, a lower interest rate may also allow you to pay off your debt sooner. This, in turn, saves you more money in interest over time and allows you to see an increase in your credit score sooner.

Remember to maintain good credit management even after you’ve scored a lower interest rate and paid down your debt. On-time payments, low credit utilization and a long credit history are all important things to keep in mind. Despite good credit management, errors are surprisingly common in credit reports, which can cause your score to dip for unfair reasons. Learn about how credit repair can help you dispute these questionable negative items and get you back to the credit score you deserve.


Reviewed by Kenton Arbon, an Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Kenton Arbon is an Associate Attorney in the Arizona office. Mr. Arbon was born in Bakersfield, California, and grew up in the Northwest. He earned his B.A. in Business Administration, Human Resources Management, while working as an Oregon State Trooper. His interest in the law lead him to relocate to Arizona, attend law school, and graduate from Arizona State College of Law in 2017. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Arbon has worked in multiple compliance domains including anti-money laundering, Medicare Part D, contracts, and debt negotiation. Mr. Arbon is licensed to practice law in Arizona. He is located in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

Common Mistakes That Lead to a Lower Credit Score

Getting a loan or a new line of credit is usually subject to a 3 digit-number known as the credit score. And although it is not the only indicator used by banks and other lenders, your score weighs heavily on your financial health. So, what are the common mistakes that lead to lower credit score and how can you avoid them?

1.  Missing or Delaying Payments

Since your credit score is an overview of your financial undertakings up to the point of applying for a loan, how you handle existing debt matters. Delays or late payments on other loans or credit card installments will affect your score negatively.

Up to 35% of your credit score is determined by your credit history. This calls for timely payments, and where that is not possible, negotiate with your lender for fairer terms to ensure continued payments. Luckily, the moment you restart regular payments, your score starts to improve.

2.  Over Utilizing Your Credit

As earlier noted, you need to pay your debts on time for your credit score to stay high, but the amount of credit you use matters. Known as credit utilization rate, this is the ratio of your credit card debts divided by the amount of credit that is available to you.

The ratio is expressed as a percentage and the higher it is, the worse your credit score gets. Of your total credit score, 20% is determined by this ratio.

Tip: Whenever possible, only use up to 30% of your credit to ensure that your credit utilization ratio remains low.

3.  Having no Credit Lines

As a follow-up on the second mistake, you may think that having zero lines of credit will make your score high. Unfortunately, that would be unwise. Remember that your credit score is derived from your credit history. Without any history to look at, there will be less information for accurate analysis and your score will be low.

4.  Having Errors in Your Credit Report

Reading your credit reportErrors, whether clerical or fraudulent, are some of the common mistakes that lead to a lower credit score. Avoid such mistakes by checking your credit report regularly and disputing any errors. On the upside, credit reporting bureaus are obligated to furnish you with a free report annually.

Also, unlike when a lender requests your credit report which can affect your score adversely, checking your own report has zero effect on your score. Besides, monitoring the report helps you to keep track of any payment that you might have missed. So, check your report periodically and ensure that you can account for all entries.

5.  Closing Your Credit Facilities

After you have paid off a credit card or loan, what comes next? Choosing to close the credit line is a huge mistake. Essentially, you will be erasing a good history that speaks to your ability to repay debts. Particularly, if you were repaying your monthly debt installments on time, then that history needs to be on your report.

Also, closing credit cards lowers the average age of your accounts, which in turn lowers your credit score. Known as credit age, this is the average time that your accounts have been active, and the higher it is, the better your credit score will be.

15% of your FICO credit score is based on the length of your credit history.

Conclusion

A low credit score can deny you anything from a mortgage to a new credit card. A bad score also means high rates and other stringent terms on a new loan. You can keep your credit score from dropping by avoiding all of the above common financial mistakes.

For credit repair and financial advice, contact Credit Absolute for a free consultation. 

Source: creditabsolute.com

Last chance for increased 70,000 mile United Explorer card offer

Last chance for increased 70,000 mile United Explorer card offer



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Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

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Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

[Targeted] Best Buy Credit Card: Spend $1,500+ Outside Best Buy & Get A $75 Reward Certificate

Update 1/18/21: Some people also have an offer for 11% back on rewards on a single purchase by 1/31/21. Hat tip to reader JJ

The Offer

Offer sent out via e-mail, unknown subject line

  • Some Best Buy credit cardholders are being offered a $75 reward certificate when you spend $1,500 or more outside of Best Buy by 2/28/21.

Our Verdict

High spend requirement.

Hat tip to reader JJ

Source: doctorofcredit.com

What Happens If You Make a Late Credit Card Payment?

April 22, 2019 &• 5 min read by Jason Steele Comments 0 Comments

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Uh-oh! You just received your credit card statement, and it shows interest charges and a $38 late fee that you didn’t expect. You realize you’re guilty of making a late credit card payment last month. Or worse, you realize you forgot to send your payment at all. Here’s a rundown of potential impacts that your missed payment may have on your account.

  1. You’re assessed a late fee. Most credit cards charge a late fee when you make a late payment. In most cases, the fee is a flat charge of up to $39. In other instances, the fee might be tiered. For example, the late fee could be $15 if the balance is less than $100, up to $25 if the balance is $100 to less than $250 and up to $39 if the balance is $250 or more.

But what exactly does “up to” mean? Federal laws now prohibit credit card issuers from charging late fees that are in excess of the amount due. So if you have a balance of only $12, then your late fee can’t be more than $12.

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On the other hand, there are credit cards that charge no late fees at all. In addition, a few cards automatically waive a first late payment. Nevertheless, don’t interpret a late-payment forgiveness policy as an excuse to pay late.

  1. You lose your interest-free grace period. Many credit card users avoid interest charges by paying their balance in full and on time. But if you fail to pay your statement balance on time, the interest charges are applied to your next statement in addition to any fees. In fact, interest charges are assessed based on your average daily balance for each day of the entire statement period. For cardholders who are already carrying a balance, the increase in interest charges won’t be as dramatic, but it can be significant.
  2. You’re charged a penalty interest rate—AKA penalty APR. Not only are most cardholders hit with a late fee and additional interest charges, but a new, higher penalty interest rate can apply when cardholders miss payments. Thankfully, some of the same simple cards, like the Avant Credit Card don’t increase your APR as a penalty for late payments.
  3. Your credit score suffers. Making a late payment on your credit card account can affect your credit score, but it depends. It’s up to credit card issuers how late a payment must be before it’s reported to the credit bureaus, but any late payment can be reported.

Thankfully, most credit card issuers won’t report payments that are less than 30 days late. And some lenders wait as long as 60 days before reporting late credit card payments.

Just because issuers don’t immediately report a late payment doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. Your credit reports show the payment history for all of your credit cards, so check your reports to see whether a late payment has been reported to the bureaus. You’re entitled to a free credit report from each of the credit reporting agencies once a year under federal law.

In between getting your free annual credit reports, you can see how your payment history is affecting your own credit by getting your free score and credit report card on Credit.com.

What to Do If You Miss a Payment

  1. Pay it as soon as possible.When you realize you missed a payment, make a payment immediately. The quickest way to make a payment is by phone or electronically—not by postal mail. Making sure the payment is received quickly reduces the likelihood that your late payment is reported to the major credit bureaus. It also increases the chance that the card issuer is willing to forgive any late fees and interest charges.
  2. Contact your credit card issuer.Once you’ve made a payment, if you were otherwise in good standing, you’re in an excellent position to request that any late fees and interest charges be waived. Simply call your credit card company and let it know the circumstances that caused you to pay late, such as if you didn’t receive your statement. In most cases, the credit card provider is happy to waive these charges in order to satisfy and retain you as a customer.
  3. Fix the problem.After you’ve done what you can to limit the immediate harm caused by a late credit card payment, take steps to keep it from happening again. For example, if your statement for your last billing cycle wasn’t delivered in the mail, switch to electronic statements. Alternatively, you can see if your credit card issuer offers payment reminders via text or email. Even better, set up automatic payments if you can.

It’s only human to miss a credit card payment sometime. It’s how quickly you address the error that matters to you, your credit score and your credit card issuer.

More on Credit Cards

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Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products cited in this article may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees and terms with credit card issuers, banks or other financial institutions directly.


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Source: credit.com

All About Credit Card Processing Fees

All About Credit Card Processing Fees – SmartAsset

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When you make a payment with a credit card not all of that money goes to the merchant. Your payment has to be authorized by multiple companies or banks along the way and some of them will deduct fees for their services. A portion of your payment goes to your card issuer’s bank, the merchant’s bank, the big payment networks such as Visa and Mastercard as well as payment processing companies. Here’s what you need to know about credit card processing fees.

What Happens When You Make a Credit Card Transaction

Before we break down the individual credit card processing fees, it’s helpful to give a quick rundown of what happens when you make a payment with your credit card.

When you try to make a purchase with your card, whichever credit card processor the merchant uses will need to receive authorization to complete the transaction. To do that, the first step is to send your information and the transaction details to the appropriate payment network, Visa, Mastercard, American Express or Discover.

The payment network then contacts the bank that issues your credit card. Your card issuer has to confirm that you have enough available credit to cover the purchase you are trying to make. If you have enough available credit, it will approve the transaction. If you don’t have enough, it will deny the transaction. That approval or denial goes back to the payment network, who sends its approval (or denial) of the transaction back to the merchant’s bank.

This entire process only takes a few seconds but it happens every time you make a purchase with your card. It doesn’t matter whether you swipe, insert a card with an EVM chip or manually enter your credit card number.

Average Credit Card Processing Fees

Average Credit Card Processing Fees
Visa 1.40% – 2.50%
Mastercard 1.60% – 2.90%
Discover 1.56% – 2.30%
American Express 1.60% – 3.00%

The table above lists an an average range for credit card processing fees from each major credit card provider. These ranges are meant only to give you an idea of how it works. There are a number of things that go into the final processing fees for any individual merchant (more on that later). Credit card issuers also are not always transparent with their fees and how they change over time. This is particularly true of Discover and American Express. However, credit card processing fees generally average around 2%. Another key trend is that American Express regularly charges higher fees.

Credit Card Processing Fees: Interchange Fees

An interchange fee is money that merchants pay every time they make a credit or debit card transaction. It’s typically a percentage of the transaction plus a flat rate for each transaction. For example, an interchange fee might be 1% of the transaction plus a flat fee of $0.25 per transaction.

This fee goes to the credit (or debit) card’s issuing bank so that it can cover its own fees. In general, a credit card issuer will charge higher fees for cards that offer more perks of benefits. However, the biggest fee that your card issuer has to pay is an assessment fee. This goes to the credit card network (e.g. Visa or Mastercard) and all networks charge the same assessment fee.

Interchange fees make up the majority of credit card processing costs for a merchant. There is a base part of the interchange fee that is non-negotiable because it is the same no matter what credit card companies a merchant works with. There is also a markup fee, which is an additional cost on top of the base fee. The markup goes to credit card processing companies (learn more about them in the next section) and they vary between processors. These fees are negotiable so a merchant should always compare these fees before choosing a company to process their transactions.

Credit Card Processing Fees: Merchant Service Providers

Even though merchants have to contact card-issuing banks to approve every transaction, they do not directly contact those banks. Instead, the transaction goes through a middle man that allows merchants and banks to communicate. This middle man is a merchant service provider (MSP). Common MSPs are Square and Payline.

MSPs charge merchants a certain fee for every transaction, whether it’s a sale, declined transaction or return. They may also charge the merchant a setup fee, a monthly usage fee and a cancellation fee.

Some merchants may have a bank that provides these services, but the majority of merchants have to use a third party MSP.

Online Versus In-Store Transactions

Credit card processing fees are cheaper if you pay in-person versus online. That’s because there is a greater risk of fraud with online payments. If you buy something in a store, the merchant has the ability to confirm that someone if using a real card and that they are the cardholder. This is harder to do with an online payment. The result is higher fees as companies try to protect themselves from fraudulent payments.

MSPs also charge additional fees for providing the software that makes an online payment transaction possible for a merchant.

The Bottom Line

It only takes a few seconds for a credit card transaction to go through, but there is a lot going on behind the scenes. Multiple banks and companies help facilitate transactions and they all want their cut of the profit. This is where credit card processing fees come in. A merchant has to pay an interchange fee every time a transaction is made, some of which is non-negotiable and some of which varies depending on the merchant service provider that a merchant uses.

A merchant bears the brunt of credit card processing fees and some merchants cannot afford to pay all the fees. This is a common reason why smaller merchants do not accept credit cards. These fees are also the reason that some merchants will require a minimum transaction amount in order to use a credit card.

Common Credit Card Fees to Avoid

  • Some credit cards charge an annual fee. This is a fee the cardholder pays each year simply for the privilege of having the card. Annual fees are particularly common for credit cards that offer valuable rewards. Shop around though because you can avoid an annual fee with some of this year’s best rewards credit card.
  • If you plan to travel, using your card outside of the U.S. could leave you paying a foreign transaction fee. Luckily, we have some cards with no foreign transaction fee in our list of the best travel credit cards.
  • One fee that you can avoid with responsible credit card usage is a late payment fee. This is a fee that your card issuer will charge if you do not pay your bill by the due date. You should always pay on time because paying late will not only result in a fee but your credit score could also be negatively impacted.

Photo credits: ©iStock.com/Juanmonino, ©iStock.com/NoDerog, ©iStock.com/andresr

Lucy Lazarony Lucy Lazarony has been writing about personal finance for more than a decade. Lucy’s a credit card expert. She is a freelance writer and award-winning journalist living in South Florida. Lucy earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Florida. Her work is featured on Credit.com, CardRatings.com, MoneyRates.com and Art Hive Magazine.
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Source: smartasset.com