Life Insurance Myths Debunked

  • Life Insurance

Misconceptions and misunderstandings have perpetuated a number of life insurance myths over the years and prevented consumers from getting the cover they need. They see life insurance as something that it’s not, believing it to be out of their reach because of their lifestyle and their budget, or believing that it’s something it’s not.

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If you have dependents, want them to live comfortably, and don’t have assets or funds to give them, you need life insurance coverage. And if you have been avoiding life insurance because of something you’ve been told or something you believe, it’s time to dispel those beliefs and get to the truth of the matter.

Myth 1: Life Insurance Premiums are Expensive

One of the most common myths concerning life insurance products is that they are too expensive. It only makes sense, to the uninitiated at least. After all, if they’re promising a death benefit of $200,000 over a twenty-year period, it stands to reason that they would seek to claim at least 25% of that balance to guarantee a profit.

In fact, a recent study found that consumers who had never purchased life insurance overestimated the premium costs by between 400% and 500%. That’s a massive difference.

If you’re in your 20s or 30s and are relatively healthy, you can get 20-year term insurance for less than $20 a month, and if anything happens during that term your beneficiaries will get $200,000. Life insurance companies can afford to offer such huge payouts and low premiums because the chances of a young person dying during that term are very slim.

Assuming you’re paying $20 a month for a 20-year term life insurance policy, this means you’re paying $4,800 over the term, or 2.4% of the total payout. However, the odds of a 20-year-old woman dying during this time are 1.42%, and these odds drop significantly if you remove smoking, drinking, risk-taking, and pre-existing conditions from the equation.

In other words, while it seems like a huge sum and a huge discrepancy, it still falls in favor of the life insurance company.

It’s a similar story for a 30-year-old. The odds of dying during the term are higher, but only just, as they are still less than 3%, leading to higher premiums but a great rate overall.

The older you get, the greater your risks become, but insurance companies want your money. They need you to sign on the dotted line, so they will continue to offer competitive prices. 

Keep this in mind the next time you purchase life insurance and are suspicious of the significant amount of coverage provided in relation to the cost.

Myth 2: It’s All About Money

Financial protection is important. You need a coverage amount that will cover the needs of your loved ones while also securing low premiums to make life easier for you. However, the generosity and cost of life insurance are the only factors to consider.

It’s important to consider the financial rating of the insurance company, which is acquired using a system such as A.M. Best and Moody’s. These ratings are used to determine the financial strength of a company, which is key, because you’re relying on them being around for many years to come and being rich enough to pay your death benefit when you die.

Myth 3: It’s All About the Death Benefit

While term life insurance policies are solely about the death benefit, which is paid upon the policyholder’s death, there are other options available. Whole life or permanent life insurance policies work like savings accounts as well as life insurance policies. They accumulate a cash value over the duration of the policy and the policyholder can cash this sum at any point.

If they do so, they will lose the potential death benefit and the policy will cease to exist, but it’s a good option to have if you ever find yourself in dire need of funds.

Myth 4: Insurers Find an Excuse Not to Pay

There was a time when pretty much all life insurance policies were reviewed upon the policyholder’s death. Thankfully, this changed with the introduction of a contestability period, which begins at the start of the policy and typically runs for up to 2 years.

If anything happens during this time, the policy can and will be reviewed and if any suspicions are raised, it will be contested. However, if this period passes, there is little the insurer can do. More importantly, if the policyholder was honest during the application process and the type of death is covered, the payout will be made.

The truth is that the vast majority of policies do not payout, but this is because the policies expire, the cash value is accepted, or the policyholder outlives the term. For policies that actually result in a death, the majority do payout. 

And why wouldn’t they? A life insurance company can expect to turn a profit via the underwriting process. It doesn’t need to use underhanded tactics or rob your loved ones of a payout to stay in the black.

Myth 5: My Dependents Will Survive Without Me

According to LIMRA, a research organization devoted to the insurance and financial sector, most Americans either have no coverage or not enough coverage. In both cases, they may assume their families will survive without a payout or that a small payout will be enough. There is some logic to this belief as it often comes after they perform a quick calculation, but that calculation is flawed.

Let’s imagine, for instance, that you’re a 35-year man with two children aged 5 and 7 and a 35-year-old wife. You earn $40,000 a year and your wife earns the same. You have a $150,000 house and a $100,000 mortgage.

After doing some quick calculations, you may assume that your wife’s salary will be enough to keep her going and ensure your children are looked after until they are old enough to care for themselves. You don’t have any debt to worry about and the only issue is the house, so you settle on a relatively small death benefit of $100,000.

But you’re making a lot of potentially dangerous assumptions here. Firstly, anything could happen between now and your death. On the one hand, you could comfortably pay off the mortgage, but on the other hand, inflation could rise to a point where $100,000 is a fraction of what it once was, and debts could accumulate. 

Your wife could also lose her job, and if that doesn’t happen when you’re alive and can get more cover, it might happen when you die, and she’s so overcome by grief and the stress of raising two children that she’s forced to give it up.

And then you have to think about your children. What if they want a college education? Can your wife afford that on her own? And what about your funeral or your children’s weddings? What happens if one of them falls ill and incurs huge medical expenses? 

$100,000 is a lot of money to receive as a lump sum, and if you only think in terms of lump sums you may never escape that mindset. But it’s not a single sum designed to be spent freely and enjoyed. It’s a sum designed to last your loved ones for many years and to ensure they are covered for most worst-case scenarios.

By the same token, you shouldn’t assume that your loved ones will survive without you just because you’re not the breadwinner or you have paid off your mortgage. Things can turn ugly very quickly. It only takes a few unexpected bills for things to go south, at which point that house could fall victim to an equity loan, a second mortgage, and eventually be owned by the bank when your loved ones fall behind.

Myth 6: Premiums are Tax Deductible

The premiums of an individual policy are not tax-deductible. However, there are exceptions if the individual is self-employed and using the coverage for asset protection. It’s also worth noting that the death benefit is completely tax free.

Myth 7: You Can’t Get Insurance Above a Certain Age

The older you are, the harder it is to get the financial protection that life insurance can provide. But it’s not impossible, just a little bit more expensive. Your insurance needs increase as you get older and life insurance companies have recognized this. They provide short-term policies specifically tailored to seniors. 

Known as Seniors Life Insurance or Final Expense Insurance, these policies provide a low lump sum payout, often less than $50,000, that can be used to pay for a funeral or to clear debts. You can even pay it directly to the funeral home and arrange your own funeral. 

You may also still qualify for a term life insurance policy. Of course, traditional whole life insurance policies are out of the question, and if you have a health condition you may be refused even a short term policy, but don’t give up before you do your research and check your options. 

This is something that most insurance agents will be happy to help you with.

Myth 8: Young People Don’t Need Life Insurance

Life insurance provides you with peace of mind. It aims to provide cover during a difficult time and ensures that your loved ones have financial support when dealing with your death. If you have dependents, then it doesn’t really matter how old you are. It’s true that you will probably outlive the term if you are young and healthy, but no one knows what’s around the corner.

Death is a certainty; the only question is when, not if. By not purchasing life insurance when you have dependents, you’re rolling the dice and placing their future at risk.

The younger you are, the cheaper the premiums will be and the less of an impact they will have on your finances. What’s more, you can also opt for whole life insurance, locking a rate in early and avoiding the inevitable regrets when you’re 60, don’t have any cover and are being quoted astronomical premiums.

Myth 9: You Won’t Qualify if you are in Bad Health

If you have been diagnosed with a terminal disease, it’s unlikely that any insurer would cover you. However, if you have survived a serious disease or have a pre-existing medical condition, you may still qualify.

It’s all about risk, and if the insurer determines you’re more likely to survive the term than not, they will offer you a policy based on those probabilities. The less healthy they consider you to be, the more premiums you will pay and the lower your death benefit will be. But you can still get a worthwhile policy and it might be a lot cheaper than you think.

Myth 10: If You Have Money, You Don’t Need Insurance

If you have assets to leave your heirs, a life insurance policy is not as important as it might be for a stay at home parent or a low-income couple. However, it still has its uses. 

For instance, many high-income households have a lot of debt, and while the assets can typically cover this debt, it will eat into the estate. There are also estate taxes and legal fees to consider, all of which can significantly reduce the value of the estate.

In this case, a short term policy can provide some additional coverage and ensure that those extra costs are covered.

Myth 11: The Money is Lost if there are no Beneficiaries

If you die with no beneficiaries, the money will likely go to your estate, at which point the probate process will begin. If you have a will, this process will be relatively quick and painless, and your designated heirs will get what they are owed. 

If not, things could get messy and the process will be slow. What’s more, if you have any debts, your creditors will take what they are owed from your estate, including your death benefit.

Adding a beneficiary will prevent all of this, but don’t expect the insurer to contact your beneficiary and let them know. They expect the beneficiary to come to them. It’s important, therefore, to assign at least one (and preferably more) beneficiary and to make sure they know of the existence of the policy.

Summary: Life Insurance Myths Debunked

Now that we’ve debunked the myths concerning life insurance, it’s time for you to get out there and get the cover you need. The type of life insurance you need, and the amount of death benefit you will receive, all depends on your personal circumstances and health. 

This is a subject we have discussed at length here at PocketYourDollars.com, so check out our other guides on the subject.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

How to Throw a Bridal Shower on a Budget: A Guide for the Frugal Host

Between impressive floral arches and customized sugar cookies, throwing a picture-perfect bridal shower aimed at being a social media showstopper can be pricey.

CostHelper.com, a website that compares the cost of services, reports that a typical bridal shower can run from $15 to $40 per person for a luncheon or party in a private room at a mid-range restaurant. If you’re going all out with an elaborate bridal shower, you could be talking $40 to $150 or more (gasp!) per person. Even a small, elaborate bridal shower (think 15 guests) could cost between $600 and $2,250—and that’s before invitations, decorations and cake.

The good news is you can actually honor the bride and your budget at the same time. A bridal shower with simple refreshments at the host’s home, for example, can cost $10 to $15 or less per person, according to CostHelper.com. You just need to employ some creative tips for budget bridal showers to make the event more affordable.

What is the best way to plan a bridal shower on a budget? Follow these six tips as you prepare to shower the bride, and there’s a good chance you’ll have more fun and less financial stress:

1. Zero in on important goals

Before you even begin to plan a bridal shower on a budget, you need to know the goals upfront so you can understand where you should be investing your time and money. Sit down with the bride (or, if it’s a surprise, consult a friend or family member of the betrothed) and establish expectations and a budget to match.

Personal finance coach Emma Leigh Geiser shares her starting tip for budget bridal showers: “Plan an event that honors who the bride truly is and what you can provide, without sacrificing your financial well-being.”

Geiser, who helps women in their 20s and 30s with personal financial challenges, recommends learning what the bride envisions for her celebration and which traditions are most important to her. Be upfront about how much you can realistically afford to spend on the bridal shower, Geiser says. And don’t be shy about saying the bridal shower is your gift to the bride.

If the bride’s priority is to have her bridal shower at a high-priced restaurant, find creative ways to lower other costs to still plan a bridal shower on a budget. Bring your own cake to the venue, for example, exclude alcohol from the menu or keep the guest list small. If the bride is a foodie and wants guests to dine on gourmet dishes, you could spend most of the budget on a favorite caterer, but then consider hosting the event at someone’s home and doing minimal decor so budget isn’t needed elsewhere.

Finding out what's truly important to the bride can help you plan a bridal shower on a budget.

2. Delegate tasks

If you’re wondering how to throw a bridal shower on a budget, know that you don’t have to foot the entire cost of the party yourself. Consider co-hosting with the rest of the bridal party or one of the bride’s family members, or delegating specific tasks to willing volunteers.

When personal finance blogger Becky Beach had her bridal shower, catering was delegated to her sister-in-law. “She knows how to throw a bridal shower on a budget,” Beach says. Deputized to handle the food, her sister-in-law served inexpensive bites purchased from a wholesale club, including sausage-roll appetizers, crab cakes, apple crisp tartlets and cream puffs. (With this lineup, who needs a main meal?!)

Assigning smaller purchases to other bridesmaids and close family members is a good tip for budget bridal showers because it can make the overall cost of the event much more manageable for the host. For example, if you delegate tasks or items that cost $30 each to six people, you’ll save $180. Some popular responsibilities to dole out include:

  • Appetizers
  • Dessert
  • Drinks
  • Invitations
  • Favors
  • Games
  • Prizes for games

3. Let the theme choose you

You don’t have to necessarily come up with a theme first. Among the tips for budget bridal showers is to take inventory of what props or decorations are available to you for free. Do you know someone who threw a bridal shower and has leftover decor or favors? Perhaps a friend’s home decor items will fit the bill—like globes and vintage-inspired items, which can be transformed into an exotic travel theme.

If you're wondering how to throw a bridal shower on a budget, keep an eye out for decor items that can create a theme−not the other way around.

Even store clearance items can be repurposed to help dictate your theme’s direction. For example, a home decor or craft store might have steeply discounted artwork. The trick is to look past the art and focus on the frame, Beach says. Can you replace the artwork with a picture of the happy couple? Maybe you can remove the glass altogether, glue twine to the back and use it for hanging wedding wishes from the guests.

Learning how to throw a bridal shower on a budget becomes easier if you’re able to snag off-season items from a party or outdoor store—such as tiki lamps or beach house decorations—which could make for a wonderful fall island or Hawaiian theme.

When planning a bridal shower on a budget, don’t forget to ask friends and family members if you can borrow other party items, such as cake stands, vases and tablecloths. They might even have unopened gifts or stationery sets that you can use as prizes for games.

4. Do the invitations, games and decorations for less

Sending out mid-range traditional invitations by mail can cost $3 to $4 per guest, according to data from CostHelper.com. Invitation costs can add up quickly when you are trying to plan a bridal shower on a budget.

If you’re open to skipping snail mail, you can leverage online invitation services that allow you to create your own designs and send to however many guests you’d like for free, Geiser says. You can easily save around $100 on invitations for a guest list of 30 by going the route of a free online invite. Some services may provide you templates to choose from, or they may include advertisements, but they do the trick nicely.

If you’re wondering how to throw a bridal shower on a budget and still keep guests entertained, search online for bridal shower games that can be printed for free or a nominal cost. You could also go the DIY route if you’re so inclined. For example, have guests try to guess what is in the bride’s purse—it’s even more fun if the bride doesn’t know this game will be played.

As far as decorating goes, focus your efforts on one area that will make the biggest impression. If the bridal shower is hosted in someone’s home, go all out decorating only one room. If the bridal shower is at a venue, like a restaurant, work on fancying up only one wall. Whether at a home or a venue, this area can serve as the focal point of the event and give the bride and guests the perfect spot for photos.

5. Make low-cost venues work

When you’re planning a bridal shower on a budget, opt for a low-cost venue that has built-in unique characteristics. “Choose a space that is its own fantastic backdrop,” Geiser says. She recommends a house with natural light and great landscaping in order to cut down on decorating costs.

Hosting the party at a bride’s friend’s or family member’s home is ideal, since it would be free. “We all know at least one person who has a killer house; ask them if they wouldn’t mind hosting,” Geiser says. (Be sure to preview the site in advance of the bridal shower.) Another good choice: Apartment buildings and condos often have clubhouses or event rooms that can be used for free or rented for a nominal fee. See if any of your bride’s family or friends have access to these areas.

Other local resources can serve as low-cost venues when you’re working on how to throw a bridal shower on a budget. A park, for example, might have a nice garden or even an indoor space that could be used. Research your town’s online municipal pages for tips on how to secure local venues. Some sites might require a nominal fee, early bookings or have other restrictions, so work on booking a space as soon as you have a bridal shower date in mind.

6. Cut food costs by keeping things simple

Whether you are hosting the bridal shower at a restaurant or at someone’s home, schedule a morning brunch or appetizers and salads in the late afternoon when guests are in-between meals. Breakfast dishes, such as an egg casserole or French toast bake, can often cost less to make than a meat-centered entree, Beach adds.

Keeping food simple is a great tip when you're trying to plan a bridal shower on a budget.

If you are in charge of preparing food, stick with quick and easy options as a tip for budget bridal showers. “You don’t have to cook and create everything yourself,” Beach says. “There are so many beautifully crafted hors d’oeuvres you can get prepackaged.”

If you are hosting the bridal shower at a restaurant, ask if they offer a buffet option instead of sit-down catering: Choosing a buffet meal is typically about 30 to 50 percent cheaper than a sit-down meal, according to Eventective, which helps you find venues and event services.

If you’ve got your heart set on sit-down dining, narrow down the menu options in advance. You or the restaurant can make a simple printout of a few entree choices and not share full menus with guests. (Adding the bride’s name to the top of a personalized menu is also a nice touch.) In addition to being a tip for budget bridal showers, this strategy can also streamline the ordering and serving process so you have more time for games and opening gifts. Win-win!

Keep track of the expenses when planning a bridal shower on a budget

You can master how to throw a bridal shower on a budget if you determine the guest-of-honor’s goals from the start. Another tip to remember when you plan a bridal shower on a budget is to track your expenses throughout the planning and hosting process to make sure you’re staying on budget.

If you are splitting costs with friends and family, remember to get reimbursed—preferably before the event, so you don’t have to worry about tracking people down to talk about business while celebrating.

As Geiser says, “What actually makes the event are the attendees, the conversation and the fun you create as a group celebrating the bride.”

Source: discover.com

What Are The Best Investments Right Now? – The Best Interest

Everyone wants to find the best investments. That’s a natural thing to want.

However, it isn’t that simple. Are we looking for the best investments for the long term? The best investments right now or for the next couple of years? What’s the risk of either of these choices?

That’s what we want to explore in today’s post.

The stock market has a lot of people spooked right now. The massive swings from day to day, week to week, and from quarter to quarter are more than many people can take. The second quarter of 2020 is a perfect example.

Take a look at some of the returns:

  • February 12 to March 18,  -27%
  • March 4 to March 11, – 12%.
  • On March 12, the index fell by -9.5%. That one day drop was the largest since 1987
    (Source: Statista).

That volatility was enough to drive many individual investors out of the market entirely. Others sold large portions of their stock holdings.

Then things got much better. From the March 18 low to June 3, 2020, the S & P 500 gained 31%, erasing all of what it lost. In the second quarter of 2020, the S & P 500 increased by 20.54%. For the year, it’s down -3.09%. That’s enough to make even the strongest stomachs queasy.

The truth is that these kinds of swings are now the norm in the stock market. As is always the case, information about the economy, earnings, geopolitical events, and many other factors can have a dramatic short term effect on stock prices. Diversifying your investments has never been more critical. Those who have the right mix of stocks, bonds, cash, and alternative investments do much better in the topsy-turvey markets of today.

For those who feel like they lost more than they thought this year, I want to offer some investments to help you better diversify your portfolios. Doing so may help you stay invested in times like these.

Table of Contents

Alternative Investments

We have talked about how alternative investments are a great way to dampen risk in a portfolio.

Much of what we’ll talk about in this post we’ve discussed in previous posts. However, we’ve found some additional options we think worthy of consideration. The SEC calls these investors accredited investors.

The idea behind the rule is that accredited investors (the wealthy) are more sophisticated and can afford to take more risk that comes with some alternative investments.

To be fair, we want to offer our thoughts on the best investments right now for both accredited and nonaccredited investors. Some of these we’ve mentioned before. Others we have not.

Please keep in mind that what we focus on here are investments to help you diversify your portfolio. They are those that are not tied to the stock markets and will not move in the same direction at the same time (noncorrelated).

With that background, let’s get started.

Finding the Best Investments Right Now

We will break these down into categories. There are many choices in each category. We will highlight some we feel are unique and some that trade publicly and are readily available.

Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITS)

REITs are a familiar investment people use for diversification. There are public and private REITs.

Some REITs invest and almost any kind of real estate. Some specialize in a specific area. Others diversify across many types of real estate.

Publicly Traded REITs

There are dozens of publicly-traded REITs on the market. By publicly traded, we mean that anyone can purchase them, and they are available on a public market exchange. The most common are mutual funds or ETFs (exchange-traded funds).

We like REITs that are low cost and that mirror a real estate index. Indexes capture the returns of all the securities within the index. They are passive investments. That means they do not have a fund manager picking which stocks to buy and sell.

Here are some to consider.

Vanguard Real Estate ETF (VNQ)

VNQ is an ETF that invests in a diversified portfolio of REITs that invested in real property and the types of real estate (office buildings, hotels, etc.) The goal of VNQ is to closely track the return of the MSCI US Investable Market Real Estate 25/50 Index. In doing so, the fund invests in the REITs included in this index. It has a low expense ratio (0.12%) and has 183 holdings in the fund. It’s a great low-cost option to diversify into real estate.

iShares Global REIT ETF (REET)

REET is a global REIT, meaning it invests in real estate inside and outside the U.S. The real estate in REET mirrors the FTSE EPRA Nareit Global REITS Net Total Return Index. Like VNQ, the iShares Global REIT has a low expense ratio that comes in at 0.14%, slightly higher than VNQ.

Though average annual returns lag other REITs, most of that is due to negative returns for 2020. Except 2018 which showed a loss of -4.89%, yearly returns since its 2014 inception are positive. The best year’s performance was in 2019, with a gain of 23.89%.

Unique Alternative Investments

Collectibles

popculture

We found a very unique alternative investment that’s available to both accredited and nonaccredited investors. Mythic Markets offers investors the opportunity to invest in fractional shares in rare pop culture collectibles.

Some things you might find in their marketplace are vintage comics, Magic: The Gathering, Pokemon, film & T.V. memorabilia, eSports Teams, and sports memorabilia. 

Because collectibles are rare and unique, they do not correlate with the stock market. The result is the chance t own an investment that brings true diversification to your portfolio. Like any alternative investment, investors should limit that percentage owner in their portfolio. Nonaccredited investors can only hold up to term percent in shares.

If you are into collectibles, Mythic Markets may be something to consider. Even if you’re not, collectibles might be a good option.

Read our detailed review for more information.

Fine Wine

vinovest

If you are one who enjoys a glass of fine wine now and again, consider that the wine you drink might be a good investment. Vinovest offers investors a way to invest in fine wine without having to do the research, store, protect, and preserve the wine. How do they do it? With technology and expertise.

Vinovest is an online platform to allow everyday investors to reach the fine wine investment field, an asset class that has traditionally only been available to the ultra-wealthy. On average, fine wine has provided an average return of 11.6% since the mid-1980s. The team at Vinovest measured their portfolios’ correlation in the last two market downturns. They found it to be negative, meaning it provided good diversification.

And that’s the theme of looking for the best investments right now. We want those that bring diversification and noncorrelation to the stock markets.

Vinovest checks all those boxes. Read our full review to learn more.

Farmland

farm

Another unique alternative investment is farmland. Most investors would never consider an investment in farmland, thinking they would have to invest a large sum of money. If you’re trying to invest in farmland on your own, that is likely the case.

However, we found a great option with a low minimum investment. The company is Farm Together. Though one needs to be an accredited investor to participate, the minimums are much smaller than most alternative investments.

The typical investments range from $10,000 – $50,000 per transaction. That $10,000 number is much more accessible than many of these types of offerings. And there are precious few funds that offer investment in farmland with cash flow.

Real land is less subject to inflation and more stable than many other investments. For one thing, we’re not making any more of it. The law of supply and demand means it’s likely to increase in value. As a tool for diversifying your stock and bond portfolio, we think Farm Together is an excellent option for accredited investors.

Read our full review to learn more.

The Marketplace to Find the Best Investments

When we think about alternative investments, we try to get outside the box and look for unique options outside of publicly-traded REITs, though we believe they are a great place to start. If you want to do your research to find good choices, there are a couple of ways to go.

First, you can go to our good friend Google and input and search until your heart’s content. Many people enjoy that process. My wife is one of those people. Her choice isn’t investments, but she can spend hours researching something she’s interested in finding. That’s not me. I like to simplify things.

That’s where option two comes into play. MoneyMade is an online marketplace where investors can look for alternative investment options. They have done much of the research for you. I’ve talked about them in another article. Here’s what we said:

“It’s a discovery engine built to help you find and compare all types of investment opportunities, spanning from alternative investment platforms through to Robo Investing.” And it’s super simple to use. Just enter the criteria of the investment you’re looking for and let MoneyMade do the rest.”

We encourage you to give it a try.

Read our review to learn more.

Final Thoughts

Today’s post is by no means supposed to be a comprehensive guide to finding the best investments right now. However, we hope it offers things you may not have heard of in the past. We left out recommendations on crowdfunded real estate for this post. There have been numerous reviews and articles written about these options. If you’d like to hear our thoughts on those, here is our analysis of two crowdfunded REITs we think merit investment.

It’s relatively easy for investors to find index mutual funds and ETFs for the stock and bond portion of their portfolios. These funds provide a good foundation for investors. With that said, to get true diversification, which can increase return and, more importantly, reduce risk, portfolios need noncorrelated assets.

With volatility at a fever pitch and likely to continue, we think the best investments right now are those that add true diversification as described here. Do you have a favorite we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments. We love learning about excellent investment opportunities.

In the meantime, check out the investments listed here. We hope you may find one that fits your needs.

Source: yourmoneygeek.com

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