Can I Afford to Have a Hot Girl Summer?

Save more, spend smarter, and make your money go further

After a year spent indoors, everyone wants to have a hot girl summer in 2021. But when your financial situation is still recovering from the pandemic, can you really afford to?

Whether you’re struggling to get by or just looking to save a few bucks, use these tips to go big this summer – without going over budget.

Cash in rewards points

Millions of Americans stocked up on toilet paper, hand sanitizer, and disinfectants during the pandemic. But many consumers inadvertently hoarded another item: credit card rewards points.

If you’re planning to reunite with high school friends or travel to a bachelorette party, cash in your points and miles to save on the trip. If you had to cancel a vacation due to the pandemic, redeem any remaining travel credit.

If you have more rewards points than you need, you may be able to redeem them for cash or as a statement credit on your card, which you can then use toward your trip.

Don’t have any rewards cards? Now may be a good time to sign up. Chase is currently offering a 100,000-point bonus for new cardholders who apply for the Chase Sapphire Preferred card, or a 60,000-point bonus for the Chase Sapphire Reserve card. Depending on where you’re going, that’s enough for a couple of flights or hotel stays.

Invite friends over for a swap

My new favorite tradition with friends is to host a swap. Everyone brings items they no longer need, and we take turns picking new-to-us items. Last time I got three dresses, a pair of Madewell overalls, a curling iron, and a dog bed.

You’re not limited to clothes at a swap. I encourage my friends to bring anything, including books, kitchenware, makeup and home decor. It’s a free way to get new items, and it encourages you to declutter your house.

Drink like a college student

Back in college, most people would have a couple drinks at home before venturing to the bars. If you’re going out with friends, consider starting with a drink or two at home.

Another money-saving trick is to eat a full meal before you go out, so you’re not tempted to grab pricey appetizers. If you’re getting drinks with your friends, limit yourself to basic cocktails instead of specialty cocktails, or stick to the draft list instead of buying a fancy bottle.

Create rules for yourself

Now that the world is opening up, it’s tempting to throw your budget away and treat yourself to everything you missed during the pandemic. Before doing that, set up some ground rules to keep yourself from going overboard.

For example, make a rule that if you’re getting dinner or brunch with friends, you won’t get take-out that week. These basic rules will help you spend less without having to give up what really matters.

Use a cash budget

Instead of bringing your credit card with you on a night out, only take the amount of cash you want to spend. You can still use your phone to order an Uber or Lyft, but you won’t have the temptation of a credit card. Decide how much you’re comfortable spending and only bring that amount.

Join a sports league

Group sports leagues like softball, soccer, or kickball are one of the most affordable ways to hang out with friends and get some exercise at the same time.

Most group leagues cost between $50 and $75 a person, depending on the sport, and usually last around six weeks. Sometimes you’ll even get a discount at a local bar where you can hang out afterwards.

Plan a budget-friendly trip

For the past few years, my college friends and I have met up every summer at my in-law’s lake house. The house is located near a small town in Indiana, only a few hour’s drive for most of us.

Instead of picking a more exotic locale, we prioritize saving money. It’s free to stay there, and we split the cost of groceries. I usually spend about $100 on gas, food, and drinks for a three-day trip.

If you’re considering a getaway with friends, get creative. Don’t automatically book a trip to Vegas or Miami. Pick a spot that’s close enough to drive, or near a popular airport where flights will be less expensive.

If you’re not lucky enough to have access to a family vacation home, look on Airbnb and VRBO for affordable destinations. Find a house with a stocked kitchen so you can cook most of your meals.

Pro tip: Use Mint’s free travel budget calculator to help you plan your next adventure.

Budget for it

When the world shut down last year, most of us got used to spending less on gas, bars, and new clothes. But as things start to open up, you may find your spending ramping back up.

Use this time to revise your budget and allocate money toward restaurants, rideshare services, and new outfits. As things return to normal, you may have to change your budget a few times before finding a happy balance. Give yourself some grace, as circumstances may change rapidly.

If you find budgeting for one month at a time difficult, give yourself a weekly allowance to use for non-essential purchases. Redirect some of your pandemic habits, like ordering take-out a few times a week, to your rediscovered social habits, like getting dinner with your friends.

Talk to your friends

While some consumers survived the pandemic without getting laid off, millions of Americans lost their jobs and remained unemployed for months. So while your friends may be ready to party, you might be focused on rebuilding your savings.

If you suffered financially during the pandemic, you may not be able to keep up with your friends this summer. Even though it may seem awkward to discuss your money problems openly, it’s better than making excuses.

If you lie about why you can’t hang out, your friends will think you’re avoiding them. But if you’re honest, they may accommodate you by suggesting budget-friendly activities. Give them the chance to understand, even if it means having an uncomfortable conversation. Who knows – one of them might be struggling as well, but too afraid to speak up.

Save more, spend smarter, and make your money go further

Zina Kumok

Zina Kumok is a freelance writer specializing in personal finance. A former reporter, she has covered murder trials, the Final Four and everything in between. She has been featured in Lifehacker, DailyWorth and Time. Read about how she paid off $28,000 worth of student loans in three years at Conscious Coins. More from Zina Kumok

Source: mint.intuit.com

Here’s All You Need to Know About Unlimited Chuck E. Cheese Games

Chuck-e-cheese stands outside of a vehicle after a reopening of a Check E Cheese store.
Contributor Jenna Limbach writes on financial literacy and lifestyle topics for The Penny Hoarder from her home base in Utah. Stephanie Bolling is a former staff writer.

Thinking of having a birthday party at Chuck E. Cheese? The Ultimate Fun and Mega Fun party options both come with 2 hours of all you can play for each child.
To keep patrons safe, Chuck E. Cheese has COVID-19 protocols implemented during birthday parties and some aspects of playtime. There are hand sanitizing stations, regular sanitizing of surfaces and touchless pay options, as well as the touchless Play Passes and bands.
You’d think taking the little ones to a pizza and games place like Chuck E. Cheese would bring some distraction-induced reprieve. But alas, they’re coming at you every five minutes for more tokens.
Just think: Your kids might wear themselves out for less than . Might.

How Chuck E. Cheese All You Can Play Works

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If you do a traditional party at Chuck E. Cheese but want social distancing, you can book a VIP party on Saturdays at 8 a.m. or Sundays at 9 a.m.
If you have to cancel a party due to COVID, you can transfer your party deposit to a new date within one year of the canceled date or use it for a to-go party pack.

  • $1 Play Pass
  • $3 Play Pass with coil wristband
  • $7.99 Rechargeable Play Band with $5 worth of game play included

Ready to stop worrying about money?
Some games might still dispense paper tickets, but Chuck E. Cheese has transitioned to e-tickets that are automatically saved to Play Passes. Once kids are done playing, they can redeem their e-tickets at the counter for prizes.
Behold the All You Can Play game option (aka the savior of parental sanity), at participating Chuck E. Cheese locations nationwide.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com
For birthday parties, you can find an option that works for you based on state or local guidelines, or even do a Party Pack at home through delivery or carryout. If you choose an at-home option, you’ll still get play points and e-tickets to use on your next visit.

Pro Tip
If you find yourself frequently going to Chuck E. Cheese to keep the kids happy, check out their rewards program.

Chuck E. Cheese and COVID-19 Safety

Privacy Policy
Check that All You Can Play is available at your Chuck E. Cheese location before you go.
The allowed number of party guests and Chuck E. appearances will vary by state and local guidelines. If local guidelines don’t allow for Chuck E. to be there in person, he’ll attend virtually on video monitors.
Not today, children.
Currently, unlimited game time comes in 30-minute increments starting at with any Chuck E. Cheese deals purchase and is good any day of the week. Save even more if you go on All You Can Play Wednesday. Mention the promotion at time of purchase and you’ll get an hour of unlimited play for .99.
Kids and families attend the Chuck E. Cheese Baton Rouge, La. Signature Grand Reopening on Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2021 in Baton Rouge, LA. Tyler Kaufman/AP Images for CEC Entertainment
Kids like to touch everything, and at a restaurant like Chuck E. Cheese those instincts run free.

Chuck E. Cheese Rewards

For one flat fee, kiddos can play unlimited games without exception for a selected amount of time.
When you download the app and sign-up, you’ll receive 500 free e-tickets. You’ll get 250 e-tickets on your sign-up anniversary and a birthday surprise for your birthday and half-birthday. Refer a friend and you’ll get one free personal pizza when they sign up.

  • For 50 points, you’ll get 15 minutes of play time, an order of Unicorn Churros or 500 e-tickets.
  • At 100 points, you receive 30 minutes of play time, one personal 1-topping pizza or 1,000 e-tickets.
  • For 200 points, you can earn 60 minutes of play time, one large 1-topping pizza or 2,000 e-tickets.

Kids can use Play Passes or Play Bands, which allow them to load time or points with a tap. Play Passes come in three tiers:
Before your next trip, you can also reload time and points onto Play Passes and Play Bands online. <!–

–>

Being a parent is expensive. And exhausting.

Credit Card Network vs Issuer: What Is the Difference?

While credit card networks and card issuers both play a role when you use your credit card to make a purchase, they do different things. Credit card networks facilitate transactions between merchants and credit card issuers. Meanwhile, credit card issuers are the ones that provide credit cards to consumers and pay for transactions on the cardholder’s behalf when they use their card.

Where it can get confusing is that some credit card networks are also card issuers. To get a better understanding, keep reading for a closer look at the differences between a credit card network vs. issuer.

What Is a Credit Card Network?

Credit card networks are the party that creates a digital infrastructure that makes it possible for merchants to facilitate transactions between merchants and the credit card issuers — meaning they’re key to how credit cards work. In order to facilitate these transactions, the credit card networks charge the merchants an interchange fee, also known as a swipe fee.

Here’s an example of how this works: Let’s say someone walks into a clothing store and uses their credit card to buy a pair of pants. They swipe or tap their credit card to make the purchase. At this point, the store’s payment system will send the details of this transaction to the cardholder’s credit card network, which then relays the information to the credit card issuer. The credit card issuer decides whether or not to approve the transaction. Finally, the clothing store is alerted as to whether or not the transition was approved.

Essentially, credit card networks make it possible for businesses to accept credit cards as a form of payment, making them integral to what a credit card is. Credit card networks are also responsible for determining where certain credit cards are accepted, as not every merchant may accept all networks.

The Four Major Card Networks

The four major credit card networks that consumers are most likely to come across are:

•   American Express

•   Discover

•   Mastercard

•   Visa

All of these credit card networks have created their own digital infrastructure to facilitate transactions between credit card issuers and merchants. These four credit card networks are so commonly used that generally anywhere in the U.S. it’s possible to find a business that accepts one or more of the payment methods supported by these merchants. When traveling abroad, it’s more common to come across Visa and Mastercard networks.

Two of these popular payment networks — American Express and Discover — are also credit card issuers. However, their offerings as a credit card network are separate from their credit card offerings as an issuer.

Does It Matter Which Card Network You Use?

Which credit card network someone can use depends on the type of credit card they have and whether the credit card network that supports that card is available through the merchant where they want to make a purchase. Most merchants in the U.S. work with all of the major networks who support the most popular credit cards, so it shouldn’t matter too much which credit card network you have when shopping domestically. When traveling abroad, however, it’s important to have cash on hand in case the credit card network options are more limited.

Merchants are the ones who are more likely to be affected by the credit card networks that they use. This is due to the fact that credit card networks determine how much the merchant will pay in fees in order to use their processing system.

Recommended: Charge Cards Advantages and Disadvantages

What Are Credit Card Issuers?

Credit card issuers are the financial institutions that create and manage credit cards. They’re responsible for approving applicants, determining cardholder rewards and fees, and setting credit limits and the APR on a credit card.

Essentially, credit card issuers manage the entire experience of using a credit card. Cardholders work with their credit card issuer when they need to get a new card after losing one, when they have to make their credit card minimum payment, or when they want to check their current card balance.

Credit card issuers can be banks, credit unions, fintech companies, or other types of financial institutions. Some of the biggest credit card issuers in the U.S. are:

•   American Express

•   Bank of America

•   Barclays

•   Capital One

•   Chase

•   Citi

•   Discover

•   Synchrony Bank

•   U.S. Bank

•   Wells Fargo

Credit Card Network vs Issuer: What Is the Difference?

Credit card issuers and credit card payment networks are easy to confuse. The main difference is that credit card networks facilitate payments between merchants and credit card issuers whereas credit card issuers create and manage credit cards for consumers. If you have an issue with your credit card — like in the instance you want to dispute a credit card charge or request a credit card chargeback — it’s the issuer you’d go to.

These are the main differences to be aware of when it comes to credit card networks vs. issuers:

Credit Card Issuer Credit Card Payment Network

•   Creates credit cards

•   Manages credit cards

•   Accepts or declines applicants

•   Sets credit card fees

•   Determines interest rates and credit limits

•   Creates rewards offerings

•   Approves and declines transactions

•   Processes transactions between credit card companies and merchants

•   Creates the digital infrastructure that facilitates these transactions

•   Charges an interchange fee to merchants

•   Determines which credit cards can be used at which merchants

How Credit Card Networks and Issuers Work Together

Credit card networks and issuers need each other to function. Without a credit card network, consumers wouldn’t be able to use their card to shop with any merchants, and the credit card issuer’s product would go unused. Credit card networks create the infrastructure that allows merchants to accept credit cards as payment.

However, it’s up to the credit card issuers to approve or decline the transaction. The credit card issuer is also the one responsible for getting credit cards into consumers’ hands when they’re eligible and old enough to get a credit card, thus creating a need for the credit card networks’ services.

Recommended: When Are Credit Card Payments Due

Get a New SoFi Credit Card Online and Earn 2% Cash Back

Credit cards can be a useful financial tool, but it’s important to understand their ins and outs before swiping — including the difference between a credit card network vs. card issuer. Both are critical to credit card transactions, with the credit card network facilitating the transaction between the issuer and the merchant, and the credit card network approving or denying the transaction.

While the major credit card networks are available at most merchants in the U.S., this may not be the case abroad, which is why it’s important to be aware of when choosing a credit card. This among many other considerations, of course, such as searching for a good APR for a credit card and assessing the fees involved.

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FAQ

What is a credit card network?

A credit card network is the party that creates the necessary infrastructure to process transactions between a credit card issuer and a merchant. Whenever someone makes a purchase with a credit card, it is processed by a credit card network. In return for processing the transaction, the merchant pays the credit card network an interchange fee, which is how the credit card networks make money.

How do I know my credit card issuer?

To find out a credit card’s issuer, simply look at your credit card. There will be a string of numbers on the credit card, and the first six to eight digits represent the Bank Identification Number (BIN) or the Issuer Identification Number (IIN). The Issuer identification number identifies who the credit card issuer is.

Who is the largest credit card issuer?

The four largest credit card networks are American Express, Discover, Mastercard, and Visa. Most merchants in the U.S. work with all four credit card networks. When traveling abroad, it’s more common to come across Visa and Mastercard networks.


1See Rewards Details at SoFi.com/card/rewards.
Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands or products mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
The SoFi Credit Card is issued by The Bank of Missouri (TBOM) (“Issuer”) pursuant to license by Mastercard® International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.

Photo credit: iStock/Poike
SOCC0322016

Source: sofi.com

3 Instances When a Landlord Can Legally Break a Rental Lease

Read this to understand when you can legally break a lease agreement.

Even before the pandemic, landlords filed 3.6 million eviction cases on average in the U.S. each year. The process is emotional and difficult for everyone involved, but there are circumstances for which you as a landlord will have to break a lease agreement early.

If you’ve got a month-to-month lease agreement, either party can terminate at any time with proper notification, at a minimum of 30 days. But if you’ve got a fixed-term lease agreement with a tenant, such as a one-year lease, you can’t break the lease mid-way through on a whim.

When can you legally terminate a lease agreement early?

Breaking a lease agreement with cause

You’ve got a lease agreement that’s legally binding that the tenant signed before moving in. If that tenant violates the lease agreement by having an unapproved roommate, unauthorized pet, unpaid rent, has caused major damage or conducted illegal activities, you have every right to terminate their lease “with cause.”

In this instance, you would send your tenant a “cure or quit” notice. Either they “cure” the problem by paying rent owed, for example, or they “quit” the property. You can even send an “unconditional” quit notice if the issue at hand isn’t cured. For example, if the tenant alters or damages part of the property without your consent and there’s no way to fix the problem. Check your state laws on these types of lease terminations.

Eviction notice.

Eviction notice.

Can a landlord break a lease agreement without cause?

You can do so but you must include the reasons for this kind of early termination in the tenant’s lease agreement. If it’s not in the agreement, you can’t just force a tenant out on a whim.

Add a clause to your lease agreement that allows you to break a lease with 30- or 60-days’ notice so the tenant has time to find another place to live. Work with an attorney to make sure the language is accurate. Be upfront and clear in your language and point it out to the tenant at signing. There’s no reason to hide your intentions. If you know well in advance that you may have to break the lease, sign a month-to-month lease.

Reasons to break the lease early

There are certain circumstances under which you can break a lease, including:

1. You want to sell the property

You can sell whenever you want, but you must have a clause in the lease agreement in order to terminate the lease legally. Lease contracts will transfer along with the property and the new owner has to abide by them. Some buyers want properties that are already tenanted.

Decide if you want the tenants on the property during the sales process or if you want them out before putting the property on the market. Also, check whether your state requires you to offer existing tenants the first right of refusal.

You want to keep your tenants happy if they’re staying on the premises. And they do have some legal rights, including 24-hour notice of showings, the right to stay during a showing and the transfer of their security deposit to the new owner once the property sells.

Lay hardwood floors

Lay hardwood floors

2. You need to renovate the property

As a landlord, you must keep your property safe and habitable. If you need full access to the property in order to renovate and remodel to keep your property in good condition, you can terminate a lease. If the upgrades are going to cause health and safety issues, you can terminate a lease early. Again, you must have a clause in the lease agreement in order to terminate the lease legally.

3. You need to move into the rental space

If you’re renting out a house, for example, and you need to move back in, you can legally terminate the lease early.

How to terminate a lease

There are a few steps you must follow to legally end a lease to avoid a tenant possibly filing a claim in court.

Send a notice to the tenant letting them know that you’re terminating their lease. Check your state laws on how to write and deliver this termination notice. There are specific requirements for doing this.

Depending on the reasons you’re giving this notice, it may state the tenant’s transgression and warn them that they must vacate the property or face eviction. Or, you might give the tenant a few days to act on fixing whatever they did wrong, e.g., find a new home for their unauthorized pet or pay any rent owed. Again, check your state laws.

If the tenant doesn’t comply with the notice, you may have to file an eviction lawsuit.

Make sure it

Make sure it

When a landlord is not allowed to break the lease early

The bottom line is if you haven’t included a clause in your lease that you may terminate the lease early, you can’t just go ahead and do so. And your state may have a list of circumstances under which you’re restricted from ending a lease early. For example, there are usually rules around breaking the lease on a rent-controlled apartment.

You may just have to wait

Nobody likes the eviction process, and you don’t want to end up in court. But sometimes, you must remove a tenant. If it’s possible, your best bet is to wait until lease renewal time and not renew the lease. Depending on your state laws, you may need to give 30- to 60-days’ notice on non-renewal.

If you didn’t have an early termination clause in your lease agreement, but you need your tenant to move out, you can pay them, a.k.a., offering cash for keys. You give a tenant enough money to cover their moving costs and a deposit on another place they might rent.

Always be open and communicative with your tenants for the best outcome. In all cases, if you’re a property manager or landlord and you need to break a lease agreement, check your state laws and get an attorney’s input.

Source: rent.com

Joe Rogan’s Real Estate Experience: Living a Luxurious Lake Life in Austin, Texas

Podcasting has its privileges. After sealing a deal for over $100 million with Spotify, Joe Rogan has become the most popular — and best paid — podcaster on earth. 

The Joe Rogan Experience host first rose to fame in the 1990s sitcom NewsRadio and went on to host stunt/dare game show Fear Factor, followed by forays into martial arts, where he is a renowned commentator for the UFC.

And while nowadays his name is tied to his immensely popular podcast (which was the most popular podcast in the U.S. for much of 2020 and 2021, reaching an estimate 11 million people per episode), the former Fear Factor host has had an extensive stand-up comedy career, which he started in back 1988 and continues to the present day.

Cashing in his podcasting pennies, Joe and his family recently took up residence in a multi-million dollar mansion. Below you’ll find all the details we could find about the Rogans’ $14.4 million property in Austin, Texas.

Joe Rogan’s house upgrade from California to Texas

The Joe Rogan Experience host, 54, and his family-of-five became part of the “mass exodus out of California” due to the Golden State’s lockdown rates and COVID-19 responses, lack of rain, homelessness epidemic, overpopulation and increased taxes.

According to the father-of-three, the Lone Star State — and the multi-million dollar dream house he found there — is a far more appealing alternative and the perfect place to call home.

While his 7,500 square foot home in California was cozy, the comedian recently moved his family into a much larger estate in Austin, Texas. 

path leading to Joe Rogan's house
Joe Rogan’s new house in Austin, Texas. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood

Rogan’s house in Austin, Texas is one of the most exclusive properties in the area, and puts the podcaster in proximity to some other well-known celebrities that reside in the state’s capital — including Supernatural actor Jensen Ackles, who also lives in a lovely lake house in Austin.

Reportedly worth four times more than his home in California, Joe purchased the Texas estate for $14.4 million.

Nestled in the outskirts of Austin, the massive spread is outside the chaos of the city, but close enough for the everyday conveniences.

With A-list neighbors such as billionaire John Paul DeJoria and Academy Award-winning actress Sandra Bullock, the podcast king created his castle in this southern slice of heaven.

Inside Joe Rogan’s Austin home, a million-dollar home fit for the world’s leading podcaster

Purchased in an off-the-market deal, Joe and his family-of-five recently moved into their lakeside home in the second half of 2020.

Although not many details have been leaked online about their sprawling new digs, it seems that Joe and his wife Jessica have plenty of room for their three daughters: Lola, 12, Rosy, 11, and 24-year-old Kayja Rose. 

According to Dirt, the massive lakeside mansion boasts 10,980 square feet and features 8 bedrooms and 10 bathrooms. 

the entrance to Joe Rogan's house in Austin, TX
Stepping inside Joe Rogan’s Austin house. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood
Joe Rogan’s new house comes with floor-to-ceiling glass walls that open up to mesmerizing lake views. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood

Located on Lake Austin, the Tuscan-style estate was built in 2006 and listed for $7.25 in 2015. 

According to Work and Money, designer Benjamin Wood and his philanthropist wife Theresa Castellano Wood are the former owners of the elegant abode.

They’re also the ones who added the Asian-inspired and modern upgrades, which add a wow factor to the already-impressive home.

Rogan’s house includes an open floorplan with the dining room, living room and library all sharing one space. Painted deep blue, this shared living space is accented by rustic wooden pillars and light wood feature walls. 

living room with floor-to-ceiling walls of glass inside Joe Rogan's house in Austin, TX
The main living area has an open floorplan that combines the dining room, living room and library. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood
The living area is accented by dark blue walls and dramatic furnishings. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood
The statement piece in Joe Rogan’s house in Texas is a floor-to-ceiling built-in library. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood

With rustic farmhouse vibes, the beautifully open kitchen includes two islands, antique cabinets and plenty of room for Joe’s favorite wild meat meals. 

With floor-to-ceiling glass walls, the family-of-five can couch-it while glancing out at the four acres of spectacular views on their private property.

The kitchen inside Joe Rogan’s Austin house comes with antique cabinetry and two kitchen islands. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood
The inviting kitchen boasts a rustic farmhouse vibe, complemented by stylish finishes and large windows. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood

Of course, the UFC commentator has a customized home gym with all the bells and whistles. And did we mention his fully-equipped podcast room?

The lakeside mansion features a large back porch and deck, alongside an impressive mezzanine featuring a large Buddha statue. With over 300 feet of water frontage, the Rogans are sure to enjoy the property’s party deck on Lake Austin.

After their lake adventures, Joe and his family can jump in the outdoor pool which includes a stonework patio and plenty of shade for those hot Texas summers. 

The house Joe Rogan left behind

In 2003, Joe and wife Jessica purchased their Bell Canyon, Calif. home for $2.33 million. After living there for 17 years, the Rogans made a handsome $1.12 million profit when they sold it for $3.45 million in March 2021.

Joe Rogan’s former home in Bell Canyon, California, which he sold for $3.45 million. Image credit: Realtor.com

With 7,500 square feet and 5 bedrooms, the family home included 5 bathrooms and 2.14 acres of outdoor space. Their former California home featured a pool and backyard deck, but nothing in comparison to their palatial Austin estate.

For now, Joe Rogan’s experience seems to be fit for a king. From the overpopulation of the Golden State to the laid back vibes of the Lone Star State, it seems like Joe’s choices in terms of real estate went from lovely to luxurious.

More celebrity homes you’ll enjoy

Tour Andrew Rea’s (Binging with Babish) House in Brooklyn
Impact Theory’s Tom Bylieu Bought the Striking $40 Million Mansion from ‘Selling Sunset’Where Does Trevor Noah Live? A Closer Look at the Daily Show Host’s Penthouse in ManhattanFrom a Prince to a King: A Look at Will Smith & Jada Pinkett Smith’s Real Estate Dynasty

Source: fancypantshomes.com

How To Start a Wedding DJ Business in 9 Essential Steps

Want to hone your DJ skills? Or maybe show them off?

Wedding DJs are in high demand these days.

Industry experts expect 2022 to be the busiest wedding season in 40 years, thanks to lockdown romances and postponed ceremonies during the pandemic.

A wedding DJ is the focal point of great wedding receptions. They set the mood, engage with the crowd and keep the couple happy.

They make good money, too. Wedding DJs make $1,000 per gig on average, according to WeddingWire, with experienced pros fetching upward of $2,000 or more.

But it takes a lot of hard work and planning to DJ a wedding. To start a successful wedding DJ business, you’ll need seed money for gear, reliable transportation — and great people skills.

How to Start a Wedding DJ Business in 9 Steps

Nick Smith started DJing weddings in southwest Indiana when he was 20 years old. His first set of speakers and audio equipment came from a bar that was going out of business.

Sixteen years later, Smith’s business has booked over 200 weddings.

“It’s a great gig if you love people and music,” he said.

Ready to spin up your own side hustle? Follow these nine steps to start a wedding DJ business.

1. Research and Talk to Other DJs

Before you invest major money into gear and advertising, make sure you’re comfortable with this type of gig.

Talk to other wedding DJs and ask what challenges they faced in the beginning — and how they overcame those hurdles.

If you’re new to DJing in general, it’s a good idea to shadow a professional wedding DJ. Search Google, Yelp or the Knot to find some in your area.

Send a friendly email asking if you can help them out at an event or two because you’re interested in being a wedding DJ.

On the day of the wedding, show up early and stay for the entire event. Observe how the wedding DJ interacts with the crowd and the type of music they play. Take notes.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • How do they make announcements?
  • What do they do when the dance floor thins out?
  • How do they handle requests?
  • What equipment do they have?

In exchange for the experience, offer to help the other DJ by unloading gear from the car and setting up the speakers.

2. Hone Your Skills

Practice makes perfect. You need to be comfortable behind the booth before you’re ready to book gigs.

Play for family and friends first. You can also book other, smaller events — like birthday parties and company parties — to get your feet wet. Online classes are another way to grow your knowledge base.

Practice playing songs, using a microphone and flowing from one song to another.

If you’re not ready to start your own wedding DJ business quite yet, consider working for a multi-op — a mobile DJ company that employs several disc jockeys.

3. Create a Business Plan

Creating a business plan is important if you plan to invest time and money into becoming a wedding DJ.

Your business plan should include:

  • Your business name and location
  • Customer demographics and target audience
  • Price points
  • Suppliers for your equipment
  • Initial start-up costs and how long until you’re profitable
  • Competitors

You can use one of these templates from the U.S. Small Business Administration to create a more detailed business plan.

Looking for more tips? Check out these 10 things you should know before you start a business. 

Setting Your Rate

The best way to set your initial rates is by researching prices for wedding DJs in your area, then offering a lower price.

How much you charge also depends on where you live: A wedding DJ in a big city earns more money than a wedding DJ in a small town.

Still, a good starting rate for a novice wedding DJ is roughly $500. You can raise your rates as you gain more experience. According to The Knot’s Real Weddings Study, couples spent an average of $1,400 on a DJ in 2021.

Wedding DJs usually pick one or more of the following pricing structures:

  • Flat fee or hourly rate
  • Packages
  • A la carte services
  • Custom quote

You should also be open to negotiating when you first start out.

Decide What DJ Services to Offer

Smith said offering additional services to clients is one of the best ways to make extra money as a wedding DJ.

“Additional services can really help add value,” Smith said. “You can offer things like uplighting, or doing sound for both the ceremony and the reception.”

Consider add-ons that earn you extra money with minimal effort. For example, some DJs offer photo booth services for guests, but Smith said photo booths are labor intensive to transport and set up.

“Unless you have someone else helping you, you want to keep things simple,” he said.

4. Buy Your DJ Gear

A big hurdle for many new DJs is acquiring equipment. It can cost a couple thousand dollars to purchase all your DJ gear.

“It’s a big cost up front for sure,” Nick said, “but you’ll earn it back quickly with gigs.”

While you don’t need state-of-the-art equipment to be a great wedding DJ, you do need a solid foundation to get started.

Wedding DJ gear checklist:

  • Laptop with at least 6 GB of internal memory and three USB inputs
  • DJ software, like Serato or Traktor
  • PA system (amplifier and speakers)
  • DJ controller / mixer
  • Over-the-ear headphones
  • Cables
  • MP3 music files

On a budget? Smith recommends looking for deals on sites like eBay and Craigslist. Check out sales at your local music store, too.

You could even borrow equipment from a friend or neighborhood church for your first couple gigs.

“You can start with a cheaper set-up, then upgrade it up over time,” Smith said.

You’ll also need to be comfortable setting up and tearing down your own DJ equipment. Figuring out how to efficiently store and transport your gear is also important if you want to be a mobile DJ.

Buy the Music

Buying music is important if you want to run a successful wedding DJ business.

Professionals caution against using streaming services like Spotify or YouTube. It isn’t technically legal and you shouldn’t rely on anything that requires Internet access anyway.

You have several options to legally purchase music for your wedding DJ business:

  • Buy mp3s through Amazon or iTunes/Apple Music.
  • Subscribe to a DJ pool like Promo City. This is a paid service that gives you access to volumes of modern music for download.
  • DJ subscription service like Virtual DJ or Pulselocker.
  • Buy used CDs and rip them to your laptop.

Set aside a little money from each gig to buy more music, and it won’t take long to compile a competitive professional DJ library.

5. Market Yourself

You have the gear. You have a plan. Now it’s time to get some customers.

You’ll need to create a DJ website and social media accounts to attract potential customers. Look at websites for other wedding DJ businesses to get ideas.

At the bare minimum, your website should include:

  • Your rates
  • Where you’re located (and how far you’re willing to travel)
  • A contact email address and phone number
  • What makes you unique from other DJs in the wedding industry
  • Testimonials and positive reviews

You can use a service like Wix or Weebly for free, or hire a professional to design a website for you.

Word of mouth is huge in the wedding business, Smith said. It’s about who you know and who knows you.

“Recommendations are everything,” Smith emphasized.

Give discounts for referrals. Make it easy for the bride and groom to leave glowing reviews about your wedding DJ business on Google and Facebook.

You’ll want to create some business cards and maybe some flyers, too.

Leave a space in your budget for marketing costs. Advertising on sites like The Knot and WeddingWire can really help pull in new customers because couples often visit these sites to find venues and vendors.

6. Meet the Couple for a Consultation

Meet up with the wedding couple several weeks before the event to discuss the playlist.

Ask about their favorite genres and bands, then create a short list of must-have songs, including their pick for the first dance and other important dances.

Perhaps more importantly, get a list of songs they don’t want played. The Chicken Dance, for instance.

“Get an idea of what they’re looking for,” Smith said, “then execute that to the best of your abilities.”

Print a questionnaire for the couple to fill out at the consultation with a timeline of the wedding, names of important people in the wedding party and other key details you should know.

You’ll also want to create contracts you can customize for each couple.

Your business contract should cover things like cancellation fees and damaged equipment policies. Make sure to discuss these policies with clients during the initial consultation.

Finally, prepare to spend several hours communicating back and forth with the couple before the wedding. Smith said he usually spends about 10 hours total preparing for the big day.

Two brides dance at their wedding reception.
Getty Images

7. Create the Playlist

Your goal as a wedding DJ is to create a memorable experience for the couple and keep the party going.

Don’t slide your original deep house remix into the wedding playlist. Remember, focus on the bride and groom — not your personal taste in music.

Play music to match the festivities. Break your songs into different blocks for the ceremony, cocktail hour, introductions, dinner and dance floor.

Each block should have different music to the atmosphere: Classical music at the ceremony, light jazz for the cocktail hour and soulful tunes for dinner, for example.

You can flex more creativity and play new music for the dance floor. But remember: You’re playing for a diverse audience. Don’t be afraid to bust out crowd favorites like “Don’t Stop Believin’” and “Livin’ On A Prayer.”

“People are at a wedding to have a good time,” Smith said. “Your job is to play the right music and create a fun atmosphere for everyone.”

8. Be On Time and Professional

You can’t be late to the party when you’re the DJ. Get there early, set up on time and prepare for a late night.

Before the wedding, write out a script of everything you plan to say. Practice pronouncing names. You don’t want to butcher the best man’s last name on stage.

Make sure to bring backup chargers, cables and other necessary gear. Things go wrong, break and run out of battery. Don’t let something unexpected (but easily preventable) ruin your wedding gig.

9. Work the Crowd and Keep the Party Going

Successful wedding DJs set the tone and vibe for the entire reception.

Be friendly, energetic and don’t forget to smile!

It’s not all about the music, though: You’ll be in charge of making announcements, calling for special dances and fielding song requests from (often intoxicated) guests.

You’ll need to communicate with other vendors at the wedding, too. You don’t want to start playing music for a special dance, for example, without the photographers and videographers in place.

Be observant, flexible and keep the party going.

It’s a lot to manage but pulling off your first successful gig can be the start of a rewarding and lucrative wedding DJ business.

Rachel Christian is a Certified Educator in Personal Finance and a senior writer for The Penny Hoarder

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Source: thepennyhoarder.com