What a Bad Credit Score Is

What is considered a bad credit score can vary depending on the credit scoring model being used but, ultimately, it comes down to what each lender considers a “bad” credit score. Your credit score is used by lenders to assess the risk that you may pose to them, should they provide you credit, and each lender may consider a different score as a “bad” credit score. When considering the most commonly used credit scoring model, FICO, the scores range from 300 to 850, and is usually categorized in the following ranges:

  • Excellent Credit: 781 – 850
  • Good Credit: 661-780
  • Fair Credit: 601-660
  • Poor Credit: 501-600
  • Bad Credit: below 500

The information in your credit report from credit bureaus is used to determine your credit score.

While the above ranges can help you get a better idea of where your credit score falls in regards to typical risk assessment and quality of credit, as stated above, each lender may consider a different score as being a “bad” credit score. For example, an auto loan lender may consider a credit score between 300 and 500 as being a bad credit score while a mortgage lender will likely consider a credit score between 300 and 650 as being a bad credit score.

What Does A Bad Credit Score Mean For Me?

For many people the subject of credit scores can be a stressful, if not sensitive, topic to discuss, especially if your credit score falls within the range that is typically considered as a bad credit score. There are numerous reasons that someone would have a bad credit score – many of which may not have been in your control – but here you are now, with “bad” credit, and it’s important to know how it will affect you.

First of all, as you may have already experienced, a lower credit score can lead to you being denied by a lender for anything from buying a mattress with a payment plan to a new home mortgage. Being denied credit, a mortgage, or even a job because of poor or bad credit can be stressful and frustrating but even being approved by a lender while your credit score is low can cost you greatly. With a bad credit score, if a lender does approve you, they will give you a very high interest rate which can cost you thousands of dollars extra. For instance, with a $25,000 5-year car loan at an interest rate of 16% (which could be significantly higher with bad credit) would likely cost you over $6,000 more than if you had decent credit and were able to get the same loan with an interest rate of 8% (which could be significantly lower with a 700+ credit score) – a typical home mortgage could cost you an extra $100,000 in interest!

What Gives You A Bad Credit Score & What You Can Do To Improve Your Score

If you’ve discovered that your credit score falls into the “bad” credit range, it is helpful to know what may have caused your credit score to drop. You can get this information by reviewing your credit report which will include any negative items which negatively impacted your credit score, causing you to have a bad credit score. There are a number of things that may give you a bad credit score, a few of which include:

  • Defaulting on a loan or credit card
  • Paying a credit card/loan/mortgage payment late
  • Foreclosure
  • Bankruptcy
  • Changing your address too frequently
  • Running frequent credit checks
  • Keeping a high balance to credit limit ratio

The above are some of the most common issues that lead to a poor or bad credit score but there are many others as well. It is important to review your credit report with a credit consultant to help shine more light on what may have caused your credit score to drop and how you can improve or repair your credit.

Thankfully, having a bad credit score is not the end of the world. There is a light at the end of the tunnel as there are many ways to improve your credit score or repair your credit. Here are a few ways in which you can take control of your credit and work on getting your score back up:

  • Pay your bills on time. Delinquent payments and collections can have a major negative impact on a credit score.
  • Keep balances low on credit cards and other “revolving credit”. High outstanding debt can affect a credit score.
  • Apply for and open new credit accounts only as needed. Don’t open accounts just to have a better credit mix. It probably won’t improve your credit score.
  • Pay off debt rather than moving it around. Also, don’t close unused cards as a short-term strategy to improve your credit score. Owing the same amount but having fewer open accounts may lower your credit score.

Another option to get out of that “bad” credit score range quickly, is to repair your credit score by disputing negative credit items which are showing up on your credit report. This can be done manually or through a credit repair company. In many cases there may be false information or even simple mistakes that can allow the negative times to be disputed and removed from your credit report. By removing these negative items from your credit report, your credit score will go up.

Source: creditabsolute.com

5 Ways to Perfect Your Credit Score

If you’re trying to perfect your credit score, it’s important to first understand what makes up your credit report and credit score. Your credit score is determined by an advanced algorithm which was developed by FICO and pulls the data from your credit report to determine your score. When calculating your credit score, the following information is going to affect your credit score in the corresponding percentages:

  • 35 percent: History of on-time or late payments of credit.
  • 30 percent: Available credit on your open credit cards
  • 15 percent: The age of your lines of credit (old = good)
  • 10 percent: How often you apply for new credit.
  • 10 percent: Variable factors, such as the types of open credit lines you have

Many of this may be common sense or information that you’ve already learned over time, resulting in a good credit score but possibly not a perfect score. If you have a bad credit score, it could take a lot of time and work to perfect your score and you may first want to consider repairing your credit. If your credit score is already above 700 but you’re trying to shoot for that perfect score of 850 to ensure the best deals and interest rates, here are 5 ways to perfect your credit score:

1. Maintaining Debt-To-Limit Ratio

To perfect your credit score, it’s recommended that you keep your debt-to-credit ratio below 30% and, if possible, as low as 10%. The debt-to-limit ratio is the difference between how much you owe on a credit card versus how much your credit limit is. For example, if one of your credit cards has a credit limit of $5,000, then you should always keep the balance below $1,500 but preferably around $500. As you can see above, 30% of your credit score is determined by the available credit on your open credit cards, so keeping the debt-to-limit ratio will increase your available credit and also show that you’re responsible with your credit.

2. Keep Your Credit Cards Active

Make sure that you use your cards at least once a year to keep them shown as “active” credit and make sure that you never cancel your credit cards. 15% of your credit score is determined by the age of your lines of credit, so you should always keep your credit cards active to lengthen the age of your line of credit. Many people tend to cancel cards that they no longer use – many times because the rates aren’t very good or because they have another card with better benefits – but even if you don’t use the cards very often (just once a year is fine), you should keep them active. Typically, someone with a credit score over 800 has credit lines with at least 10 years of positive activity.

3. Always Pay Bills On Time

Probably the most well-known factor of a credit score and the factor that has the biggest impact on your credit score (35% of your score) is your history of paying your credit payments on-time. If you have a history of always making your credit card, mortgage, and car payments on time, you will greatly improve your credit score. This can also have an adverse effect as well, should you ever make a late payment. Unfortunately, it only takes one late payment to severely reduce your credit score so it’s crucial that you make sure to always make credit payments on time.

4. Dispute Errors On Your Credit Report

If you don’t already, make sure that you request a copy of your credit report once every year and review it for errors. It is actually quite common for credit reports to contain errors which can be disputed and potentially allow you to have negative items removed from your credit report. If, for instance, your credit report shows a late payment on a credit card but contained errors in the record, you can dispute the negative item and request to have it removed from your report. Having a negative item, like a late payment, removed from your report can improve your credit score significantly. While disputing errors on your credit report can be tedious and take a lot of time, it is usually worth it. Another option would be to contact a credit repair agency to help you dispute any negative items on your credit report.

5. Reduce The Number of Credit Inquiries

While this may only affect 10% of your credit score, keeping the number of credit inquiries down can still help to build that perfect credit score but is often ignored. You should never have more than one credit inquiry per year but many people do not realize how often this is done and often times have their credit checked more than once per year. If you’re applying for a car loan, checking your credit score online, or applying for a new credit card, these type of actions will almost always result in a credit inquiry and should be avoided if you’ve already had a credit inquiry earlier in the year. Make sure you do your research on what will result in a credit inquiry so that you don’t accidentally have more than one a year without realizing it.

Source: creditabsolute.com

How long does it take to get a credit card? – Lexington Law

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

If you’re considering getting a new credit card, you may be wondering how long you’ll have to wait before you can start using your card and building credit. Typically, it takes a few weeks from the time of application to receive the card in the mail. To determine the specifics, it’s important to understand the three stages of acquiring a credit card: application, approval and mailing.

Most of the time, applying and getting approved for a card happens within a matter of minutes. The main holdup is waiting for the card to come in the mail, which may take up to 10 business days. You may also spend more time waiting if you applied for a card that requires exceptional credit, which requires issuers to manually review your application and credit history.

How long does it take to get a credit card? Application time takes less than hour, approval time ranges from minutes to weeks, and mailing time ranges from 5 to 10 business days.

Step 1: Apply Online

Total wait time: Less than an hour

How to Apply for a Credit Card

When you apply for a credit card online, you’ll need to enter personal information like your name, address, income, employment status and identification info, like a Social Security number. Within minutes, you’ll likely receive an approval or denial, because most credit cards have preset approval criteria.

Getting Preapproved

Getting preapproved or prequalified for a credit card will help you get a card faster because it automates the approval process. You may either receive a preapproval offer in the mail or complete an online form with some personal and financial information. Filling out preapproval forms doesn’t have any impact on your credit score and allows your credit card offers to be more personalized.

Step 2: Get Approved

Total wait time: Anywhere from a few minutes to a few weeks

How Does the Credit Approval Process Work?

If you are preapproved or apply for credit cards with preset criteria, you’ll likely know if you’re approved or denied within minutes. However, if you apply for a credit card that requires exceptional credit, you won’t receive an instant verdict. This is because the credit card issuer must manually review your application and credit history. This can take anywhere from a few days to a week or longer. They may look at:

  • Negative items: Derogatory marks like late payments and delinquent accounts
  • Debt load: Including your debt-to-income ratio and credit utilization ratio
  • Credit score: A high-level indication of your credit health

How to Check Your Application Status

If you’re waiting on a mail-in application or approval that’s hard to get due to high standards, you may be able to check your application’s status online. Most major credit card issuers—except Capital One, Chase and Synchrony—allow users to check their application status online. If that option isn’t available to you, or if you prefer talking to someone, call the issuer’s card services number.

How to Increase Your Chances of Approval

Make sure to only apply for credit cards with criteria that fit your credit health. For example, some credit cards are designed for people with bad credit, while others require excellent credit. Overall, if you don’t have much credit history or if you have bad credit, you likely won’t be approved for cards with great rewards and interest rates.

Step 3: Receive Card

Total wait time: Five to 10 business days

How Long Does It Take for Credit Cards to Come in the Mail?

Unless you applied for a card requiring excellent credit, most of the waiting time is eaten up by the mailing process, which typically takes five to 10 business days.

What to Do If My Card Is Taking Longer Than Expected

If you urgently need the card or are wondering what’s taking so long, consider doing the following:

  • Request an expedite. Expedited delivery for new and replacement cards is offered by many issuers—and sometimes, it’s even free.
  • Track the card. This won’t help the card arrive faster, but it will give you a better idea of its progress. You can either check the card’s status online or call the issuer using a tracking number. This will help you learn when the card was sent and when you can expect it to arrive.
  • Call the issuer. If it’s been more than 10 business days or the amount of time estimated for delivery, your card may have gotten lost in the mail, or even stolen. Consider calling your issuer and requesting that they cancel the old card and issue a new one. Even though this will take longer, it’s a wise safety measure.
Credit card taking longer than expected to arrive? Request an expedite, track the card, call the issuer.

Can I Use My Card Before It Arrives?

If you need to pay bills or make important transactions before your card is scheduled to arrive in the mail, you may be able to access your card number immediately after approval. Check with your issuer to see if it offers this feature, and request an instant card number as soon as you’ve been approved. Applying and getting approved for a credit card has never been easier, especially if you’ve been practicing good credit management. Remember to use your new card responsibly to keep your credit score in the best shape possible. And remember that we’re here to help with credit repair if things happen that are outside of your control, like unfair or inaccurate reporting. Talk to us today to get started.


Reviewed by Cynthia Thaxton, Lexington Law Firm Attorney. Written by Lexington Law.

Cynthia Thaxton has been with Lexington Law Firm since 2014. She attended The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia where she graduated summa cum laude with a degree in International Relations and a minor in Arabic. Cynthia then attended law school at George Mason University School of Law, where she served as Senior Articles Editor of the George Mason Law Review and graduated cum laude. Cynthia is licensed to practice law in Utah and North Carolina.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

Common Credit Score Mistakes

Here at Credit Absolute we’ve helped our fair share of clients who have just been dealt a bad hand and everything went bad at once, destroying their credit score.

One of the more extreme case was with one of our clients who had been laid off during the recent recession. This caused him get behind on car and mortgage payments for several months before finally going into foreclosure, having his car repossessed, and maxed out credit cards.  This left him drowning in debt and when he finally found new employment, the previous lenders began garnishing his wages, making it nearly impossible to pay his current bills, let alone pay off old debt. He was then forced to file bankruptcy and is now working to rebuild his credit after years of bad luck ruined his credit.

There are definitely situations like this that may be out of your control and your bad credit score may just be the result of bad luck, but in most cases it has more to do with poor credit habits and common credit mistakes. While derogatory marks on your credit report do eventually fall off, it does take awhile. So it’s important to make sure you avoid these common mistakes.

Common Credit Score Mistakes That Can Kill Your Credit Score

While some unforeseen circumstances may be unavoidable, there are quite a few different things that can negatively affect your credit score and should be avoided whenever possible. Here are a few common mistakes that people with low credit scores tend to make:

  • You Close Old Credit Card Accounts

A large part of your credit score is determined by your credit history and by keeping your old credit cards can help improve your credit score. You will still need to occasionally use those cards to keep them “active” but you definitely don’t want to close out old cards.

  • You Take Too Long To Shop For The Best Rate

This is a very common mistake among new home and car buyers who have been advised to shop around for the best rates. While it is definitely recommended to search around for the best rates when buying a car or home, you want to avoid having your credit checked numerous times by shopping too long for a good rate. One tip to help avoid this mistake is by working with a mortgage broker; they can run your credit once but will still have access to numerous mortgage companies in order to find you the best rate without having to re-run your credit for every lender.

  • You Don’t Use Credit, Even Though You Have Access To It

Sadly, this happens far too often and, while it may not hurt your credit, it is a lost opportunity that could be helping you maintain a good credit score. If you have credit cards that you’ve perhaps had for years and no longer use, you’re missing out on a great opportunity to improve your credit. Credit that isn’t being used won’t help your credit score so make sure that you’re using your credit card at least a few times a year to ensure it stays “active” and continues to benefit your score.

  • You Max Out Your Credit Cards

While this mistake isn’t always done intentionally – many people max out their credit cards because of unexpected financial burdens – many people are unaware that they are severely hurting their credit score by maxing out a credit card. Try to avoid using more than 50% of your available credit (preferably less than 30%) to maintain a good debt to credit ratio which will help increase your credit score.

  • You Became A Co-Signer

This can be a sensitive matter of conversation because co-signing often involves two people who are very close and trust each other enough to risk their credit on behalf of the other. Unfortunately, many people haphazardly co-sign without a second thought and without considering the implications of the matter. Before co-signing, make sure that the person you’re co-signing for isn’t a likely risk of delinquency. If they stop paying, you start paying with bad credit – you could also be held accountable for the remainder of the debt as well.

  • You Don’t Worry About “Just One” Missed Payment

According to FICO, “Delinquent payments, even if only a few days late, and collections can have a major negative impact on your FICO Scores.”

Far too often people will neglect to pay their bills on time simply because they forget to, are too busy, or simply don’t think it’s a big deal if they’re just a few days late. Unfortunately this can severely impact your credit score, lowering it substantially. Avoid late payments whenever possible and set reminders if you have the tendency to forget.

Rebuild Your Credit

Whether you’ve been the subject of Murphy’s Law and been rained on with horribly bad luck, resulting in a low credit score, or you’ve just inadvertently made some poor choices that have caused your score to drop, Credit Absolute can help rebuild your credit score quickly and affordably. Don’t continue to be dragged down by poor credit and high interest rates, contact us today for a free consultation!

Source: creditabsolute.com

How you get bad credit

No one likes having a low credit score or bad credit and in many cases you may not even know why you have bad credit. While it is more common for young adults to find themselves damaging their credit without realizing it, it can happen to anyone at any age. If you want to avoid having bad credit, it’s important to know what causes your credit score to go down and how you get bad credit.

First of all, it’s also important to know the difference between bad credit and no credit. If you’ve never had a credit card, car loan, mortgage or any other type of loan or any credit history, then you’ll likely be deemed as having no credit and could be denied by lenders as being high risk, simply because they have no data to show whether you’re a reliable borrower. This is not the same thing as having bad credit which looks as bad or worse than having no credit. Bad credit is caused by a bad credit history, large amount of debt, or other issues on your credit report.

Top 4 Reasons You Have Bad Credit

To help you better understand why your credit is bad, here are 4 of the most common reasons that you may have damaged your credit:

  • Too Many Credit Checks: Likely the most common reason that your credit score is lower than you’d like is due to frequent credit checks. If your credit is checked more than once per year, then you will likely lose points on your credit score. This can be caused by applying for credit cards too often, checking your credit score frequently, or even from checking mortgage rates from multiple lenders in an attempt to get the best deal on your new home. Credit checks are very common so it is imperative that you keep track of how often you have having your credit checked to avoid this common mistake.
  • Large Amount of Debt: Another reason that many people have bad credit without realizing it, it due to a large amount of debt. You may be paying your credit card payments on time, have little or no negative instances on your credit report and may have even been very careful to not check your credit too often but may still have bad credit. This is often times caused by a poor debt to credit ratio which is when you use all of your available credit for your debts. In other words, if you have a credit card with a $3,000 limit and you continually have it maxed out or more than 50% (below 30% is optimal) of your available credit is used, then you will likely damage your credit. You may also be declined for loans if you have a large amount of debt compared to your income which is very common with someone who has a mortgage, car loan, and other forms of debt which consumes a large percentage of their income.
  • Past Delinquencies: If you’ve had trouble with debt in the past, such as a foreclosure, repossession, bankruptcy, neglected loan or other similar derogatory mark on your credit in the past, it could be keeping your credit score down and causing you to have bad credit. Many of these types of delinquencies can stay on your credit report for 7 to 10 years so, while you may have forgotten all about it, it may still be showing on your report and handicapping your ability to rebuild your credit.
  • Late Payments:  It can be surprising how many people actually do not realize how their payment history can severely impact their credit. This is likely because many lenders will provide a due date for monthly payments but will provide some type of grace-period before late fees are assessed. This can often-times cause complacency, leading to occasional late payments by borrowers simply because they think they have a couple extra days after the due date to get their payment in. Well, unfortunately, many lenders will report late payments to the credit bureaus which will result in a negative mark on your credit report and a lower credit score. This is very common with credit cards and mortgage payments and any late payment can severely damage your credit and could even increase your interest rate.

How You Can Repair Your Bad Credit

While bad credit can be a complete nightmare and it may seem impossible to improve your credit again, there’s still hope. It will take time but you can certainly repair your credit and get your credit back on track. First of all, going forward, you’ll want to make sure that you avoid the common mistakes listed above but you can also work on adapting some best practices to improve your credit score. Make sure that you make your payments on time, keep a low debt-to-credit ratio – only using about 30% of your available credit on your credit cards – and make sure that you keep using your cards at least a few times a year. Rather than cancelling old cards that you don’t use anymore, it is also beneficial for you to hold on to old cards, using them occasionally, as older cards will help your credit more than new cards which no history.

Lastly, you should check your credit report for errors or inconsistencies which could allow you to dispute negative items on your report which would help to repair your bad credit. While this can be done manually, it is usually recommended that you hire a credit repair company who can go to bat for you against the credit bureaus which will give you much better chance of finding errors and getting negative items removed from your credit report. Most people see an increase in their credit score in less than 45 days when using a credit repair service.

Source: creditabsolute.com

15 types of credit cards

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Whether you’re a seasoned cardholder or a first-timer, you may be surprised at how many types of credit cards are available. Depending on your credit score and the length of your credit history, you may not be able to qualify for the ones with the most favorable terms and lowest interest rates. But chances are, there’s a card that fits your needs and—if used responsibly—may help you build credit.

Broadly speaking, there are four different types of credit card categories:

  1. Cards That Help Build Credit
  2. Cards That Can Save You Money
  3. Cards That Offer Cash Back and Rewards
  4. Cards for People With Bad Credit

Here, we’ll break down each category, discuss the specific card types and explain each one’s unique benefits so that you can make the most of your card.

Cards That Help Build Credit

If you’re new to the world of credit, you may be wondering how to build credit quickly, without going into debt. If you’re in college, you may have the added load of student debt. When you’re just starting out, it’s important to find a card that’s right for you and manage it carefully to start your credit health out on the right foot. You may even be able to earn some rewards along the way.

Cardholders ages 18 – 22 have an average credit score of 672.

1. Student Credit Cards

Student credit cards operate exactly the same way that standard credit cards do. The main difference is that their total credit limits tend to be lower. Additionally, since they are marketed toward students who likely don’t have much of a credit history, the requirements for approval are typically more lenient. 

Benefit: Some student cards offer incentives for good grades, like a small cash reward for each school year that you earn a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Example: Discover it® Student Cash Back

2. Starter Credit Cards

Starter credit cards are designed for those with little to no credit history. Consider getting one if you’ve never had a line of credit, or if you have one that hasn’t been open very long. These cards typically don’t offer great rewards programs or cash-back incentives, and they come with high interest rates. However, if you can find one with no annual fee, it can be a great option to begin building credit.

Benefit: Establish your credit and build a solid payment history with this type of credit card, which is generally easy to qualify for.

Example: Capital One Platinum® Credit Card

3. Joint Credit Cards

Unlike authorized user credit cards, joint credit cards require both parties to apply together. Both parties are equally responsible for paying the balance. Therefore, late or missed payments may ding both credit scores—while consistent, on-time payments will benefit both scores. 

Benefit: If a person doesn’t have a high enough credit score to qualify for a good credit card, they may consider applying with their partner for a joint credit card with more favorable terms.

Example: Bank of America® Cash Rewards Credit Card

Cards That Can Save You Money

Sometimes applying for a credit card is a strategic move. Maybe you want to transfer your balance to a card with a lower interest rate, avoid paying interest for an introductory period or customize features for your business. These cards can help you save money—your way.

Approximately 74% of credit cards have no annual fee.

4. Zero Percent Purchase APR Credit Cards

Sometimes cards will offer temporarily lower APRs for an introductory period. Cards that boast zero percent APR don’t require you to pay interest on new purchases for a set amount of time, usually about 12 months. 

Benefit: Save money on interest by borrowing money essentially for free. Just make sure to pay off your balance by the time your introductory period is over to avoid interest charges.

Example: U.S. Bank Visa® Platinum Card

5. No Annual Fee Credit Cards

Many credit cards charge annual fees for the convenience of having the card and for the benefits and rewards they offer. Depending on how elite the card is, these fees can be up to $450 or more. However, almost three-fourths of cards offer no annual fee—and many of these still come with decent cash back programs. Scan your credit card offer or the terms and conditions to make sure your card has no annual fee. 

Benefit: Save an average of $58 each year by avoiding unnecessary annual credit card fees.

Example: Citi® Double Cash Card

6. Balance Transfer Credit Cards

Similar to zero percent purchase APR credit cards, balance transfer cards offer temporarily low introductory rates—but specifically for balance transfers. This is a great option for those who want to save money on a high-interest credit card. Rather than closing the unfavorable card—which may lower your credit score—a balance transfer may be a better option.

Benefit: Avoid paying hefty amounts of interest by transferring your balance to a card with a much lower introductory rate. 

Example: Wells Fargo Platinum Card

7. Business Credit Cards

If you’re a business owner, you may want to apply for a credit card specifically for business use. This will help you separate personal and business expenses, and the rewards may help your business save money. You’ll then begin to build business credit. To apply you’ll need decent credit and either a federal tax ID or employer identification number (EIN).

Benefit: Enjoy business-specific perks like higher credit limits, expense management reports and the ability to add more cards for employees. 

Example: Costco Anywhere Visa® Business Card by Citi

Cards That Offer Cash Back and Rewards

In order to get the most out of their spending, most cardholders gravitate toward credit options that offer cash back and rewards. 

Cardholders carry an average of 4.1 cards, 2.4 of which are rewards-based.

8. Cash Back Credit Cards

Cash back credit cards allow you to earn a certain percent—typically ranging from one to five—of the money back every time you make a purchase with the card. Some issuers will pay this amount annually, while others pay monthly.

Benefit: Find a card that allows you to customize where you get your cash back. For example, certain cards allow you to earn five percent cash back in a store category of your choice.

Example: Chase Freedom Unlimited®

9. Retail Credit Cards

Retail or store credit cards are offered by specific businesses and can only be used to make purchases with that store. While these cards aren’t ideal for everyday purchasing needs, they’re a great way to earn generous rewards with stores that you frequently shop at. There are over 300 store credit cards available, from Walmart and Target to Lowe’s and JCPenney. 

Benefit: Store cards typically don’t charge annual fees, don’t require excellent credit and offer substantial first-purchase discounts as well as long-term cash back rewards.

Example: Amazon Prime Store Card

10. Hotel Credit Cards

Hotel credit cards are affiliated with a specific hotel chain and offer rewards on a “points” basis. Typically, they’ll offer some points for purchases made at unrelated businesses such as grocery stores, gas stations and restaurants. But the main attraction is the bonus points earned on eligible purchases made directly with the hotel. 

Benefit: Earn generous sign-up bonuses, rewards when you spend money on hotel bookings and yearly free nights. 

Example: Hilton Honors American Express Surpass® Card

11. Airline Credit Cards

Certain credit cards offer rewards on purchases made with a specific airline, while others allow you to earn rewards with any airline or travel-related expense. These rewards rack up in the form of “miles.” For example, many cards offer two miles for every one dollar spent on flights. 

Benefit: For frequent travelers, airline credit cards are a great way to score free and discounted flights.

Example: Delta SkyMiles® Gold American Express Card

12. Gas Rewards Credit Cards

Not to be confused with gas station credit cards—which operate like retail cards—a gas station rewards card offers cash back when you pay at the pump. It can be used anywhere, but you’ll enjoy bonus rewards at gas stations.

Benefit: Earn up to three to five percent cash back on gas purchases, often with no annual fee and a zero percent introductory APR. 

Example: PenFed Platinum Rewards Visa Signature® Card

13. Charge Cards

Charge cards operate in exactly the same manner as regular credit cards, except for one major caveat: you must completely pay off the total balance each month. Failure to do so results in late fees and penalties and will cause a drop in your credit score. On the flip side, they typically come with sizable initial bonuses and rewards.

Benefit: Enjoy higher credit limits and generous point systems—oftentimes offering up to five points per one dollar spent.

Example: ThePlatinum Card® from American Express

Cards for People With Bad Credit

If you’re struggling to get approved for credit cards, loans or other lines of credit because of bad credit, don’t be discouraged. There are credit cards with terms designed specifically for those with poor credit. 

Approximately 12% of Americans have a FICO score below 550.

14. Secured Credit Cards

Most credit cards are unsecured. This means that you are not required to put up a security deposit. Secured cards, on the other hand, require an up-front payment to act as collateral in the event that you can’t pay your balance. Credit card issuers see borrowers with bad credit scores as riskier, so this deposit helps mitigate some of that risk. 

Benefit: Secured cards give borrowers with poor credit access to credit when they otherwise wouldn’t be able to qualify for a card.

Example: Capital One® Secured Mastercard®

15. Prepaid Cards

Prepaid cards aren’t technically credit cards, because they don’t involve borrowing money. Instead, a cardholder loads a set amount of money onto the card, and purchases are subtracted from the card’s balance, similar to a gift card. The spending limit then renews if and when the card is reloaded. 

Benefit: Prepaid cards help you stay within a budget and avoid getting into credit card debt.

Example: American Express Serve® FREE Reloads

What Type of Credit Card Is Best?

Ultimately, the decision for which card to get is up to your personal preferences and financial goals. However, there are a few good rules of thumb when looking for the best credit cards. Remember to read the terms and conditions carefully before signing up. Generally, cards with any of the following perks may be worth pursuing:

  • Zero percent introductory APR
  • Low APR after the introductory period
  • Sign-up bonus
  • Solid rewards or cash-back program
  • No annual fee

All of the different types of credit cards may seem daunting at first, but once you understand the unique benefits of each one, you’ll be able to find a card that fits your needs. Remember that—regardless of credit card type—good credit management is the key to keeping your credit healthy. After years of on-time payments, low credit utilization, a good mix of credit and few hard inquiries, you’ll be well on your way to your best score yet.


Reviewed by Kenton Arbon, an Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Kenton Arbon is an Associate Attorney in the Arizona office. Mr. Arbon was born in Bakersfield, California, and grew up in the Northwest. He earned his B.A. in Business Administration, Human Resources Management, while working as an Oregon State Trooper. His interest in the law lead him to relocate to Arizona, attend law school, and graduate from Arizona State College of Law in 2017. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Arbon has worked in multiple compliance domains including anti-money laundering, Medicare Part D, contracts, and debt negotiation. Mr. Arbon is licensed to practice law in Arizona. He is located in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

Paying Off Credit Cards Fast

Credit card debt can very quickly suck you into an endless cycle of poverty, bad credit and frustration if you don’t pay it off quickly. Here are 5 ways to quickly pay off your credit cards with the least amount of pain.

Tip #1: Cut Costs

Take note of all your monthly expenses, and see where you can cut back. You don’t need to settle for less than what you want – instead, simply find the cheapest ways to live a lifestyle that makes you happy.

Try cutting back on buying new doodads like gadgets, TV’s, and cars, and try postponing those vacations and massages until you’re in better financial straits. After all, if you’re in credit card debt, it’s likely you’ve already had your fun – now it’s time to pay the piper over the next 2-3 years.

Even an extra $25 a month will go a long way in the journey to financial freedom, so start cutting back!

Tip #2: Pay Off the Credit Card With The Highest Interest First

If you have multiple credit cards and you try to make equal payments to each one each month, then it’s easy to feel like you’re going nowhere. To get a sense of accomplishment, find the credit card with the highest interest, give it the biggest chunk of your monthly payments, and only pay the minimum and finance charge (plus a little more) on the other cards.

Once you pay it off, congratulations – that’s a huge chunk off your financial worries, and paying your cards just became much easier.

TIP: If you’re the type who gets motivated by success, then there’s also the option to pay off the credit card with the smallest balance first. You’ll pay it off sooner, and you’ll get the determination to stay the course.

Tip #3: Consider Debt Consolidation

Debt consolidation is a service that lets you combine, or “consolidate,” all your credit card bills into a single bill. The great thing about debt consolidation is that it lets you pay just one bill, and at a smaller interest, than by paying each card individually.

The drawback is that your credit rating will take a hit, but that can be fixed over time, too. Right now, the most important thing is to get out of debt, and fast. Debt consolidation does just that.

If you don’t want to try debt consolidation, then we recommend you find a way to transfer balance from high-interest cards to lower-interest ones. Even a reduction of 2% in interest can result in hundreds of dollars of savings each year, which you can use to reduce your debt even further.

What About Cutting Up Your Credit Cards?

You may have been advised to cut up your credit cards until you pay them off, just to keep yourself from using them before then. If you’re prone to uncontrollable swiping, then that’s good advice – otherwise, it’s better to work up the discipline to simply not use them, cut costs, and make faithful payments, and keep your credit cards handy in case of emergencies.

For a free financial consultation, contact Credit Absolute today!

Source: creditabsolute.com

15 types of credit cards – Lexington Law

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Whether you’re a seasoned cardholder or a first-timer, you may be surprised at how many types of credit cards are available. Depending on your credit score and the length of your credit history, you may not be able to qualify for the ones with the most favorable terms and lowest interest rates. But chances are, there’s a card that fits your needs and—if used responsibly—may help you build credit.

Broadly speaking, there are four different types of credit card categories:

  1. Cards That Help Build Credit
  2. Cards That Can Save You Money
  3. Cards That Offer Cash Back and Rewards
  4. Cards for People With Bad Credit

Here, we’ll break down each category, discuss the specific card types and explain each one’s unique benefits so that you can make the most of your card.

Cards That Help Build Credit

If you’re new to the world of credit, you may be wondering how to build credit quickly, without going into debt. If you’re in college, you may have the added load of student debt. When you’re just starting out, it’s important to find a card that’s right for you and manage it carefully to start your credit health out on the right foot. You may even be able to earn some rewards along the way.

Cardholders ages 18 – 22 have an average credit score of 672.

1. Student Credit Cards

Student credit cards operate exactly the same way that standard credit cards do. The main difference is that their total credit limits tend to be lower. Additionally, since they are marketed toward students who likely don’t have much of a credit history, the requirements for approval are typically more lenient. 

Benefit: Some student cards offer incentives for good grades, like a small cash reward for each school year that you earn a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Example: Discover it® Student Cash Back

2. Starter Credit Cards

Starter credit cards are designed for those with little to no credit history. Consider getting one if you’ve never had a line of credit, or if you have one that hasn’t been open very long. These cards typically don’t offer great rewards programs or cash-back incentives, and they come with high interest rates. However, if you can find one with no annual fee, it can be a great option to begin building credit.

Benefit: Establish your credit and build a solid payment history with this type of credit card, which is generally easy to qualify for.

Example: Capital One Platinum® Credit Card

3. Joint Credit Cards

Unlike authorized user credit cards, joint credit cards require both parties to apply together. Both parties are equally responsible for paying the balance. Therefore, late or missed payments may ding both credit scores—while consistent, on-time payments will benefit both scores. 

Benefit: If a person doesn’t have a high enough credit score to qualify for a good credit card, they may consider applying with their partner for a joint credit card with more favorable terms.

Example: Bank of America® Cash Rewards Credit Card

Cards That Can Save You Money

Sometimes applying for a credit card is a strategic move. Maybe you want to transfer your balance to a card with a lower interest rate, avoid paying interest for an introductory period or customize features for your business. These cards can help you save money—your way.

Approximately 74% of credit cards have no annual fee.

4. Zero Percent Purchase APR Credit Cards

Sometimes cards will offer temporarily lower APRs for an introductory period. Cards that boast zero percent APR don’t require you to pay interest on new purchases for a set amount of time, usually about 12 months. 

Benefit: Save money on interest by borrowing money essentially for free. Just make sure to pay off your balance by the time your introductory period is over to avoid interest charges.

Example: U.S. Bank Visa® Platinum Card

5. No Annual Fee Credit Cards

Many credit cards charge annual fees for the convenience of having the card and for the benefits and rewards they offer. Depending on how elite the card is, these fees can be up to $450 or more. However, almost three-fourths of cards offer no annual fee—and many of these still come with decent cash back programs. Scan your credit card offer or the terms and conditions to make sure your card has no annual fee. 

Benefit: Save an average of $58 each year by avoiding unnecessary annual credit card fees.

Example: Citi® Double Cash Card

6. Balance Transfer Credit Cards

Similar to zero percent purchase APR credit cards, balance transfer cards offer temporarily low introductory rates—but specifically for balance transfers. This is a great option for those who want to save money on a high-interest credit card. Rather than closing the unfavorable card—which may lower your credit score—a balance transfer may be a better option.

Benefit: Avoid paying hefty amounts of interest by transferring your balance to a card with a much lower introductory rate. 

Example: Wells Fargo Platinum Card

7. Business Credit Cards

If you’re a business owner, you may want to apply for a credit card specifically for business use. This will help you separate personal and business expenses, and the rewards may help your business save money. You’ll then begin to build business credit. To apply you’ll need decent credit and either a federal tax ID or employer identification number (EIN).

Benefit: Enjoy business-specific perks like higher credit limits, expense management reports and the ability to add more cards for employees. 

Example: Costco Anywhere Visa® Business Card by Citi

Cards That Offer Cash Back and Rewards

In order to get the most out of their spending, most cardholders gravitate toward credit options that offer cash back and rewards. 

Cardholders carry an average of 4.1 cards, 2.4 of which are rewards-based.

8. Cash Back Credit Cards

Cash back credit cards allow you to earn a certain percent—typically ranging from one to five—of the money back every time you make a purchase with the card. Some issuers will pay this amount annually, while others pay monthly.

Benefit: Find a card that allows you to customize where you get your cash back. For example, certain cards allow you to earn five percent cash back in a store category of your choice.

Example: Chase Freedom Unlimited®

9. Retail Credit Cards

Retail or store credit cards are offered by specific businesses and can only be used to make purchases with that store. While these cards aren’t ideal for everyday purchasing needs, they’re a great way to earn generous rewards with stores that you frequently shop at. There are over 300 store credit cards available, from Walmart and Target to Lowe’s and JCPenney. 

Benefit: Store cards typically don’t charge annual fees, don’t require excellent credit and offer substantial first-purchase discounts as well as long-term cash back rewards.

Example: Amazon Prime Store Card

10. Hotel Credit Cards

Hotel credit cards are affiliated with a specific hotel chain and offer rewards on a “points” basis. Typically, they’ll offer some points for purchases made at unrelated businesses such as grocery stores, gas stations and restaurants. But the main attraction is the bonus points earned on eligible purchases made directly with the hotel. 

Benefit: Earn generous sign-up bonuses, rewards when you spend money on hotel bookings and yearly free nights. 

Example: Hilton Honors American Express Surpass® Card

11. Airline Credit Cards

Certain credit cards offer rewards on purchases made with a specific airline, while others allow you to earn rewards with any airline or travel-related expense. These rewards rack up in the form of “miles.” For example, many cards offer two miles for every one dollar spent on flights. 

Benefit: For frequent travelers, airline credit cards are a great way to score free and discounted flights.

Example: Delta SkyMiles® Gold American Express Card

12. Gas Rewards Credit Cards

Not to be confused with gas station credit cards—which operate like retail cards—a gas station rewards card offers cash back when you pay at the pump. It can be used anywhere, but you’ll enjoy bonus rewards at gas stations.

Benefit: Earn up to three to five percent cash back on gas purchases, often with no annual fee and a zero percent introductory APR. 

Example: PenFed Platinum Rewards Visa Signature® Card

13. Charge Cards

Charge cards operate in exactly the same manner as regular credit cards, except for one major caveat: you must completely pay off the total balance each month. Failure to do so results in late fees and penalties and will cause a drop in your credit score. On the flip side, they typically come with sizable initial bonuses and rewards.

Benefit: Enjoy higher credit limits and generous point systems—oftentimes offering up to five points per one dollar spent.

Example: ThePlatinum Card® from American Express

Cards for People With Bad Credit

If you’re struggling to get approved for credit cards, loans or other lines of credit because of bad credit, don’t be discouraged. There are credit cards with terms designed specifically for those with poor credit. 

Approximately 12% of Americans have a FICO score below 550.

14. Secured Credit Cards

Most credit cards are unsecured. This means that you are not required to put up a security deposit. Secured cards, on the other hand, require an up-front payment to act as collateral in the event that you can’t pay your balance. Credit card issuers see borrowers with bad credit scores as riskier, so this deposit helps mitigate some of that risk. 

Benefit: Secured cards give borrowers with poor credit access to credit when they otherwise wouldn’t be able to qualify for a card.

Example: Capital One® Secured Mastercard®

15. Prepaid Cards

Prepaid cards aren’t technically credit cards, because they don’t involve borrowing money. Instead, a cardholder loads a set amount of money onto the card, and purchases are subtracted from the card’s balance, similar to a gift card. The spending limit then renews if and when the card is reloaded. 

Benefit: Prepaid cards help you stay within a budget and avoid getting into credit card debt.

Example: American Express Serve® FREE Reloads

What Type of Credit Card Is Best?

Ultimately, the decision for which card to get is up to your personal preferences and financial goals. However, there are a few good rules of thumb when looking for the best credit cards. Remember to read the terms and conditions carefully before signing up. Generally, cards with any of the following perks may be worth pursuing:

  • Zero percent introductory APR
  • Low APR after the introductory period
  • Sign-up bonus
  • Solid rewards or cash-back program
  • No annual fee

All of the different types of credit cards may seem daunting at first, but once you understand the unique benefits of each one, you’ll be able to find a card that fits your needs. Remember that—regardless of credit card type—good credit management is the key to keeping your credit healthy. After years of on-time payments, low credit utilization, a good mix of credit and few hard inquiries, you’ll be well on your way to your best score yet.


Reviewed by Kenton Arbon, an Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Kenton Arbon is an Associate Attorney in the Arizona office. Mr. Arbon was born in Bakersfield, California, and grew up in the Northwest. He earned his B.A. in Business Administration, Human Resources Management, while working as an Oregon State Trooper. His interest in the law lead him to relocate to Arizona, attend law school, and graduate from Arizona State College of Law in 2017. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Arbon has worked in multiple compliance domains including anti-money laundering, Medicare Part D, contracts, and debt negotiation. Mr. Arbon is licensed to practice law in Arizona. He is located in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

How to refinance a mortgage with bad credit

Refinancing your mortgage with a bad credit score is completely possible, but is a more complicated process than refinancing with a good score. Because your credit score is such a large aspect of any loan application and refinancing process, it is in your best interest to consider all of your options before moving forward.

Refinancing your mortgage could be a great opportunity to gain some payment flexibility or even take advantage of a lower interest rate. To avoid leaving money on the table, explore all of your options for refinancing with bad credit.

How Credit Scores Affect Refinancing

Lenders use your credit score and overall lending history to calculate the risk of lending you money. A lender will view a borrower with a low credit score caused by loan defaults and constant late payments as a high risk. Because the borrower has shown negative borrowing practices in the past the lender will be more reluctant to sign or refinance a loan.

30-Year Mortgage Rates Based on Credit Scores

FICO Score APR
760–850 4.6%
700–759 4.8%
680–699 5.0%
660–679 5.2%
640–659 5.6%
620–639 6.1%

Based on 2018 national averages for a $200,000 fixed loan.
Source: FICO

Putting together a mortgage refinancing package for a borrower with a bad financial history might cause the lender to increase the length of the loan term, increase the total interest rate or even increase the total monthly payments. Unfortunately, when a borrower has a pattern of falling behind on payments, a lender will offer more expensive refinancing packages to make up for the added risk.

Is Refinancing Right for You?

It is important to note that refinancing your mortgage may not always save you money. You might come out with the same financial deal or a worse option than you currently have, especially if you have a low credit score. In fact, looking at the average outcomes of Freddie Mac mortgages that were refinanced between 1994 and 2018 shows that only a small fraction of refinances actually resulted in the borrower saving money.

Graphic: Average Mortgage Refinancing Outcome

Source: Freddie Mac

While refinancing may not be right for everyone, it’s still important to consider the benefits of flexibility and length of terms. If you see yourself falling behind on payments or want to pay off your loan faster, refinancing your mortgage might still offer you some benefits.

Refinancing With Your Current Lender

When approaching your current lender about refinancing your mortgage it is first important to assess where you stand as a borrower. If you make payments on time and are in great financial health the lender will most likely want to continue doing business with you. However, if you have been late on payments and are struggling to cover other financial responsibilities the lender might be more reluctant to refinance your mortgage.

1. Shop Around for Low Rates

Before approaching your current lender for refinancing options, it is important to check for other options. To aid with any negotiations you should first check with other banks to see what interests rates are the best. Coming to your current lender after already shopping around for prices will give you more bargaining power to get a lower rate.

2. Show Proof of Savings

If your credit score is low but you have money in the bank a lender may still offer you a competitive rate. Showing proof of income and savings is a good option for new borrowers with short lending historys. For lenders, any proof that a borrower will be able to make payments toward a mortgage or loan will lower the overall lending risk and make a positive impact on the terms of the refinancing agreement.

3. Get a Loan Cosigner

If you have a low credit score and do not have sufficient money in the bank to lower your overall risk, you can use a loan cosigner. A cosigner shows the validity of an agreement and essentially promises to pay any debts that are outstanding if the borrower cannot pay. Depending on your financial situation, it can be difficult to get someone to agree to be your loan cosigner. As such, you should only approach people you’re close with.

4. Show Proof of Income

Even if you do not have a large amount of savings in the bank you can still demonstrate you will make payments on time and carry through with your mortgage agreement by showing proof of income. If you have a well-paying job or have sufficient income coming in, a lender will be more likely to offer a good refinancing option to you. Even without money in the bank or a good credit score, showing proof of income demonstrates that you are financially stable enough to make payments on the loan.

5. Improve Your Credit Score

Before visiting your lender to inquire about mortgage refinancing options you should first look at your credit report for points of action around how you can build your credit score. If your credit report is full of negative items like late payments, hard inquiries and delinquent accounts there could be some places to make up some extra points. Through a series of disputes, letters and phone calls with the major credit agencies you can work toward getting a higher score. There are also companies that offer credit repair solutions that can get your credit removal cases rolling to help improve your score.

Consider Cash-Out Refinancing

Cash-out refinancing is a mortgage refinancing option ideal for people who owe less than their house is worth. It is important to note that a cash-out refinancing option trades your current loan for a cash payment and a larger loan. Lenders can typically refinance a loan for up to 80 percent of the current market value.

Equity is earned on a home when its market value price increases over the price in which you paid for it. Earned equity is normally cashed out with the sale of a home, but it can also be tapped into with cash-out refinancing.

Graphic: 80% have tappable equity on their home

The largest disadvantage to a cash-out refinance is the equity loss of your investment. Although the amount of money between what you currently owe and what your house is valued can be a sizable help for short-term debts, you will still be accountable to pay back the new and larger loan in the long term.

Apply for the Home Affordable Refinance Program

The Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) is an initiative created by the Federal Housing Finance Agency following the 2008 economic recession, which caused large mortgage defaults in America. With the sudden drop in housing prices, many Americans were overpaying for their mortgages. HARP has helped refinance over 3 million mortgages so far and represents over 20 percent of all refinances. It is important to note that HARP is not the best solution for everyone, and has five main requirements for eligibility.

  • Your loan is currently owned by the mortgage-backed securities companies Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae.
  • Your mortgage/loan was signed before May 31, 2009.
  • Your current loan-to-value ratio is over 80 percent.
  • You are up to date with your mortgage payments and have not missed a payment in the last six months nor missed more than one payment in the past year.
  • The mortgage was either for your current residence, a second home or a four-unit investment property.

Seek FHA Refinancing

The Federal Housing Administration has a number of refinancing options built to help homeowners with existing FHA secured loans. Unfortunately, the streamlined refinancing is not available for loans that originated outside of any Federal Housing Administration secured lenders. One benefit of refinancing through the FHA is credit or income checks are not part of the process. If your mortgage is secured with the FHA, there are some prerequisites for the refinancing program.

  • You are current on payments and have not missed or been late on a payment for the past year.
  • You have owned the house for over six months.
  • You use an FHA approved lender or an FHA approved bank when refinancing.

If you are still unsure if you qualify the FHA mortgage portal includes a step-by-step guide that can give you an estimate of your best refinancing options available.

Mortgage Refinancing During the Coronavirus Outbreak

Graphic: Coronavirus Impact on Refinancing Your Mortgage

The coronavirus outbreak has impacted our lives on every front. Loss of jobs and income has lead to uncertainty and has made it difficult for many Americans to make their mortgage payments. Many homeowners have been taking advantage of the mortgage relief that was part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), legislation that was signed in on March 27, 2020. This allows eligible homeowners with FHA-insured mortgages to have their payments due dates pushed back, also known as forbearance.  

Other homeowners are taking this opportunity to refinance their mortgage. According to the Mortgage Bankers Association, refinancing applications are being filed at a rate that’s 168% higher than during the same period in 2019. Though re-financing sounds like an attractive plan-of-action, it may not be right for everyone — there are additional considerations to make if your credit score is less than ideal.

To better understand your options, see some refinancing factors, considerations, challenges and resources below.

Is Refinancing Worth It?

It is worth looking into refinancing but this may not be the right move for you depending on a variety of factors. In a broader sense, this is a great opportunity to save money if the determining factors are on your side — in that case, yes, it could be worth refinancing your mortgage.

Refinancing Factors To Consider

Before you jump on the phone with your mortgage lender, there are some factors that you should consider that can help you determine if you are a good candidate.

  • Your credit score: As mentioned before, a lower score will typically equate to a higher APR. See the table above for an idea of how your FICO credit score correlates with your APR. Refinancing typically doesn’t negatively affect your credit but there are instances where it could, like refinancing too often.
  • Your recent payment record: If you have a recent history of late or missed payments (not tied to the coronavirus pandemic) that could have a negative impact on your results.
  • Occupancy length: How long you’re planning on living at your house is another huge factor that can affect your savings.
  • How old your mortgage is: The amount of years that you have left on your mortgage is a huge factor. If you are close to paying off your mortgage, it’s likely not worth it.
  • Many of the same rules apply: Regardless of coronavirus, there are certain actions that can improve or hurt your chances when refinancing. To recap, those best practices are: 
    • Shopping around for low rates
    • Showing proof of your savings
    • Getting someone to cosign your loan
    • Showing proof of your income
    • Improving your credit score

Current Mortgage Rates

Mortgage rates are historically low right now, the lowest being 3.13% on March 2, 2020. As of April 16, 2020, the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate was 3.780%, according to Bankrate and 3.341% according to NerdWallet. These rates are changing rapidly so it’s important to keep tabs on their movements if you’re considering refinancing. Check out daily rate updates on Mortgage News Daily to stay up-to-date on mortgage rate information.

Challenges and Risks of Refinancing Your Home

There are always risks that come with refinancing your home. One of the biggest challenges that the current climate has created is the time it may take to get your refinancing request through due to the high demand right now. See that challenge and additional ones below:

  • Longer to acquire: Requests are backed up because lenders don’t have the capacity to process all of the requests that are coming in due to demand coupled with staffing shortages.
  • Closing costs: Most refinancing processes require some sort of fee for processing the request. Depending on your situation, that’s something to consider.
  • Savings loss: Just like refinancing at any other time, there is no guarantee of savings and many people end up in the same spot or with a loss in savings due to increased rates or loss of certain benefits.

Questions To Ask Your Mortgage Lender

Before calling or making an appointment with your lender it’s a great idea to use a mortgage refinancing calculator to get a preliminary idea of how refinancing could work out for you. If you see a positive result and decide to call your lender, make sure you have your proper documents handy and have questions ready to ask them. Some of those could include:

  • What is the estimated turnaround time for this process? 
  • What are the new interest rate and APR?
  • Will I be able to lock in my loan rate?
  • What additional costs would I incur (title policies, inspections, credit reports, etc.)?
  • Will the new agreement include prepayment penalties?

H3: COVID-19 Mortgage Resources

Below is a collection of helpful resources to make sure you understand your options and keep up with the ever-changing rates and information that’s being distributed.

Coronavirus-Specific Resources

Additional Mortgage Information

In the end, there is no ‘one size fits all’ answer to whether or not you should attempt to refinance your home. We recommend reaching out to an advisor who can evaluate your individual situation. If you’re worried about your credit score hurting your chances of refinancing, try a free credit consultation to learn more about your score and how credit repair could help your financial situation. 

Source: lexingtonlaw.com