Use This Apartment Inspection Checklist When New Tenants Move In

An apartment inspection checklist will help simplify the process when tenants move in and move out.

Before a tenant moves into your unit, you should conduct a walk-through of the property to check its condition, preferably with the tenant. The walk-through should be done again once the lease term ends. In both instances, you need an apartment inspection checklist.

An apartment inspection checklist lets you record and keep track of the condition of the home and allows the renter to note any issues. This protects both property managers and owners and the tenant, as it helps identify when the damage occurred and who’s responsible.

Creating an apartment inspection checklist will ensure that you’re checking each unit (and tenants) fairly, applying the same criteria. It will also save time. Here’s a look at when you use an apartment inspection checklist and what it should include.

What’s an apartment inspection checklist?

This checklist includes sections for each room in the unit so that you can note the condition of every aspect of the room — before someone moves in and after they move out. For each room, take note of the condition of the walls, windows, floors, fixtures, plumbing, electricity, safety features and more. The checklist should feature two columns for you to take notes about the condition before and after a lease term.

The apartment inspection checklist is an organized way of recording the condition of everything, which helps you identify if damage occurred while the tenant was living in the home. It also protects renters, giving them a record of any issues with the property before they move in. The property owner or manager and the tenant should sign the checklist as proof that they reviewed it.

When to use an apartment inspection checklist?

Use an apartment inspection checklist at the beginning of the lease term. Walk through the unit — with the tenant, if possible — and check every aspect of the interior and exterior of the home. Note the condition of each element. Save the checklist to use again when tenants move out.

Once a lease term ends and a renter moves out, conduct the same walk-through. Note the condition of the walls, floors, windows, fixtures and other aspects. Compare the condition at the end of the lease to the beginning and make a note of any differences. Calculate the cost of any needed repairs or maintenance, outside of normal wear and tear, and deduct that amount from the security deposit that the renter paid when they signed the lease. Return the balance to the tenant.

Apartment walk-through

Apartment walk-through

Why do you need the checklist?

An apartment inspection checklist is a safeguard. For property owners and managers, it’s a way of documenting the unit’s existing condition and helps hold tenants accountable for any damage while they live in the home. Making a note of pre-existing damage and the condition after the lease ends can minimize disputes over whether to return the security deposit. It’s also a record of any repairs to make before a new tenant moves in.

The checklist and going on the walk-through let tenants see the condition of the rental before they move in and document any issues. Once they move out, it provides a record of how they left the property. The record can also help clear up any disputes that arise.

Property owners or managers and tenants should sign the apartment inspection checklist once it’s completed. Give a copy to the renter and keep another copy in your files.

Sample apartment inspection checklist template

Having an apartment inspection checklist template will make walk-throughs much easier and more streamlined. You won’t have to remember what to look for each time and it lets you equitably check the unit’s condition. Just make sure to use the same checklist for each tenant. Here’s a sample template that you can use.

Make transitions easier

Drafting an apartment inspection checklist will help you handle tenant move-ins and move-outs seamlessly. It will help you track the condition of the property and identify repairs needed and who’s responsible. Listing your property at Rent.com will also help you find and screen new tenants and collect rent online.

Source: rent.com

The 15 Best Neighborhoods in New Orleans for Renters in 2022

Jazz, St. Louis Cathedral, Mardi Gras, jambalaya, gumbo, crawdad pie, blues, beignets and cemeteries are all words you might associate with the Big Easy.

If you’re not sure how to find the best neighborhoods in New Orleans, you’ve come to the right place. We’re all about helping you find that sweet spot — whether that means living next door to the best pralines or cozying up on your own balcony for the best jazz in town.

Here are 15 New Orleans neighborhoods that will give you the best that The Big Easy has to offer. Which one will you call home?

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,537
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,032
  • Walk Score: 72/100

A quiet suburban neighborhood on the west bank of the Mississippi River is the perfect spot for folks looking for great views of the skyline and loads of history. Algiers Point is just that neighborhood, complete with attractive Creole cottages, local bars, ornate architecture, art studios (like the Rosetree Blown Glass Studio and Gallery) and live-music joints. Don’t forget to enjoy the local fare, loads of seafood and tasty local booze.

  • Median 1-BR rent: N/A
  • Median 2-BR rent: $1,500
  • Walk Score: 82/100

No matter your housing needs, Bayou St. John can accommodate and meet the needs of practically any kind of renter. Besides the abundant offerings of activities and advantages you’ll get by living right next to the bayou, there are plenty of ways this neighborhood is an excellent place for children. You can find many parks, museums and high-ranking schools.

This district doesn’t forget that adults also need to have the stuff to do for fun. This area is known for its live music along with a wide variety of local shops and restaurants. In addition, you can easily find vegan-friendly food or any number of more traditional foods offered in Spanish or Louisiana style.

Bywater, new orleans

Bywater, new orleans

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,195
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,195
  • Walk Score: 86/100

Bywater is another super walkable part of town. The vibrant food offering, live music venues and Bohemian vibe don’t hurt the neighborhood, either!

Here you’ll find even more late-night dive bars, artsy joints with unique moods and full-scale production companies. The art studios and music venues are just a part of the happening hood that is Bywater. It’s also one of the more affordable neighborhoods in the city for one-bedroom apartments.

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,537
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,032
  • Walk Score: 72/100

For renters looking for an up-and-coming area that offers great qualities, Central City is the place for you. The neighborhood is constantly growing and that shows in the steady stream of newly available dining establishments, bars and entertainment venues. You’ll find that Central City is on the lakeside of St. Charles Avenue and has some importance to the city’s brass band history and Mardi Gras Indian traditions.

  • Median 1-BR rent: N/A
  • Median 2-BR rent: $1,600
  • Walk Score: 76/100

East Carrollton has a reputation for being a great neighborhood for families because the area is only 15 minutes to the east of Downtown, so it has convenient walking access to many great locations.

In addition, it’s right by many parks, festivals and other community events. Besides entertainment, this location provides easy access to education of any level. This neighborhood also has a plethora of bars, restaurants and shops, so you can find everything you might need in a convenient space.

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,537
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,032
  • Walk Score: 72/100

Fillmore may meet your needs for those looking to rent in an area that’s both affordable and safe. You won’t have to worry about older properties because this neighborhood is up and coming and has plenty of recently constructed homes that guarantee you’ll have a home with everything you and your family might need.

This area’s reputation is of a smaller neighborhood that still boasts many parks, shops and family-friendly restaurants. Another great thing about this neighborhood is easy access to several high schools known for their quality.

French Quarter, one of the best neighborhoods in New Orleans

French Quarter, one of the best neighborhoods in New Orleans

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,750
  • Median 2-BR rent: $3,157
  • Walk Score: 94/100

Of all the best neighborhoods in New Orleans, none are probably more well known than the French Quarter. Most tourists wouldn’t dream that living here is possible, but locals know the area is one of the liveliest and most interesting spots in the whole city, though it’s probably the noisiest — thanks to those tourists.

While the tourists run to Bourbon Street, locals enjoy the architecture, historic spots, antiques, boutiques, live music and views of the Mississippi off the beaten paths elsewhere in the neighborhood. The museums and family-friendly vibes don’t hurt, either, but the walkability score is one of the top-rated reasons to live here, too — everything is accessible by foot.

Moving into the French Quarter means having incredible eats, amazing bars, Mardi Gras access, art galleries, fine jewelry, street performers and, of course, those amazing beignets right there any time you want, day or night.

  • Median 1-BR rent: $2,009
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,411
  • Walk Score: 92/100

The Garden District is a great place to consider settling into, thanks to its many upscale boutiques, an abundance of beautiful greenery and great local restaurants.

The Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is perfect for walking with its expanse of lush vines, Spanish moss and creepy tales to relish as you make your way through. Overall, the neighborhood has a young vibe with plenty of affordable dining and delicious fare.

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,500
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,600
  • Walk Score: 89/100

Irish Channel is another walkable part of town near the French Quarter. The borders on this neighborhood sometimes overlap with the Lower Garden District — depending on who’s drawing the map — with architecture distinctly different from the rest of town.

A number of 19th-century mansions and cottages fill Magazine Street, St. Charles Avenue and others, with a window shopper’s paradise to explore. Live here, dine here, shop here, enjoy life here. And, of course, don’t forget to belly up to the bar in some of the best Irish pubs in town.

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,537
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,032
  • Walk Score: 72/100

Lakeview, as the name indicates, is on the lakefront in New Orleans. The neighborhood is home to amazing marinas and seafood restaurants, tucked in beside City Park. If you love walking and the outdoors, this neighborhood is a fantastic choice for you.

Wander the paths of the Besthoff Sculpture Garden (part of the New Orleans Museum of Art), visit the Storyland amusement park with the kids, shop in style, grab burritos with friends or nosh on burgers with homemade ice cream. Overall, the neighborhood gives off a casual, fun, free-spirited vibe.

Marigny, LA

Marigny, LA

Source: Rent.com/Royal St.
  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,100
  • Median 2-BR rent: $1,550
  • Walk Score: 96/100

Marigny is one of the most walkable neighborhoods in the country, ranking at 96 out of 100 from folks who live and move here. In Marigny, you’ll find the best of the best New Orleans has to offer in all aspects. The housing is cozy and quaint in the best ways, while you’re right on the edge of the French Quarter, so everything’s uber convenient.

Marigny is best known for the busy Frenchmen Street, a local hot spot for bars, tattoo parlors, music clubs, restaurants and more. Snag drinks with friends for cheap at the local bars or catch the local live music at any of the many clubs. Then, tuck in for the night in your affordable apartment.

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,501
  • Median 2-BR rent: $1,990
  • Walk Score: 80/100

Mid City is only a little way away from the French Quarter and all the entertainment that has made it famous. A prominent feature of Mid City is having easy access to public transportation, such as taxis, rideshare services or the streetcar. For those who love to walk where they’re going, a paved path leads directly to the French Quarter.

If you want to explore Mid City, then you’ll find plenty to do. There are annual festivals, famous landmarks and a commercial district that has plenty to offer.

  • Median 1-BR rent: N/A
  • Median 2-BR rent: $1,200
  • Walk Score: 65/100

History, food and art your thing? Then, St. Roch might just be the neighborhood for you. The neighborhood is moderately walkable and loaded with intriguing options for dining — like local seafood and oysters, Mexican fare and award-winning cocktail bars — and local independent art galleries.

It’s the perfect spot for low-key life for folks looking for a moderately active neighborhood where you can still find some peace and quiet in the off hours.

Uptown, one of the best neighborhoods in New Orleans

Uptown, one of the best neighborhoods in New Orleans

  • Median 1-BR rent: $1,537
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,032
  • Walk Score: 72/100

It seems like every city has a neighborhood called Uptown. But New Orleans’ Uptown is pretty unique with the St. Charles Avenue streetcars running, the beautiful historic mansions, Tulane and Loyola Universities and the stunning Audubon Park and Zoo, along with tons of local shops and restaurants you won’t find anywhere else.

This neighborhood is perfect for Mardi Gras fans — with exceptional views and easy access to the carnival. Off-season, it’s perfect for shoppers and diners, with lovely locally-owned boutiques and small cafés, po-boy shops and seafood spots. Plus, you’ll have plenty of gorgeous walking paths and amazing brews all along the way.

  • Median 1-BR rent: $2,500
  • Median 2-BR rent: $2,900
  • Walk Score: 72/100

The Warehouse District in New Orleans is a fabulous neighborhood with more art, culture and dining than you could hope for. The old warehouses were transformed from smelly old pits to amazing restaurants, bars, seafood joints, boutique shops, museums and more. It’s the perfect place to settle in for the trendiest lifestyle in the city and the best Creole cuisine along with seafood from the local waters.

In the neighborhood, you’ll find the Ogden Museum of South Art, the National WWII Museum, loads of galleries on Julia Street, local art events and some of the best gumbo in the city.

Find the best New Orleans neighborhood for you

From the French Quarter to Mid City, you know that New Orleans has intriguing, distinct neighborhoods. Now, to find the best apartments for rent in New Orleans! Check the listings we’ve got for you — you’ll be amazed at what you find.

The rent information included in this article is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of November 2021 and is for illustrative purposes only. This information does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

Source: rent.com

What is Altcoin Season? Why Does It Happen?

2021 has been a heady time for cryptocurrency. Led by Bitcoin, the whole sector has seen huge rises in prices and tremendous volatility along the way. There’s been a massive development of decentralized finance (DeFi) technology applications and cryptocurrency ecosystems that allow people to trade and lend their tokens without the support of a traditional financial institution.

With all this activity and volatility, some have wondered what it will mean for the cryptocurrency ecosystem. Will Bitcoin continue to dominate and soar? Will other coins rise up to take the top spot in the field? Insiders have already coined a phrase for the possibility of Bitcoin stalling out and other cryptocurrency products and token rising in value. It’s known as “altcoin season.”

Altcoins: What Are They?

Basically, altcoins are cryptocurrencies that aren’t Bitcoin or Ethereum. In fact, Bitcoin is so dominant in the field that even Ethereum is sometimes referred to as an altcoin.

Bitcoin is the big kahuna of cryptocurrency, the one that started it all, the one that’s traded the most every day, the one that’s gotten the most backing from mainstream financial institutions, and, of course, the one that’s worth the most ($885,497,080,149 as of December 17, 2021). Ethereum is similar: a long track record, a variety of projects and systems built on top of it, substantial trading volume, and a high overall value (worth $459,827,737,310 as of December 17, 2021).

Altcoins are just about everything else. Sometimes they’re tokens built on top of Ethereum for DeFi projects, sometimes they’re offered in an “initial coin offering” for use with a specific product, sometimes they’re spun up by developers because they think there’s something wrong or missing in the current crypto ecosystem. This could be variants or forks of mainstream coins (like Litecoin (LTC) or Bitcoin Cash), or a whole new type of coin with a specific usage (stablecoins like Tether or USDC), or tokens for use in a specific ecosystem, like XRP for use in Ripple.

When Does “Altcoin Season” Happen?

Altcoin season happens when there’s steady outperformance of tokens and coins that aren’t Bitcoin.

There’s no promise or guarantee that every runup in Bitcoin will turn into a downturn later or that altcoins will start outperforming the original crypto. In fact, it’s not uncommon for all cryptos to rise together, as excitement about the sector grows and new money goes into all sorts of coins looking for profits.

There are a number of theories for why altcoin season could potentially happen. One popular one is that Bitcoin investors will pocket their gains from a surging Bitcoin, maybe by selling some of it, and then move those gains into other cryptocurrencies.

They might do this for one of two reasons:

1.    To realize gains. This might happen if the value of Bitcoin owned by an investor has gone up relative to the dollar or other fiat currencies or cryptocurrencies, and they want to spend some of those gains on things that can’t be bought with crypto itself.

2.    Expectations of future growth change. After a large runup of Bitcoin, an investor’s projected future growth or value of an asset might change compared to the price of investing. So, with inflated Bitcoin values, it’s possible that altcoins could be a better investment going forward. And if enough investors and traders make that decision, they will be.

How Do You Know If It’s Altcoin Season?

You can’t determine altcoin season just by looking at the price of altcoins or Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency in isolation.

Looking at their “market cap”, or the total value of all the circulating tokens, can be a better indicator of what’s going on with investor valuation of cryptocurrencies. This is because price isn’t just determined by investor interest or disinterest, but also by the number of outstanding coins.

How Are Altcoins Doing Relative to Bitcoin?

To tell if we are in altcoin season, we have to look at two things. The first is Bitcoin’s “dominance” vis a vis the rest of the crypto market as well as the performance of altcoins relative to Bitcoin.

At the time of writing in December 2021, according to CoinMarketCap, Bitcoin’s dominance is 41% of the total market. Near the beginning of this year, it stood at 70%. Bitcoin’s highest dominance was 96% in late 2013, Bitcoin’s lowest dominance was early 2018, when it stood at around 33%. Its lowest this year is around 40%, which it hit in May of this year.

Bitcoin has fallen in value by almost 40%, giving a chance for altcoins to gain value in comparison. But we can also compare Bitcoin market value to that of altcoins:

•   Bitcoin’s market value has grown from $176 billion to $885 billion.

•   XRP, the cryptocurrency associated with Ripple, has had its market cap grow from $9 billion to just under $38 billion.

•   Cardano (ADA), whose token is called ADA, has grown from about $3 billion to $41 billion.

•   Litecoin, a Bitcoin alternative founded in 2011 and thus one of the oldest altcoins, has grown from around $3 billion to $10 billion.

•   Ethereum (ETH), the least alt of the altcoins, the most well established of all non-Bitcoin tokens, has grown from $29 billion to $459 billion.

Whether altcoin season is happening at all — and if so, whether it will continue — still remains to be seen.

The Takeaway

Altcoin season describes a time period when altcoins steadily outperform Bitcoin. There are a few ways to try to determine altcoin season, but it remains impossible to predict. Basically, you’ll know it when you’re in it.

Interested in crypto? With SoFi Invest®, you can trade cryptocurrency online from a selection of more than two dozen coins – from Bitcoin and Ethereum to altcoins like Chainlink, Dogecoin, Solana, Litecoin, Cardano, and Enjin Coin.

Find out how to get started with SoFi Invest.

Photo credit: iStock/Prostock-Studio


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
Crypto: Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies aren’t endorsed or guaranteed by any government, are volatile, and involve a high degree of risk. Consumer protection and securities laws don’t regulate cryptocurrencies to the same degree as traditional brokerage and investment products. Research and knowledge are essential prerequisites before engaging with any cryptocurrency. US regulators, including FINRA , the SEC , and the CFPB , have issued public advisories concerning digital asset risk. Cryptocurrency purchases should not be made with funds drawn from financial products including student loans, personal loans, mortgage refinancing, savings, retirement funds or traditional investments. Limitations apply to trading certain crypto assets and may not be available to residents of all states.
Third Party Brand Mentions: No brands or products mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
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What is Delta in Options Trading?

In options trading, Delta is an important assessment tool used to measure risk sensitivity. Delta is a risk metric that compares changes in a derivative’s underlying asset price to the change in the price of the derivative itself.

Essentially it measures the sensitivity of a derivative’s price to a change in the underlying asset. Using Delta as part of an options assessment can help investors make better trades.

Delta is one of “the Greeks,” a set of options trading tools denoted by Greek letters. Some traders might refer to the Greeks as risk sensitivities, risk measures,or hedge parameters. The Delta metric is the most commonly used Greek.

Recommended: A Beginner’s Guide to Options Trading

Option Delta Formula

Analysts calculate Delta using the following formula with theoretical pricing models:

Δ = ∂V / ∂S

Where:

•   ∂ = the first derivative

•   V = the option’s price (theoretical value)

•   S = the underlying asset’s price

Some analysts may calculate Delta with the much more complex Black-Sholes model that incorporates additional factors. But traders generally don’t calculate the formula themselves, as trading software and exchanges do it automatically. Traders analyze these calculations to look for investment opportunities.

Option Delta Example

For each $1 that an underlying stock moves, an the equity derivative’s price changes by the Delta amount. Investors express the Delta sensitivity metric in basis points. For example, let’s say there is a long call option with a delta of 0.40. Investors would refer to this as “40 delta.” If the option’s underlying asset increased in price by $1.00, the option price would increase by $0.40.

However, the Delta amount is always changing, so the option price won’t always move by the same amount in relation to the underlying asset price. Various factors impact Delta, including asset volatility, asset price, and time until expiration.

If the price of the underlying asset increases, the Delta gets closer to 1.0 and a call option increases in value. Conversely, a put option becomes more valuable if the asset price goes lower than the strike price, and in this case Delta is negative.

How to Interpret Delta

Delta is a ratio that compares changes in the price of derivatives and their underlying assets. It uses theoretical price movements to track what will happen with changes in asset and option price. The direction of price movements will determine whether the ratio is positive or negative.

Bullish options strategies have a positive Delta, and bearish strategies have a negative Delta. It’s important to remember that unlike stocks, options buying and selling options does not indicate a bullish or bearish strategy. Sometimes buying a put option is a bearish strategy, and vice versa.

Recommended: Differences Between Options and Stocks

Traders use the Delta to gain an understanding of whether an option will expire in the money or not. The more an option is in the money, the further the Delta value will deviate from 0, towards either 1 or -1.

The more an option goes out of the money, the closer the Delta value gets to 0. Higher Delta means higher sensitivity. An option with a 0.9 Delta, for example, will change more if the underlying asset price changes than an option with a 0.10 Delta. If an option is at the money, the underlying asset price is the same as the strike price, so there is a 50% chance that the option will expire in the money or out of the money.

Call Options

For call options, delta is positive if the derivative’s underlying asset increases in price. Delta’s value in points ranges from 0 to 1. When a call option is at the money the Delta is near 0.50, meaning it has an equal likelihood of increasing or decreasing before the expiration date.

Put Options

For put options, if the underlying asset increases in price then delta is negative. Delta’s value in points ranges from 0 to -1. When a put option is at the money the Delta is near -0.50.

How Traders Use Delta

In addition to assessing option sensitivity, traders look to Delta as a probability that an option will end up in or out of the money. The more likely an option is to generate a profit, the less risky it is as an investment.

Every investor has their own risk tolerance, so some might be more willing to take on a risky investment if it has a greater potential reward. When considering Delta, traders recognize that the closer it is to 1 or -1 to greater exposure they have to the underlying asset.

If a long call has a Delta of 0.40, it essentially has a 40% chance of expiring in the money. So if a long call option has a strike price of $30, the owner has the right to buy the stock for $30 before the expiration date. There is a 40% chance that the stock’s price will increase to at least $30 before the option contract expires.

Traders also use Delta to put together options spread strategies.

Delta Neutral

Traders also use Delta to hedge against risk. One common options trading strategy, known as neutral Delta, is to hold several options with a collective Delta near 0.

The strategy reduces the risk of the overall portfolio of options. If the underlying asset price moves, it will have a smaller impact on the total portfolio of options than if a trader only held one or two options.

One example of this is a calendar spread strategy, in which traders use options with various expiration dates in order to get to Delta neutral.

Delta Spread

With a Delta spread strategy, traders buy and sell various options to create a portfolio that offsets so the overall Delta is near zero. With this strategy the trader hopes to make a small profit off of some of the options in the portfolio.

Using Delta Along With the other Greeks

Delta measures an option’s directional exposure. It is just one of the Greek measurement tools that traders use to assess options. There are five Greeks that work together to give traders a comprehensive understanding of an option. The Greeks are:

•   Delta (Δ): Measures the sensitivity between an option price and the price of the underlying security.

•   Gamma (Γ): Measures the rate at which Delta is changing.

•   Theta (θ): Measures the time decay of an option. Options become less valuable as the expiration date gets closer.

•   Vega (υ): Measures how much implied volatility affects an option’s value. The more volatility there is the higher an option premium becomes.

•   Rho (ρ): Measures an option’s sensitivity to changing interest rates.

The Takeaway

Delta is a useful metric for traders evaluating options and can help investors determine their options strategy. Traders often combine it with other tools and ratios during technical analysis. However, you don’t need to trade options in order to get started investing.

A great way to begin investing is by opening an investment account on the SoFi Invest® app. While SoFi does not offer options trading, it does allow you to research, track, buy and sell stocks, ETFs, and crypto right from your phone.

Photo credit: iStock/PeopleImages


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.
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Source: sofi.com

What Is Fibonacci Retracement in Crypto Trading?

A retracement level is the price at which a stock or cryptocurrency tends to see a reversal in its trend. Fibonacci retracement is a popular tool in technical analysis that helps determine support and resistance levels on a price chart.

What Are Fibonacci Retracement Levels?

Fibonacci numbers are a series where each number equals the sum of the two previous numbers. The most basic series is: 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377 etc.

When it comes to technical analysis, investors use Fibonacci Replacement Levels, expressed as percentages, to analyze how much of a previous move a price has retraced. The most important Fibonacci Retracement levels are: 23.6% 38.2%, 50% and 61.8%.

Some analysts refer to 61.8% as “the golden ratio,” since it equals the division of one number in the series by the number that follows it. For example: 8/13 = 0.6153, and 55/89 = 0.6179.

The other Retracement levels reflect other calculations: Dividing one number by the number three places to its right equals 23.6%. For example: 8/34 = 0.2352. Bitcoin traders often use 78.6%, which is the square root of 0.618,

Some prefer the 0.618 and 0.382 levels because these are the retracement levels analysts believe are most likely to generate a trend reversal. These levels are considered inflection points where fear and greed can alter price action. When an asset is trending upward but loses momentum, it’s possible that a pullback to the 0.618 price level could result in a bounce upward, for example.

How Does Fibonacci Retracement Work and What Does it Do?

There are several theories as to why the fibonacci retracement works. Some of these include:

•   Fibonacci price levels reflect the effects of extreme fear and greed in the market. To use this to their advantage, traders might buy when people are panicking and sell when others are getting greedy.

•   Fibonacci patterns are often observed in nature as well as in mathematics. For example: fruits and vegetables. If one would look at the center of a sunflower, spiral patterns could appear to curve left and right. Counting these spirals, the total often is a Fibonacci number. If one could divide the spirals into those pointed left and right, then two consecutive Fibonacci numbers could be obtained. Therefore, it’s thought that these patterns may be important in financial markets as well.

•   The law of numbers: If a greater percentage of people practice Fibonacci crypto trading, then the likelihood of its accuracy increases.

At its core, a Fibonacci retracement is a mathematical measurement of a particular pattern. When it comes to Fibonacci in crypto, traders try to apply these patterns to price action to predict future price movements.

Who Created Fibonacci Retracements?

While traders commonly use Fibonacci in crypto today, the number sequences pre-date the invention of cryptocurrency by many centuries. Fibonacci numbers are based on the key numbers studied by mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci (or Leonardo of Pisa) in the 13th century, although Indian mathematicians had identified them previously. He was a medieval Italian mathematician famous for his “Book of the Abacus”, the first European work on Indian and Arabian mathematics, which introduced Hindu-Arabic numerals to Europe.

Formula

In an uptrend or bullish market, the formulas for calculating Fibonacci retracement and extension levels are:

UR = High price – ((High price – Low price) * percentage) in an uptrend market; where UR is uptrend retracement.

UE = High price + ((High price – Low price) * percentage) in an uptrend market; where UE is an uptrend extension.

For example: A stock price range of $10 – $20, could depict a swing low to swing high.

Uptrend Retracement (UR) = $20 – (($20 – $10) * 0.618)) = $13.82 (utilizing 0.618 retracement)

Uptrend Extension (UE) = $20 + (($20 – $10) * 0.618)) = $26.18 (utilizing 0.618 retracement)

If a stock pulls back $13.82 could be a level that the stock bounces back to reach higher levels than its swing high price, e.g. $20. In an uptrend, the general idea is to take profits on a long trade at a Fibonacci price extension Level ~ $26.18.

What Does a Fibonacci Retracement do?

Markets don’t go straight up or down. There are pauses and corrections along the way. To buy stocks in an uptrend, one would look to get the best price possible.

Some traders use Fibonacci Retracement to determine how much a stock could pull back before continuing higher. Traders can use these retracement levels to find optimal prices at which to enter a trade.

A swing high happens when a security’s price reaches a peak before a decline. A swing high forms when the highest price reached is greater than a given number of highs around it.

Swing low is the opposite of swing high. It refers to the lowest price within a timeframe, usually fewer than 20 trading periods. A swing low occurs when a lowest price is lower than any other surrounding prices in a given period of time.

Support and Resistance

Support is the price level that acts as a floor, preventing the price from being pushed lower, while resistance is the high level that the price reaches over time. Analysts often illustrate these as horizontal lines on a graph.

A support or resistance level can also represent a pivot point, or point from which prices have a tendency to reverse if they bounce (in the case of support) or retreat (in the case of resistance) from that level.

Learn more: Support and Resistance: What Is It? How To Use It for Trading

Limitations of Fibonacci Retracement

Fibonacci retracements in crypto or other markets may be slightly predictive. But over relying on them can be counterproductive for reasons such as:

•   Fibonacci retracements, like any other indicators, could be used effectively only if investors understand it completely. It could end up being risky if not used properly.

•   There are no guarantees that prices will end up at that point, and retrace as the theory indicates.

•   Fibonacci retracement sequences are often close to each other, therefore it may be tough to accurately predict future price movements.

•   Using technical analysis tools like Fibonacci retracements can give investors tunnel vision, where they only see price action through this one indicator. Assuming that any single indicator is always correct can be problematic.

A Fibonacci retracement in crypto trading could wind up being even less predictive than in other financial markets due to the extreme volatility that cryptocurrencies often experience.

Fibonacci Retracements and Bitcoin

Fibonacci retracements can also be used for trading cryptos such as Bitcoin (BTC), similarly to how they’re used in stocks. In this case, one would use the levels 23.6%, 38.2%, 50%, 61.8% and 78.6% to determine where the cryptocurrency price would reverse.

Crypto prices are very volatile, and leverage trading is common. Leverage is the use of borrowed funds to increase the trading position, beyond what would be available from the cash balance alone. Therefore, it can be important to have some reference as to when the price could reverse, to not incur major losses.

Using the Fibonacci Retracement Tool to Trade Cryptocurrencies

In order to get started with a Fibonacci Retracement Tool, a trader could find a completed trend for a crypto, say, Bitcoin, which could either be an uptrend or downtrend.

Below are some steps on how to use Fibonacci retracement tool:

1.    Determine the direction of the market. Is it an uptrend or downtrend?

2.    For an uptrend, determine the two most extreme points (bottom and top) on the Bitcoin price chart. Attach the Fibonacci retracement tool on the bottom and drag it to the right, all the way to the top.

3.    For a downtrend, the extreme points are top and bottom and the retracement tool could be dragged from the top to the bottom.

4.    For an uptrend or downtrend, one could monitor the potential support levels: 0.236, 0.382, 0.5 and 0.618.

Recommended: Crypto Technical Analysis: What It Is & How to Do One

Fibonacci Retracement Example for Bitcoin

In December 2017, Bitcoin fell from $13,112 to around $10,800, within a short timeframe. After that, it rallied up to $12k twice, but did not break above that level until 2021. That indicates a bearish pattern, as it couldn’t break above its previous high. In technical analysis it is called a double top.

On the Fibonacci tool, the $12k resistance point coincided with the 50% level of retracement. When the price could not reach this level, it started to fall again. In this scenario, traders using Fibonacci Retracement might consider this a good time to exit a long position or establish a short position. A short trade is based on the speculation that the price of Bitcoin is going to fall.

By February, 2018, the trade materialized as Bitcoin continued its downtrend falling all the way to $9,270. The short trade would have worked and traders could have realized a profit from using the crypto Fibonacci Retracement tool, although those who managed to HODL for years after that would have made even more.

FAQ

Does Fibonacci retracement work with crypto?

While the Fibonacci retracement tool is traditionally used for analyzing stocks or trading currencies in the forex market, some analysts believe it is also helpful in determining a crypto trading strategy.

How accurate is fibonacci retracement?

In crypto, Fibonacci retracement levels are often fairly accurate, although no indicator is perfect and they are best used in combination with other research. The accuracy levels increase with longer timeframes. For example, a 50% retracement on a weekly chart is a more important technical level than a 50% retracement on a five-minute chart.

What are the advantages of using fibonacci retracement?

Here are some benefits of using Fibonacci Retracement.

•   Trend prediction. With the correct setting and levels, it can often predict the price reversals of bitcoin at early levels, with a high probability.

•   Flexibility. Fibonacci Retracement works for assets of any market and any timeframe. One must note that longer time frames could result in a more accurate signal.

•   Fair assessment of market psychology. Fibonacci levels are built on both a mathematical algorithm and the psychology of the majority, which is a fair assessment of market sentiment.

The Takeaway

The Fibonacci Retracement tool can help identify hidden levels of support and resistance so that analysts can better time their trades. Analysts believe this tool is more effective when utilized with types of cryptocurrency that have higher market-capitalization, like Bitcoin and Ethereum, because they have more established trends over extended time frames.They consider it less effective on cryptocurrencies with a smaller market capitalization.

Whether you use Fibonacci Retracement or other methods to create your cryptocurrency trading strategy, a great way to get started is by opening a brokerage account on the SoFi Invest investment app. You can use it to trade more than a dozen different coins, including Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Cardano, and Dogecoin.

Photo credit: iStock/HAKINMHAN


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.
Crypto: Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies aren’t endorsed or guaranteed by any government, are volatile, and involve a high degree of risk. Consumer protection and securities laws don’t regulate cryptocurrencies to the same degree as traditional brokerage and investment products. Research and knowledge are essential prerequisites before engaging with any cryptocurrency. US regulators, including FINRA , the SEC , and the CFPB , have issued public advisories concerning digital asset risk. Cryptocurrency purchases should not be made with funds drawn from financial products including student loans, personal loans, mortgage refinancing, savings, retirement funds or traditional investments. Limitations apply to trading certain crypto assets and may not be available to residents of all states.
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Source: sofi.com

Upgrade Your Saturday Morning: 10 Weekend Breakfast Ideas Worth Trying At Home

Stay in your pajamas and pretend you’re a master chef with these weekend breakfast ideas!

After a long week, nothing is better than sleeping in a bit and enjoying a filling and delicious breakfast. So, plan to skip long brunch lines and treat yourself at home with these easy weekend breakfast ideas.

From mouthwatering omelets to make-ahead strattas and casseroles, here are 10 helpful ways to upgrade your weekend breakfast plans.

1. Pour a cuppa (or two)

Cup of tea.

Cup of tea.

Instead of rushing out the door on a Saturday or Sunday morning for a day jam-packed with activities, linger a little longer at home and treat yourself to a lowkey tea party.

Make a pot of your favorite tea, slice up your favorite fruit into a salad and nibble on a scone or two. If you’re feeling luxurious, whip up a bowl of heavy cream and add the homemade whipped cream into your teacup or mug.

Want to have tea like the Queen? Buy or make your own clotted cream and add a little into an English tea. According to tea expert Ashita Agrawal, “English breakfast tea is a favorite for its full-bodied, rich and very refreshing tasting notes. It pairs excellently with eggs, sweetbreads or salads.”

2. Swap scrambled eggs for a homemade omelet

Omelet.

Omelet. Scrambling eggs is easy, but it can get old very quickly if it’s your go-to weekend breakfast idea. Turn your kitchen into a fancy brunch spot and treat yourself to an omelet.

  1. Prep your eggs: Grab two or three eggs per omelet, crack them into a bowl and lightly beat them with a fork.
  2. Melt your butter: Heat a nonstick skillet on medium-low heat and add in some butter.
  3. Pour in your eggs: Once you add your eggs to the pan, let them sit for about 60 seconds. Take a spatula and start to gingerly lift the cooked eggs around the edges of your pan.
  4. Add your fillings: Without overstuffing your omelet, add the filling as your eggs start to set in your pan.
  5. Fold it: Use your spatula to fold your omelet in half. Let it sit a few more seconds and voila — you just made an omelet.

Need help deciding what should go into your homemade omelet? Take your pick!

Cheese fillings:

  • Asiago
  • Blue
  • Boursin
  • Cheddar
  • Chèvre
  • Comté
  • Cream cheese
  • Feta
  • Fontina
  • Goat cheese
  • Gouda
  • Gruyère
  • Manchego
  • Monterey Jack
  • Mozzarella
  • Parmesan
  • Pecorino
  • Pimiento cheese
  • Taleggio

Meat fillings:

  • Bacon
  • Pancetta
  • Chorizo
  • Country ham
  • Crab
  • Diced ham
  • Lobster
  • Sausage
  • Shredded chicken
  • Shrimp
  • Smoked salmon
  • Steak
  • Trout

Vegetable and herb fillings:

  • Artichoke hearts
  • Avocado
  • Basil
  • Bell peppers
  • Caramelized onions
  • Chile peppers (jalapenos or poblano)
  • Chives
  • Cilantro
  • Dill
  • Hash browns
  • Leeks
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Parsley
  • Potatoes
  • Scallions
  • Spinach
  • Thyme
  • Tomatoes

And if you want to kick our omelet experience up a notch — consider topping your breakfast with the following:

  • Caviar (if you’re feeling luxurious)
  • Chili (from a can or homemade)
  • Everything but the Bagel seasoning (pick it up at Trader Joe’s)
  • Hot sauce
  • Kimchi
  • Mixed greens
  • Old Bay seasoning
  • Pesto
  • Red pepper flakes
  • Salsa

3. Make a yogurt bar

Yogurt bowl.

Yogurt bowl.

Not only is yogurt delicious, but it has loads of protein, calcium and potassium (as well as numerous vitamins and minerals). If you want an easy and healthy weekend breakfast idea, plan to create an at-home yogurt bar.

Simply grab your favorite kind of yogurt flavor and then consider all your options for toppings. You can add as many or as few toppings as you want — there are no rules here. Need help dressing up your yogurt? Go to town with some of these:

  • Almonds
  • Almond butter
  • Bananas
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cacao nibs
  • Cereal
  • Chia seeds
  • Chocolate chips (dark or white)
  • Coconut
  • Cookie butter
  • Cranberries
  • Dates
  • Flaxseed
  • Fruit jam
  • Graham crackers
  • Granola
  • Grapes
  • Hemp seeds
  • Honey
  • Kiwi
  • Peaches
  • Peanut butter
  • Pecans
  • Pineapple
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Raisins
  • Raspberries
  • Strawberries
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Walnuts

4. Bust out your cookie cutter collection

Cookie cutters.

Cookie cutters.

Whether you have kids or you’re just a kid at heart, bring your cookie cutter collection into your weekend breakfast routine. Cookie cutters can help turn your morning eggs or pancakes into whatever shape you want.

Making eggs? Add a little bit of butter or oil to a pan and heat it. Place your cookie cutter into the pan and when the butter or oil is hot enough, drop your egg into the cutter. Your egg will form around the cookie cutter!

Opting for a sweeter Sunday morning brunch and making pancakes? Place your cookie cutter on your griddle or pan, the same way as the eggs, and pour your batter into the middle of the cutter.

5. Build a smoothie bowl

Smoothie bowl.

Smoothie bowl.

Since it’s the weekend and you’ve got more time to spare, one of the best weekend breakfast ideas is to pour your smoothie into a bowl (instead of a glass or to-go tumbler). Just make a thicker smoothie (adding frozen fruit will help do this) and pour it into a bowl before adding in your favorite toppings (check out the yogurt bar topping ideas).

Since it will take you longer to spoon your smoothie into your mouth (and chew your chosen toppings) than sucking it down with a straw, your morning smoothie will take a little longer to consume. Consider this your weekend moment of mindfulness!

6. Let your toaster sleep in

Toast.

Toast.When you think toast, think beyond your toaster. Since it’s the weekend and you have a little more time, move past spreading butter on a piece of bread and calling it a meal. Opt for making hearty toast that will keep you full for hours.

Simply heat a slice or two of your favorite bread in a skillet over medium heat. Don’t worry about putting butter or oil down — the bread will toast directly on the pan. Leave each side down for about 2 minutes.

Need inspiration beyond your plain avocado toast? Any of these weekend breakfast ideas will do:

  • Hummus — topped with mushrooms, garlic, crushed red pepper and sage
  • Smashed avocado, chickpeas and crushed red pepper
  • Shaved pears layered on top of whipped ricotta and honey
  • Peanut butter (or any type of nut butter you prefer) topped with bananas and honey — you can even add granola, nuts or the seeds of your choice!
  • Open-faced BLT — Egg, bacon, lettuce and tomato, add hot sauce for spice or avocado
  • Smashed avocado with pistachios and honey — add granola or seeds if you’re feeling extra crunchy!
  • White cheddar, avocado, strawberry and sea salt. If you’re feeling extra, drizzle a teaspoon of honey on top of your toast!
  • Smashed avocado, corn, cotija cheese and pickled red onions. Splash some hot sauce on this to kick up the flavor!
  • Watermelon radish on top of smashed avocado, topped with sesame seeds or Everything But The Bagel seasoning
  • Sliced apples on top of almond butter, add a drizzle of honey
  • Avocado drenched in cottage cheese and pesto with pine nuts to top it off

7. Turn weekend brunch into a cocktail hourBloody mary.Bloody mary.

Say cheers to the weekend with an adult beverage or two! Instead of paying top dollar for a breakfast cocktail, make your own at home. Try these brunch menu favs:

  • Bellini: A sweet effervescent drink with peach puree and prosecco.
  • Bloody Mary: Tomato juice and vodka are the base of the ever-popular Bloody Mary, but don’t forget the Worcestershire sauce, garlic, hot sauce, horseradish, lemon and lime juice, fresh herbs and a celery stick. Popular garnishes to include:
    • Asparagus
    • Bacon
    • Cheese cubes
    • Crab legs
    • Cucumbers
    • Jalapenos
    • Peppers
    • Pepperoncini
    • Pickles
    • Okra
    • Radishes
    • Shrimp
  • French 75: A spritely and refreshing cocktail made of gin, champagne, lemon juice and sugar.
  • Irish Coffee: Upgrade your coffee with Irish whiskey, sugar and whipped cream.
  • Kir Royal: A red-hued cocktail, this drink features champagne and creme de cassis.
  • Mimosa: A classic — mix chilled juice (orange juice is the traditional go-to, but you can use any type of juice) and champagne.

8. Make your breakfast the night beforeStratta.Stratta.

One of the best weekend breakfast ideas is to simply make your breakfast the night before…or at least prep so the most you have to do is pop it into the oven and bake.

Making a breakfast dish ahead allows you to sleep in later and enjoy the fruits of your labor with little effort the next day. Here are some options:

  • Breakfast burritos
  • Breakfast polenta dishes
  • Egg casseroles
  • Egg muffins
  • French toast
  • Frittatas
  • Hash brown casseroles
  • Homemade muesli
  • Homemade nut bars
  • Latkes
  • Muffins
  • Overnight oats
  • Slow cooker oatmeal
  • Smoothie kits
  • Strattas

9. Pay attention to the details

Pancakes served in bed.

Pancakes served in bed.

“There are lots of simple and fun ways to elevate your home brunch,” says Liz McCray from Bloody Mary Obsessed. “Infuse vodka with jalapeños for a spicy addition to a Bloody Mary or use fresh or frozen fruit to make from scratch juices for your mimosas!”

Additionally, Liz says, “Small splurges like chocolate chips in your pancakes or using a fluffy and buttery brioche bread for French toast will up-level your home brunch game. Grab a bouquet of fresh flowers from the farmers market or Trader Joe’s as a centerpiece and you’ve got an elevated home brunch!”

10. Eat like a chef

Breakfast tacos.

Breakfast tacos.

According to California Bay Area chef Garrett Adair, “If you want to eat like a chef, there’s one thing to make — breakfast tacos.”

You heard the professional. Plan to make breakfast tacos this week — here’s what you’ll need:

  • Eggs: Fried or scrambled, however you prefer.
  • Beans: Refried beans are perfect for breakfast tacos, but black or pinto beans work well, too.
  • Cheese: Cheddar cheese or cotija will do the trick.
  • Avocado: Slice it, smash it or make some guacamole.
  • Salsa or hot sauce: Pick your favorite and splash it on.
  • Tortillas: Corn or flour

If you want a heavier breakfast taco, feel free to add your favorite meat. Chorizo, chicken and steak also make excellent breakfast taco toppings.

Bon appétit!

Whether you live for savory breakfast dishes or a sweeter morning snack, there are plenty of delicious and easy-at-home weekend breakfast ideas to try. So, next time you look for brunch reservations — just stay in your pajamas and treat yourself (if you’re feeling generous, your friends, too) instead!

Source: rent.com

How To Write a 30-Day Notice Letter To Your Landlord

Sending a notice to vacate to your current landlord will help ensure a smooth and easy transition to your next place.

You absolutely love your current apartment. Everything about it has been perfect, but you realize it’s time to move on. Even though your lease has a defined end date, it’s common courtesy to notify your landlord that you’re ready to move.

Submitting a 30-day notice letter to your landlord is the proper way to get the ball rolling. Not only will it ensure everyone is on the same page about you moving out, it makes sure you’re all on the same schedule.

Why do I give a notice to vacate?

One of the hardest things to remember about leasing an apartment is that it’s a legal transaction. You sign a legal document to move in, so you need to create a document when you want to move out.

A notice to vacate is the letter you give your landlord stating your intention to terminate your lease. The specifics of how to submit this letter — and when — is usually a part of your rental agreement. Even if your lease has a set end date and that’s when you’re moving out, submitting an official letter makes your intentions clear and avoids confusion.

Is a 30-day notice letter to my landlord the norm?

While it’s pretty standard to provide 30 days’ notice of your intent to move out, not every lease sets the notification period to the same amount of days. Some landlords may want more notice, transforming your 30-day notice letter to a 45- or 60-day letter.

Your lease provides any clarification you need on when to send this letter, so it’s best to check it well before you plan on moving out.

Thinking of what to include in a letter

Thinking of what to include in a letter

What should the notice letter look like?

There are a few essential elements that belong in your notice to vacate letter and a few best practices to follow. First, make sure your letter has:

  • Your name, your current address and the date
  • The date on which you plan to move out
  • A forwarding address where your security deposit can go
  • Acknowledgment that a final inspection will occur

Additionally, it’s best if you:

  • Review your lease before writing your letter to check not only on a time frame to give notice but other requirements for moving out.
  • Type your letter rather than write it by hand. Use a pen for your signature, but typing the letter makes it easier to keep a record for yourself.
  • Keep the tone straightforward and polite. Stay on the topic of giving your notice and don’t bring up other issues or complaints.

Even if your lease doesn’t require you to send a formal letter if you’re moving out on the actual date your rental agreement ends, err on the side of caution and do so anyway. This gives you a paper trail and offers you legal protection should any issues arise down the road.

A 30-day notice letter template

This template can help you get started when it’s time to write your own 30-day notice letter to your landlord. Simply download the 30-day notice sample letter and replace the sections in parenthesis ( ) with your information.

(Your name)
(Street address and unit number)
(City, State and ZIP Code)

(Date)

(Landlord or property manager’s name)
(Property address)
(City, State and ZIP Code)

Re: Notice of Intent to Vacate

Dear (Landlord or property manager’s name),

This letter is to inform you of my official 30-day notice to vacate. I’d like to terminate the lease signed on (Month, Date, Year) for the property located at (Your address with apartment number). I will move out on (Date).

I will return my keys on (Move out date) to (Specific address) per the terms of my lease.

I’m also aware a final inspection of the apartment will take place, the results of which could potentially impact my security deposit. Please let me know, via email at (Your email address), if the full amount is not being returned. You can return my security deposit to (Forwarding address.)

Should you have any questions, or need to reach me after I move out, you can contact me at (Phone number) or (Email address).

Sincerely,

(Your name and signature)
(Apartment number)

Sharing why you’re moving out

This is an optional bit of information you can include in your letter. It’s not necessary to tell your landlord why you’re moving out, but sometimes it’s nice for them to know that it’s not the apartment driving you away.

If you’d like, add in a sentence to your letter along these lines: I’ve enjoyed living here and am moving out because of a (new job/relocation opportunity/roommate opportunity, etc.).

If you’re moving out because of an issue with the apartment and want to share it here, that’s OK, too, just try and remain diplomatic. You don’t want to use your letter as an opportunity to accuse your landlord of anything. Try something like: I’m leaving because of (a rent increase, issue with apartment). You don’t need to get really detailed, either.

Again, this additional line is completely optional and up to you entirely.

Hire a moving company

Hire a moving company

What happens after your notice to vacate?

Once you’ve submitted your official letter, it’s a good idea to reach out to your landlord and informally share your plans. You can also notify them your letter is coming and address any questions they may have without having to wait.

The next steps involve planning your move. If you haven’t found a new place to live yet, get searching. You may also want to schedule movers since you’ve now established your move-out day with your 30-day notice letter to your landlord.

What if I forget?

The biggest possible issue, should you forget to send a 30-day notice letter to your landlord, is penalties. You could end up on the hook for extra fees as high as another month’s rent. You could also end up dealing with an automatic lease renewal, which means having to break your lease to move out. This could lead to even more charges and potential problems since you’ve missed your window to easily vacate the apartment.

To avoid forgetting, as soon as you know you’re going to move, set a reminder for yourself to give 30-day notice and mark the cut-off date in your calendar. Give yourself as many ways as possible to get that letter sent.

Handling the termination of your lease right

Moving from one home to another is always full of little details. From scheduling movers to packing all your stuff, the weeks leading up to a move are busy.

Before you get into the weeds of your actual move, take the right steps to properly prepare your landlord. That all starts by giving notice of your intent to vacate. It will be the easiest and the less time-consuming thing you have to do during the move-out process and could make a big difference.

Source: rent.com

Tax Loss Carryforward

A tax loss carryforward is a special tax rule that allows capital losses to be carried over from one year to another. In other words, capital losses realized in the current tax year can also be used to offset gains or profits in a future tax year.

Investors can use a capital loss carryforward to minimize their tax liability when reporting capital gains from investments. Business owners can also take advantage of loss carryforward rules when deducting losses each year.

Knowing how this tax provision works, and when it can be applied, is important from an investment tax-savings perspective.

What Is Tax Loss Carryforward?

Tax loss carryforward is the process of carrying forward capital losses into future tax years. A capital loss occurs when you sell an asset for less than your adjusted basis. Capital losses are the opposite of capital gains, which are realized when you sell an asset for more than your adjusted basis.

Adjusted basis simply means the cost of an asset, adjusted for various events (i.e. increases or decreases in value) through the course of ownership. Whether a capital gain or capital loss is short-term or long-term depends on how long you owned it before selling. Short-term capital losses and gains apply when an asset is held for one year or less, while long-term capital gains and losses are associated with assets held for longer than one year.

The Internal Revenue Service allows certain capital losses, including losses associated with personal or business investments, to be deducted from taxable income. There are limits on the amount that can be deducted each year, however, which depend on the type of losses that are being reported.

In order to allow taxpayers to claim the full capital loss deduction they’re entitled to, the IRS makes it possible to carry tax losses forward into future years.

Recommended: What to Know about Paying Taxes on Stocks

How Tax Loss Carryforwards Work

In general terms, a tax loss carryforward works by allowing you to report losses realized on assets in one tax year on a future year’s tax return. IRS loss carryforward rules apply to both personal and business assets. The main types of carryforwards allowed by the Internal Revenue Code are capital loss carryforwards and net operating loss carryforwards.

Capital Loss Carryforward

IRS rules allow investors to “harvest” tax losses, meaning they use capital losses to offset capital gains. An investor could sell an investment at a capital loss, then deduct that loss against capital gains from other investments, assuming they don’t violate the wash sale rule.

The wash sale rule prohibits investors from buying substantially identical investments within the 30 days before or 30 days after the sale of a security for the purposes of tax-loss harvesting.

If capital losses are equal to capital gains, they would offset one another on your tax return, so there’d be nothing to carry over. For example, a $5,000 capital gain would cancel out a $5,000 capital loss and vice versa.

If capital losses exceed capital gains, you can claim the lesser of $3,000 ($1,500 if married filing separately) or your total net loss shown on line 21 of Schedule D for Form 1040. Any capital losses in excess of $3,000 could be carried forward to future tax years. The IRS allows you to carry losses forward indefinitely.

Net Operating Loss Carryforward

A net operating loss (NOL) occurs when a business has more deductions than income. Rather than posting a profit for the year, the business operates at a loss. Business owners may be able to claim a NOL deduction on their personal income taxes. Net operating loss carryforward rules work similar to capital loss carryforward rules, in that businesses can carry forward losses from one year to the next.

For losses arising in tax years after December 31, 2020, the NOL deduction is limited to 80% of the excess of the business’s taxable income, according to the IRS. To calculate net operating loss deductions for your business, you first have to omit items that could limit your loss, including:

•   Capital losses that exceed capital gains

•   Nonbusiness deductions that exceed nonbusiness income

•   Qualified business income deductions

•   The net operating loss deduction itself

These losses can be carried forward indefinitely at the federal level.

Note, however, that the rules for NOL carryforwards at the state level vary widely. Some states follow the federal rules, but others do not.

How Long Can Losses Be Carried Forward?

According to the IRS, tax loss carryforward rules allowed losses to be carried forward indefinitely. That includes both capital losses associated with the sale of investments or other assets, as well as net operating losses for a business. Prior to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, business owners were limited to a 20-year window when carrying forward net operating losses.

It’s important to keep in mind that capital loss carryforward rules don’t allow you to simply roll over losses. IRS rules state that you must use capital losses to offset capital gains in the year that they occur. You can only carry capital losses forward if they exceed your capital gains for the year. The IRS also requires you to use an apples-to-apples approach when applying capital losses against capital gains.

For example, you’d need to use short-term capital losses to offset short-term capital gains. You couldn’t use a short-term capital loss to balance out a long-term capital gain or a long-term capital loss to offset a short-term capital gain. This rule applies because short- and long-term capital gains are subject to different tax rates.

Example of Tax Loss Carryforward

Assume that you purchase 100 shares of XYZ stock at $50 each. Thirteen months after purchasing the shares, their value has doubled to $100 each so you decide to sell, collecting a capital gain of $5,000. You also hold 100 shares of ABC stock, which have decreased in value from $70 per share to $10 per share over that same time period.

Your capital losses would total $6,000 (the difference between the $7,000 you paid for the shares and the $1,000 you sold them for). You could use $5,000 of that loss to offset the $5,000 gain associated with selling your shares in the first company. Per IRS rules, you could also apply the additional $1,000 loss to reduce your ordinary income for the year.

Now, say you also have another stock that you sold at a $5,000 loss. You could apply $2,000 of that loss to offset ordinary income, then carry the remaining $3,000 forward to a future tax year, per IRS rules. All of this, of course, assumes that you don’t violate the wash sale rule when timing the sale of losing stocks.

The Takeaway

If you’re investing in a taxable brokerage account, it’s important to include tax planning as part of your strategy. Selling stocks to realize capital gains could result in a larger tax bill if you’re not deducting capital losses at the same time. With tax-loss harvesting, assuming you don’t violate the wash sale rule, it’s possible to carry forward investment losses to help reduce the tax impact of gains over time. This applies to personal as well as business gains and losses. Thus, understanding the tax loss carryforward provision may help reduce your personal as well as investment taxes.

In order to understand the true impact of gains and losses, it may help to open an investment account with SoFi Invest®. Here you can trade stocks as well as ETFs and even cryptocurrency. Even better, as a SoFi Member you have access to financial professionals who can offer complimentary guidance and answer your most pressing investing questions.

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SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.
Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.
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Source: sofi.com

Average Directional Index (ADX) Explained

The Average Directional Movement Index, or ADX, is an indicator used in technical analysis to help determine the strength of a pricing trend. The indicator was developed by Welles Wilder as part of his Directional Movement System for commodity trading. Since then it has been used for other tradeable investments such as stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and foreign currency.

The ADX can help investors understand when to buy and sell positions. Here’s a closer look at what ADX is, how to calculate it, and the role it plays in making investment decisions.

What is ADX?

ADX shows an average of price range values that indicate expansion or contraction of prices over time — typically a period of 14 days, but, in some cases it may be calculated for shorter or longer periods as well. Shorter periods may respond quicker to pricing movements but may also have more false signals. Longer periods tend to generate fewer false signals but may cause the indicator to lag the market.

The Average Directional Index is part of Wilder’s Directional Movement System, which attempts to measure the strength of pricing trends in both the positive and negative directions, by using DMI+ and DMI- indicators. The DMI+ indicates positive directional movement, and the DMI- indicates negative directional movement. ADX is calculated as the sum of the differences between DMI+ and DMI- over time. These three indicators are often charted together.

ADX Formula

Calculating the Average Directional Index on your own is a bit complex; it requires a series of calculations to be carried out in a specific order. Luckily, you probably won’t ever have to do it yourself — instead take a look at advanced chart settings for publicly available stock charts on websites like the Wall Street Journal . There is often an option to add an ADX or DMI overlay to the chart.

For those who are curious, here’s a look at the formulas required to calculate ADX:

+DI = (Smoothed +DM/ATR) X 100

-DI = (Smoothed -DM/ATR) X 100

DX= (|+DI – -DI|/|+DI + -DI|) X 100

ADX = ((Prior ADX X 13) + Current ADX))/14

Assumptions:

DM = Direction Movement

ATR = Average True Range

+DM = Current High – Previous High

-DM = Previous Low – Current Low

Smoothed +/- DM = ∑14 t=1DM – ((∑14 t=1DM)/14) + CDM

CDM = Current DM

How to Interpret ADX Results

It’s possible that prices within a given market could be moving up or down within a given range without ever developing into a trend. The ADX is used first and foremost to determine whether or not an up or down trend exists in a market at all.

According to Wilder’s calculations, when ADX is above 25, it indicates a strong trend; when ADX is below 20, that indicates there is no trend.

Generally, analysts conclude that between 20 and 25 represents a bit of a gray area in which some say that a developing trend is possible. It’s also possible that prices are simply ranging back and forth rather than trending.

For those who follow ADX, an ADX between 25 and 50 may represent a moderate strength trend. A result of 50 to 100 indicates trends that are increasingly strong.

How to Read an ADX Chart

Identifying the direction of trends is relatively easy when looking at an ADX chart. A line that’s moving in the upward direction indicates a strengthening trend, while a line moving in the downward direction indicates weakening. The steeper the slope of the line, the stronger the trend.

When ADX turns down, it may be an indicator that a trend is ending, which could be an opportunity for investors to consider whether they want to continue holding a position. If ADX has been low for a period of time and begins to rise by four or five points, it may be a bullish indicator that investors should consider buying to take advantage of a potentially burgeoning trend.

Using ADX, +DMI, and -DMI in tandem can generate crossover signals that can help signal opportunities to buy or sell. For example, the +DMI line crossing above the -DMI line is a potential signal to buy when ADX is above 20.

Investors tend to use ADX in conjunction with other technical analysis indicators such as moving averages to help them analyze price movements.

ADX can be used as a momentum indicator that can signal potential reversals in trends. For example, if ADX and market price are moving in an upward trajectory together, that can indicate that prices are strongly trending higher. However, if ADX declines but prices continue to rise, it may be an indicator that the market is losing momentum and prices will turn down soon.

ADX Comparisons

ADX is related to some other indicators. Here’s a breakdown of similarities and differences.

ADX vs DMI

Like ADX, DMI can be used as an indicator to help determine if the price of a security is trending and how strong that trend is. DMI does not take the direction of the trend into account.

DMI can be positive or negative. Positive DMI, or +DMI, is the difference between a stock’s high price today and its high yesterday. Values from the previous 14 days are then added up.

Negative DMI, of -DMI is the difference between a stock’s low from today and its low price from yesterday. A sum is then taken for these values for the previous 14 days.

ADX is calculated as the sum of the difference between positive and negative DMI over time.

ADX vs the Aroon Indicator

The Aroon Indicator is made up of two indicators, the Aroon-Up and the Aroon-Down. Aroon-up reflects the number of days since the last 25-day high, while Aroon-Down represents the number of days since the 25-day low.

The Aroon Indicator is similar in many ways to ADX. It’s used to identify the beginning of a trend or changes to trends, and determine whether a trend exists or if prices are just fluctuating within a range. It can also help investors determine the strength of a trend.

Higher Aroon values indicate a trend, while low values represent a weakening or nonexistent trend.

Pros and Cons of Using ADX

Like any indicator, the ADX has benefits and limitations. Here’s a look at some of the pros and cons:

Pros Cons
Helps identify whether a trend exists or if prices are simply fluctuating within a given range. False trading signals can occur, for example when crossovers are happening too frequently, which can result in confusion as trades quickly shift direction.
Can indicate shifts in trends to help investors make buy and sell decisions.
When used in conjunction with +DMI and -DMI, investors can examine crossover signals to make buy and sell decisions.

The Takeaway

When using technical analysis to decide when to buy and sell investments, individuals may make use of a wide range of research and analytic tools, such as ADX, DMI, the Aroon Indicator, and other trend indicators.

For investors who prefer this type of hand-on approach, a SoFi Invest® brokerage account offers active investing. For others, who may prefer a more hands-off approach, SoFi Invest offers automated investing accounts — an automatically managed portfolio based on their risk tolerance and goals.

Find out how to get started with SoFi Invest.

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SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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Source: sofi.com