The Best Places to Live in Virginia in 2022

Virginia is for lovers — or so the saying goes. It’s near impossible not to fall in love with a state that contains so much U.S. history, as many former U.S. presidents were born here and the first Thanksgiving took place here. Plus, it has charming small towns and access to both the mountains and the ocean.

Virginia forests cover over 60 percent of the state for the outdoor enthusiast, making it easy to be one with nature on the weekends. It also attracts young professionals to its many universities and top military, business and manufacturing jobs.

Four of the wealthiest counties in the U.S. are in Virginia, thanks to higher spending power. Keep on reading to get to know the best places to live in Virginia in 2022, including one of its biggest cities, Virginia Beach.

Alexandria, VA

Alexandria, VA

  • Population: 159,467
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,951
  • 2-BR median rent: $2,372
  • Median home price: $598,500
  • Median household income: $100,939
  • Walk Score: 62/100

Located right at the state’s northern tip, Alexandria borders the Potomac River with Washington, D.C., just across the water. Old Town Alexandria, the city’s historic area, showcases Colonial-era architecture that takes you right back in time. Walk the cobblestone streets to the many museums and restaurants and learn more about George Washington’s hometown.

Living in Alexandria makes it convenient for those that work in the nation’s capital but enjoy a quieter, more affordable suburb. You can rent a one-bedroom for $1,952 per month on average and enjoy a stroll through Huntley Meadows Park on the weekends.

Arlington, VA

Arlington, VA

  • Population: 238,643
  • 1-BR median rent: $2,315
  • 2-BR median rent: $3,125
  • Median home price: $675,000
  • Median household income: $120,071
  • Walk Score: 81/100

Arlington’s strategic location just across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., makes it an excellent option for those working in the nation’s capital and one of the best places to live in Virginia. Average rents for a one-bedroom hover around $2,315 per month if you want to move to Arlington. Employers in the city mainly focus on the federal government, including the Pentagon.

While the rent prices are higher, the city’s walkability and outdoor spaces like the W&OD Railroad Trail make up for it. You can also visit the Arlington National Cemetery and other wartime monuments nearby, as the city had a large part in the nation’s wars.

Charlottesville, VA

Charlottesville, VA

  • Population: 46,553
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,417
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,600
  • Median home price: N/A
  • Median household income:$59,471
  • Walk Score: 47/100

Home to the University of Virginia, Charlottesville is more than a college town. Charlottesville has more than 40 wineries along the Monticello Wine Trail, thanks to the perfect combination of soil and climate.

If you’re more of a hiker, don’t miss the trails at Shenandoah National Park, right by the Blue Ridge Mountains. In Historic Court Square, you can find the town’s first taverns along with the Live Arts Theatre, the art center and other museums. On average, you can find one-bedroom apartments in Charlottesville for $1,417 per month.

Fredricksburg, VA

Fredricksburg, VA

  • Population: 27,982
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,630
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,941
  • Median home price: $377,500
  • Median household income: $65,641
  • Walk Score: 29/100

Located off Interstate 95, Fredericksburg is the perfect location for those commuting to either Washington, D.C., or Richmond. The preserved buildings from around the turn of the century now house restaurants, antique shops and small retail shops right in the center of town. Craft breweries and distilleries have recently opened in the area, as well.

Head to the Rappahannock River with your kayak and enjoy floating downstream when the weather is nice. Living in Fredericksburg brings a quiet, charming community, as well as convenience to your 9-to-5.

Newport News, VA

Newport News, VA

  • Population: 186,247
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,155
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,257
  • Median home price: $237,250
  • Median household income: $53,215
  • Walk Score: 44/100

Newport News is right along the banks of James River, near the Hampton Roads harbor. The city is central to several amenities offered in Williamsburg and Virginia Beach, too — just a short drive away. The city has a rich history dating back to the Revolutionary War and the founding of Jamestown so you can tour all sorts of attractions and museums. You can also enjoy hiking, camping and more nearby at the York River State Park.

Prominent employers in the area focus on transportation, mainly railroad and aviation. You can find an apartment in Newport News for $1,155 per month on average for a one-bedroom.

Norfolk, VA

Norfolk, VA

  • Population: 238,005
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,451
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,641
  • Median home price: $265,000
  • Median household income: $51,590
  • Walk Score: 54/100

Conveniently located near Virginia Beach, Norfolk has many ports that have helped make its economy one of the fastest-growing in the U.S. The suburb features several malls, a thriving performing arts center, the Virginia Opera and the critically-acclaimed Chrysler Museum of Art. Nearby, you can also see the world’s largest battleship, the USS Wisconsin.

You’re a hop and a skip from the beach and several state parks like False Cape State Park for hiking and boating. It’s easy to find a home in Norfolk — you can rent a one-bedroom apartment for $1,451 per month on average.

Richmond, VA

Richmond, VA

  • Population: 226,610
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,376
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,641
  • Median home price: $290,750
  • Median household income: $47,250
  • Walk Score: 57/100

One of the oldest major cities in the U.S. and one of the best places to live in Virginia, Richmond now serves as the capital of the state. Right in the middle of the city, you can enjoy a stroll through Libby Hill Park in the historic Church Hill neighborhood. This park is one of three original parks created while Virginia was a colony.

You can also walk in the Fan District and enjoy the mansions and row houses built at the end of the last century. The city is also home to six Fortune 500 companies with a growing economy. You can live in Richmond for $1,376 per month on average for a one-bedroom apartment.

Roanoke, VA

Roanoke, VA

  • Population: 100,011
  • 1-BR median rent: $800
  • 2-BR median rent: $946
  • Median home price: N/A
  • Median household income: $44,230
  • Walk Score: 48/100

Nestled in the south part of Shenandoah Valley, Roanoke is right by the beauty of the Blue Ridge mountains. The small town turns on the charm with its many festivals like the Strawberry Festival, Dickens of a Christmas and the Kite Festival. The downtown area boasts a farmer’s market, several museums and a zoo.

The Historic Roanoke City Market is the oldest market in Virginia that has been continuously operating since 1882. Healthcare, transportation and banking are the primary industries in the area. You can find an apartment in Roanoke for $800 per month on average for a one-bedroom.

Virginia Beach, VA

Virginia Beach, VA

  • Population: 459,470
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,309
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,417
  • Median home price: $321,750
  • Median household income: $76,610
  • Walk Score: 47/100

One of the biggest cities in the state, Virginia Beach boasts a three-mile boardwalk that’s a sight as the afternoon sun sets. The beachfront area encompasses about 40 city blocks, with small restaurants, hotels and family-friendly activities. The Virginia Beach Art Center showcases local artists’ works so you can grab custom items.

It’s not all beach all the time. Virginia Beach also has access to some of the best schools, especially in the Bayfront neighborhood. Many large employers have headquarters in the area, including insurance and the federal government.

If that all sounds good, you can find places to live in Virginia Beach for $1,309 per month on average for a one-bedroom.

Williamsburg, VA

Williamsburg, VA

  • Population: 15,425
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,705
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,469
  • Median home price: $404,000
  • Median household income: $57,463
  • Walk Score: 30/100

The self-proclaimed “Colonial Capital of Virginia,” Williamsburg truly feels like you were back in the 18th century. The city’s intentional restoration and preservation of structures and architectures are seen throughout. The Historic Triangle, a hub for several historic sites and museums, is a fun stop for landmark lovers.

Williamsburg is also home to the College of William and Mary, the second-oldest institution for higher education in the U.S.

The York River State Park offers more than 30 miles of hiking trails, kayak and mountain biking opportunities. If the colonial city charmed you and you’re ready to find an apartment in Williamsburg, you can rent one for $1,705 per month on average.

Find an apartment for rent in Virginia

The Old Dominion state has a beautiful coastline and a rich history as one of the 13 original colonies. Many nature opportunities abound thanks to the Appalachian Mountains, along with a strong economy in Virginia.

Whatever you’re looking for, one of these best places to live in Virginia will match your lifestyle — from big cities to small towns. Thinking of moving to one of these cities? Check out all the apartments for rent in Virginia right here.

The rent information included in this summary is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of December 2021.
Median home prices are from Redfin as of December 2021.
Population and median household income are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The information in this article is for illustrative purposes only. This data herein does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

The Best Places to Live in Idaho in 2022

We’re calling it. Idaho could be the next Colorado. Or Montana. Or Oregon. By that, we mean that Idaho is a state defined by its natural beauty. Home to the Rocky Mountains, it’s full of mountains, canyons, rivers and forests. Sixty-two percent of Idaho’s land is protected public land, meaning that it’s open to the public for outdoor recreation and enjoyment. From hiking to fishing, locals here love spending time outdoors.

But being sandwiched between more “famous” outdoorsy states like Montana and Oregon, Idaho is usually overlooked as a great place to live. But not anymore. Idaho is quickly growing. From larger cities like Boise to idyllic mountain towns, here are the best places to live in Idaho in 2022. And we would be remiss to not at least mention that yes, there are great potatoes.

Boise, ID

Boise, ID

  • Population: 235,684
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,531
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,777
  • Median home price: $485,000
  • Median household income: $60,035
  • Walk Score: 44/100

Even if you don’t know much about Idaho, you’ve likely heard of Boise. Idaho’s capital city is roughly half an hour east of the Oregon border. It’s close to outdoor areas like the Boise National Forest, the hills and mountains of which provide a scenic backdrop to the city. Nearby ski hills like Brundage Mountain are all set for skiers come wintertime.

But nature can also be found in town. Makes sense, as Boise is also known as the City of Trees. In addition to parks like Ann Morrison Park, the 25-mile Boise River Greenbelt follows the river of the same name through town. This non-motorized path runs along the river, providing a tranquil place to walk or exercise, as well as connecting neighborhoods to downtown and the city center.

Despite its rugged surroundings, Boise is quite cosmopolitan. Its vibrant Downtown is home to theaters, museums, dining and local events, so there’s plenty to do. The agriculture, science and tech industries support a diverse jobs market. The city is also home to campuses for the University of Idaho and Idaho State.

And you’ll find living in Boise very affordable, too, with one-bedroom apartments averaging just over $1,500 a month. Whether you’re part of a family unit or a single young professional, that’s a price range that can work for everyone. Taken all together, it’s easy to see why Boise is one of the best places to live in Idaho.

Caldwell, ID

Caldwell, ID

Source: ApartmentGuide.com/Cedar Crossing Luxury Townhomes
  • Population: 59,996
  • 1-BR median rent: N/A
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,600
  • Median home price: $400,000
  • Median household income: $49,046
  • Walk Score: 27/100

If you want to live close to a major city like Boise but prefer a small-town atmosphere, Caldwell sits just on the edge of the Boise metropolitan area. Apartments in Caldwell are even more affordable than in nearby Boise. Home prices are also lower.

Caldwell is notable for its historic neighborhoods and architecture. Located in the verdant Treasure Valley, which is home to multiple rivers, outdoor sports and recreation are huge here. Caldwell is especially well-known for its relaxing hot springs.

With low crime, good schools and a laidback quality of life, Caldwell is a great place to raise a family or retire. While the city’s social scene is a bit slow, Boise is just 20 minutes away with nightlife, dining and entertainment.

Coeur d

Coeur d

  • Population: 54,628
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,495
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,922
  • Median home price: $577,750
  • Median household income: $51,073
  • Walk Score: 41/100

Home to the famous Coeur d’Alene Resort, this mountain town in northwestern Idaho is predominantly known as a tourism destination to enjoy the region’s lakes, forests and mountains. But take a chance on it and you’ll find that Coeur d’Alene is not just a tourist town and is a lovely place to settle down.

Obviously, ample outdoor recreation is found here, from boating on Lake Coeur d’Alene to hiking at Tubbs Hill. With tourism, retail, education, recreation and healthcare dominating the local jobs market, there are tons of work opportunities, especially during the busy tourist season.

Coeur d’Alene boasts a highly-ranked school system and safe neighborhoods for families and young people alike. While the town has a close-knit community, it also enjoys the perks of being a tourism destination. This includes the type of high-quality, multicultural dining scene you’d usually find in larger cities. Apartments in Coeur d’Alene have reasonable rates despite the notoriously high prices of mountain towns.

Eagle, ID

Eagle, ID

Source: ApartmentGuide.com/The Lakes at Eagle
  • Population: 30,346
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,746
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,918
  • Median home price: $865,000
  • Median household income: $92,807
  • Walk Score: 28/100

Living in Eagle offers renters and homeowners alike a safe, suburban environment close to the bustle of Boise. With a high median household income and elevated housing prices, the area is definitely more on the affluent side. But for that, you get access to a top-ranked school district and all the comforts of suburban living. With Boise just half an hour away, it’s also ideal for commuters.

Eagle knows how to keep its community engaged. Throughout the year, it offers events like the Eagle Saturday Market where you can enjoy music and purchase locally-made goods. Eagle Island State Park, golf courses and the nearby mountains and rivers also have plenty in the way of outdoor fun. The Boise River in particular offers great fishing.

Hayden, ID

Hayden, ID

  • Population: 15,570
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,360
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,620
  • Median home price: $549,500
  • Median household income: $56,930
  • Walk Score: 23/100

Located in northern Idaho, the small town of Hayden is a suburb of Coeur d’Alene. Situated on the shores of Lake Hayden, spending time out on the lake or in the nearby mountains is just as popular here as it is in nearby Coeur. But a definite upside of living in Hayden is that you get all the outdoor access without the Coeur crowds.

With affordable rental and home prices, Hayden provides a comfortable base for retirees and families. Locals praise the friendly community and abundance of family-friendly activities like the Triple Play Family Fun Park. But, of course, outdoor fun is where it’s at here, from manicured golfing at Avondale to swimming and sunning at Honeysuckle Beach.

Lewiston, ID

Lewiston, ID

  • Population: 34,203
  • 1-BR median rent: $338
  • 2-BR median rent: $696
  • Median home price: $325,000
  • Median household income: $56,479
  • Walk Score: 49/100

Located just a stone’s throw from the border of Washington state, Lewiston is a small town in northern Idaho. As with many places in Idaho, access to the outdoors is one of the main draws of living in this charming, family-oriented town. But what the area lacks in mountains, it makes up for in grassy plains, meandering rivers and stunning canyons.

Sitting at the confluence of the mighty Snake and the Clearwater Rivers, Lewiston offers easy access to water sports and boating. But the area’s biggest claim to fame is the nearby Hell’s Canyon in the Seven Devils mountain range. At nearly 8,000 feet deep and cut through by the Snake River, it’s the deepest river gorge in North America. With no road access, the best way to experience this marvel of nature is on a whitewater rafting expedition.

Apart from outdoor recreation, living in Lewiston offers a walkable downtown with dining and wine bars, historic museums and family-friendly neighborhoods. But one of the biggest upsides to living in Lewiston? Incredibly affordable rent and housing prices. A two-bedroom apartment for less than $700? Where do we sign?

Meridian, ID

Meridian, ID

  • Population: 117,635
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,534
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,814
  • Median home price: $538,000
  • Median household income: $71,389
  • Walk Score: 26/100

Located just 15 minutes from central Boise, Meridian is Idaho’s second-largest city. Not only is it one of the fastest-growing cities in the state, but it’s also one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation.

Living in Meridian offers near-instant access to Boise’s jobs market and cosmopolitan attractions. But Meridian itself is a compact, safe and family-friendly community. Families with kids especially enjoy the area due to the good school system and affordable housing options.

As a prosperous suburb, Meridian is slightly more expensive than Boise. But for families seeking a more suburban lifestyle, it’s a worthwhile payoff. Wholesome family fun like water parks and a children’s museum offers plenty to keep the kids entertained. And Meridian also has the same proximity to all the same outdoor activities that Boise does, from hiking to boating.

Moscow, ID

Moscow, ID

  • Population: 25,435
  • 1-BR median rent: $645
  • 2-BR median rent: $895
  • Median home price: $374,000
  • Median household income: $41,896
  • Walk Score: 63/100

Right after Boise, Moscow is by far the best place to live in Idaho for young people. Why? It’s the home of the University of Idaho. Moscow bustles with the kind of vibrant social scene you’ll find in college towns. From theater to art to music to nightlife, it’s a great place for young people. The abundance of arts and culture and annual festivals like the Lionel Hampton International Jazz Festival has earned Moscow the title of the Heart of the Arts. The town itself is also charming, with red brick buildings and a high walk score.

Another major plus of living in a college town is the affordability. Apartments in Moscow are available for total steals starting at just under $650. And it wouldn’t be an Idaho city without great outdoor activities. Head out in the countryside along the 12-mile Latah Trail Bike Path to take in the scenery. But be aware. Moose are found in the area.

Nampa, ID

Nampa, ID

  • Population: 100,200
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,577
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,630
  • Median home price: $382,000
  • Median household income: $48,846
  • Walk Score: 32/100

Situated west of Meridian, Nampa marks the farthest edges of Boise’s metropolitan area. With low crime, good schools and safe neighborhoods, it’s a popular place to live for families with young children. Commuters also enjoy living close to Boise, which is just a 20-minute drive away. As with other cities and suburbs around Boise, Nampa is ideal for nature lovers. The nearby Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge is home to a wide variety of wildlife, including birds, deer, rabbits and more. Hiking, fishing, hunting and swimming are just some of the activities available within the refuge.

Apartments in Nampa have very reasonable rates. For less than $100 difference, you can upgrade from a one-bedroom apartment to a two-bedroom. Residents looking to buy a house will also be attracted by some of the lowest housing prices in the Boise metropolitan area.

Post Falls, ID

Post Falls, ID

  • Population: 38,485
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,645
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,650
  • Median home price: $500,000
  • Median household income: $54,021
  • Walk Score: 25/100

If Coeur d’Alene is too pricey, its neighboring suburb of Post Falls offers affordable living close to the region’s gorgeous mountains, lakes and forests. The average price difference between a one-bedroom and a two-bedroom apartment in Post Falls is just $5. This makes it easy to upgrade your living situation to a roomier apartment.

Similar to Coeur d’Alene, outdoor recreation is the name of the game here. From swimming at Q’emiln Park to fishing at Falls Park, living in Post Falls allows locals to take full advantage of the pristine nature surrounding them. Another major plus of living in Post Falls is its proximity to Spokane, WA. Spokane is just a 20-minute drive to the west, so you can easily live in Post Falls with its affordable cost of living but commute to Spokane for work.

Twin Falls, ID

Twin Falls, ID

  • Population: 51,807
  • 1-BR median rent: NA
  • 2-BR median rent: $995
  • Median home price: $320,000
  • Median household income: $50,739
  • Walk Score: 32/100

Nestled along the Snake River in southern Idaho, Twin Falls’ low housing costs and outdoor opportunities easily make it one of the best places to live in Idaho. You can find two-bedroom apartments in Twin Falls for under a thousand dollars. With a median household income just under the statewide average, locals here can expect to earn enough for a comfortable lifestyle. With a high employment rate, you can find work in the healthcare and manufacturing industries.

Spending less on housing allows locals to save money for fun outdoor sports and activities. The Snake River Canyon offers hiking and cycling trails, as well as boating and rafting. You can even go BASE jumping off Perrine Bridge or take in the multi-level waterfall views of Shoshone Falls.

Find an apartment for rent in Idaho

Have we convinced you yet that Idaho is the next great outdoor state? Maybe you’ll just have to find apartments for rent in Idaho and move there to find out for yourself.

The rent information included in this summary is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of December 2021.
Median home prices are from Redfin as of December 2021.
Population and median household income are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The information in this article is for illustrative purposes only. This data herein does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

The Best Places to Live in Utah in 2022

Known for having the “greatest snow on earth” and hosting the Olympics back in 2002, Utah has made a name for itself in the western United States. Over recent years, it has become a desirable place to live for anyone who loves the outdoors, whether it be for skiing and snowboarding, hiking or rock climbing.

Apart from the outdoor recreation it offers, Utah also has a very friendly, family-oriented environment and has seen a lot of tech companies pop up, attracting people of all ages and from all walks of life. However, each city in the state still has its own variety of offerings and culture. Check out the best places to live in Utah to find out if any of them might be right for you!

Draper, UT

Draper, UT

  • Population: 51,017
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,510
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,827
  • Median home price: $690,340
  • Median household income: $117,266
  • Walk Score: 32

One of the most desirable areas in the Salt Lake Valley, Draper takes up the southeast corner, right up against the mountains. It’s a little more expensive than other parts of the valley, but it also has a unique, secluded feeling. Many choose to live in the hills of Draper for the views you can get of the entire Salt Lake Valley — you can see all of the city lights without being right in the middle of them.

Herriman, UT

Herriman, UT

  • Population: 51,144
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,042
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,745
  • Median home price: $505,000
  • Median household income: $101,460
  • Walk Score: 17

What was practically a brand new city only 10 years ago has quickly become a large suburb that’s bustling with families and one of the best places to live in Utah. Herriman has a new high school that opened recently because it has so many kids attending school in the area, and it’s still growing at a rapid rate.

Lehi, UT

Lehi, UT

  • Population: 75,907
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,387
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,675
  • Median home price: $540,000
  • Median household income: $95,510
  • Walk Score: 20

Home to the well-known tech hub, Silicon Slopes, Lehi is another fast-growing city. It’s only a 30-minute drive from Salt Lake and is close to just about everything one could ever need. It holds the Traverse Mountain Outlets, where you can find just about any type of store and eat at many restaurants. And if you’re into the tech scene, you can explore all of the many companies setting up their headquarters nearby.

Logan, UT

Logan, UT

  • Population: 52,778
  • 1-BR median rent: N/A
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,502
  • Median home price: $381,000
  • Median household income: $41,833
  • Walk Score: 51

Logan is part college town, part farm country. Utah State University attracts students from all over the country and many enjoy attending sporting events (the USU football team recently had an incredible season) and exploring the mountains surrounding the city. There are also plenty of farms in Logan, including Gossner Foods, a food and dairy plant that’s known throughout the nation for its Swiss cheese.

It has a small-town feel, but with many city amenities and conveniences. Plus, if you’re up for a 30-minute drive, you can hang out at beautiful Bear Lake, with blue waters and mountain surroundings, for a weekend getaway.

Orem, UT

Orem, UT

  • Population: 98,129
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,287
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,447
  • Median home price: $440,000
  • Median household income: $64,590
  • Walk Score: 49

An extremely family-oriented city, Orem is an older city that’s seeing a revitalization to become one of the best places to live in Utah. Over the last handful of years, Orem has seen more young families move in, and the city works hard to put on great holiday celebrations, parades and community events. If you’re looking to belong to an engaged group of community-oriented people, then this city might be the place for you.

Provo, UT

Provo, UT

  • Population: 115,162
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,154
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,374
  • Median home price: $421,000
  • Median household income: $48,888
  • Walk Score: 56

Provo is mostly known for Brigham Young University, the large university run by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. As expected for a town with a university, lots of young college students are found there. However, what’s slightly different is the number of married college students, many of which have babies and young children.

Provo might be one of the youngest cities you’ll ever come across and there are lots of parks, restaurants and activities geared towards families and college students in the area.

Riverton, UT

Riverton, UT

  • Population: 45,285
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,822
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,855
  • Median home price: $599,000
  • Median household income: $101,619
  • Walk Score: 22

Riverton is full of families of all sizes, many of which have elementary school-aged children, creating a lively environment. There are plenty of parks and open recreational areas created with these families in mind. Riverton is a fairly calm city that’s mostly suburbs of single-family homes and low crime — a safe place for anyone, whether you’ve got a large family or are single and looking for something that’s a slower pace.

Salt Lake City, UT

Salt Lake City, UT

  • Population: 199,723
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,325
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,650
  • Median home price: $463,750
  • Median household income: $60,676
  • Walk Score: 67

Likely the most famous city in Utah, Salt Lake City is a vibrant place with lots to do. With mountains nearby, you can hike and enjoy winter sports at the many ski resorts. Or, if you’re more of a city-dweller, there’s always the downtown area that has plenty of great food, music, theater performances and even art to check out.

St. George, UT

St. George, UT

  • Population: 95,342
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,666
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,645
  • Median home price: $518,000
  • Median household income: $58,259
  • Walk Score: 32

About 30 minutes from Zion National Park lies St. George, a warm and sunny city nestled into the red rocks of Southern Utah. Many retirees settle here due to the mild climate and many golf courses, but it’s also becoming more popular among families and is a quickly-growing city. It’s also great for anyone that loves to experience any type of entertainment, as it has plenty of hiking trails and is only two hours away from Las Vegas, where you can see shows and dive into the nightlife.

West Jordan, UT

West Jordan, UT

  • Population: 116,961
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,104
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,299
  • Median home price: $488,700
  • Median household income: $80,955
  • Walk Score: 35

One of the larger cities in Utah, West Jordan is a suburb spanning the valley just southwest of Salt Lake, all the way to the base of the mountain where a copper mine lies. It has everything a family could need nearby, including many large grocery stores, shopping centers and parks.

Although it’s a bigger city, with it being a suburb, it doesn’t always feel that way and often seems more calm and quiet in comparison to places like Provo and Salt Lake.

Find an apartment for rent in Utah

It’s not hard to find a good place to live in Utah. With the overall safety and family-focused approach, many find it easy to settle in here. And no matter where you live in the state, you’re bound to find your next outdoor adventure, whether you like hanging out at the lake, skiing in the mountains or exploring the red rocks of southern Utah. Start your search and find apartments for rent in Utah.

The rent information included in this summary is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of December 2021.
Median home prices are from Redfin as of December 2021.
Population and median household income are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The information in this article is for illustrative purposes only. This data herein does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

The Best Places to Live in North Carolina in 2022

The Wright Brothers really set the standard for the southern state of North Carolina. They basically invented modern flight there, and since then, the Tar Heel State has totally taken off, if in a slightly different way.

North Carolina is a “best of all worlds” sort of scenario. Within its borders are the Coastal Plain, the Appalachian Mountains and the Piedmont regions. Longing for unspoiled tidepools? North Carolina has ’em. Majestic mountains, perfect for hiking, cycling or just good old-fashioned staring? There are plenty of those to enjoy, too. No matter what you’re looking for, North Carolina has a city to fit the bill. The icing on the cake is that it’s still pretty affordable, compared with some other parts of the country.

Let’s start learning about the Old North State, already!

Apex, NC

Apex, NC

  • Population: 59,300
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,289
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,329
  • Median home price: $553,255
  • Median household income: $111,435
  • Walk Score: 20/100

Just north of Holly Springs is the suburb of Apex, which has changed a ton since its 1850s-era days as a small railroad hub. Pretty much since that time, the people of Apex have been hell-bent on preserving the town’s charm and historic significance. It must have worked, as it was named the No. 1 Best Places to Live in America by Money magazine in 2016.

Apex offers people local to Research Triangle all the access they need to the employers, universities and such, but with quieter home life. Apex’s newly renovated downtown features the Halle Cultural Arts Center, located in the historic Town Hall. In fact, the downtown area as a whole is on the National Register of Historic Places as a prime example of a lovingly maintained railroad town.

Although Apex is experiencing something of a surge in population, the community is determined to maintain its small-town feel. They put on a full slate of events to bring community members together, including Juneteenth, Apex Latino Arts Festival, Apex Music Festival and the Apex Christmas Parade, among others.

Biltmore Estates, Asheville, NC

Biltmore Estates, Asheville, NC

  • Population: 92,870
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,435
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,810
  • Median home price: $420,000
  • Median household income: $49,930
  • Walk Score: 39/100

No write-up would be complete without a mention of Asheville as one of the best places to live in North Carolina. Don’t let the city’s smaller population and low walk score confuse you, however. Asheville is as vibrant as cities come, with a delightfully walkable and enjoyable downtown area to its credit. Artists and one-of-a-kind boutiques liberally pepper this mountain town, so it’s not surprising it’s a draw for creative types, in particular. In fact, it features not one, but two arts districts — the Downtown Art District and the River Arts District.

Asheville is also renowned for its foodie scene, lovingly referred to by locals as “Foodtopia.” With a special emphasis on breweries, Asheville has more breweries per capita than anywhere else in the U.S. Local restaurants range from walk-up to fine dining, many with authentic Appalachian cuisine on the menu.

Located in the western part of the state in the Blue Ridge Mountains, people who visit or dwell in Asheville no doubt appreciate access to world-class architectural gems like the incredible Biltmore estate and the Basilica of Saint Lawrence.

Charlotte, NC

Charlotte, NC

  • Population: 885,708
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,382
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,642
  • Median home price: $353,000
  • Median household income: $62,817
  • Walk Score: 31/100

Just over the state line from South Carolina is North Carolina’s largest city, population-wise. Known as the “Queen City,” people flock from all over to live in Charlotte. The affordable cost of living, delightfully mild climate and diverse workplace options are generally among the main reasons people want to call this city home. However, once they arrive and get used to the amenities, it’s tough to go anywhere else, which is probably why it’s listed at or near the top of the country’s fastest-growing cities year after year.

Among its selling points, Charlotte is about as green as a city gets, with 174 miles worth of bike and pedestrian-friendly paths to enjoy. In fact, American Forests has named it a top 10 city for urban forests. This family-friendly city is also home to the NASCAR Hall of Fame, as well as the U.S. National Whitewater Center, where people can enjoy everything from guided whitewater tours to kayaking lessons. A melting pot city in its own right, Charlotte’s foodie scene includes cuisine of all kinds, especially Indian, Greek and Asian options. The breweries in Charlotte are also top-notch.

Greensboro, NC

Greensboro, NC

  • Population: 296,710
  • 1-BR median rent: $793
  • 2-BR median rent: $912
  • Median home price: $230,000
  • Median household income: $48,964
  • Walk Score: 34/100

It’s hard to find a more beautiful area than Greensboro, which has the Smoky Mountains to the West and the Blue Ridge Mountains to the east. Indeed, many people choose to call Greensboro home because of its quiet, country way of life. The affordability factor doesn’t hurt, either, as a one-bedroom unit in Greensboro is only $782 per month!

Part of the “Piedmont Triad” (along with High Point and Winston-Salem), Greensboro is likely one of the next big spots in North Carolina. It has so much going for it, including a low cost of living, as well as distinct seasons (but with nice, mild winters).

Although Greensboro is less developed than some of the other cities on this list of the best places to live in North Carolina, it still has plenty to do and see. Among the sights are the International Civil Rights Center & Museum, the Greensboro Science Center and the Greensboro History Museum. The downtown area is also a hotspot for people looking to enjoy good food and a good time.

Greenville, NC

Greenville, NC

  • Population: 93,400
  • 1-BR median rent: $700
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,195
  • Median home price: $260,000
  • Median household income: $40,875
  • Walk Score: 36/100

Next on our list of the best cities to live in North Carolina is the Inner Banks community of Greenville. Home to East Carolina University, it’s no surprise that apartments in Greenville are more affordable than in many larger, more professionally-focused cities. Still, there’s plenty for people of all ages and persuasions to do in Greenville.

For example, proximity to eastern North Carolina’s waterways make boating, fishing and water-skiing beloved pastimes. It’s also a bird-watching mecca, especially at the local Goose Creek State Park.

In terms of nightlife, the Uptown District, located right on the banks of the Tar River, has dozens of unique, locally-owned and operated eateries, breweries and so on. The Greenville Town Common is also ultra-popular, thanks to its full schedule of concerts, festivals and events that happen all throughout the year.

High Point, NC

High Point, NC

  • Population: 112,791
  • 1-BR median rent: $976
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,134
  • Median home price: $225,000
  • Median household income: $47,234
  • Walk Score: 25/100

The centrally located city of High Point is one of the healthcare and banking hotspots of North Carolina, even though it started out as a critical railroad hub. Today, it’s beloved for its many furniture stores, earning it the nickname, the “Home Furnishings Capital of the World.” In fact, people come from all over to get great deals on high-quality pieces for the home. The world’s largest home furnishings trade show, High Point Market, is not surprisingly held there.

Families love to live in High Point thanks in large part to its active outdoorsy community and excellent school system. Anyone can easily continue their educational path in High Point or elsewhere in the Piedmont Triad, thanks to the 16 local colleges and universities. There are dozens of public parks, stacked with walking, biking and pet-friendly trails, not to mention a huge sporting community for kiddos and adults alike.

Holly Springs, NC

Holly Springs, NC

  • Population: 37,812
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,372
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,667
  • Median home price: $534,000
  • Median household income: $112,029
  • Walk Score: 24/100

Not too far south of the Research Triangle is the comparatively small suburb of Holly Springs. The upside to this area is that it’s quiet, charming and beautiful. However, home prices and income levels are higher in Holly Springs than in many other parts of North Carolina.

The area really revs up in a family-friendly way once a year during HollyFest, a festival held in the fall every year and attended by people from all over. It includes a cornhole tournament, a pig race, pumpkin carving contest and many other seasonal favorite activities.

Holly Springs is growing by leaps and bounds, which is something that the state clearly expects to continue. In recent years, the city has put a hundred million dollars or so into the parks and infrastructure in preparation for an impending population boom.

Raleigh, NC

Raleigh, NC

  • Population: 474,069
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,360
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,607
  • Median home price: $376,000
  • Median household income: $67,266
  • Walk Score: 33/100

Raleigh is one-third of the state’s prized jewel, the Research Triangle. In concert with the nearby cities of Chapel Hill and Durham, the area is a hub of all things research, thanks to the presence of three major universities (Duke, North Carolina State and the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill). As a result, Raleigh is a popular home to academics of all persuasions, and, of course, students.

No matter your occupation, Raleigh and its surrounding areas are likely to have opportunities galore. The Triangle in total boasts more than 7,000 companies across a variety of industries like technology, manufacturing, ag-tech, life sciences and many more.

But life in Raleigh is about more than just work and study. It’s also a pretty nice place to hang your hat at night and boasts a thriving, diverse cultural scene and almost too many breweries to count. Smack in the middle of the state, Raleigh residents also enjoy easy, scenery-rich drives to both the coast and the mountainous regions.

Wilmington, NC

Wilmington, NC

  • Population: 123,744
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,409
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,567
  • Median home price: N/A
  • Median household income: $47,580
  • Walk Score: 37/100

Coastal access is one of the main reasons that people love this mild-weathered North Carolina community. As an added bonus, considering the location, apartments in Wilmington are downright affordable! Indeed, it’s the ideal place for people who appreciate the water and all of the fishing, boating and other recreational opportunities it provides.

It’s not just the vast Atlantic Ocean, either. The Cape Fear River is hugely popular among locals and vacationers alike, and its café, boutique and nightlife-rich Riverwalk is a must-see, as it was voted America’s Best Riverfront.

Wilmington is also steeped in historic significance, which is probably why so many movies and television shows film there. It’s tough to recreate the natural beauty and authenticity that Wilmington offers! The 230-block National Register Historic District features lovingly preserved live oak trees and architectural gems that harken back to the area’s earlier days. Picturesque doesn’t even begin to describe it.

Winton-Salem, NC

Winton-Salem, NC

  • Population: 247,945
  • 1-BR median rent: $925
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,110
  • Median home price: $239,450
  • Median household income: $45,750
  • Walk Score: 28/100

Winston-Salem, more commonly known as Winston, is growing more slowly than some other North Carolina cities. As a result, it’s one of the more affordable cities in the state on our list of the best places to live in North Carolina.

Winston’s thoughtful, intentional growth includes lots of international residents, particularly those of Indian and Greek descent. So, it’s not surprising that a number of festivals celebrating those cultures are held every year in the area. There are plenty of other festivals to enjoy, as well, from the Gears & Guitars event to the Bookmarks Festival of Books and Authors.

Apartments in Winston-Salem range from standard to fully unique. In fact, it’s not unusual to find a space that’s been renovated from a tobacco factory into gorgeous lofts. Some of the crown jewels of the area are Wake Forest University, Salem Lake and Quarry Park, which is 228 acres of sheer outdoor beauty.

Take your pick

It’s just about impossible to pick the wrong place to live in North Carolina. Fortunately, for even the choosiest renter, there are plenty of apartments for rent in North Carolina. So, pick a city (or two) and start looking around for a place in the state that’s equal parts Southern gentility and diverse progressiveness.

The rent information included in this summary is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of December 2021.
Median home prices are from Redfin as of December 2021.
Population and median household income are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The information in this article is for illustrative purposes only. This data herein does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

The Best Places to Live in South Carolina in 2022

With its variety of beach towns and laid-back atmosphere throughout the state, there are a lot of cities considered the best places to live in South Carolina.

There are big plantation homes and tons of American history throughout the state, not to mention the unique culture of the Lowcountry. All combined, South Carolina is really like no other place in the U.S.

From outdoor fun to delicious, local eats and all the activities in between, living in South Carolina is an experience worth having. Here are 13 of the best places to live in South Carolina.

Charleston, SC

Charleston, SC

  • Population: 137,566
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,479
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,224
  • Median home price: $280,000
  • Median household income: $68, 438
  • Walk score: 63/100

With so much history packed into one town, Charleston is a great place to call home. As the starting point for the Civil War, you can explore Fort Sumter and take in a major turning point in our country’s own story.

When you’re ready to dip into the modern amenities of the city, there’s no shortage of enticing eats, preserved architecture and culture to enjoy. It’s the perfect mix of a city and a coastal town with so much to do right outside your door and so many beaches just minutes away.

Clemson, SC

Clemson, SC

  • Population: 17,501
  • 1-BR median rent: n/a
  • 2-BR median rent: $590
  • Median home price: $257,500
  • Median household income: $43,568
  • Walk score: 34/100

Of course, the biggest draw to this particular city is Clemson University. There’s plenty of student housing around this prestigious school. And, although Clemson gets billed as a college town, the city and school have a positive, intertwined community.

Leaving the draw of campus and all that football, introduces you to all the rest Clemson has to offer, including the Bob Campbell Geology Museum, the Brooks Center for Performing Arts and even the South Carolina Botanical Gardens.

Columbia, SC

Columbia, SC

  • Population: 131,674
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,067
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,103
  • Median home price: $200,000
  • Median household income: $47,286
  • Walk score: 35/100

Another college town, Columbia is home to the University of South Carolina. The campus stretches across the city, and tailgate culture is huge, everywhere. You’re most likely a football fan, to some degree, if you call this city home.

In addition to being Gamecock central, Columbia is also the state capital, bringing in a diverse population — that’s not all college students — to make the city run. It’s one of the best places to live in South Carolina because of its varied population and professional opportunities. There’s also plenty of fun things to do.

Fort Mill, SC

Fort Mill, SC

  • Population: 22,284
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,425
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,692
  • Median home price: $410,000
  • Median household income: $91,061
  • Walk score: 19/100

A charming historic district and proximity to Charlotte, NC make Fort Mill an appealing way to stay close to the city without actually living in it. Fort Mill offers miles of hiking and biking trails along its own greenway, plenty of golf and all the dining and shopping you could want.

One of the fastest-growing communities in the area, Fort Mill is drawing in families and young professionals alike — anyone who wants the combination of activity and natural beauty wrapped up in a carefully laid out town.

Greenville, SC

Greenville, SC

  • Population: 70,635
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,284
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,445
  • Median home price: $280,000
  • Median household income: $56,609
  • Walk score: 39/100

Known as an artsy city, neighborhoods in Greenville provide an eclectic mix of locations. Combining small-town charm and more urban amenities, you’ll find plenty of galleries, public festivals and events to satisfy your creative side.

Greenville is also perfectly placed for nature lovers to get a dose of outdoor beauty. Situated right in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, scenic hikes are less than an hour away. For a closer touch of nature, Falls Park lures residents in with its waterfalls and suspension bridge.

Hilton Head, SC

Hilton Head, SC

  • Population: 39,861
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,162
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,600
  • Median home price: $395,000
  • Median household income: $84,575
  • Walk score: 16/100

While you may consider Hilton Head more of a vacation spot than a living destination, the island offers something for everyone. Beautiful beaches, world-class golf, shopping, restaurants and even nightlife are all here. But, it’s not all resorts in this slice of the Lowcountry. There are plenty of communities that provide that homey feel.

Another draw of Hilton Head is its location. The island is one of the best places to live in South Carolina because of its proximity to both Savannah, GA, and Charleston. You can set yourself up for a more picturesque home life while taking advantage of big-city opportunities.

Lexington, SC

Lexington, SC

  • Population: 22,157
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,255
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,420
  • Median home price: $208,000
  • Median household income: $72,996
  • Walk score: 16/100

The historic and modern mix perfectly together in Lexington. Its historical claim to fame is the home to one of the first battles in the Revolutionary War. Another part of the city’s history revolves around commerce, and Lexington’s Old Mill stands as a symbol of the area’s commitment to small businesses.

Shopping around here means supporting locals and long-standing, family-owned shops. Its history and commerce are all in one, packaged in a quaint, suburban environment that continues to draw in young professionals and families.

Mauldin, SC

Mauldin, SC

  • Population: 25,409
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,378
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,333
  • Median home price: $249,200
  • Median household income: $67,860
  • Walk score: 28/100

A suburb of Greenville, Mauldin provides that safe, suburban feel without taking you too far away from a bustling city center. With access to everything the big city has to offer, staying close to home also provides ample opportunities for natural beauty and activity.

The 400-acre Lake Conestee Nature Park is not only a natural habitat for lots of local wildlife, but it’s also a perfect place for outdoor enthusiasts. And, it’s only five minutes from the center of town. You also can’t skip over the food in Mauldin when talking about the amenities of the town. You’ll find delicious Lowcountry cooking and plenty of great local restaurants.

Mount Pleasant, SC

Mount Pleasant, SC

  • Population: 91,684
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,525
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,783
  • Median home price: $555,500
  • Median household income: $103,232
  • Walk score: 29/100

As a South Carolina town with literally everything you could ever want, Mount Pleasant is a popular choice to call home. It’s quiet and picturesque, with strong community vibes and a variety of residents. It’s a town that caters to its population with great restaurants, shops and thriving nightlife.

Another laid-back coastal town that has it all, you’re also close to so much that makes South Carolina great. Sullivan’s Island is only a short car ride away, and Isle of Palms isn’t too far, either. On top of that, you’re less than three miles from Charleston. It’s the perfect, middle spot to enjoy everything the entire area offers.

Myrtle Beach, SC

Myrtle Beach, SC

  • Population: 34,695
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,314
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,400
  • Median home price: $250,000
  • Median household income: $43,200
  • Walk score: 23/100

Known primarily as a vacation destination that can get a little rowdy, Myrtle Beach has a lot to offer once you step away from the tourist traps and move past the amusement parks and high-rise hotels.

Taking up 60 miles of coastline, Myrtle Beach is a resort town, with all the typical amenities, and that presents a lot of opportunity both for job-seekers and entrepreneurs. There’s also the climate to consider when thinking of Myrtle as one of the best places to live in South Carolina — it’s fantastic. Mild weather and the lulling sounds of the ocean attract families, young professionals and empty-nesters to call this place home.

Rock Hill, SC

Rock Hill, SC

  • Population: 75,048
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,132
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,320
  • Median home price: $277,000
  • Median household income: $50,444
  • Walk score: 32/100

A thriving art scene gives the downtown area of Rock Hill its own signature. Named the state’s first cultural district, this area is full of galleries, museums, theaters and art studios. Not only that, but you’ll find the streets peppered with murals and sculptures from local artists.

Not an arts town alone, Rock Hill also has 31 parks, including Cherry Park and its 68 acres of hiking trails and landscaped walkways. Boyd Hill is another option with a disc golf course, picnic areas and even an outdoor swimming pool.

Spartanburg, SC

Spartanburg, SC

  • Population: 37,399
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,140
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,217
  • Median home price: $205,000
  • Median household income: $40,053
  • Walk score: 29/100

If South Carolina is calling to you for its mountain views, you’ll want to check out Spartanburg. With its small-town feel and neighborly vibe, living here still reminds you that you’re in the south but without the beach-front scenery the majority of the state provides.

A revitalized downtown is representative of the quick pace at which the city has grown over the last few years, and you’ll find diversity in job opportunities and living options as a result.

Tega Cay, SC

Tega Cay, SC

Source: Facebook.com/TegaCayCity
  • Population: 11,335
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,330
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,600
  • Median home price: $460,000
  • Median household income: $130,918
  • Walk score: 16/100

Another suburb of Charlotte, Tega Cay is a close-knit, lakeside community that fits most people’s ideal of small-town living. A family-friendly place, you’ll find plenty of restaurants and shops, as well as water sports on the lake.

Residents of Tega Cay also value the safety of the city. It’s the kind of place where kids are always out riding bikes and the community pool fills up with eager swimmers each summer. It’s almost like the suburban town you’d find in a movie.

Find an apartment for rent in South Carolina

Whether you want city living, ocean waves or even mountain tops, apartments for rent in South Carolina can provide the perfect view. With locations that accommodate any pace of life, alongside some delicious, fresh seafood, you’ll quickly see why there are so many places in the state people call the best.

The rent information included in this summary is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of October 2021.
Median home prices are from Redfin as of October 2021.
Population and median household income are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The information in this article is for illustrative purposes only. This data herein does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

Comments

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Source: apartmentguide.com

How I Made $2,000 in 1 Week by Writing an eBook

Hey everyone! Today, my fellow female finance blogger, Fiona Smith, is going to show you how she made $2,000 in 1 week by self-publishing an ebook on Gumroad. Fiona is the creator of The Millennial Money Woman, she’s been featured on Forbes, she’s a speaker at the national FinCon 2021 conference, and she’s a co-founder of a local non-profit charity, promoting financial literacy to underprivileged minorities. Today, Fiona will teach you how to potentially make a few extra $1,000 a month by writing an ebook. Take it away Fiona!

Hey guys and gals! How I Made $2,000 in 1 Week by Self-Publishing an eBook

How I Made $2,000 in 1 Week by Self-Publishing an eBook

My name is Fiona aka The Millennial Money Woman. I run my own personal finance blog and love helping others make more money and build long-term wealth.

If you had told me in early 2020 that I would soon make $2,000 in 1 week by self-publishing an ebook, I would have probably looked at you like you’re crazy!

I’ve always had an inner author and always thought about writing a book. I just never got around to it because, you know, life.

And for whatever reason, in the middle of the pandemic, I had the urge to write, publish, and sell an ebook about personal finance!

Here’s a bit of my personal story:

When I was young, I saw my grandparents lose everything they ever put into their small family business due to poor financial planning. 

From that day forward, I swore to myself that I would never go through the financial difficulties that my grandparents faced. 

I also swore to myself that I would try to help everyone I could to avoid making the same financial mistakes my grandparents once made. 

That’s why I committed myself to the path of learning about personal finance (I earned my Master’s Degree in Personal Financial Planning) to give others the tools that I wish I had growing up.

…And that’s ultimately how I came up with my ebook topic: How to Get Rich from Nothing.

My ebook doesn’t necessarily define “rich” as just having money.

In my ebook, “rich” also means:

  • Building a rich mindset
  • Developing rich relationships
  • Maintaining a rich outlook on life

…You get the point. 

And you know what?

Although I was admittedly a bit scared to write the book (because I was afraid that it would be a total flop), I decided to sit down one morning and put pen to paper. It was time I show the world what The Millennial Money Woman was made of. 

Now, 2 months after my first ever ebook release, I can happily tell you that in my first week of selling my ebook, I’ve made more than $2,000!

And in this article, I’m going to show you exactly how I did it.

Related content:

How to Make Money by Writing an eBook

The cool thing about writing ebooks is that there’s no secret code or formula to making money.

You can write an ebook that’s 5,000 words long or 100,000 words long. It could be a fiction novel or it could be an educational resource (like mine). It could be about the different types of dirt used on a golf course or it could be about how to start a blog.

Like I said, there’s no secret sauce.

The only key ingredient that holds true for any profitable passive income is to start! You won’t know your potential if you don’t give it a shot. 

As Wayne Gretzky famously once said, “you miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.”

So, here are some things you may want to keep in mind as you start writing your ebook:

  • Start with a topic where you have “expert” knowledge
  • Set mini-goals so that you finish the book on time
  • Write in simple, plain-English text
  • Proofread & re-edit often

This is the key to writing a successful ebook:

Write something that you’re passionate about – because you will spend a lot of time on your ebook (I took about 100+ hours from start to finish!). 

Imagine spending 100+ hours writing something that you don’t enjoy talking about!

That’s tragic – and such a waste of time. 

Set Mini-Goals

I would not have completed my ebook in 1 month if I had not set mini-goals.

Typically, it takes about 4 to 8 months for the average author to complete a book.

Because I’m trying to promote myself, my work, and my ebook in the shortest amount of time possible, I knew that time is of the essence, which is why I pushed to finish my ebook in just 1 month.

Imagine hearing yourself say, “I want to publish and sell my ebook in exactly 1 month from today.”

How would that make you feel?

Would you get heart palpitations? Would you feel anxious? Would you feel so overwhelmed that you wouldn’t know where to start?

Yep, that was me.

Here’s how I got over my paralysis and anxiety:

I broke my big goal (finishing a book in 1 month) into much smaller, more achievable goals. 

And, guess what? It worked.

Here’s what I did:

  • First, I figured out how many chapters my book would have (turns out I wanted 14 chapters)
  • Second, I determined what each chapter would cover
  • Third, I determined roughly how many words each chapter would have (turns out between 1,500 to 2,500)
  • Fourth, I determined how long it would take me to write each chapter (between 1 day to 2 days)
  • Fifth, I arranged for someone else to proofread my book once I finished the first draft
  • Sixth, I figured out a basic marketing strategy to promote my ebook on my Twitter account

After exactly 2 weeks (14 days for 14 chapters), I had someone re-read my first draft after which I [heavily] edited my ebook and re-read my book again for more edits. 

After exactly 3 weeks, I had a preliminary draft completed with a cover image that I created using Canva (see below).

After exactly 4 weeks, I had finalized my ebook, written 3 drafts, and had accomplished my pre-marketing strategy. 

Was I successful?

My goal, at the official launch, was to sell exactly 1 ebook (I set my sights low). 

By the end of week 1, I had made over $2,000 on ebook sales. I honestly couldn’t believe it – I was literally earning money in my sleep. 

All of this was made possible because I decided to break down this 1 huge goal of selling my ebook in 1 month into tiny little mini-goals.

After each mini-goal was accomplished, I moved on to the next step.

I created a structure for myself (and I work very well with a structure) so that I could stay in line with my overarching goal while not overwhelming myself without knowing where to start.

Don’t Reinvent the Wheel

I’ve published over 100 blog posts in the past 12 months on my website.

My blog posts are typically 3,000 to 6,000 words each, so they’re lengthy, they’re well-researched, and they offer lots of visual graphics about finance.

So, as I started writing my ebook, which is about finance, I had an idea…

If you already run a blog or have content written about the same or similar topic you’re planning to write about in your ebook – consider repurposing your old text!

Why reinvent the wheel if you already took the time previously to write about the same/similar topic?

Believe it or not (and I’m living proof), people who value your content and thoughts will pay money for an ebook with similar information that they can find on your blog, website, etc. for free. 

Why?

Because an ebook is typically a thoughtful curation of your finest work – carefully selected in an order that is often easier to read than on a blog or website, for example. 

Of course, you wouldn’t want to have your ebook be exactly the same as your previous content – your audience will notice that you didn’t put effort into the ebook.

And if your audience notices you didn’t put in effort, they can leave their remarks via ebook reviews or lower-star ratings (which will hurt your sales and your reputation). 

Put in the work, edit the text, and make sure that the content you provide makes sense, adds value, and flows.

Your eBook Marketing Strategy

Guys and gals – I cannot say it enough: Your network is key.

How do you expect to sell your ebook if you don’t have anyone to sell it to?

Here are some things you’ll probably want:

  • A social media following
  • A website following (potentially)
  • Ambassadors to help promote your book
  • An email or e-newsletter with a wide reach

I’m not saying you need 10,000’s of followers on social media to make a profit on your ebook. In fact, you can see profitable numbers if you “just” have a few hundred followers. 

That’s because the quality of your audience matters – not the quantity.

Would you rather have 10,000 unengaged followers or 1,000 high-quality, engaged followers – who would buy your book if you push a marketing campaign their way?

I know which option I’d take.

A good marketing strategy honestly should start before you start selling your ebook. 

I started promoting my ebook the day I started writing my ebook!

Why?

Because I wanted to see if my audience was even interested in buying my ebook – I didn’t want to spend 100+ hours on my ebook if I was only going to generate $100 in sales.

Here’s what I did:

I made sure I slipped into the inboxes of all of the important “influencers” in my niche (finance) – both on and off of Twitter – and asked them their candid, honest opinion:

Would they be willing to spend $15 on another finance book?

The only caveat is that this finance book was structured as a 14-week program, with actionable advice, written in simple English without technical jargon, and offered advice from a Millennial for Millennials.

And you know what?

I had a lot of positive feedback and a lot of constructive feedback. I used that constructive feedback to improve the overall format and outline of my ebook. 

Don’t ever shy away from constructive feedback. It will make you better.

Here’s how I started my ebook marketing strategy:

  • Market ebook before it is officially published to garner interest
  • Promote your ebook 1x to 2x times per day on your social media account
  • Send invitations to your niche influencers to read & review your ebook for free
  • Ask the top influencers of your niche to share your ebook link on its official launch day

And this is what my launch tweet looked like:

Another marketing strategy is to offer your book on a pre-order basis.

You’re basically selling a product that doesn’t exist yet – and you’re still making money!

If you receive 0 interest, you can cancel your project, save yourself some time, and give everyone a refund that has purchased your pre-order. 

If your pre-orders come in hot, then you better make sure you can deliver what you promised your audience. 

Your Earning Potential

I get a lot of questions about how much money you could expect to earn with an ebook.

And the answer is this: It completely depends.

Honestly, it depends on a lot of things like:

  • Your niche
  • Your expertise
  • Your audience
  • Your popularity

When I wrote my first ebook, I was honestly a nobody – and I was writing about a topic that has been talked about so many times before.

In other words, my niche was pretty saturated.

But here’s how I differentiated myself: 

My value proposition was that I would write my personal finance book in an easy-to-read, visually effective, and story-like manner. 

I also didn’t just talk about money in the form of numbers.

I included many anecdotes, stories, and my past experiences (with my millionaire mentor) in the hopes that my readers would pick up the same valuable information that I did from my mentor.

Once my book was ready to publish, I used the publishing and sales platform known as Gumroad.

Gumroad is an online platform that offers either free accounts or premium accounts for new users (if you’re serious about making sales on Gumroad, then the premium account – although more expensive initially – is worth the price). 

I’ve published my book using the premium Gumroad account, and haven’t looked back since.

So how much can you earn by selling an ebook?

You can earn between $50 to $5,000+ per month.

How much you earn is completely up to you. 

It also largely depends on how often you market your ebook (marketing it too many times is spammy and marketing it too little won’t give you the sales). 

I promoted my ebook between 1x to 2x per day. 

That’s it. 

Just make sure that whichever platform you use to promote your new ebook (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, your website, your newsletter, etc.), you are authentic and genuine.

You don’t want to come across as pushy or aggressive, because that could cost you your followers (and likely reputation). 

You should also be aware of this:

Typically speaking, your ebook will earn you the most money at the beginning of your launch – that’s because you’ve [hopefully] promoted the ebook in the weeks and days coming up to its official launch. 

As the weeks turn into months after your ebook launch, chances are the demand (aka your profits) of your ebook will wane.

That’s totally normal and expected.

You can always bring back the original hype about your ebook by doing things like this:

  • Go on a podcast and promote your ebook
  • Add a new section or chapter to your ebook
  • Give away something for free with your ebook
  • Promote a notice that your ebook prices will increase soon

There are savvy ways to reignite the hype of your ebook. 

Or – you could simply write a new ebook!

Why Writing Ebooks is an Awesome Side Hustle

Writing (and selling!) ebooks is honestly one of the best side hustles. 

Why?

Because you can literally make money while you sleep. 

I’ve never earned money in my sleep before (aside from maybe my stock market investments), and I’ll never forget the first time I awoke to a Gumroad email on my phone that gave off a loud “ping!,” notifying me that I had just made a sale. 

I wasn’t even working!

And I made money. 

Ok, so I made $15, which in the grand scheme of things, isn’t a lot of money.

But for me, passively earning $15 from my first sale shattered a glass ceiling. 

I finally realized the power of earning passive income – and how passive income could literally change your life forever.

How?

Earning money passively – like by selling an ebook – is one of the very few ways (aside from maybe being a business owner) that can help you escape the daily grind of the 9 to 5 job. 

If your goal is to have the freedom to choose whether you want to work or spend time with your family on any given day, then passive income from ebooks could be a great start.

Your side hustle income could literally help you earn your way to early retirement.

The money that you make with passive income can help you:

  • Save more
  • Invest more
  • Pay off debt
  • Build wealth

The possibilities are endless. 

You just have to recognize the opportunity.

Closing Thoughts

If you want to earn some side income, but don’t know how, then you should seriously consider writing and selling an ebook. 

Speaking from personal experience, an ebook is one of the best side hustle incomes you can earn. I mean, who doesn’t want to earn an extra $2,000 per week?

I sure could use an extra $2,000!

The beauty of ebooks is that the process can be 100% free – you don’t have to hire an editor, an advertising agency to promote your ebook, or a publishing company. 

So aside from the opportunity cost of spending your time writing the book, you’re basically looking at a 100% profit!

Hopefully you’re not like me, where I took 4+ years to realize my vision and pursue what I love (writing and helping Millennials understand personal finance). Instead, if you are an expert in a certain area – I don’t care if it’s dog training or cookie baking – you should consider writing an ebook and using your network to promote your work. 

Don’t wait for tomorrow if you can do it today.

Your bank accounts will thank me later. 

For those of you who are wondering which ebook I wrote, mine is called How to Get Rich from Nothing. The book is designed to help you “get rich” not just financially but also “get rich” through your network, your mindset, your spirit, and your future goals.

Are you interested in writing a book? What questions do you have for Fiona on this topic?

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Source: makingsenseofcents.com

The Pros and Cons of Renting a Micro Apartment

When it comes to housing, we’re at the crossroads of a lot of stats. This past year, there was an increase in single-person households and a rise in urban living. Even taking Covid into consideration, in 2020 in North America, 83.6 percent of residents lived in cities. And U.S. News reported in 2018 that two-thirds of the world’s population will live in cities by 2050. All this highlights the need for more affordable living spaces and the need for more living spaces in general.

One answer in the past few years has been the construction of micro apartments or micro units. Not as trendy as tiny homes (there’s no equivalent Tiny House Nation for micro apartments), they’re still a great way to afford city life — if it works for you. And that’s the question.

What is a micro apartment or micro unit?

First off, these small apartments are not tiny one-bedrooms. Micro apartments, a.k.a. micro units, are usually between 200 and 400 square feet. They have an open floor plan, a bit more like a studio apartment, with a living room, sleeping space and a kitchen area possibly with an island or room for a small table. There’s a separate bathroom and some come fully furnished.

But the rules about size aren’t set in stone. No standard definition exists. According to an Urban land Institute (ULI) report, “a micro unit might be 300 square feet in New York City or 500 square feet in Dallas. A micro unit is a somewhat ambiguous term that covers anything from a relatively small studio or one-bedroom apartment to a short-term lease, SRO [single room occupancy] unit with communal kitchen and common room areas.”

To put that into perspective, one-bedroom apartments in the U.S. averaged 1,156 square feet, and the average size of a primary bedroom in a house is about 224 square feet (14′ x 16′).

Micro apartment with bike storage

Micro apartment with bike storage

The pros of micro apartments

Here are some reasons to consider looking at micro units as you go on your apartment search.

Lower rent

Although a micro apartment actually costs more per square foot, the overall monthly rent is about 20 to 30 percent lower, according to ULI. And because it’s so small, you should have lower utility costs.

More amenities

Small doesn’t mean you’re living in a cell. Builders and developers entice micro unit renters with access to balconies, rooftop gathering spots, communal game rooms, external workspaces, dog runs and other fun stuff outside the walls of the micro apartment.

Easy maintenance

It should go without saying, but here’s a reminder, anyway. It might take just an hour a week to clean your space. That’s a great news if you travel a lot.

Lower carbon footprint

Using less energy to heat and cool, furnishing with fewer pieces, having access to public transportation all mean you’re traveling more softly in the environment.

A way in

In cities with prohibitively high costs of living, the rent on a micro apartment might be the only way you’re going to get a toehold in a place you’ve always dreamed about living.

Micro apartment with tiny kitchen

Micro apartment with tiny kitchen

Cons of micro apartments

Such a small space isn’t right for everyone, and you’ve got to consider the other side of the micro unit coin.

Hard to find

There’s only a small stock of micro units in the U.S., and they’re likely hiding in large, dense cities like New York, Boston, Washington, D.C. and San Francisco.

Tight squeeze

This past year has taught us a lot about living, working, educating and entertaining all in one place. If another pandemic is in our future, a micro apartment might feel a bit cramped if we’re all sent back indoors 24-7.

Changing your lifestyle

Among other things, if you’re a shopper, you’re going to have to curtail the habit. You’ll have to pare down your clothing and furniture. And if you love to entertain, it can be tough to get more than a couple of people to hoist their glasses around your table.

Finding furniture and appliances

Your dreams of a large French-door 28-cubic foot refrigerator will be dashed. It might be difficult to find those Goldilocks right-size pieces to fit your smaller space. On the plus side, lots of manufacturers are making smaller versions of great appliances to fit small-apartment living.

Is a micro apartment right for you?

A lot of thought will go into whether a micro unit is right for you. Consider your lifestyle and your belongings, as well as your wallet. Be honest when answering the following question:

  • Are you the kind of person who will downsize and keep up with the minimalist spirit?
  • Do you have a pet that will need space?
  • Do you plan on partnering with someone?
  • Can you cope without having the space to throw your annual holiday party?
  • Can you live and work in such a small space if the world has to return to pandemic protocols?

If you aren’t sure, look into other types of small apartments, like a studio or an efficiency or even shared housing with roommates.

Going small doesn’t mean you have to go all “Alice in Wonderland” down a claustrophobic rabbit hole. Find something with large windows, natural light, higher ceilings, a balcony and outdoor amenities, and you can still live large in a small space.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

The Best Places to Live in Tennessee in 2022

Tennessee is known as the “volunteer state” thanks to its role of sending volunteer soldiers to the War of 1812 and then again after the Mexican-American War in 1846. Today, it’s also known for being home to the Country Music Capital of the World and the University of Tennessee, which was founded two years before Tennessee became the 16th state. Here are the best places to live in Tennessee in the coming year.

Brentwood, Tennessee

Brentwood, Tennessee

  • Population: 42,783
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,508
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,992
  • Median home price: $1,110,000
  • Median household income: $168,688
  • Walk Score: 24/100

While it’s only 10 miles from Downtown Nashville, Brentwood has its own rich history with great restaurants and parks. From Concord Park, a 40-acre park that surrounds the Brentwood Public Library and offers locals walking and bike paths, to Granny White Park with tennis courts and a baseball field, nature lovers won’t have a hard time enjoying outdoor activities.

There are a number of historic sites and homes throughout Brentwood and the city developed a scavenger hunt and interactive map of historic places to help locals and visitors learn more about the area.

Being close to Nashville also means those living in Brentwood have easy access to the amenities the larger city affords.

Chattanooga, Tennessee

Chattanooga, Tennessee

  • Population: 182,799
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,262
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,602
  • Median home price: $300,000
  • Median household income: $45,527
  • Walk Score: 41/100

Known as the Scenic City, Chattanooga sits on the far southeastern part of the state and borders Georgia. Thanks to its mild climate, outdoor enthusiasts take full advantage of what nature provides in terms of hiking trails, rock climbing, biking, camping and more.

Attractions include the historic Chattanooga Choo Choo which includes the Glenn Miller Gardens, live music at Songbirds and several dining and imbibing options. There is also Lovers Leap at Rock City, Lookout Mountain with Ruby Falls, the tallest and deepest underground waterfall open to the public in the United States, and Audubon Acres, a 130-acre nature sanctuary. Families can have fun together in one of the best places to live in Tennessee by visiting the Chattanooga Zoo, Tennessee Aquarium and Creative Discovery Museum.

Clarksville, Tennessee

Clarksville, Tennessee

  • Population: 158,146
  • 1-BR median rent: $963
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,178
  • Median home price: $315,000
  • Median household income: $53,604
  • Walk Score: 20/100

Fifty miles northwest of Nashville is Clarksville, where community and access to family-friendly entertainment is part of the fabric of the city. Living in Clarksville means meeting friends at the local deli or the vinyl shop downtown. It means trivia nights, enjoying the public art, including murals and sculptures in and near downtown and learning about local history at the museums.

Clarksville is also near Kentucky’s Fort Campbell, one of the county’s largest military bases. While Clarksville is home to active service members and their families, it’s also home to many retired military members who’ve decided to remain in the area to live and work.

Franklin, Tennessee

Franklin, Tennessee

  • Population: 83,097
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,767
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,954
  • Median home price: $874,999
  • Median household income: $98,231
  • Walk Score: 25/100

For those who want to live in a community with that close-knit Americana feeling, Franklin fits the bill. Located 30 minutes south of the country music capital of the world, locals can lay down roots in this area and take advantage of outdoor family-friendly activities like heading to the farmers’ markets, hiking and biking along the trails.

Unlike busier cities around Tennessee, living in Franklin is pretty quiet when it comes to nightlife. Other than smaller venues that welcome live entertainment on weekends, most head to Nashville for evening fun.

Hendersonville, Tennessee

Hendersonville, Tennessee

  • Population: 6,357
  • 1-BR median rent: $ 1,489
  • 2-BR median rent: $ 1,850
  • Median home price: $475,000
  • Median household income: $38,654
  • Walk Score: 25/100

Known as the city by the lake, those living in Hendersonville know they’re lucky to live in such close proximity to Old Hickory Lake. The lake allows plenty of opportunities to fish, boat, kayak and enjoy other water activities.

Historic Rock Castle gives visitors a glimpse into the history of one of the best places to live in Tennessee located 18 miles northeast of Nashville.

Knoxville, Tennessee

Knoxville, Tennessee

  • Population: 187,603
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,069
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,114
  • Median home price: $310,000
  • Median household income: $40,341
  • Walk Score: 30/100

Knoxville is located in East Tennessee. The city is nestled between the lush forests, streams and waterfalls of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area with its whitewater paddling, rock climbing, horseback riding and hiking trails.

It’s also home to the state’s largest and most famous university: the University of Tennessee. While it’s three hours from Nashville and four hours from Chattanooga, those living in Knoxville appreciate having more space and a tighter-knit community than their larger urban neighbors while still having access to great restaurants, food trucks, brewing companies and thriving farmers’ markets.

Memphis, Tennessee

Memphis, Tennessee

  • Population: 651,073
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,012
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,062
  • Median home price: $172,000
  • Median household income: $41,228
  • Walk Score: 41/100

Memphis has a long and storied history with the Civil Rights Movement in the United States. The Lorraine Motel where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated, is located in Memphis. In 1991, the two-story motel was converted into the National Civil Rights Museum, where it features exhibits that trace the history of the movement in the country from the 17th century to the present.

Today, several neighborhoods make up the vibrant city, one of the best places to live in Tennessee. From Downtown with views of the Mississippi River to Hickory Hill and East Memphis areas just east of Downtown with a more suburban feel, to the north and south areas. Memphis also features the Memphis Zoo which houses more than 3,500 animals, Shelby Farms Park, one of the country’s largest urban parks and, of course, the birthplace of the blues and home to Graceland.

Mount Juliet, Tennessee

Mount Juliet, Tennessee

  • Population: 37,029
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,314
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,674
  • Median home price: $474,950
  • Median household income: $91,303
  • Walk Score: 17/100

Located about 17 miles east of Downtown Nashville, Mt. Juliet is sometimes called the city between the lakes since it’s between Old Hickory Lake and Percy Priest Lake. The family-friendly community is complete with a farmers market, plenty of parks with football fields, volleyball courts and even “Bark Park,” a 3/4 –acre fenced-in area for our furry friends to meet and play.

Murfreesboro, Tennissee

Murfreesboro, Tennissee

  • Population: 146,900
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,165
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,389
  • Median home price: $389,945
  • Median household income: $62,003
  • Walk Score: 22/100

Located about an hour southeast of Nashville, living in Murfreesboro allows residents to have the best of both worlds: a suburban atmosphere with access to big-city entertainment. Sometimes referred to as “The ‘Boro” by locals, Murfreesboro is home to Middle Tennessee State University, as well as great restaurants, bars and coffee shops. Cannonsburgh Village allows locals and visitors to go back in time as the reproduction pioneer village features a gristmill, schoolhouse and general store.

Murfreesboro has eight city parks for locals to enjoy outdoor adventures whether it’s playing tennis, baseball or simply enjoying the waterfalls along a hike. While its historic downtown isn’t huge, The Square is where many people meet up, where the annual Christmas tree is lit and events like Jazz Fest and Friday Night Live take place. Main Street includes charming restaurants, antique shops and boutiques.

Nashville, Tennessee

Nashville, Tennessee

  • Population: 670,820
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,962
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,954
  • Median home price: $449,900
  • Median household income: $59,828
  • Walk Score: 41/100

Known as Music City and the Country Music Capital of the World, it’s not hard to find great live music at any of Nashville’s famous music venues, including Ryman Auditorium, the Grand Ole Opry or the Cannery Ballroom at Station Inn. The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum showcases permanent and rotating (and online) exhibits.

Still, there’s more to living in Nashville than its music. The city, located in the north-central region of the state, has a thriving food scene with world-class restaurants and charming coffee shops, and the Nashville Zoo delights young and old. Since there are different neighborhoods with their own charm and character, whether it’s Downtown, West End, East Nashville or Germantown, it’s easy to check out areas throughout Nashville and enjoy what each has to offer.

Find an apartment for rent in Tennessee

Tennessee may be known for its music scene but there’s so much more than great music throughout the state. Whether you’re looking for an active nightlife environment or something a bit more family-friendly, there are apartments for rent in Tennessee that will fit your interests and budget in one of these best places to live in Tennessee.

The rent information included in this summary is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of October 2021.
Median home prices are from Redfin as of October 2021.
Population and median household income are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The information in this article is for illustrative purposes only. This data herein does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

The Best Places to Live in Arizona in 2022

It may be a desert, but between the mountains and the cacti, living in Arizona is pretty special. There are plenty of reasons to move to the Grand Canyon State, and even more opportunities to find the perfect city to call home. Whether you’re looking into an active lifestyle of hiking, biking, mountain climbing and even white water rafting, or a more metropolitan experience, the best places to live in Arizona all have something to offer you.

Chandler, Arizona

Chandler, Arizona

  • Population: 261,165
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,641
  • 2-BR median rent: $2,136
  • Median home price: $470,000
  • Median household income: $82,925
  • Walk Score: 38

Combining a vibrant downtown with family-friendly neighborhoods, it’s no wonder the city of Chandler sits on so many lists as one of the best places to live in Arizona. Spend the week commuting to work and sending kids off to school, but when the weekend comes, venture into the city center. Here you’ll find plenty of activity, from pub crawls to music festivals.

For something truly special, visit Desert Breeze Park and take a ride on a vintage train. If you’re looking for something to do on a weekly basis, schedule in time to shop at the Downtown Farmer’s Market or swing into Yoga in the Park. Both activities happen weekly on Saturdays.

Gilbert, Arizona

Gilbert, Arizona

  • Population: 254,114
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,800
  • 2-BR median rent: $2,156
  • Median home price: $495,000
  • Median household income: $96,857
  • Walk Score: 32

A picture-perfect location for small-town living, Gilbert offers apartments that are close to all the amenities you could possibly need without feeling squished into a big, busy city. Peppered with shops, the downtown area has great places to eat, grab a coffee or absorb some culture. You’ll find the Gilbert Historical Museum and the Hale Centre Theatre right in the thick of things, as well.

For nature-lovers, there’s amazing bird watching at Riparian Preserve at the Water Ranch. Manmade lakes maintain a thriving ecosystem of Arizona’s natural surroundings. To combine the outdoors with some serious fun, Freestone Park includes a recreation center, mini amusement park, skate park and a mini train ride. There’s also the usual playground, sports fields and picnic spaces.

Glendale, Arizona

Glendale, Arizona

  • Population: 252,381
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,366
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,751
  • Median home price: $385,275
  • Median household income: $55,020
  • Walk Score: 45

Known for its modern vibe and extensive entertainment options, Glendale is a great choice to call home.

For sports fans, living in Glendale is a top-notch choice. Here, you’ll find the Arizona Cardinals during baseball season and the Phoenix Coyotes take to the ice for hockey. Even college sports are close by in State Farm Stadium. It’s home to not only the Cardinals but also the Fiesta Bowl.

The city also serves as a major draw for military personnel thanks to Luke Air Force Base. This base is the largest fighter pilot training spot in the world.

Mesa, Arizona

Mesa, Arizona

  • Population: 518,012
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,312
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,564
  • Median home price: $405,000
  • Median household income: $58,181
  • Walk Score: 42

While we’re talking sports, another ideal way to get that baseball fix is to call Mesa home. This is where Spring Training happens. Both the Oakland A’s and Chicago Cubs come here to prepare for their season each year.

During the off-season, Mesa offers plenty to do, all without making it feel like you’re living in a huge city. It’s actually just the right size to make it a safe, bike-friendly city. You’ll also find a few perfect outdoor spots with recreational options that range from nature walks to horseback riding, kayaking and rafting. Even better, you’ll never struggle for a solid picnic spot.

Peoria, Arizona

Peoria, Arizona

  • Population: 175,961
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,372
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,617
  • Median home price: $456,700
  • Median household income: $75,323
  • Walk Score: 34

Having a home in Peoria offers up a good mix of the big city and the quiet suburbs. As with most of the best places to live in Arizona, it has an extensive list of outdoor activities and some beautiful scenery.

Among all this natural beauty, you can also get in a little baseball here, too. The city hosts the San Diego Padres and Seattle Mariners for Spring Training.

However, the central feature of Peoria is Lake Pleasant Regional Park. This pristine lake draws visitors who want to boat and fish, as well as hike and camp. You’ll find water skiers and wakeboarders out enjoying themselves, too.

Phoenix, Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona

  • Population: 1,680,992
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,187
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,517
  • Median home price: $393,500
  • Median household income: $57,459
  • Walk Score: 54

No list of the best places to live in Arizona could be complete without talking about living in Phoenix. It’s not just the state capital, but a bustling hub of activity. Some of the best neighborhoods in Phoenix encompass the trifecta of perfection — beautiful neighborhoods, fun places to go out and excellent shopping.

Given its diverse population, anyone can find their ideal home in this city. Nightlife and the college scene are both booming for the younger crowd, but the city holds plenty of family-friendly amenities, as well. It’s also a popular destination for retirees.

Prescott Valley, Arizona

Prescott Valley, Arizona

  • Population: 46,515
  • 1-BR median rent: $2,290
  • 2-BR median rent: $2,357
  • Median home price: $593,000
  • Median household income: $51,909
  • Walk Score: 22

With its compact city center, Prescott makes it easy to enjoy live music, shop a little and sit down in the grass for a picnic without wandering far. Courthouse Plaza is really where it’s at, but it’s not all there is to do when you live in Prescott.

You’ll also find two lakes, which enable residents to enjoy a variety of activities. Goldwater Lake creates the perfect outdoor atmosphere. The surrounding park has a playground, volleyball courts and more. Lynx Lake is big enough for boats but is also a great place to camp and fish.

Scottsdale, Arizona

Scottsdale, Arizona

  • Population: 258,069
  • 1-BR median rent: $2,064
  • 2-BR median rent: $3,000
  • Median home price: $695,000
  • Median household income: $88,213
  • Walk Score: 48

Rated as one of the best cities to retire to in the U.S., living in Scottsdale isn’t just for people who no longer have to work. It is, however, a hub of luxury for Arizona residents, with plenty of high-end hotels, golf courses and more.

Scottsdale has a vibe all its own, being a little wild west, thanks to Old Town, and a little forward-thinking, with modern accents and a focus on entrepreneurs.

If your perfect Arizona town has something old, something new and plenty of upscale fun, Scottsdale is right for you.

Surprise, Arizona

Surprise, Arizona

  • Population: 141,664
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,490
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,787
  • Median home price: $410,00
  • Median household income: $69,076
  • Walk Score: 22

With humble beginnings as a single square mile of land, the city of Surprise has sure grown up. Today, it houses one of the best public art collections in the state. Featuring creations heavily influenced by the local landscape and culture, it’s not all small town here. You’re also only 45 minutes from downtown Phoenix.

Encased by natural beauty, those living in Surprise can see the White Tank Mountains to the west and the Sonoran Desert to the north. Hiking, fishing and camping are all less than 20 minutes away.

In the spring, the population blows up as Surprise welcomes the Kansas City Royals and Texas Rangers for Spring Training.

Tempe, Arizona

Tempe, Arizona

  • Population: 195,805
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,494
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,715
  • Median home price: $425,000
  • Median household income: $57,994
  • Walk Score: 62

If you’re looking to live in Tempe, home of Arizona State University, you’ll find many amenities aimed at college students and recent graduates who may decide to stay close.

Sitting along the Salt River, Tempe offers plenty of waterfront activities. It’s also considered a suburb of Phoenix, so the big city isn’t far.

For those who really want to settle down, the city is home to a lot of tech companies and professional opportunities.

Tucson, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

  • Population: 548,073
  • 1-BR median rent: $932
  • 2-BR median rent: $2,159
  • Median home price: $308,000
  • Median household income: $43,425
  • Walk Score: 45

The University of Arizona looms large for anyone searching for an apartment in Tucson, but there’s more to this city than the Wildcats.

Tucson has the unique distinction of seasons but they’re not what you might think. There’s Snowbird Season, when Tucson neighborhoods see a higher influx of visitors. Then, there’s Monsoon Season, where crazy thunderstorms, high winds and dust storms can quickly, though temporarily, transform the landscape.

No matter the time of year, though, the city offers unique districts throughout downtown for art, shopping, businesses and entertainment. You’ll also find easy access to Tucson’s rich history, and plenty of options to get outside and hang out.

Find an apartment for rent in Arizona

With beautiful weather, ample sunshine and plenty of choices that fall under the best places to live in Arizona, this may be your next home state. If so, it’s time to start looking for apartments for rent in Arizona.

Which city will you start with?

The rent information included in this summary is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of October 2021.
Median home prices are from Redfin as of October 2021.
Population and median household income are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The information in this article is for illustrative purposes only. This data herein does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

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Source: apartmentguide.com