What Careers Make the Most Money: 75 Jobs for Fuller Pockets

Deciding what career to pursue can be difficult when you don’t know where to start or don’t have a passion for a particular field yet. However, planning early on and researching things such as potential salary can help you feel eager to get your future started.

Choosing to follow a career field that pays a lot can be a difficult but rewarding process. Whether you’re a recent grad or changing careers, learning more about jobs that can help you live a comfortable life is the first step. In this guide, you’ll find out what careers make the most money and what you need to get started.

See Average U.S. Salaries

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The Benefits of a High-Paying Job

Choosing a career that pays well can be very beneficial for your future. If you are looking to start a family, build retirement savings, or travel around the world, finding a high-paying career can get you a step closer to your goals.

Although some people may say that money doesn’t bring you happiness, knowing that you have enough money for all your necessities, such as rent, bills, and groceries, can bring you peace of mind. A recent study shows that larger incomes are associated with a greater well-being and a higher level of satisfaction with life overall​​. In addition to that, it can also make you more productive and help you succeed at work.

the benefits of a high-paying career

What Careers Make the Most Money?

If you’re ready to find a career that will bring you financial security and are willing to persevere and work hard, here are the 75 best-paying jobs in the U.S. according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statics National Occupational and Wage Estimates:

1. Anesthesiologist

An anesthesiologist is a doctor that administers anesthetics and analgesics before, during, or after surgery. They are critical to surgery procedures since they allow the surgeon and other physicians to complete invasive procedures with no discomfort to the patient. In addition to administering general and regional anesthesia, they also closely monitor the patient’s vitals. Due to the risk involved, anesthesiology can be a stressful but rewarding career to follow.

  • Average Annual Salary: $271,440
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Internship (one year)
    • Residency (three years)
    • Obtain a state license

2. Surgeon

Working together with anesthesiologists, surgeons* operate on patients who have suffered from injuries or diseases. Surgeons are also leaders of the surgical team, so they have to make important decisions quickly, sometimes involving life or death. There are many different kinds of surgeons, and you can train to become a general surgeon or have a specialization such as neurology or cardiology. If you plan to become a surgeon, it’s necessary to understand the gravity of the job and have a passion for the STEM field.

  • Average Annual Salary: $251,650
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Residency (three to seven years)
    • Obtain a state license

See the Average Salary for Surgeons

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3. Obstetrician and Gynecologist

From providing reproductive system care to bringing a new life into the world, obstetricians and gynecologists play an important role in women’s health. They help prevent, diagnose, and treat conditions affecting the female reproductive system. As a gynecologist, you would primarily handle women’s reproductive health, and as an obstetrician, you would also deal with childbirth in the surgical field.

  • Average Annual Salary: $239,120
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Residency (four years)
    • Pass a written board exam
    • Practice (two years)
    • Pass an oral board exam

4. Orthodontist

If you’re amazed by how braces can help fix teeth irregularities, a career as an orthodontist may be for you. Orthodontists diagnose, examine, and treat imperfect positioning of teeth and oral cavity anomalies. By prescribing and installing braces, orthodontists help improve not only mouth and teeth function but also the appearance of patients’ smiles.

  • Average Annual Salary: $237,990
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Dental school (four years)
    • Pass a national board exam
    • Residency (two to three years)

5. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

If you’ve ever seen yourself as a dentist but you’re also amazed by how surgery procedures can better someone’s life, becoming an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is a great option for you. These surgeons are dentists with additional training who perform surgeries on the mouth, jaw, and face. They may also diagnose and treat problems in that area, as well as perform surgery to improve the function and appearance of the patient’s facial structure.

  • Average Annual Salary: $234,990
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Dental school (three to five years)
    • Residency (four to six years)
    • Board Certification

6. Physician

Just like surgeons, physicians* diagnose and treat illnesses or injuries and help maintain the patient’s overall health. There are two main types of physicians: doctors of osteopathy, who specialize in preventive medicine and holistic care, and doctors of medicine, who take a more scientific approach to diagnosis and treatment. However, within these types, you could choose to have a specialty such as urology, immunology, or radiology, to name a few.

  • Average Annual Salary: $218,850
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Internship
    • Residency according to specialization (three to eight years)

See the Average Salary for Physicians

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7. Psychiatrist

Mental health is as important as physical health, so if you’re fascinated about how the mind works, becoming a psychiatrist* will help you understand the relationship between the mind and body. Psychiatrists diagnose, treat, and help prevent mental disorders such as bipolar disorder, depression, and schizophrenia. They can also prescribe medications and recommend a patient be hospitalized.

  • Average Annual Salary: $217,100
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Obtain a license
    • Certification from the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
    • Residency (four years)

See the Average Salary for Psychiatrists

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8. Prosthodontists

Prosthodontists specialize in improving the function of your mouth. They diagnose and treat complex issues, as well as design and rehabilitate prostheses for patients who have trouble with their bite, missing teeth, or who want to improve their appearance. If you have a passion for physics, medicine, and have great attention to detail and some artistic skills, prosthodontics may be a great fit for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $214,870
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Dental school (four years)
    • Post-doctoral residency (three years)
    • Obtain a state license

9. Family Medicine Physician

If you don’t want to be tied to diagnosing and treating a particular health condition, becoming a family medicine physician can be a good career option. They diagnose, treat, and provide preventive care to families of all ages. As primary care providers, they are very versatile and can treat anything from a simple cough to a broken bone.

  • Average Annual Salary: $214,370
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Family medicine residency (four years)
    • Pass board exam

See the Average Salary for Physicians

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10. General Internal Medicine Physician

General internal medicine physicians diagnose and treat a variety of injuries and diseases relating to the internal organs. Commonly referred to as general internists, they primarily treat adults and adolescents and are trained to handle a broad spectrum of illnesses. If you enjoyed your anatomy science class in high school, this may be a good career path for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $210,960
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Internal medicine residency (three years)
    • Obtain board certification

11. Chief Executive

If leadership is your forte and you thrive by helping others achieve their goals, becoming a CEO can help you put your skills into action. At the highest level of management of a company, chief executives decide and formulate company policies according to the guidelines set up by a board of directors. They are not only tied to planning, directing, and coordinating operational activities within the company, but also act as a leader to help the company meet its goals.

  • Average Annual Salary: $197,840
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Business and industry experience

12. Dentist

Similar to orthodontists, dentists* also diagnose and treat issues with the mouth, gums, and teeth. Dentists treat more than just cavities — they extract teeth, perform teeth cleaning, and fit dentures. Another benefit of being a dentist is being able to build relationships with patients and see improvement with their teeth over time.

  • Average Annual Salary: $194,930
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Dental school (four years)
    • Pass National Board Dental Examinations

See the Average Salary for Dentists

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13. Nurse Anesthetist

Nurse anesthetists* administer anesthesia on patients as well as monitor their vital signs and their recovery. They are registered nurses who specialize in anesthesiology and assist surgeons and physicians to help them complete procedures. If you want to meet patients of all ages and from all walks of life and make them feel secure and calm before surgery, becoming a nurse anesthetist might be just right for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $189,190
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Registered nurse licensure
    • Experience in critical care (one year)
    • Nurse anesthesia program
    • Pass the national certification exam

See the Average Salary for Nurse Anesthetists

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14. Pilot

Are you an adrenaline junkie with a head for heights? If so, becoming an airline pilot can be a great way to make a living off your passion. Pilots* operate and fly airplanes that transport passengers and cargo. As a pilot, you can fly aircraft regionally, nationally, and internationally or even become a flight instructor. In addition to flying, pilots also make sure the aircraft is functioning properly, checking for malfunctions and needed maintenance, as well as ensuring the weather conditions and routes are safe.

  • Average Annual Salary: $186,870
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Military, college, or civilian flight school
    • Federal Air Transport certificate
    • ATP license (1,000-1,500 hours of flying)
    • Pass a medical exam

See the Average Salary for Pilots

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15. Pediatrician

If seeing children develop their skills and grow strong sounds fascinating to you, you can be part of their journey as a pediatrician*. Pediatricians diagnose, treat, and help prevent injuries and diseases in children from infancy to adulthood. For more specific treatment, they might also refer them to a specialist. Pediatricians tend to love being around children and can also acquire a subspecialty, such as oncology or developmental-behavioral pediatrics.

  • Average Annual Salary: $184,570
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Pass a licensure exam
    • Residency (three years)
    • Obtain American Board of Pediatrics certification

See the Average Salary for Pediatricians

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16. Computer and Information Systems Manager

Technology is a big part of our lives these days, and if you’re good with computers and data, you might find a passion for this career. Computer and information systems managers plan, coordinate, and direct activities in electronic data processing, computer programming, information systems, and systems analysis. They are there to help companies and organizations navigate technology. In addition to supervising workers, they also help install and upgrade systems and protect them from potential threats.

  • Average Annual Salary: $161,730
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Graduate degree (recommended)
    • Industry certifications and experience

17. Architectural and Engineering Manager

From a small coffee shop to a huge skyscraper, do you ever wonder how buildings come to life? As an architectural and engineering manager, you would plan, direct, and coordinate architectural and engineering activities or work on research and development. Some managers work in offices designing and coordinating the creation of buildings that are safe and purposeful. Others may also work in research laboratories and construction sites.

  • Average Annual Salary: $158,100
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Graduate degree (recommended)
    • Industry certifications and experience

18. Natural Science Manager

If science was your favorite subject as a kid and you loved to do experiments, becoming a natural science manager might make your younger self very happy. Natural science managers supervise scientists such as chemists, physicists, and biologists by planning, directing, and coordinating activities in those fields. They may spend their time in labs or in the office coordinating production, testing, and quality control of research projects.

  • Average Annual Salary: $154,930
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Graduate degree (recommended)
    • Experience as a scientist

19. Marketing Manager

Are you a creative person with a love for problem-solving and communicating with others? If so, becoming a marketing manager* might be what you’re looking for. Marketing managers supervise the whole process of creating and implementing marketing campaigns. They determine the demands of products and services and identify potential customers and opportunities. In addition to developing strategies to maximize profits, they also provide help with hiring staff and team-building.

  • Average Annual Salary: $154,470
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Graduate degree (recommended)
    • Industry certifications and experience

20. Petroleum Engineer

Becoming a petroleum engineer* is the right path for you if you want to help provide the world with energy. Petroleum engineers design equipment to help extract oil and gas from the earth and determine the need for new tools and equipment. To do this, they spend a lot of time researching, studying, and analyzing data to find the safest and most cost-effective way to perform the extractions.

  • Average Annual Salary: $154,330
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Professional engineering license
    • Society of Petroleum Engineers certification (recommended)

21. Financial Manager

Financial managers* are responsible for the finances of a company by planning and directing accounting, insurance, securities, banking, and any other financial activities. Their tasks can range from creating financial reports, developing long-term financial goals, and directing investment activities. If you have a love for numbers and have great attention to detail and communication skills, this is the job for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $151,510
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Master’s degree (recommended)
    • Obtain some certifications and licensures

See the Average Salary for Financial Managers

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22. Podiatrist

If you want to join a critical field and make an impact in people’s lives by relieving their pain, becoming a podiatrist* might be the right step for you. Podiatrists are physicians who specialize in diagnosing and treating diseases and deformities of the human foot, ankle, and lower leg. They are able to perform surgeries and transplants, and can also prescribe medications and braces for less complex cases.

  • Average Annual Salary: $151,110
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Podiatric medical school (four years)
    • Residency (three years)
    • Pass American Podiatric Medical Licensing Exam

See the Average Salary for Podiatrists

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23. Lawyer

Representing clients in civil and criminal legal issues and disputes, lawyers can also advise clients on legal transactions and prepare legal documents. As a lawyer, you may work in the private sector for big firms and even small businesses, or work in the public sector for the government as a district attorney or public defender. If you have a passion for helping people and solving conflicts, this might be the right path for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $148,910
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Law school (three years)
    • Pass a state-specific law exam
    • Internship experience

24. Sales Manager

Sales managers* direct an organization’s sales team by planning, directing, and coordinating the distribution of a product or service. Some duties may include establishing sales territories, setting quotas and goals, analyzing sales statistics, and training sales representatives. If you want to become a sales manager, you have to not only be great at selling but also making strategic decisions and motivating people.

  • Average Annual Salary: $147,580
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Master’s degree (recommended)
    • Industry experience and certifications

See the Average Salary for Sales Managers

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25. Advertising and Promotion Manager

As an advertising and promotion manager*, you would plan and coordinate advertising programs and policies. They build interest in purchasing products or services from their organization, as well as create marketing materials such as posters, giveaways, brochures, and coupons. If you want to have a job in which you can put your creativity to action, this is the right career for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $147,560
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Master’s degree (recommended)
    • Industry experience and certifications

50 Additional High-Paying Careers

If the careers mentioned above are not a fit for you, there are plenty of other jobs that pay a lot of money. Here are 50 additional careers that make the most money, listed by average annual salary:

  • Physicist* – $137,700
  • Compensation and Benefits Manager – $137,160
  • Astronomer – $136,480
  • Public Relations and Fundraising Manager* – $135,580
  • Law Teacher – $134,760
  • Human Resources Manager* – $134,580
  • Purchasing Manager* – $132,660
  • Judge* – $131,850
  • Computer and Information Research Scientist – $130,890
  • Air Traffic Controller* – $127,440
  • Computer Hardware Engineer – $126,140
  • Training and Development Manager* – $125,920
  • General and Operations Manager* – $125,740
  • Pharmacist* – $125,460
  • Optometrist* – $125,440
  • Nuclear Engineer – $125,130
  • Health Specialties Teacher – $124,890
  • Political Scientist – $124,100
  • Personal Service Manager – $123,980
  • Economics Teacher – $123,720
  • Actuary* – $123,180
  • Personal Financial Advisor* – $122,490
  • Aerospace Engineer* – $121,110
  • Economist* – $120,880
  • Computer Network Architect – $119,230
  • Medical and Health Services Manager – $118,800
  • Industrial Production Manager – $118,190
  • Sales Engineer* – $117,270
  • Physician Assistant* – $116,390
  • Nurse Midwife* – $115,540
  • Education Administrator* – $115,200
  • Chemical Engineer* – $114,820
  • Nurse Practitioner* – $114,510
  • Art Director* – $114,490
  • Software Developer* – $114,270
  • Engineering Teacher – $114,130
  • Industrial-Organizational Psychologist – $112,690
  • Mathematician – $112,530
  • Electronics Engineer* – $112,320
  • Geoscientist – $112,110
  • Air Transportation Worker – $111,420
  • Physical Scientist – $110,100
  • Veterinarian* – $108,120
  • Administrative Services and Facilities Manager – $108,120
  • Information Security Analyst* – $107,580
  • Business Teacher – $107,270
  • Construction Manager* – $107,260
  • Electrical Engineer* – $105,990
  • Biochemist – $104,810
  • Microbiologist* – $91,840

Deciding your future is never easy, but planning in advance can not only give you peace of mind but help you achieve your goals faster. If having financial freedom and emotional well-being is a priority to you, having a high-paying job can help you achieve that. It’s not always easy to do, and having a job with a high salary will be demanding. Now that you went through the list of careers that make the most money, you can feel inspired to begin following your dreams.

How to Land a High-Paying Career

Methodology

In order to find out the top 75 careers that make the most money, we used data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statics National Occupational and Wage Estimates from May 2020. The average annual salary is the data provided under annual mean age and sorted from highest to lowest. To calculate the average of what Americans spend their yearly salary on, we used the average expenditure per consumer unit research. To achieve the percentages, we added up the income quintiles percentages provided in Table C for each category and divided them by 5, which resulted in the average percentage spend.

*The salaries in Mint’s Salary tool have a different source and might differ from the ones listed from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Indeed | Monster | BLS Expenditures | PNAS | AmeriTrade

The post What Careers Make the Most Money: 75 Jobs for Fuller Pockets appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

17 Tips for Getting a Job Out of College

As if adulting wasn’t enough, juggling final exams, project deadlines, and a social life, along with worrying about getting a job out of college, can make the last few months of your senior year feel overwhelming. The good news is you’re not alone.

Many graduates feel like they can’t find a job after college. In fact, 66 percent of them are not very optimistic that they’ll get a job that will fit their career goals. Although searching for jobs after graduation can be stressful, learning how you can prepare for the job market can lift some weight off your shoulders.

If you want to learn how to navigate the job search and dodge common mistakes recent grads make, this guide will help you better prepare for the future. You can also check out the Game of Life After College in our infographic below.

The Current Landscape for Getting a Job After College

Is it hard to get a job after college? There’s not a concrete answer to this, since each person has their own set of skills and experience. However, here are some stats to keep in mind and other pressing questions answered, including what percentage of college students get a job after they graduate and what is the average time to get a job after graduation.

  • In 2020, the percentage of employed college graduates went down from 76% to 67%.
  • In August 2021, employment rose by 235,000 in one month.
  • The unemployment rate went from 14.7% in April 2020 to 5.2 percent in August 2021.
  • In October 2020, 67.3% of college graduates were employed after they graduated.
  • It takes an average of three to six months for college graduates to find a job after college.
  • In March 2021, the unemployment rate for bachelor’s degree holders was 3.7% compared to 6.7% for those only holding a high school diploma.

Reasons People Struggle With Getting a Job Out of College

Finding a job after college can be challenging, especially when learning how to adapt to life after graduating. If you are in the position where you can’t find a job after college, the following reasons might help explain:

Not Being Prepared

Some college graduates will only start preparing for their career after graduation. Although preparation involves some effort, such as taking online courses, finding an internship, or networking, being prepared for the job market is crucial to getting a job after college.

Not Being Proactive

Not being proactive by following up with potential employers and reaching out to your network is also a common reason college graduates might take longer to land a job. Only applying on job boards is a common mistake job seekers make, as they tend to get lost in the pool of applicants.

Not Enough Experience

Having a degree in hand doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll get a job right after graduation. Most employers consider having internship and work experience one of the top factors for considering a candidate.

Not Making It About the Employer

Another common mistake recent graduates make is focusing on what they want out of a job and not the employer’s needs. Employers want to know what you can provide them with and how your skills align with the position.

Not Doing Enough Research

If you don’t know what you’re looking for, you likely won’t be able to find it. Not doing enough research is another struggle graduates face when starting the job search. Researching what’s suitable for you and what career paths to take can help you achieve your career goals faster.

 

how to stay motivated in the job search

How To Get a Job Right Out of College

Now, with all these stressors against you, you might be wondering, “How do I get a job just out of college?” Even if this won’t be your first job ever, making the most of your college experience and job search process can put you at ease.

1. Get Experience During College

While in college, you’ll have many opportunities to join clubs and organizations, attend events and seminars, and learn new skills. Each of these can help you learn more about yourself and enhance what you have to offer — plus, it looks great on your resume.

Pro tip: If you didn’t have a job during college, use your participation in a club or organization as your job experience.

2. Start Networking

When you’re ready to start your career, you’ll likely hear that networking is very important, and that’s because at least 70 percent of open positions are not advertised. Meeting people within your major and professional organizations can be a great way to start building connections. But don’t limit yourself — even friends, family, and coworkers can be part of your network.

Pro tip: If you haven’t heard back from a job you applied for, ask for help from your network or college alumni who work for that company.

3. Research the Job Market

Just like a research project for a class in college, exploring different job fields can help you narrow down your job search. Learning about what kinds of jobs are in that field, what a typical day looks like, how the job market is, and what requirements are needed can help you understand exactly what to look for and increase your chances of getting hired.

Pro tip: When doing your research, take note of common skills and experience required in the job descriptions, and personalize your resume accordingly.

4. Be Proactive

If you want to find a job right after you graduate, being proactive is the key. Don’t just wait around — apply to different jobs, reach out to people in your network and on LinkedIn, and follow up on any jobs you haven’t heard back from. By showing interest and being proactive, you’ll let hiring managers know that you’re ready to put your skills and experience to work.

Pro tip: After applying for a job, send the hiring manager a personal email letting them know you applied and why you believe you’re a good fit for the job.

5. Become a Volunteer

Seeking volunteer opportunities can be a great way to give back to the community while also building your skills and connections. Finding a volunteering activity that you enjoy can also help boost your communication and interpersonal skills, and could potentially lead you to find your future employer.

Pro tip: Join a volunteering club or organization on campus to help the local community.

6. Attend Career Fairs

Career fairs might sound intimidating, but there’s a good chance your future employer is there. Recruiters at career fairs are ready to meet people and want to learn more about you and your experience. This is a great way to develop your interviewing skills as well as learn more about different companies and job opportunities.

Pro tip: Research companies on the career fair list ahead of time, so you can come prepared with specific questions to ask the recruiters.

7. Create a Portfolio Website

Take an extra step and create a personal website to showcase your skills and experience. Even if it’s just a simple website, this is a great opportunity to share your writing, photography, or art, or just to tell your story.

Pro tip: Add your website to your resume and job applications as well as your LinkedIn profile to make you stand out to employers.

8. Land an Internship

Finding an internship can be a great way to test the waters and see what a potential job in that field might look like. As a matter of fact, 55 percent of employers believe having internship experience is one of the top factors for considering candidates. Getting an internship can also help you build connections and could even lead to a full-time position.

Pro tip: Taking an internship position after graduating college can help you sharpen your skills if you didn’t get enough experience during school.

9. Consider a Part-Time Job

Even if it’s not in your field, pursuing a part-time job can also help you build connections and skills. Getting a part-time job on campus can not only allow you to earn some extra bucks to pay your tuition, but it can also help you understand your work style and what kinds of tasks you enjoy doing. Finding a part-time position in your field can also get you a foot in the door, and potentially lead to a full-time position.

Pro tip: Working part-time after college can help you build your work ethic and bring in extra money while applying for full-time positions.

10. Keep Your LinkedIn Updated

A lot of recruiters will take a look at your LinkedIn profile during the hiring process — in fact, 72 percent of them use it for recruiting. Keeping your LinkedIn profile updated with your most recent resume and experience can help show recruiters that you’re open to work.

Pro tip: You can also add an #OpenToWork frame to your profile picture on LinkedIn to let recruiters know you are actively looking.

11. Leverage Career Services

On-campus career centers are one of the best sources for new job opportunities, especially locally. Many employers will leave their information with university career centers, which means they’re open to hiring graduates from there. On top of giving you career guidance, career centers may also offer resume and networking workshops, mentoring programs, and mock interviews.

Pro tip: You can still visit your campus career center after graduating to get tips and strategies on how you can improve your resume and interview skills.

12. Take Online Courses

If you want to level up your skills aside from what you learn in class, taking online courses can help you get hands-on experience in the field. It can also guide you to figure out if it’s the right career path for you.

Pro tip: There are a variety of open online courses you can take for free on websites such as Coursera, Udemy, and edX.

13. Find a Mentor

There are many benefits of having a mentor, like providing career guidance and constructive criticism. A mentor is someone you trust and look up to, and can be a supervisor, coworker, teacher, or even a friend. Building a relationship with your mentor can also help you strengthen your communication skills and avoid common pitfalls.

Pro tip: If you don’t have someone close to you to become your mentor, many college career centers have mentorship programs that link you to alumni.

14. Create a Routine

The job hunt can seem endless at times, but building a routine can help you keep track of your goals. Schedule times on your calendar for each task, such as searching for jobs, updating your resume and profile, following up with recruiters, taking online courses, and networking. But don’t forget about your health! Schedule mental health breaks, such as working out, taking a walk, watching a movie, or reaching out to a loved one.

Pro tip: Try using time management techniques such as the Pomodoro Technique and time blocking to help you stay on track.

15. Join Professional Development Groups

Job board websites can feel overwhelming when there are so many job postings. Narrow down your search by finding groups for a specific field or location. These groups can also be a great place to connect with other job seekers who can share career insights.

Pro tip: Facebook and LinkedIn are great places to find groups, such as remote job seekers and city-specific jobs.

16. Level Up Your Resume

Since some job postings tend to get hundreds of applicants, many job seekers are finding ways to stand out from the crowd. One way to do this is by spicing up your resume and making it creative. You can do that by trying different resume layouts, colors, and even adding a fun facts section. Although some would go as far as sending a donut box resume, be mindful of the company you are applying for.

Pro tip: You can create your resume using a template from websites such as Canva. Make sure it’s saved as a PDF so resume-scanning softwares can still read it.

17. Apply on Company Websites

Another way to stand out from the crowd and not get lost in the sea of job applicants is to apply directly on the company’s website instead of only big job boards. Some companies will keep their websites updated with current job openings and actively check for candidates. Applying through their website can make it more personal and show that you’re especially interested in working for them.

Pro tip: If you find a place where you genuinely want to work, it may be worth emailing them even if they don’t have current openings to show you are interested.

Why Your First Job Out of College Matters

Your first job out of college might not be a perfect fit, but it’s still one of the most important. If you happen to be in a position where you realize the job is not what you expected, use it as a learning opportunity.

This is your chance to develop your skills and learn from your mistakes. So dive into your first job like a pro and learn negotiation skills, tackle your time management abilities, connect with others in the industry, and discover your preferred work style. Taking advantage of a not-so-great first job can set you up for career success down the road.

 

If getting a job out of college is one of your main goals, preparing ahead of time can not only help you stay motivated while job searching, but can also help you land a job faster. By learning what common mistakes you’re struggling with and following the tips in this guide, you can get one step closer to achieving career success. Monster | Psychology Today

The post 17 Tips for Getting a Job Out of College appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Now Hear This: Workplace Noise Isn’t Just Annoying, It’s Downright Dangerous

There’s an invisible danger lurking in workplaces across the country that can damage employees’ health and hamper their productivity as it attacks the brain. Believe it or not, it’s sound. Not even loud sound, like a jackhammer, but just the ordinary background noise that most any busy office tends to generate.

Occupational noise is something that few people in management ever think of, but Northwestern University Professor of Neurobiology and Communication Sciences Dr. Nina Kraus certainly has. Her book, Of Sound Mind – How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World, explains how it can take a nasty toll on your staff.

‘Safe Noise’ Isn’t Safe at All

I spoke with Professor Kraus recently. Her excitement for the magic of sound, how our brains make sense of the auditory world, her joy in what it all brings to us just permeates the book, complemented by her YouTube videos. She began our interview with this observation:

“All employers want to reduce the incidence of health problems, absenteeism, burnout, health insurance, workers’ compensation claims and insurance rates. They study ways to reduce risk, but are generally not aware of how safe noise is connected to all these things.”

I’ll bet you are wondering, “Safe noise? What’s that?”

“Most of us are aware of the risk in listening to music that’s too loud – in fact cellphones display a warning when we approach a level where we can do actual damage to our hearing,” she observes.

“Dangerous levels of noise are all around us. Just think of the poor gardener with a leaf blower or lawn mower and not wearing any kind of hearing protection. Over time, real hearing loss will likely develop.”

Injury to Your Sound Mind

“But there is another kind of noise – safe noise – that is not loud enough to physically damage your ears, won’t give you a hearing loss, per se, but will damage your hearing brain, or, as we call it, ‘your sound mind.’

“It is called ‘safe’ because it is below the noise levels the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health says requires hearing protection. These are quieter sounds, like the beeping truck outside, a refrigerator, the sounds generated in a typical office environment.”

And that’s one of the concepts Of Sound Mind develops through examples taken from everyday life. “Our hearing brain determines how we think, feel, move and interact with all of our senses. Safe noise can very much damage the hearing brain – not the ear, the brain.” Kraus underscores.

I had never heard the term before, aware of hearing damage from dangerously loud sounds, but not what it does to the brain. This made me think of Rod Serling’s opening remarks in The Twilight Zone: “There is a fifth dimension, beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity.”

To Kraus, that fifth dimension is the hearing brain, “As our world has become filled with persistent levels of safe sound, our ability to think, to concentrate and to feel has been compromised as our brain – the hearing brain – sustains actual, provable injury.”

She cited a study of children at a school, where half of the students were in a room facing subway trains. Test results showed them to be far worse off than kids in a quiet room.

“In a typical office, ambient office noise includes the irritating sound of computer fans, chairs scraping on the floor, background noise of people talking who are not part of the conversation you are involved in, music, a radio or the TV. Phones are ringing, people are getting texts on their phones and on it goes.

“Our hearing – the hearing brain – is connected to cognition,  to how we think, feel, move and engage other senses, our sensory motor and reward systems.

“These ambient noises harm employees in the typical office, as they cause significant physiological stress, which interferes with the ability to focus, to think, to pay attention, to remember. And, it is all on an unconscious level, worldwide costing billions of dollars due to decreased productivity and increased absenteeism.”

What to Do about Workplace Noise?

When I built my own office years ago, I had ambient noise in mind. It is quieter than a library, and we face a noisy street. We have carpeting, sound-absorbing baffles, cloth paneling on the walls, acoustic ceiling tile. All of these solutions are available to business offices too.

“When an employer is aware of the problem,” Kraus maintains, “so much can be done to provide employees an acoustically healthier work environment. We need to value quiet and noise reduction.” Here are some ideas on how to identify and fix problems with annoying sounds in the workplace:

  • Avoid florescent and other buzzy lights.
  • No background music or TV.
  • Good insulation from neighboring rooms and the outdoors if on a busy street.
  • Cloth wall-hangings.
  • Everyone can silence their phones and notifications.
  • Listen to the sounds of your workspace, giving yourself time to become aware of the irritating sounds. When you identify an annoying sound, ask yourself, “Is this necessary?” Come to honor the sounds you wish to hear.
  • Zoom calls can be quite loud sometimes – use headphones, or keep volume down when possible.

In addition, I’ll throw in my own tip: I bought a pair of 3M Peltor X4A earmuffs, which can be worn on an airplane, office or at home when trying to sleep. They virtually eliminate all ambient noise.

Of Sound Mind will change your understanding of our acoustic world and provide justification for business owners to develop a noise-reduction strategy. I encourage visiting the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory’s website to learn more: https://brainvolts.northwestern.edu/. 

Attorney at Law, Author of “You and the Law”

After attending Loyola University School of Law, H. Dennis Beaver joined California’s Kern County District Attorney’s Office, where he established a Consumer Fraud section. He is in the general practice of law and writes a syndicated newspaper column, “You and the Law.” Through his column he offers readers in need of down-to-earth advice his help free of charge. “I know it sounds corny, but I just love to be able to use my education and experience to help, simply to help. When a reader contacts me, it is a gift.” 

Source: kiplinger.com

How to Ask for a Pay Raise in 5 Easy Steps

In any economy, it’s possible to negotiate a raise. Have you been asked to cover another employee’s duties because your company is struggling to find help? Have you been putting in extra hours to help your department meet its goals? Has your company benefited from your stellar performance? Then it may be time to ask for a raise.

But summoning the courage to ask for more money can be tough — especially if this will be the first time you’ve ever done it.

We’re not talking about cost-of-living increases to keep your buying power up with inflation. Rather, we’re talking about a reward for your performance and contribution to the company that goes beyond expectations.

If you want a real raise — a raise you deserve — you need to ask for it. It probably won’t fall in your lap. But with the right timing and preparation, you’ll feel less fear and more confidence in making your request, and you’ll have nothing to lose by asking. Just remember: Nothing ventured, nothing gained. Here’s how to plan your pitch and get the pay you deserve.

Prepare and make your pitch

Step 1: Make a list of your specific accomplishments

Think you deserve more money? Be prepared to prove it. You need to show your boss the value you add to the team and point out specific instances you went above and beyond the call of duty.

Ideally, you should keep a personal log of significant contributions you made to your job from day one. If you haven’t, start now. For example, note how you saved the company money or boosted sales, how you decreased hassle or stress on a project, and how you showed leadership under pressure. Use as many details as possible, such as numbers and facts. You’ll want to take five to seven of your most recent or biggest-impact contributions and present them in a bulleted list.

If your job description has changed over the past year, or you’ve taken on added responsibilities, include those with your list of accomplishments. If you’ve recently completed training, received credentials or obtained an advanced degree that will benefit your employer, make sure to point that out as well. To drive home your case, you might want to make copies of any e-mails, memos or notes you’ve received from higher-ups, clients or colleagues that praise your performance, advises Teena Rose, president of Résumé to Referral, a résumé writing service provider.

Remember: your pay raise is based on your contribution to the company. Do not bring your personal financial situation into the discussion at all — your boss doesn’t care that your rent has gone up, you’ve got a wedding to pay for or you’re expecting a new baby. When handing out raises, he or she only cares about the bottom line of the company. You should only ask for a raise if you feel you truly deserve it — not because you need it.

Step 2: Find out how your salary compares

You’ll need to tell your boss exactly how much you’d like to get paid. When you know what others in your field are paid and what your position is worth, you can use that figure as a starting point for negotiations.

Step 3: Consider negotiating benefits and perks

A raise doesn’t have to come in dollar signs. So before entering negotiations, think of other areas you are willing to negotiate such as vacation time, flexible work hours, stock options or tuition reimbursement. You might also consider bargaining for the right to telecommute, a more prestigious title or a week at a professional conference in Hawaii, suggests career coach Marty Nemko.

If the benefits and perks are as important or more important to you than money, you can include them in the forefront of your pitch. But if you prefer the dough, keep a couple of possible perks in your back pocket just in case your boss says “no” to a monetary raise. They’ll give you something else to bargain with if negotiations stall.

Step 4: Time your pitch right

If your annual performance review isn’t any time soon, approach your boss after you’ve done well on a project or taken on extra responsibilities. This will make your case much easier to present because your boss already will have a positive taste in his or her mouth. You don’t want to allow him or her time to forget what an asset you are.

Step 5: Broach the topic professionally

 Set up a meeting with your boss and approach the subject like two parties trying to reach a compromise. Come with your list of accomplishments neatly typed for your boss to reference and your salary request printed at the top.

When making your case, don’t compare yourself to co-workers — stick to the field in general. And don’t be cocky or greedy. If you’ve only been at your entry-level job for a year or two, expecting a hefty bonus, substantial raise or prestigious promotion is probably unrealistic unless you really, truly outdid yourself. Going into the negotiations with a sense of entitlement may actually hurt your chances.

Oh, and don’t threaten to quit unless you really mean it. If you give your boss an ultimatum — “Give me a raise or else” — you just may find that “or else” is your only option.

If your boss says ‘no’

There are a number of reasons your boss may turn down your request, but if it’s because there simply isn’t enough money available, shift gears. “Suggest an upgrade in your position,” says Nemko. “It’s easier for your employer to rationalize a higher salary if your job description is changed to include higher-level work.” You could also ask to reopen negotiations in a few months.

Ask your boss candidly what it’ll take for you to get a raise by that time — and then do it. This shows your boss you truly are interested in increasing your value to the company and will give you a specific accomplishment to quantify when you reopen negotiations.

Boss still turning you down flat? Simply say, “I understand your position,” and leave the room. “An ambiguous response is often more effective than an aggressive one because it leaves your boss wondering what you’ll do next,” says Nemko.

Indeed, you have some thinking to do. “If they consistently say no, and you are consistently performing well, it may be time for you to start looking for a company that is willing to pay you what you deserve,” says Ross MacPherson, founder of Career Quest, a job coaching firm.

Source: kiplinger.com

Is Your Job Burning You Out?

No one can ignore the toll COVID-19 and issues flowing from it have taken on the American workforce. How many more stories of first responders, physicians, parents all at their wits’ end, facing something they had never experienced before: Burnout.

We’ve all heard the term, but do you know what it is, how to spot it in family, friends and co-workers? Most importantly, what can be done about this life-endangering condition? What can we do if burnout haunts family or friends at work?

In a well-researched, just-released book, The Burnout Epidemic, author Jennifer Moss describes and suggests lifesaving ways of “recognizing and responding to burnout.”

In my legal opinion, it should be considered as required reading for CEOs and upper-management-level employees; it is that valuable.

Jennifer began our interview by noting that, “A great deal of misinformation about this phenomenon tends to minimize just how serious a problem it is.” She describes the ways that management — and employees — are failing to deal with it.

1. Managers don’t see burnout when it’s right in front of them

Consequences: Not recognizing the signs of burnout and prioritizing a response to it in your organization leads to misdiagnosing the problem. One example is labeling employees as underperforming when they are actually chronically stressed. This is causing a huge exodus from employment in numbers not seen before.

2. Employees don’t admit to themselves that something is terribly wrong

Consequences: Workers are falling off the cliff from burnout, leading to long-term unemployment, resulting in a nationwide economic impact. The evening news — where tearful health care professionals admit to being resentful of COVID patients who refuse to be vaccinated — is the perfect example of what burnout does to people. They lose empathy and quit caring.

It is a true psychological disorder, the result of chronic stress, that has a profound impact on brain function. For employees, the following feelings are indicators of burnout:

  • A sense of failure and self-doubt.
  • Feeling helpless, trapped, defeated.
  • Detachment, feeling alone in the world.
  • Loss of motivation. “Just going through the motions.”
  • An increasingly cynical and negative outlook. Anger.
  • Greatly decreased satisfaction and sense of accomplishment.
  • Gastrointestinal issues, headaches, anxiety. Extreme fatigue. Insomnia.

3. Managers falsely believe that burnout suddenly appears and can just as suddenly vanish.

Consequences: Many managers don’t know what to look for, or fail to acknowledge burnout when it’s there. They fail to address the mental health among employees with high-stress jobs, believing that the only time someone is in trouble is when they hit a wall, don’t show up for a shift or go home in tears.

It isn’t something that just happens one day. There is a point where it can be dealt with, but if not, a remedy becomes far more difficult. Management needs to prioritize mental health. Co-workers should be aware of and look for these typical outward signs of burnout and encourage those exhibiting them to seek professional help:

  1. Increased absenteeism.
  2. Impaired focus. “She often seems to be physically exhausted.”
  3. Disengagement. “I used to care, but I just don’t anymore.”
  4. Being overly sensitive to feedback in a way that’s greatly different from their usual positive attitude.
  5. Keeping away from others. Isolation.
  6. Headaches, nausea, loss of appetite or weight gain, as food becomes a coping mechanism.
  7. Decreased productivity. Inability to catch up. More errors.

 “Overwork and burnout contributed to more than 745,000 deaths worldwide in just one year,” concluded a World Health Organization study reported in Psychology Today. “People working 55 or more hours per week have an estimated 35% higher risk of a stroke and a 17% higher risk of dying from heart disease than those who work 35-40 hours a week.”

4. They fail to recognize the risk inherent in their whole field. 

For example, lawyers, physicians, financial, insurance and tax advisers, health care — people in caregiver/lifesaving roles are more vulnerable. Certain occupations, such as police, nursing, EMT, firefighters — often due to low staffing — essentially obligate employees to work overtime or take on additional shift work.

Consequences: People who are attracted to these occupations generally have Type-A personalities, high levels of compassion, and tend to be perfectionists. If you are looking for a strong predictor of hitting the wall, it’s members of these groups.

Many lawyers, a field that has extremely high levels of burnout, work in law firms that require 2,000 billable hours or more a year, which represent only a fraction of the actual hours worked. As these firms define job success by billable hours, employees are pushed to overwork, sacrifice their own health for that of a client’s satisfaction, and pleasing senior partners. 

The invisible goal is to advance — the billable hours tell their boss that they are performing, while the amount of overwork contributes to burnout.

I asked Jennifer, “How can family and friends help?”

“When you hear, ‘I’m fine,’ read between the lines.  If they say things like, ‘I am so tired. It will never change. It will always be like this,” these are warning signs you must not ignore. Get them to a mental health counselor regardless of their protest. You may very well be saving their life.”

Attorney at Law, Author of “You and the Law”

After attending Loyola University School of Law, H. Dennis Beaver joined California’s Kern County District Attorney’s Office, where he established a Consumer Fraud section. He is in the general practice of law and writes a syndicated newspaper column, “You and the Law.” Through his column he offers readers in need of down-to-earth advice his help free of charge. “I know it sounds corny, but I just love to be able to use my education and experience to help, simply to help. When a reader contacts me, it is a gift.” 

Source: kiplinger.com

25 Best Jobs for Introverts To Feel the Most Fulfilled

When navigating which career is right for you, finding something that aligns with your personality is no doubt a fine place to start. But if you fancy yourself as an introvert, you might want to avoid careers involving a lot of social interactions. Thankfully, there are many careers introverted people can excel at while still feeling comfortable.

Studies show that your personality has important effects on early career outcomes. Therefore, success does not depend on your extroversion, but on your ability to put your skills, experiences, and personality to work in your favor. So if you’re an introvert, knowing the best jobs for introverts is the first step to discovering what career suits you best. Keep reading to find out what are some of these jobs or jump to our infographic for some interview tips.

What Is an Introvert?

Introversion and extroversion are popular terms you might’ve seen if you’ve taken a personality test, and most people have some degree of both. Introverted people tend to be more reserved, usually prefer less stimulating environments, and enjoy time alone to recharge. Although not all introverts fit one standard definition, here are some common characteristics of introverts:

  • Quiet and reserved
  • Introspective
  • Feel tired from social interactions
  • Enjoy being alone
  • Self-aware
  • Have a small group of friends
  • Independent
  • May experience shyness and social anxiety

qualities of introverted people

Best Jobs for Introverts

What jobs are introverts good at and what are the highest paying jobs for introverts? We gathered data from Mint’s salary tool to discern just that, and to help these quiet but ambitious people find true job satisfaction. Get your resumes ready, introverts!

1. Accountant

If you like working with numbers and having the opportunity to work in almost any industry, becoming an accountant can be the career for you. As a stable and growing job field, accountants prepare and examine financial records and analyze any opportunities or risks. This is a job more often done on your own and with some one-on-one client meetings.

  • Average Salary: $66,500
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Certified Public Accountant license

2. Actuary

Do you love working with statistics, math, and financial theories? Becoming an actuary can be a great introverted job option. Actuaries determine the financial risks for certain outcomes and help businesses develop policies to minimize those risks. Since most of the work is done from a computer, this is a good career for introverts who like to spend time working on their own.

  • Average Salary: $113,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Casualty Actuarial Society certification
    • Society of Actuaries certification

3. Application Developer

Application developers design, create, and update programs and apps for devices. In this job you’re able to work for different industries and companies, full time or self-employed, and with the possibility of working remotely. If you want to bring ideas to life and help develop applications, this can be the job for you.

  • Average Salary: $79,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Google Developers Certification (recommended)
    • Apple Developers Certification (recommended)
    • Industry experience

4. Architect

Spending most of their time working independently, architects plan and design houses, office buildings, and other structures. If you are a creative that loves problem-solving, architecture might be just right for you. This job also won’t require much social interaction, other than meeting with clients and going to construction sites.

  • Average Salary: $76,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Master’s degree (recommended)
    • Paid internship (three years, generally)
    • State license

5. Archivist

People who are especially introverted could find working as an archivist a great opportunity to work mostly on their own. Archivists can work at universities, libraries, and research institutions overseeing and maintaining collections of historical items and artwork.

  • Average Salary: $49,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Master’s degree
    • Industry experience

6. Artist

With endless mediums to choose from, becoming an artist is a job for all personality types. Whether you want to become a textile artist, a painter, or a sculptor, this is a great career for creative-minded people who want to work at home or in a studio independently.

  • Average Salary: $32,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Industry experience

7. Content Manager

If working with clients to develop content, such as blog posts, videos, and interactives, and building a strategy for them to perform better sounds interesting, becoming a content manager might be the right career for you. Many content managers are able to work remotely as they oversee a company’s content creation and strategy, as well as manage writers.

  • Average Salary: $54,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Content management systems course (recommended)
    • SEO course (recommended)
    • Industry experience

8. Data Architect

Data architects manage and design data systems, as well as research new opportunities for data acquisition. If you enjoy working with data and technology, this is a challenging and rewarding job that won’t require a lot of social interactions and could be done from home.

  • Average Salary: $115,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Industry experience and certifications

9. Digital Marketer

One of the many jobs with work from home capability is digital marketing. If you love problem-solving and promoting products and services, becoming a digital marketer might be what you’re looking for. Digital marketers utilize technology to promote content, reach customers, and increase brand awareness.

  • Average Salary: $57,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Digital marketing course (recommended)
    • Google Analytics certification (recommended)
    • Industry experience

10. Editor

If you’re a language fanatic and like reading, you might find it fulfilling to become an editor. They work mostly alone with the option to work from home, reading and revising content to be published. Editors can span many media industries, including magazines, book publishing, and even company communications.

  • Average Salary: $57,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Industry experience

11. Executive Chef

If you’re a foodie at heart and love to please people with your cooking, you might have to look into becoming an executive chef. They manage the kitchen to ensure everything is prepared to the right standards, as well as train the staff and create menus.

  • Average Salary: $55,000
  • Requirements:
    • Culinary school (recommended)
    • Industry experience

12. Graphic Designer

Graphic designers use digital tools to create visuals that communicate ideas. From creating logos to app designs, this is the perfect job for those creative-minded introverts that love technology. Since many graphic design jobs are done from home, this is a very rewarding and flexible profession that’s great for introverted people.

  • Average Salary: $40,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Adobe Creative Suite courses (recommended)
    • Industry experience

13. Information Technology Manager

Information technology managers don’t need to be outgoing as long as they have a passion for technology and problem-solving. This is a fast-growing job, where you would fix software and hardware issues and provide upgrades, as well as work with the security of the company’s information systems.

  • Average Salary: $85,500
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • IT management certifications (recommended)
    • Industry experience

14. Landscape Designer

If you love the outdoors and want to flex your creativity, a career as a landscape designer combines both. They develop landscaping plans for parks and other outdoor spaces with features such as water fountains, ponds, walkways, and gardens.

  • Average Salary: $50,500
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Industry experience

15. Librarian

If your preferred workplace is a quiet one, becoming a librarian could be just what you’re looking for. Librarians help visitors find and check out books, prepare catalog books and periodicals, and possibly manage the library budget and oversee events.

  • Average Salary: $48,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Master’s degree
    • Teaching credential (for public school librarians)
    • Praxis II Library Media Specialist test (requirement varies by state)

16. Mechanic

If you enjoy working with your hands and fixing things, becoming a mechanic is a job that won’t require much social interaction since a big part of it is spent working on vehicles. Mechanics repair, inspect, and perform maintenance, as well as use tools and technologies to maintain and modify vehicles.

  • Average Salary: $45,500
  • Requirements:
    • Complete an automotive education program
    • Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification

17. Photographer

If you see the world in a creative way and like to capture moments, becoming a photographer is a great flexible job for introverts. With many genres to pick from, such as wedding, portrait, travel, and landscape photography, this job can lead to many different experiences and is a good way to put your creativity to work.

  • Average Salary: $30,000
  • Requirements:
    • Photography courses
    • Industry experience

18. Psychiatrist

If you’re interested in how the mind works and understanding the importance of mental health, becoming a psychiatrist might be right for an introvert. Psychiatrists diagnose, treat, and help prevent mental disorders, as well as prescribe medication and recommend hospitalization in some cases.

  • Average Salary: $190,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Medical school
    • State license
    • Certification from the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
    • Residency (four years)

19. Research Scientist

If you’re fascinated by science and performing experiments, look into becoming a research scientist. Working in laboratories for the government, environmental organizations, and educational institutions, research scientists perform trials and experiments and can work in many different fields.

  • Average Salary: $66,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Master’s degree
    • Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) certification (recommended)
    • Industry experience

20. Social Media Manager

If you enjoy creating content for Instagram, Facebook, and other social media but don’t necessarily want to post about yourself, consider becoming a social media manager. They plan and create social media posts and marketing campaigns for clients, as well as analyze social media performance and engage with followers and customers.

  • Average Salary: $41,500
  • Requirements:
    • Social media experience
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Internship experience

21. Software Test Engineer

Another great career for techies is to become a software test engineer. They analyze software programs by creating and implementing methods of testing, and recommend improvements. There’s a variety of opportunities for this job since you can work for different companies and even as a contractor.

  • Average Salary: $70,500
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • ISTQB Foundation Level Certification (recommended)
    • Industry experience

22. Therapist

If you love helping people, becoming a therapist may be the path to take. Some common qualities of introverted people include empathy and the ability to listen, which are also characteristics of a good therapist. They listen to their patients’ challenges and help with strategies to improve their lives.

  • Average Salary: $82,030
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Master’s degree (recommended)

23. Translator

If you are fluent in more than one language and want to find a job that lets you work from home, a translator might be right for you. This is a flexible job since you would work translating and converting information into another language.

  • Average Salary: $40,500
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Industry experience and training

24. Veterinarian

Although you might have to interact with pet owners often, as a veterinarian you will spend most of your time caring for animals. So if you have a passion for animals and love to see them grow healthy, becoming a veterinarian might be a career that will make you happy and fulfilled.

  • Average Salary: $91,500
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Experience working with animals
    • Certification from an accredited veterinary program
    • North American Veterinary Licensing Examination
    • State license

25. Writer

Introverts can be great at expressing themselves in writing rather than verbally, which makes becoming a writer a great option. If you have a passion for creating stories, writers have a wide possibility of jobs, such as content writing, copywriting, technical writing, and creative writing, which can be done from the comfort of your home.

  • Average Salary: $51,000
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Industry experience

What To Look for in a Job as an Introvert

When looking for jobs as an introvert, it’s important to find something that will energize instead of drain you. Although some introverts might enjoy jobs that require a lot of social interaction like sales or customer service, they can often be mentally and even physically draining.

Instead, focus on jobs in which you can be independent and have limited social interactions, such as a graphic designer or a translator. Opting for a remote job can also be a great way to limit draining interactions, since meetings tend to be less frequent and are done virtually. You can also look for freelance job opportunities that let you work independently and at your own pace.

Bottom line: Don’t let your introversion hold you back. An inherent desire to work independently doesn’t mean you can’t become a CEO or take on traditionally extroverted roles. It’s all about finding ways to leverage your introverted qualities in your favor. Once more, that begins with learning about the best jobs for introverts.

best jobs for introverts infographic

Sources: Time | Mind.org

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