The difference between thrift stores and consignment shops

Consignment and antique shops are great, but they tend to be pricier because their collections are curated. These stores do all the hunting down and fixing up for you, and that service is offset via higher price tags. While consignment shops are more likely to have highly sought after antiques from pedigreed brands, you can still certainly find hidden gems at nearly any thrift store — you just may have to put in more effort to find what you’re looking for. Balance the odds of what you want being there with the price range you’re willing to pay when deciding where to shop.

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Getting what you need while giving back to the community

Many of your favorite causes run thrift shops to help fund their programs and services. Prime Thrift near Fair Park benefits American Veterans (AMVETS), Disabled American Veterans (DAV) and other local and national charitable organizations, while Out of the Closet in Oak Lawn benefits the AIDS Healthcare Foundation. Genesis Women’s Shelter, a nonprofit that provides safety, shelter and support for women and children who have experienced domestic violence, operates two thrift stores: one in Oak Lawn and another in South Oak Cliff. There are four Soul’s Harbor locations throughout the metroplex, with proceeds going toward its programs to help men break the cycle of homelessness and addiction. Some of these shops even have exclusive relationships with estate liquidators, increasing your chances of finding treasures among their wares.

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If you’re looking for a bit more than just decor, check out your local ReStore, which benefits Habitat for Humanity. There, you can find actual building materials, such as tile, cabinets, wood flooring, windows, doors or even vintage brick. In addition to these, they also have plenty of new and vintage home furnishings, large appliances and more. With 10 locations across D-FW, it’s a convenient alternative to big-box stores when shopping for your next home design project.

Choose your shopping days wisely

For donation-based thrift stores, Mondays and Tuesdays are typically the best days to shop, because most people tend to drop off items early in the week after spending the weekend cleaning. Signing up for emails is a great way to stay on top of the latest finds and deals, but there’s just no substitute for going in regularly. It works the same with searching online, whether it’s eBay, Craigslist, or Facebook Marketplace. “I’m a huge fan of Facebook Marketplace” says Whitney Marsh, an interior designer and business owner who furnished her Oak Cliff coffee shop, B-Side, with thrifted finds. “I also really love Souls Harbor in Waxahachie,” Marsh notes.

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Whitney Marsh, an interior designer and business owner, furnished her Oak Cliff coffee shop B-Side with thrifted finds, including this handmade tile she found for less than $100.(Whitney Marsh)

Have a strategy before you start shopping

There are two ways to go about hunting vintage pieces. Either have a piece or project in mind and know what you want to pay for it, or be able to spot a good deal. This can involve researching brands, pieces, and eras to be able to find your ideal mix of quality pieces that aren’t in demand. Marsh says that’s her strategy. “I know what I like, and I also know what brands are known for quality goods,” she explains. “I definitely have a style. I’m drawn toward leather furniture, solid wood, wool rugs and unique art.”

Marsh created this seating area using chairs thrifted from Soul’s Harbor and a unique brass ship she found through Facebook marketplace.(Whitney Marsh)

For example, you may love midcentury modern (MCM) pieces, but the popularity of decor from that era means there’s more demand, and unscrupulous sellers may assign that label to random items in order to get them to sell. You may find more success by researching some favorite brands or designers from the MCM era and looking for those specifically to avoid fake listings and inflated prices. Be aware that people will list items online with a famous brand name keyword to get more hits, such as saying a “Pottery Barn-style” rug or “MCM-style lamp.” If you’re shopping in person, don’t be afraid to ask the store’s staff about an item you’re looking for; they may have something similar that just hasn’t been put out yet. Or, they might be willing to take down your name and keep an eye out for items on your list — especially if you’re a regular customer.

Simple design rules to consider

In this area Marsh designed for a client, she paired a thrifted console with a modern lamp and abstract art to create balance.(Whitney Marsh)

Once you’ve found that unique piece you’ve been searching for, how do you style it? Thrifted pieces bring character into a space, but it is possible to have too much of a good thing, says Marsh. “I like to pair thrifted pieces with more high-end textiles. I love an old leather sofa that’s worn in against a very bold luxury wallpaper.” If you buy a well-worn piece and want to play up that lived-in aesthetic, try to surround it with items that are clean and modern. Too much rusticity can end up looking like neglect. Same goes for smaller items, such as pots, frames or books — space them out in designed vignettes throughout your home instead of clustering them all together. Also, keep in mind that pairing thrifted furniture is easier when they share some similar elements. For example, mismatched nightstands look more cohesive if they are roughly the same size and color.

Thrifting can be a way to save big, depending on when and where you shop, and what you’re looking for. “I definitely shop with a specific corner or space in mind. I also really only pull the trigger on things that seem like they’re good quality and the right price,” says Marsh. But if you’re patient, persistent and know what you want and what you’re willing to pay for it, it’s just a matter of time before you find it.

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Source: dallasnews.com

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Cybersecurity, TPO, Verification Tools; Tech Tracking Whereabouts; Why Rates Are Where They Are

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Cybersecurity, TPO, Verification Tools; Tech Tracking Whereabouts; Why Rates Are Where They Are

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Fri, Apr 19 2024, 11:33 AM

It is “Take Your Child to Work Day” next Thursday which, if you work from home, is probably like a day off from school for the tyke. (I won’t be bringing my son Robbie to work, who, as I write this, is pedaling from Chicago to New York and bunked down last night in Union Home’s Bill Cosgrove’s humble abode.) I do not track his exact whereabouts, but we all know that, in having a smart phone, one gives up pretty much all of their privacy. For example, a new working paper posted to the National Bureau of Economic Research sought to examine the polling data that indicates 22 percent of Americans reported attending religious services on a weekly basis. They did this by looking at geodata from smartphones of 2 million people in 2019, and found that while 73 percent of people did indeed step into a place of worship on a primary day of worship at least once over the course of the year, just 5 percent of Americans studied in fact did so weekly, significantly smaller than the data people reported to pollsters. (Found here, this week’s podcasts are sponsored by Optimal Blue. OB’s smart solutions automate critical functions like pricing, hedging, trading, and social media. More originators and investors rely upon Optimal Blue’s integrated solutions, data, and connections to support their unique business strategies, no matter how complex. Hear an interview between Robbie and me on a variety of topics in mortgage that are germane to the Daily Commentary.)

Lender and Broker Products, Software, and Services

Operations leaders! You don’t want to miss this event if you care about improving your operations! Join Femi Ayi, EVP Operations at Revolution Mortgage, Brooke Smith, Senior Manager, Loan Sourcing Digital Solutions at Fannie Mae, and Jodi Eberhardt, Strategic Integration Director at Freddie Mac, and Richard Grieser, VP, Marketing at Truv, as they highlight different strategies to provide customers with a more transparent, efficient borrowing experience. Freddie Mac’s Loan Product Advisor® asset and income modeler (AIM) and Fannie Mae’s Desktop Underwriter® (DU®) validation service play a critical role for lenders committed to streamlining origination processes and improving loan quality. However, the key to optimizing borrower verification workflows and ensuring compliance is partnering with the right provider that helps lenders improve loan quality and save hundreds of dollars per loan compared to traditional verification providers. Come join us! “Minimizing Risks with GSE Borrower Verifications”, April 24 2:00 PM ET Use code TRUV100 to participate FOR FREE, even if you are not an MBA member! Register now.

“AFR Wholesale® is thrilled to announce the renewal of our partnership with AIME for 2024, underscoring our commitment to the wholesale channel. As we continue our collaboration, we are committed to providing essential resources, comprehensive training, and robust support to independent mortgage professionals and the wholesale channel. This partnership will allow AFR to set new industry standards, promote best practices, and deliver exceptional services to our clients and partners. We also will look to spearhead innovative initiatives aimed at boosting operational efficiencies and enhancing customer experiences. Reflecting on a history of successful collaborations, we are excited about the potential for even greater achievements. This announcement is just the beginning, as AFR plans to unveil several exciting partnerships and updates in the coming weeks. Join us in driving change in mortgage lending. To get involved, contact us at [email protected], 1-800-375-6071, visit AFR.”

In the wake of frequent breaches within our industry, we are reminded of the precarious position mortgage lenders and their customers’ data are currently in. These repeated security incidents emphasize an undeniable truth: robust cybersecurity defenses are not merely an option; they are imperative. A breach can mean the difference between a thriving business and a devastating collapse. There is a very real risk to mortgage companies right now; you’re not just guarding data, you’re safeguarding trust, livelihoods, and the very integrity of the financial system. It’s a responsibility to take seriously, and it’s time to double down on cybersecurity. Richey May’s cybersecurity team is here to help: Check out the latest post detailing the often-overlooked risks in the industry.

Capital Markets

One can’t ignore the U.S. Federal Reserve’s role in interest rates. (The current STRATMOR blog is titled, “Relying on the Fed: How Did This Happen?”) The “experts” have been predicting multiple rate cuts in 2024. Sure enough, the much-awaited Fed pivot has materialized, but it’s not what investors had been expecting. The Fed change was supposed to signal a reverse of its contractionary monetary policy path, keeping rates high, which has been in place since March 2022.

But that is not the message, especially after three consecutive months of stronger-than-expected inflation readings. Fed Chair Jay Powell said, “The recent data have clearly not given us greater confidence and instead indicate that it’s likely to take longer than expected to achieve that confidence. Last year, rebounding supply supported U.S. growth in spending and also employment, alongside a considerable decline in inflation. The more recent data show solid growth and continued strength in the labor market, but also a lack of further progress so far this year on returning to our 2 percent inflation goal.”

As always, the Federal Reserve is watching the data as it comes out. But things will be higher for longer. At least the next rate move is still forecast to be a cut. Things could get rocky for lenders and borrowers if that shifts to a hike, which could happen if price pressures resurface and put a so-called soft landing into doubt. And now we have the yield on the benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury note up at its highest level since November, above 4.6 percent versus a yield of 4.25 percent in the last week or two and starting the year at 3.88 percent, meaning that the 10-year is now nearing a full point rise for 2024!

As today’s podcast interview alluded, it’s been pretty quiet out there in terms of market-moving news. Weekly jobless claims showed no change from last week’s level and there was a better-than-expected Philadelphia Fed survey for April yesterday, which prompted some selling. Investors bought plenty of Treasuries to close 2023 and open 2024, betting on several rate cuts this year from the Fed. However, Fed speakers hammering home patient rhetoric on interest rates (several more Fed speakers reiterated yesterday that they do not feel urgency to cut rates at this time) due to a reluctance of the U.S. economy to cool, has forced investors to abandon bets on a rally, giving way to a wave of selling.

Accordingly, mortgage rates surged in the latest Primary Mortgage Market Survey from Freddie Mac, with the 30-year rate above 7 percent for the first time this year. For the week ending April 18, the 30-year and 15-year mortgage rates jumped 22 basis points and 23 basis points versus the prior week to 7.10 percent and 6.39 percent, respectively. Those rates are 71 basis points and 63 basis points higher than this time last year.

Inflation is back below 3 percent, but hotter-than-expected readings for the rental category of housing in the first few months of the year are a big reason the Fed has held back on the rate cuts that Wall Street has been hoping for. Markets seeing the biggest rent declines are the ones where there’s been the most construction. The Northeast and Midwest have experienced lingering high inflation, while the West and South have seen it moderate rapidly.

Existing-home sales fell 4.3 percent in March to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.19 million, a widely expected decline given the recent slip in purchase mortgage applications and solid gains registered in the first two months of 2024 from increased supply and a temporary dip in mortgage rates. Sales were down 3.7 percent from the previous year. The median existing-home sales price rose 4.8 percent from a year ago to $393,500, the ninth consecutive month of year-over-year price gains and the highest price ever for the month of March. The inventory of unsold existing homes grew 4.7 percent from one month ago to the equivalent of 3.2 months’ supply at the current monthly sales pace.

There is no data of note on today’s economic calendar, though there is one Fed speaker, Chicago President Goolsbee. For capital markets folks, today is Class D 48-hours. We begin the day with Agency MBS prices better by .125-.250, the 10-year yielding 4.59 after closing yesterday at 4.65 percent, and the 2-year is at 4.96.

Employment

“At Evergreen Home Loans, our mission is simple: equip our clients with affordable strategies to not only buy a home but to make a winning offer. Our unique approach helps families secure their futures and build generational wealth. As we navigate a fluctuating housing market, Evergreen Home Loans remains committed to innovation and client success. Our tailored solutions emphasize stability and long-term prosperity, ensuring that homeownership is a reality for first-time buyers and seasoned investors alike. By fostering a supportive environment and providing strategic financial guidance, we empower our clients to turn their dreams of homeownership into tangible assets that benefit generations. We’re expanding our team and invite skilled loan officers and branch managers to explore the career opportunities we offer. Join us in making a difference and shaping the future of homeownership. To view all openings visit: Careers.”

Synergy One Lending continues to reemerge as one of the industry success stories in 2024. The addition of 12 new branches and the successful expansion of the company’s footprint into several new markets has provided an even stronger foundation of profitable growth as it prepares for even more ahead. A vision with a P&L structure built to grow market share, relentless execution and adoption of leading-edge technology and a culture that is focused on their 3 core values (delighted customers, inspired employees and a pristine reputation) are leading indicators of the company’s trajectory. Be part of it and Make Your Mark by reaching out to Aaron Nemec at (208) 794-7786 or Eric Kulbe at (303) 717-0293.

Geneva Financial, operating in 48 states, announced that Jessie Ermel has joined its leadership team as Chief Compliance Officer where Jessie will drive quality control and compliance for the company’s mortgage operations.

Our industry lost another veteran recently with the death of Alabama’s John Johnson. John was CEO and co-founder of MortgageAmerica, Inc. from 1978 to 2012. But John’s mortgage career began in 1966 at Colonial Mortgage Company and then Molton-Allen & Williams. He served as the Mortgage Bankers Association of Alabama President in 1980-1981 and chaired the organization’s Convention in 1982. John was awarded the Certified Mortgage Banker designation in 1982. was a member of the Board of Directors of the Mortgage Bankers Association of America from 1999-2003, served as Chairman of the Residential Board of Governors in 2001-2002, and was Chairman of the Board of Directors for MERS in 2006. Guys like this helped make our industry what it is today, and he’ll be missed.

 Download our mobile app to get alerts for Rob Chrisman’s Commentary.

Source: mortgagenewsdaily.com

Apache is functioning normally

The median annual salary for pediatricians is $198,420, according to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. There are many different paths a doctor can take when it comes to choosing their medical specialty. Doctors who enjoy helping children feel their best and live healthy lives will likely find a lot of fulfillment in their jobs.

To learn more about how much a pediatrician makes a year, keep reading.

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What Are Pediatricians?

A pediatrician is a type of doctor who provides medical care to children ranging from infancy to adolescence. They specialize in diagnosing and treating injuries, developmental issues, and illnesses children commonly experience. From routine exams to issuing vaccines to providing medicine to sick children, pediatricians can help.

The path to becoming a pediatrician can be a long and expensive one. Typically, that means college, medical school, a residency, and possibly a fellowship. Medical school can easily cost $250,000 in tuition. It’s wise to consider this investment when pursuing a career as a pediatrician. Many doctors have a high amount of medical school debt when starting out.

Also, keep in mind that being a pediatrician involves interacting with children and their families all day. This may not therefore be the best job for introverts.
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How Much Do Starting Pediatricians Make a Year?

While pediatricians can eventually earn very competitive salaries, like any job, they tend to earn less when they are entry-level. The lowest 10% of earners in this role make just $75,670, which is significantly lower than the median annual salary for all physicians of $198,420.

What is the Average Salary for a Pediatrician?

On average, a pediatrician can make a salary that is considerably higher than the American average for all jobs. Where a pediatrician chooses to work can greatly impact how much a pediatrician earns. This is a quick glance at the annual mean wage for a variety of workplaces where a pediatrician may be employed:

•   Offices of physicians: $203,690

•   General medical and surgical hospitals: $180,790

•   Outpatient care centers: $232,420

•   Colleges, universities, and professional schools: $84,810

•   Specialty (except psychiatric and substance abuse) hospitals: $201,100.

Another factor that also affects pediatrician earning potential is the state the doctor works in. This table below highlights how average pediatrician salaries vary by state, with typical pay arranged from highest to lowest by location.

In addition, it shares how much a pediatrician’s hourly pay vs, salary is.

What is the Average Pediatrician Salary by State for 2023

State Annual Salary Monthly Pay Weekly Pay Hourly Wage
Oregon $222,171 $18,514 $4,272 $106.81
Alaska $221,079 $18,423 $4,251 $106.29
North Dakota $221,044 $18,420 $4,250 $106.27
Massachusetts $218,405 $18,200 $4,200 $105.00
Hawaii $216,375 $18,031 $4,161 $104.03
Washington $211,404 $17,617 $4,065 $101.64
Nevada $209,030 $17,419 $4,019 $100.50
South Dakota $208,910 $17,409 $4,017 $100.44
Colorado $206,290 $17,190 $3,967 $99.18
Rhode Island $205,782 $17,148 $3,957 $98.93
New York $196,083 $16,340 $3,770 $94.27
Delaware $193,921 $16,160 $3,729 $93.23
Vermont $191,477 $15,956 $3,682 $92.06
Virginia $191,115 $15,926 $3,675 $91.88
Illinois $191,057 $15,921 $3,674 $91.85
Maryland $187,806 $15,650 $3,611 $90.29
Nebraska $183,797 $15,316 $3,534 $88.36
Missouri $182,659 $15,221 $3,512 $87.82
California $182,152 $15,179 $3,502 $87.57
South Carolina $181,082 $15,090 $3,482 $87.06
Pennsylvania $179,627 $14,968 $3,454 $86.36
New Jersey $179,258 $14,938 $3,447 $86.18
Oklahoma $177,994 $14,832 $3,422 $85.57
Maine $177,900 $14,825 $3,421 $85.53
Wisconsin $177,526 $14,793 $3,413 $85.35
North Carolina $177,345 $14,778 $3,410 $85.26
New Hampshire $174,681 $14,556 $3,359 $83.98
Idaho $174,250 $14,520 $3,350 $83.77
Texas $173,077 $14,423 $3,328 $83.21
Kentucky $172,518 $14,376 $3,317 $82.94
Wyoming $171,910 $14,325 $3,305 $82.65
Minnesota $171,467 $14,288 $3,297 $82.44
Michigan $170,777 $14,231 $3,284 $82.10
New Mexico $170,501 $14,208 $3,278 $81.97
Indiana $169,638 $14,136 $3,262 $81.56
Ohio $166,670 $13,889 $3,205 $80.13
Arizona $166,130 $13,844 $3,194 $79.87
Connecticut $165,286 $13,773 $3,178 $79.46
Mississippi $164,126 $13,677 $3,156 $78.91
Iowa $163,921 $13,660 $3,152 $78.81
Montana $163,627 $13,635 $3,146 $78.67
Arkansas $163,030 $13,585 $3,135 $78.38
Alabama $161,584 $13,465 $3,107 $77.68
Utah $159,236 $13,269 $3,062 $76.56
Tennessee $159,121 $13,260 $3,060 $76.50
Kansas $154,538 $12,878 $2,971 $74.30
Georgia $150,529 $12,544 $2,894 $72.37
Louisiana $149,706 $12,475 $2,878 $71.97
West Virginia $138,728 $11,560 $2,667 $66.70
Florida $133,219 $11,101 $2,561 $64.05

Source: ZipRecruiter

Pediatrician Job Considerations for Pay & Benefits

Alongside earning a $100,000 salary or more, most pediatricians also receive superior employee benefits. If a pediatrician runs their own practice, they will need to supply themselves and their employees with these benefits.

Those who are employed by employers like hospitals or medical groups can expect to gain access to benefits like paid time off, health insurance, and retirement accounts. They may also have unique benefits like continuing education allowances and malpractice insurance coverage.
💡 Quick Tip: Income, expenses, and life circumstances can change. Consider reviewing your budget a few times a year and making any adjustments if needed.

Pros and Cons of Pediatrician Salary

The main advantage associated with competitive pay for pediatricians is that they are quite high. With a median salary of $198,420, pediatricians are greatly rewarded for their hard work.

However, they must pursue many years of higher education to earn that salary. Many young doctors struggle under the weight of their student loan payments. So, while this salary may seem high at first glance, much of it can go towards student loan debt initially.

It’s also worthwhile to consider work-life balance. Being a pediatrician and improving the health of children can be a very rewarding career, but it can also involve long, tiring hours and being on call for patients on nights and weekends. Medical problems and emergencies crop up all the time, so this is a factor to acknowledge.

Recommended: How Much House Can I Afford?

The Takeaway

Pediatricians can earn very high pay while making a big difference in the lives of their patients and their families. They do have to commit to many years of schooling and education to become a pediatrician, but once they do, they can earn a great living.

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FAQ

Can you make 100k a year as a pediatrician?

Most pediatricians make $100,000 a year or more, especially after gaining a few years of work experience. The median annual salary for a pediatrician is $198,420.

Do people like being a pediatrician?

Pursuing a career in pediatric medicine is a major commitment and those who are passionate about this field and patient care are likely to really enjoy their work. However, this role requires many hours of patient interaction a day, so even if someone finds the work fascinating, it won’t be a good fit for them if they are antisocial.

Is it hard to get hired as a pediatrician?

The main challenge in getting hired as a pediatrician surrounds not having the right credentials. Potential pediatricians must pursue medical school and any required medical licenses in order to find a job in this field, which is no easy feat.


Photo credit: iStock/alvarez

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The median annual pay for a sonographer is $78,210 annually for the most recent year studied, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Working as a sonographer is a great way to enter the medical field without having to pursue an expensive advanced degree. Typically, only an associate’s degree is needed to work as a sonographer, which can be obtained quickly and affordably.

Read on to learn more about how much a sonographer can earn and what it’s like to work as this kind of professional.

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What Are Sonographers?

A sonographer — also known as a diagnostic medical sonographer — uses sonography technology and tools to create images typically known as ultrasounds or sonograms. These images can give us a detailed look at organs and tissues within the body or of embryos and fetuses. There are many different types of sonographers who specialize in distinct areas of medicine, such as:

•   Abdominal sonographers

•   Breast sonographers

•   Cardiac sonographers (echocardiographers)

•   Musculoskeletal sonographers

•   Pediatric sonographers

•   Obstetric and gynecologic sonographers

•   Vascular technologists (vascular sonographers).

As briefly mentioned above, training for this career usually doesn’t involve medical school and its cost. Instead, diagnostic medical sonographers may obtain a bachelor’s degree, an associate’s degree, or perhaps a vocational school degree or hospital training program certificate. Some may be trained in the Armed Forces.

It’s also worth noting that working as a sonographer will likely involve a high degree of patient interaction. For this reason, it may not be a good job for introverts.
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How Much Do Starting Sonographers Make a Year?

Entry-level sonographers should expect their salary to be on the lower side until they gain more experience. The lowest 10% of earners make less than $61,430 per year.

However, the top 10% of earners working as sonographers make more than $107,730, meaning this is a career path that can lead to a job that pays $100,000 a year.

In addition to experience level, other aspects that can lead to competitive pay is your geographical location (big city vs. rural community) and whether the employer is a major hospital network, say, or a small, independent medical office.

Recommended: What Trade Earns the Most Money?

What is the Average Salary for a Sonographer?

Those who work full-time as a sonographer can expect to earn a median annual salary of $78,210. However, some sonographers choose to work part-time and are paid by the hour. In terms of how much a sonographer makes an hour, the median hourly pay for sonography work is $37.60 per hour.

Many factors can influence how much a sonographer earns and the state they work in is a major one. The following table illustrates how average sonographer salaries can vary significantly by state, with earnings shown from highest to lowest.

What is the Average Sonographer Salary by State for 2023

State Annual Salary Monthly Pay Weekly Pay Hourly Wage
New York $130,753 $10,896 $2,514 $62.86
Pennsylvania $119,728 $9,977 $2,302 $57.56
New Hampshire $117,077 $9,756 $2,251 $56.29
New Jersey $115,302 $9,608 $2,217 $55.43
Wyoming $114,058 $9,504 $2,193 $54.84
Washington $113,902 $9,491 $2,190 $54.76
Wisconsin $113,086 $9,423 $2,174 $54.37
Massachusetts $113,082 $9,423 $2,174 $54.37
Alaska $112,787 $9,398 $2,168 $54.22
Oregon $111,873 $9,322 $2,151 $53.79
Indiana $111,695 $9,307 $2,147 $53.70
North Dakota $111,668 $9,305 $2,147 $53.69
Hawaii $109,499 $9,124 $2,105 $52.64
Arizona $109,385 $9,115 $2,103 $52.59
New Mexico $108,705 $9,058 $2,090 $52.26
Colorado $107,986 $8,998 $2,076 $51.92
Minnesota $107,959 $8,996 $2,076 $51.90
Montana $107,737 $8,978 $2,071 $51.80
Nevada $106,643 $8,886 $2,050 $51.27
Alabama $106,391 $8,865 $2,045 $51.15
South Dakota $105,538 $8,794 $2,029 $50.74
Vermont $105,369 $8,780 $2,026 $50.66
Ohio $105,308 $8,775 $2,025 $50.63
Rhode Island $103,621 $8,635 $1,992 $49.82
Iowa $102,378 $8,531 $1,968 $49.22
Delaware $102,241 $8,520 $1,966 $49.15
Connecticut $102,051 $8,504 $1,962 $49.06
Virginia $101,059 $8,421 $1,943 $48.59
Mississippi $100,644 $8,387 $1,935 $48.39
Tennessee $100,545 $8,378 $1,933 $48.34
Utah $100,028 $8,335 $1,923 $48.09
Illinois $99,727 $8,310 $1,917 $47.95
Georgia $99,110 $8,259 $1,905 $47.65
Maryland $99,089 $8,257 $1,905 $47.64
California $98,791 $8,232 $1,899 $47.50
Nebraska $97,188 $8,099 $1,869 $46.73
Maine $96,740 $8,061 $1,860 $46.51
Missouri $96,025 $8,002 $1,846 $46.17
South Carolina $95,081 $7,923 $1,828 $45.71
Kansas $94,735 $7,894 $1,821 $45.55
Idaho $94,316 $7,859 $1,813 $45.34
Louisiana $94,256 $7,854 $1,812 $45.32
Oklahoma $94,119 $7,843 $1,809 $45.25
Texas $93,511 $7,792 $1,798 $44.96
North Carolina $93,119 $7,759 $1,790 $44.77
West Virginia $92,468 $7,705 $1,778 $44.46
Kentucky $89,668 $7,472 $1,724 $43.11
Michigan $89,461 $7,455 $1,720 $43.01
Florida $87,711 $7,309 $1,686 $42.17
Arkansas $85,099 $7,091 $1,636 $40.91

Source: ZipRecruiter

Sonographer Job Considerations for Pay & Benefits

If a sonographer chooses to work part-time, they may not gain access to the same suite of valuable employee benefits that full-time sonographers typically earn. While employee benefits can vary by employer, full-time sonographers can generally expect to receive healthcare coverage, paid time off, and retirement plans as a part of their overall compensation package.
💡 Quick Tip: Income, expenses, and life circumstances can change. Consider reviewing your budget a few times a year and making any adjustments if needed.

Pros and Cons of Sonographer Salary

One of the biggest pros associated with a sonographer’s salary is that they don’t have to take on expensive medical school debt — which can really eat into a worker’s monthly budget. An associate’s degree or a postsecondary certificate may be required but will cost less than pursuing other degree requirements commonly found in the medical field.

Regarding cons, some may find the salary doesn’t outweigh the hardships of the job. Many sonographers work nights and weekends and are on their feet for long periods of time.

Recommended: Pros and Cons of Minimum Wage

The Takeaway

Sonographers currently earn an average of $78,210 per year. They have a very valuable medical-service skill set, and demand for that skill is growing. It’s anticipated that job openings for this role will grow by 10% from 2022 to 2032, which is above the national average rate. As they navigate their careers, sonographers will likely want to make progress in their financial lives, with smart budgeting and saving.

SoFi helps you stay on top of your finances.

FAQ

Can you make 100k a year as a sonographer?

It is possible to earn $100,000 or more each year as a sonographer. On average, sonographers in the state of New York earn $130,753 per year. Where someone lives, how many years of experience they have, and their specialty can all impact how much they earn.

Do people like being a sonographer?

Working as a sonographer is a great fit for anyone who finds the work interesting and who enjoys patient interaction. Because this role requires so much patient care throughout the day, it’s not the best fit for those who are antisocial.

Is it hard to get hired as a sonographer?

Around 9,600 openings for diagnostic medical sonographers are anticipated to be available each year. Because of this high demand, if someone has the right education and qualifications, they should be able to find work as a sonographer.


Photo credit: iStock/dusanpetkovic

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*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed towards active SoFi accounts, such as your SoFi Checking or Savings account, subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

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Source: sofi.com

Apache is functioning normally

As artificial intelligence continues to grow in prominence, mortgage professionals “must carefully evaluate and manage” their use of AI and “focus on deriving the benefits while avoiding potentially catastrophic risks.”

That’s one of the key conclusions reached by the BlackFin Group in a recently published white paper, “Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Mortgage Banking.” The paper was co-authored by several BlackFin executives and mortgage technology leaders from other organizations, including Chuck Iverson at Mason-McDuffie Mortgage and Maria Moskver at Cloudvirga.

The paper notes that “AI is not a homogenous technology” and offers a variety of uses across the mortgage ecosystem, from origination and servicing to default solutions and asset sales. The authors outline six of the most common types of AI — machine learning, deep learning, natural language processing, generative AI, expert systems and cognitive computing — while excluding two others (rule-based systems and robotic process automation) that are less relevant to their definition of AI.

They argue that understanding the technology is imperative when choosing a specific tool to deploy.

“In our view, what distinguishes AI is the ability to address situations that are not precisely like the ones it has previously addressed,” the authors state.

Data from Precedence Research shows that the size of the global AI market is estimated to grow from $454 billion in 2022 to $2.5 trillion in 2032. But even with this expected influx of investment capital and user demand, BlackFin’s paper finds that mortgage companies are struggling today to implement AI tools in an efficient manner.

The authors cite some examples, including automated document processing and underwriting systems, in which a company’s expenses have increased but productivity hasn’t.

“Lenders frequently comment on the lack of ROI on technology as costs have risen, even if much of that increase can be attributed to an increase in sales compensation,” the authors write.

They go on to describe the potential significance of AI in multiple areas of mortgage lending. It can reduce the costs to manufacture or service a loan. It can accomplish tasks that humans or other types of technology cannot. And it can fundamentally change the origination and servicing processes. But the authors also stress that none of this should be expected to happen quickly.

“There is little evidence so far that AI can fundamentally transform our industry in the next 5-10 years — there are too many structural and regulatory impediments for that to be the case,” they wrote.

“I think if you want to innovate, you need to be able to think long-term. I don’t think anyone’s ever innovated in the short-term,” Rechat CEO Shayan Hamidi recently told HousingWire. “So you need to be able to have the appetite for that: be willing to take the risks and be willing to be patient for quite some time. And I think AI is one of those things. You can do some fun, cool stuff with it very quickly, but then if you want to start doing meaningful things, it’s a big long-term investment, at least today.”

BlackFin Group — founded in 2019 and based in Englewood, Colorado — is a management consulting firm that helps to guide strategic decisions and find innovative solutions for banks, nonbanks and credit unions across the country. In 2022, it launched a practice dedicated to reverse mortgages.

Source: housingwire.com

Apache is functioning normally

The short answer: In most cases there isn’t an instant fix for improving your credit score. Building, improving or even repairing credit takes time. 

Your credit score is like a snapshot that lenders use to determine your financial trustworthiness. Whether you’re applying for a loan, a credit card, or even renting an apartment, your credit score plays a crucial role in the decisions made about your financial future. But what if you’re in a pinch and need to improve your credit quickly? Can you fix your credit in just a week? 

Why Do Credit Scores Take So Long To Update?

How often do you check your credit score? Everyday? If you have, maybe you’ve noticed in the past how long it takes your credit score to update. The credit reporting process is another reason why it would take longer than a week to update your score – it takes a while for lenders, banks, and the bureaus to record your activity. 

Here’s what you should consider about the reporting process:

1. There are consistent reporting periods

Creditors typically report your account information to the credit bureaus at the end of each billing cycle. This means that any changes you make to your credit behavior, such as paying off a credit card balance or opening a new account, won’t immediately reflect on your credit report. Instead, you’ll have to wait until the next reporting period for these updates to be included.

2. The bureaus need time to verify your information

Even when creditors submit information to the credit bureaus, there is processing time involved. The credit bureaus need to receive, verify, and process the data before updating your credit report. This process isn’t instantaneous and can take several days to weeks, depending on various factors such as the volume of information being processed.

Additionally, the bureaus have specific schedules for updating credit reports, which may vary depending on factors like the bureau’s workload and the frequency of data submissions from creditors.

3. There’s a lag between when your credit reports update and when your score updates

Even after the credit bureaus update your credit report, there may still be a lag before your credit score reflects these changes. This is because your credit score is calculated based on the information in your credit report. While some credit scoring models may update more frequently, others may only update periodically, resulting in delays in your credit score reflecting recent changes.

4. Not everything is strong enough to impact your credit score

Additionally, your credit score may not change significantly if there hasn’t been much recent activity on your credit accounts. For example, if you haven’t made any new credit applications or incurred new debts, your credit report may remain relatively unchanged.

The Reality of Fixing Credit

While some changes to your credit report may occur relatively quickly, significant updates to your credit score typically take time to reflect accurately. It’s essential to be patient and continue practicing responsible credit habits while waiting for your credit score to update.

While you may not be able to fix your credit in a week, there are some strategies you can try to start improving it immediately:

Always Try to Pay Your Bills on Time

Making on-time payments is one of the most important factors in your credit score. Even a single late payment can have a negative impact, so prioritize paying your bills by their due dates.

Pay Down Credit Card Balances

If you have high credit card balances, paying them down can improve your credit utilization ratio, which in turn can positively affect your credit score.

Check Your Credit Report for Errors

Errors on your credit report can drag down your score. By reviewing your report and challenging any inaccuracies, you can potentially see an impact to your score. You can request a free copy of your credit report from each of the three main credit bureaus at AnnualCreditReport.com . 

Become an Authorized User

If you have a trusted family member or friend with good credit, asking to become an authorized user on one of their credit accounts can help boost your score. Just be sure that the primary account holder has a history of responsible credit usage.

Report Rent and Utilities

Rent, utilities, cell phone bills are examples of regular payments you may be making each month that don’t show up on your credit. If you feel confident that you can continue making those payments each month, you can always sign up for a rent and utility reporting service in order to get credit for paying your bills on-time.

The Importance of Patience

Unfortunately, the idea of fixing your credit overnight or even in a week is mostly a myth. 

While it’s understandable to want to improve your credit as quickly as possible, it’s essential to approach the process with patience and realistic expectations. By focusing on making responsible financial decisions over time, you can gradually raise your credit score and achieve your financial goals.

Source: credit.com