Stock Market Today: Stocks Finish Lower as Traders Mull Recession Odds

The potential for the U.S. to slip into recession was the topic du jour Monday as stocks kicked off the week with a wobbly, uneven session.

Over the weekend, former Goldman Sachs chief Lloyd Blankfein told CBS’ Face the Nation that recession was “a very, very high risk factor.” That opinion was met by a number of other calls Monday morning.

Wells Fargo Investment Institute, for instance, says “our conviction is that the chances of an outright recession in 2022 remain low” but believes odds are growing that 2023 could see an economic contraction. UBS strategists say the chances are different depending on where you look – their global economists say “hard data” points to a sub-1% chance of recession over the next 12 months, but the yield curve implies 32% odds.

“There’s no crystal ball to predict what’s next, but historical trends can come into play here. With the [S&P 500] closing 15% below its weekly record, there’s only been two times in the past 60-plus years that the market didn’t fall into bear territory after a similar drop,” adds Chris Larkin, Managing Director of Trading at E*Trade. “This doesn’t mean it’s bound to happen, but there is room for potential downside.”

Larkin says to keep an eye on major retail earnings this week – which will kick off in earnest with Walmart’s Tuesday report – to get a pulse check on the American consumer.

Sign up for Kiplinger’s FREE Investing Weekly e-letter for stock, ETF and mutual fund recommendations, and other investing advice.

Monday itself was a fairly quiet affair. Exxon Mobil (XOM, +2.4%) and Chevron (CVX, +3.1%) were among a number of plays from the energy sector (+2.7%) that popped after U.S. crude oil futures jumped another 3.4% to $114.20 per barrel.

Twitter (TWTR, -8.2%) shares dropped after Tesla (TSLA, -5.9%) CEO Elon Musk spent the weekend questioning how much of Twitter’s traffic comes from bots. Wedbush analyst Daniel Ives said the move feels more like a “‘dog ate the homework’ excuse to bail on the Twitter deal or talk down a lower price.” TWTR stock has now given up all its gains since Musk announced his stake in the social platform.

The major indexes finished an up-and-down session with mostly weak results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average managed to eke out a marginal gain to 32,223, but the S&P 500 declined 0.4% to 4,008, while the Nasdaq Composite retreated 1.2% to 11,662.

Also worth noting: Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway will file its quarterly Form 13F soon. Check back here tonight as we examine what Buffett has been buying and selling. 

stock chart for 051622stock chart for 051622

Other news in the stock market today:

  • The small-cap Russell 2000 closed out the session with a 0.5% dip to 1,783.
  • Gold futures gained 0.3% to settle at $1,814 an ounce.
  • Bitcoin was off 1.6% to $29,551.92 (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 4 p.m.)
  • JetBlue Airways (JBLU, -6.1%) ramped up its hostile takeover attempt of Spirit Airlines (SAVE, +13.5%) on Monday, urging SAVE shareholders to vote against a buyout offer from fellow low-cost air carrier Frontier Group Holdings (ULCC, +5.9%). JBLU last month offered to buy Spirit Airlines for $33 per share – a premium to the $21.50 per share ULCC offered in February – but SAVE’s board of directors rejected the bid citing concerns over regulatory approval. JBLU followed up in early May with an “enhanced superior proposal,” including paying a $200 million, or $1.80 per SAVE share, reverse break-up fee should regulators block the deal.
  • Warby Parker (WRBY) fell 5.3% after the eyeglass maker reported a loss of 30 cents per share in its first quarter. This was much wider than the per-share loss of 3 cents the company reported in the year-ago period and missed the consensus estimate for breakeven on a per-share basis. Revenue of $153.2 million also fell short of analysts’ expectations. WRBY did maintain its full-year revenue guidance of $650 million to $660 million. “We remain cautiously optimistic on shares as WRBY continues to show ability to grow the top line, open new stores, and is recession resistant as a lower cost option for non-discretionary spend,” says CFRA Research analyst Zachary Warring (Buy). “We see the company leveraging SG&A to become profitable in the second half of 2022.”

Check Out Europe’s Dividend Royalty

If you’re seeking out more stable opportunities amid an uncertain U.S. market … well, the rest of the world is admittedly looking pretty shaky, too. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t a few morsels worth a nibble. 

BCA Research notes that while there’s negative news around the globe, “European benchmarks already discount a significant portion of the negative news.” And looking ahead, inflation there is expected to peak over the summer “as the commodity impulse is decelerating” – that should help stagflation fears recede and help European shares.

Graham Secker, Morgan Stanley’s chief European and U.K. equity strategist, chimes in that his firm remains “overweight [European] stocks offering a high and secure dividend yield.”

We’ve previously highlighted our favorite European dividend stocks, which on the whole tend to produce higher yields than their U.S. counterparts.

But we’d also like to shine the spotlight on Europe’s twist on an American income club: the Dividend Aristocrats. The S&P Europe 350 Dividend Aristocrats have somewhat different qualifications than their U.S. brethren, but in general, they’ve proven their ability to provide stable and growing dividends over time.

Read on as we look at the European Dividend Aristocrats.

Source: kiplinger.com

Stock Market Today: Stocks Paper Over Lousy Week With Wild Friday

Wall Street spent most of Friday applying some vibrant lipstick to what was otherwise a pig of a week for investors.

A broad market rally – one that saw each of the S&P 500’s 11 sectors finish higher – wasn’t a response to any new positive catalysts. Quarterly reports were light today, with most investors flipping the earnings calendar to next week’s retail-heavy slate.

And Friday’s most noteworthy datapoint was the University of Michigan’s latest consumer sentiment index reading, which dropped from 65.2 in April to 59.1 in May – a 10-year nadir that was well lower than the 64.1 reading expected.

Sometimes the market just enjoys a relief rally.

“Following a week of heavy selling, but with inflationary pressures easing just at the margin, and the Fed still seemingly wedded to 50-basis-point hikes for each of the next two FOMC meetings, the market was poised for the kind of strong rally endemic to bear market rallies,” says Quincy Krosby, chief equity strategist for LPL Financial.

He adds that given the Federal Reserve is only at the beginning of its rate-hike cycle and would like to see demand pull back further, “this rally will most likely weaken.”

Of course, even if this is just a pause before more market declines, investors don’t necessarily have to time the bottom to buy in at a decent valuation.

“This is still an attractive entry point, as we do not believe this is 1999/2000,” says Nancy Tengler, CEO and CIO of asset management firm Laffer Tengler Investments.

Sign up for Kiplinger’s FREE Investing Weekly e-letter for stock, ETF and mutual fund recommendations, and other investing advice.

The buying was strongest in consumer discretionary stocks (+3.9%) such as Amazon.com (AMZN, +5.7%) and Tesla (TSLA, +5.7%), along with technology plays (+3.3%) including Nvidia (NVDA, +9.5%) and Advanced Micro Devices (AMD, +9.3%).

Energy (+3.4%) was also bid higher amid a big pop in oil; U.S. crude futures finished 4.1% higher to $110.49 per barrel, helping to spark new highs in gasoline futures prices.

Notably absent from the rally was Twitter (TWTR, -9.7%), which sank after Elon Musk tweeted that the deal was “temporarily on hold.” 

All the major indexes put up spectacular gains Friday, though for the week, it was still losses all around: The Nasdaq Composite (+3.8% to 11,805) still finished off 2.8% for the week, the S&P 500 (+2.4% to 4,023) was down 2.4% across the five days, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (+1.5% to 32,196) closed the week 2.1% in the red.

stock chart for 051322stock chart for 051322

Other news in the stock market today:

  • The small-cap Russell 2000 bounced 3.1% to 1,792.
  • Gold futures had no such luck. The yellow metal was off 0.9% to a 14-week low of $1,808.20 per ounce.
  • Bitcoin snapped back 5.1% to $30,034.99. (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 4 p.m.)

Keep Your Guard Up Against Inflation

Inflation is prevalent virtually everywhere – including on corporate America’s earnings calls.

We’re most of the way through the first-quarter earnings season, and over the past few months, publicly traded companies keep repeating the “I” word as they discussed their most recent financial results.

FactSet used its Document Search technology to track mentions of the term “inflation” on corporate earnings calls, According to their senior earnings analyst, John Butters, of the 455 S&P 500 companies that have conducted earnings conference calls from March 15 through May 12, “377 have cited the term ‘inflation’ … which is well above the five-year average of 155.”

In fact, this is the highest overall number of S&P 500 companies citing inflation on their calls going back to at least 210. (The previous record? 356 … in the final quarter of 2021.)

It’s another signal that inflation continues to be a persistent problem – and with forecasts calling for still-high inflation to come, more active investors might do well to pack a little more protection. We’ve previously analyzed other ways to stay in front of inflation, such as stocks with pricing power and inflation-fighting funds.

Today, we look at another batch of investments that can help harness high inflation, with a focus on commodities, real estate and other areas of the market.

Kyle Woodley was long AMD, AMZN and NVDA as of this writing.

Source: kiplinger.com

Could Musk’s Twitter Buyout Hit the Skids?

Anyone who expected turbulence amid Elon Musk’s quest to acquire Twitter (TWTR) got precisely what they anticipated Friday morning, when the Tesla (TSLA) CEO tweeted that the Twitter deal was “temporarily on hold.”

TWTR shares plunged roughly 15% in Friday’s premarket trade following Musk’s tweet, which linked to a May 2 Reuters story about Twitter’s recent statement that “the average of false or spam accounts during the first quarter of 2022 represented fewer than 5% of our [monetizable daily active users] during the quarter.”

Musk later tweeted that he is “still committed to acquisition,” which helped cut into the losses somewhat, though another seed of doubt was already sown. 

“[Musk] is clearly intent in querying the company’s estimate that spam accounts make up less than 5% of active daily users – a key metric given that establishing an accurate number of real tweeters is considered to be key to future revenue streams via advertising or paid for subscriptions on the site,” says Susannah Streeter, senior investment and markets analyst for U.K. firm Hargreaves Lansdown.

But she also raises the possibility of an ulterior motive.

“There will also be questions raised over whether fake accounts are the real reason behind this delaying tactic, given that promoting free speech rather than focusing on wealth creation appeared to be his primary motivation for the takeover,” Streeter says. “The $44 billion price tag [of the Twitter deal] is huge, and it may be a strategy to row back on the amount he is prepared to pay to acquire the platform.”

That price tag might seem like even more of a stretch now than when Musk first got involved with Twitter.

“I am offering to buy 100% of Twitter for $54.20 per share in cash, a 54% premium over the day before I began investing in Twitter and a 38% premium over the day before my investment was publicly announced,” Musk said in April when he declared his bid for the social media platform.

Since then, the S&P 500 and the communication services sector have both declined by double digits, with many high-priced technology and tech-esque shares plunging precipitously.

Twitter, to be fair, is roughly flat since then. But this latest hurdle puts his once seemingly imminent Twitter deal even further in doubt among investors and analysts alike.

TWTR stock chartTWTR stock chart

The market has yet to price TWTR shares at the $54.20 per share Musk offered in April. Not even after Musk revealed earlier this month that backers such as Andreessen Horowitz, Sequoia Capital and Oracle (ORCL) founder Larry Ellison were lined up to help provide more than $7 billion in financing.

As of Thursday’s close, TWTR shares were trading 15% below Musk’s $54.20-per-share bid. In Friday’s premarket trade, that number was nearly 30%.

Wall Street’s pros appear mildly skeptical the Twitter deal closing, too. According to S&P Global Market Intelligence, the 27 analysts who currently cover Twitter have an average price target of $51.50 and collectively consider the stock a Hold.

Source: kiplinger.com

Stock Market Today: Stocks Stumble as Inflation Remains Red-Hot

It was a choppy day for stocks as investors unpacked the latest consumer price index (CPI). Data released by the Labor Department this morning showed that prices consumers paid for goods and services in April rose at an annual rate of 8.3% – down from March’s 8.5% pace to mark the first drop in inflation in eight months. While encouraging at first glimpse, there were concerning signs deeper inside the report.

For instance, the decline in CPI last month reflected a drop in gas prices, which have since rebounded. Food prices remained elevated, while airfare and restaurant bills increased ahead of the key summer travel season. And core CPI, which excludes the volatile energy and food categories, rose 0.6% on a sequential basis – double what it was in March.

“While this report appears to mark the first that shows some moderation from the ever-rising pace of inflation since September of last year, one data point does not necessarily make a trend; and the rise in core CPI should lead to some consideration that the moderation in inflation will not be quick,” says Jason Pride, chief investment officer of private wealth at wealth management firm Glenmede. 

With prices already high, Pride said, it should be harder for the CPI to continue to rise at the same pace, especially with the Federal Reserve also hiking interest rates to combat higher prices. “However, it will likely take multiple reports for such a trend [of moderating inflation] to clearly establish itself,” he says.

Sign up for Kiplinger’s FREE Investing Weekly e-letter for stock, ETF and mutual fund recommendations, and other investing advice.

This sentiment is echoed by Mike Loewengart, managing director of Investment Strategy at E*Trade. “Today’s read is a stark reminder that the journey to pre-pandemic levels of inflation will be a long one,” Loewengart says. “Although inflation slowed from March, the market’s reaction suggests that record high prices continue to weigh heavy on investors psyches. And with inflation persistently hot, the Fed has more fodder for increased rate hikes, which the market doesn’t often welcome with open arms.”

After bouncing between gains and losses in early trading, markets took a decisive turn lower this afternoon. At the close, the Nasdaq Composite was down 3.2% at 11,364, the S&P 500 Index was off 1.7% at 3,935 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average was 1.0% lower at 31,834. 

stock price chart 051122stock price chart 051122

Other news in the stock market today:

  • The small-cap Russell 2000 retreated 2.5% to 1,718.
  • U.S. crude futures surged 6% to end at $105.71 per barrel.
  • Gold futures gained 0.7% to settle at $1,853.70 an ounce.
  • Bitcoin slid below the $30,000 for the first time since July 2021, down 5.9% at $29,477.50. (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 4 p.m.)
  • Roblox (RBLX) was down as much as 10% in after-hours trading Tuesday after the video game developer reported a first-quarter loss of 27 cents per share, wider than the 21 cents per share Wall Street was expecting. The company’s revenue of $631.2 million also fell short of the consensus estimate, as did bookings of 54.1 million. Still, the metaverse stock managed to finish today up 3.4% after Chief Financial Officer Michael Guthrie said on the company’s earnings call that year-over-year growth may have bottomed in March, sooner than anticipated. 
  • Coinbase Global (COIN) shares plunged 26.4% on Wednesday after delivering a pretty disappointing quarterly report. Q1 revenues were off 27% year-over-year to $1.17 billion, widely missing analysts’ expectations for $1.50 billion. Meanwhile, the company swung to a $430 million loss after earning $388 million in the year-ago period. Monthly users were down 19% YoY, too. Also raising eyebrows in the cryptocurrency community was an update to the Risk Factors section in its Form 10-Q, warning that users could potentially lose access to their assets in the event Coinbase ever had to go through bankruptcy proceedings.

Inflation Remains a Top Concern for Investors

Inflation remains top of mind for investors. This is according to the latest Charles Schwab Trader Sentiment Survey, which reviews the outlooks, expectations and trading patterns of 845 Charles Schwab and TDAmeritrade clients. Inflation was the main concern for those surveyed in the report (20% of respondents), followed by geopolitics (15%) and recession/domestic politics (12% apiece). And nearly half of participants (45%) do not believe inflation will begin to ease until 2023. 

“Overall, in the second quarter, market sentiment among traders is unquestionably skewing bearish,” says Barry Metzger, head of trading and education at Schwab. But market participants do see investing opportunities, the report notes.

Among the sectors survey respondents are most bullish on at the moment are energy (70%) and utilities (54%). The industries they are most upbeat toward include cybersecurity (71%) and agriculture (70%). 

And 70% of those surveyed are interested in seeking out opportunities in defense stocks. While Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has unsettled many parts of the stock market, it has also sparked an increase in global military spending, which could create a potential boon for the industry. Here, we’ve compiled a quick list of defense stocks that are poised to benefit from this spending build. The names featured include familiar names as well as some under-the-radar picks – and they all sport top ratings from Wall Street’s pros.

Source: kiplinger.com

How to Check Your Credit Card Balance: A Step-By-Step Guide

It’s easy to swipe a credit card and lose track of exactly how much you’re spending. That’s why it’s critical to check your credit card balance on a regular basis. By checking your credit card balance, you’ll know how much you owe so you can make payments or adjust your spending accordingly.

As for how to check a credit card balance, you can do so online, over the phone, or on the monthly statement that comes in the mail. Keep reading to learn more about how to check a balance on a credit card and why your credit card balance matters.

What Is a Credit Card Balance?

There are two different types of balances consumers will come across when it comes to their credit cards: current balances and statement balances.

The statement balance is the total balance owed at the end of the billing cycle. If someone wants to avoid paying interest, they need to pay off their statement balance in full each month. The current balance, on the other hand, is the total amount owed plus any fees, charges, credits, and payments that have been added to the account since the billing cycle ended. Given how credit cards work, it’s not necessary to pay the entire current balance to avoid interest charges.

In addition to their current balance and statement balance, each month the cardholder will also be told what their credit card minimum payment is. This is the lowest amount of their balance that they can pay in order to remain in good standing with their credit card issuer. They’ll need to pay interest on the remaining unpaid balance.

Recommended: Charge Cards Advantages and Disadvantages

Why Is It Important to Know Your Balance?

A credit card balance represents the total amount owed to the credit card issuer. If the cardholder wants to avoid paying interest on their remaining balance, they’ll need to pay off their credit card balance in full each month. So, for budgeting purposes, it’s helpful to know what that balance is.

A credit card balance also can indicate how high or low someone’s credit utilization ratio is. This ratio compares how much credit someone is using to how much credit they have available based on their credit card limits. It’s generally advised to keep your credit utilization ratio under 30% — but the lower, the better. Paying off a credit card balance in full each month can also help keep credit utilization low.

Additionally, checking your credit card balance each month can allow you to spot any unusual or potentially fraudulent charges on your credit card. If anything is amiss, you could then quickly contact your issuer and dispute the credit card charge. This could result in a credit card chargeback, allowing you to get the money back.

Reviewing a credit card statement can also help consumers identify where to cut back their spending so they can save more or afford to pay down more credit card debt.

How to Check a Credit Card Balance

Even if you’re confident you can pay off your balance in full each month, it’s smart to stay on top of your credit card balance for the reasons mentioned above. Read on to learn how to check the balance on your credit card.

Log In to the Mobile App or Go Online

Thanks to mobile banking and credit card apps, it only takes a few seconds to check a credit card balance from a smartphone. These mobile apps are helpful for checking a credit card balance on the go. It’s also possible for consumers to check their credit card balances by logging onto their online accounts from a computer, smartphone, or tablet.

Call the Card Issuer

It’s also possible to call the credit card issuer directly to confirm what your current credit card balance is. The phone number to call is printed on the credit card and also listed on the credit card issuer’s website. Keep in mind your issuer may provide different numbers to call depending on your reason for calling.

Send a Text to Your Bank

Don’t love making phone calls? Some banks and credit card issuers also allow account holders to text them to check their account balance, which is a speedy and convenient way to get an update.

Check Paper Statements

Each month, the account holder will receive a paper credit card statement through the mail or over email. The Account Summary section of the statement will outline what the statement balance on the credit card as well as the following details, which are given what a credit card is:

•   Payments and credits

•   New purchases

•   Balance transfers

•   Cash advances

•   Past due amount

•   Fees charged

•   Interest charged

Recommended: When Are Credit Card Payments Due

Consider the SoFi Credit Card

As you can see, making a point to regularly check your credit card balance is smart for a number of reasons. In addition to helping you stay on top of your spending and how much you owe, it can also help you to monitor your credit utilization and check charges for any fraudulent activity. Checking your credit card balance is easy to do online, over the phone, via text, or on your credit card statement.

Feeling on top of your credit card balances and looking for a new credit card? The SoFi Credit Card doesn’t charge foreign transaction fees. Plus, SoFi cardholders earn 2% unlimited cash back when redeemed to save, invest, or pay down eligible SoFi debt. Cardholders earn 1% cash back when redeemed for a statement credit.1 Apply for a credit card online today with SoFi.

Check out everything the SoFi credit card has to offer.

FAQ

Can you transfer a balance to a new credit card?

It’s possible to transfer a balance from one credit card to a new one by using a balance transfer credit card. Typically, balance transfer cards come with a low or 0% introductory APR, which makes it possible to pay down debt without spending too much on interest for a temporary period of time. Keep in mind that balance transfer fees will typically apply.

What is a credit card balance refund?

When someone pays off their credit card balance before getting a refund for a purchase they made, that results in what is known as a negative credit card balance. To get that money back, you can either request a refund or wait for the funds to get applied to future credit card balance.

What happens if I overpay my credit card balance?

If someone overpays their credit card balance for whatever reason, they can either have that balance applied to a future purchase or they can request a credit card balance refund.

What does a negative balance on a credit card mean?

Having a negative credit card balance means that someone has a credit card balance that is below $0. For example, if someone pays off their credit card balance and then requests a refund from a merchant for $250, they would end up with a negative balance of $250. The credit card issuer would then owe that money to the account holder.

What happens if you cancel a credit card with a negative balance?

If someone chooses to close a credit card that has a negative balance, they need to request a refund before they close their account as they won’t be able to apply that negative balance to a future bill. Some credit card issuers will issue this refund automatically, but it’s best to confirm the refund is happening before closing an account.


Photo credit: iStock/milan2099

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’swebsite .
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
The SoFi Credit Card is issued by The Bank of Missouri (TBOM) (“Issuer”) pursuant to license by Mastercard® International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.
1See Rewards Details at SoFi.com/card/rewards.
SOCC0322013

Source: sofi.com

What Is IRS Tax Form 1098 (Mortgage Interest Statement)?

@media (max-width: 1200px) body .novashare-buttons.novashare-inline .novashare-button-icon width: 100%; .novashare-inline .novashare-button .novashare-button-block background: #000000; .novashare-inline .novashare-button .novashare-border border-color: #000000; .novashare-inline .novashare-button .novashare-inverse color: #000000;


Additional Resources

In an effort to help make filing taxes easier this year, we are breaking down the various IRS tax forms to help you know if you need them, and how to use them.

There’s nothing like a love letter from your mortgage lender with an IRS tax form to make you swoon with joy.

As tax forms go, the 1098 ranks among the simplest as you prepare your tax return. But there are some things you need to know about Form 1098 and how to use it in your tax return.

What Is IRS Tax Form 1098, Mortgage Interest Statement?

The IRS Form 1098 informs you how much interest you paid on your mortgage loan for the last tax year. 

Mortgage lenders send you this document in case you want to itemize your deductions on your tax return. They also send a copy to the Internal Revenue Service for their records, so don’t get any ideas about taking liberties with your interest deduction. 

Far fewer taxpayers itemize their deductions since the standard deduction jumped in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. That makes Form 1098 less relevant to the average American than it once was, though it does contain information you may need.

However, the form remains relevant to real estate investors, who deduct mortgage interest on Schedule E of their tax return. Mortgage interest is an expense for investment properties and comes off their taxable profit. Deducting it from your investment property profit doesn’t require you to itemize your deductions. 


Who Should File Form 1098?

Property owners don’t file Form 1098 as part of their federal tax return. They simply list the amount of mortgage interest in the appropriate place on their return: Schedule A for homeowners, Schedule E for investment property owners.

Mortgage lenders need to file Form 1098 with the IRS if the borrower paid more than $600 in a given year and send you a copy — which you can frame if you so choose. They typically send the form in February with the total mortgage interest paid in the previous year.


How to File IRS Form 1098

While you don’t need to file Form 1098 as a borrower, it helps to be able to read it. 

The most important information lies in Box 1: the amount of mortgage interest paid in the previous year. However, the form contains other useful information, including:

  • Box 2: Outstanding mortgage principal (your remaining loan balance)
  • Box 3: Mortgage origination date (your loan start date)
  • Box 4: Refund of overpaid interest (if applicable)
  • Box 5: Mortgage insurance premiums (if you paid private mortgage insurance for a conforming loan or mortgage insurance premium for a Federal Housing Administration loan, it appears here)
  • Box 6: Points paid on the purchase of the principal residence (you may be able to deduct these as well)
  • Boxes 7-11: Identifying information about your loan, such as the property address

You’ll also find identifying information about yourself, such as your name and Social Security number.


Other 1098 Forms

While the mortgage interest statement is the most common type of 1098 form, it’s not the only brat in the pack. You may also come across the following 1098 forms.

Form 1098-C, Contributions of Motor Vehicles, Boats

If you donated a vehicle — including boats or airplanes — to a charitable organization last year, you’ll receive a 1098-C from the charity. 

Charities often give these vehicles to individuals in need or sell them at below-market rates and use the profit to fund programs. Alternatively, the charity might auction the car to raise money for their cause.

Form 1098-C confirms you weren’t part of that transaction. However, if you donated a beater worth less than $600, you may not receive one of these forms. Read the instructions for Form 1098-C for more information.

Form 1098-E, Student Loan Interest Statement

You may feel like you’ll be paying off your student loans for the rest of your life, but at least you get a tax break. Maybe. 

Each year, you’ll receive a 1098-E detailing how much interest you paid to each loan servicer if it exceeded $600. You can deduct the interest from your taxable income on your 1040 without itemizing your deductions as long as you meet the income requirement.

You can deduct up to $2,500 in student loan interest for loans used to pay for qualified expenses while you were in school. However, the deduction does phase out if your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) falls between $70,000 and $85,000 (between $140,000 and $170,000 if married filing a joint return). You cannot take a student loan interest deduction if your MAGI exceeds $85,000 or more ($170,000 or more if you file a joint return). 

If you paid less than $600 in student loan interest last year, the servicer may not send you a 1098-E, but you can still deduct this interest as long as you have a record of how much you paid. If you don’t know, ask your servicer and record it in your tax file.

As a bonus, if your parents or someone else pays student loans in your name for you, the IRS considers the money a gift, and you can still deduct the interest on your own taxes. However, if the loan is in someone else’s name, that person is entitled to take the interest deduction as long as he or she is the one paying on it.

Form 1098-T, Tuition Statement

If you or one of your dependents is currently in school, the school will send an IRS Form 1098-T at the end of the year detailing all fees you paid for qualified tuition and other related expenses. Calculate all education-related tax deductions and credits, such as the tuition and fees deduction, the lifetime learning credit, or the American opportunity tax credit.

The amounts on the form encompass all money you paid to the school, even if you paid in advance — the payment appears on the tax form for the year in which you actually paid it. 

For example, if you pay your spring semester tuition in December of the previous year, it will show up on the prior year’s 1098-T. These amounts include any money used from loans to pay for tuition and education expenses and list financial aid like college scholarships and grants separately.

Some expenses, such as college textbooks and school supplies, are not generally reported on the 1098-T, but you can still claim them for higher education tax credits or deductions so long as they’re classified as qualified expenses by the IRS.


Form 1098 FAQs

If you still have burning questions about 1098 tax forms, these answers to frequently asked questions can help clear them up.

How Do I Get a 1098 Form?

Your mortgage lender sends you a Form 1098, Mortgage Interest Statement. If you haven’t received it by late February, blow off some steam by yelling at your lender. (Just kidding. Be nice. They literally still own part of your house. But thinking about yelling at them should make you feel better.)

Form 1098-C comes from the charity you donated a vehicle to, while Form 1098-E comes from your student loan servicer. Form 1098-T comes from your college or university. 

Do I Need to File Form 1098 With My Tax Return?

No, you don’t. You need only include the information in the appropriate field on your tax return.

When in doubt, ask your accountant or tax advisor. Alternatively, you can use an online tax preparation service, which will ask you for the amount you paid and fill it into the right field for you. 

What Happens if I Don’t File a 1098 Form?

The IRS doesn’t require borrowers to file a 1098 form at all. But if you ignore them, you might miss out on valuable income tax deductions and make an involuntary donation to Uncle Sam. 

If you are a lender, charity, student loan servicer, or university, you are required by law to both send a 1098 form to the payer and file it with the IRS. Failure to do so will result in your immediate execution — no, not really, but the IRS may penalize you, audit you, or otherwise make your life unpleasant. 


Final Word

With a higher standard deduction these days, most Americans don’t have to stress over documenting and itemizing every single deduction anymore. It makes filing your tax return that much simpler.

However, homeowners who itemize their personal deductions do still want to include their mortgage interest among them. And the mortgage interest deduction offers another way for real estate investors to lower their taxes while leveraging other people’s money to build their portfolio of properties. Get tax advice from a qualified tax professional if you have any questions about these tax benefits.

Whether you deduct mortgage interest on your tax return or not, keep your 1098 forms in your tax records for at least three years after filing. You never know when Uncle Sam will pay you a nasty visit with an audit, and every deduction could help if he does. 

.kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-table-of-content-wrappadding:30px 30px 30px 30px;background-color:#f9fafa;border-color:#cacaca;border-width:1px 1px 1px 1px;.kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-table-of-contents-titlefont-size:14px;line-height:18px;letter-spacing:0.06px;font-family:-apple-system,BlinkMacSystemFont,”Segoe UI”,Roboto,Oxygen-Sans,Ubuntu,Cantarell,”Helvetica Neue”,sans-serif, “Apple Color Emoji”, “Segoe UI Emoji”, “Segoe UI Symbol”;font-weight:inherit;text-transform:uppercase;.kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-table-of-content-wrap .kb-table-of-content-listcolor:#001c29;font-size:14px;line-height:21px;letter-spacing:0.01px;font-family:-apple-system,BlinkMacSystemFont,”Segoe UI”,Roboto,Oxygen-Sans,Ubuntu,Cantarell,”Helvetica Neue”,sans-serif, “Apple Color Emoji”, “Segoe UI Emoji”, “Segoe UI Symbol”;font-weight:inherit;.kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-table-of-content-wrap .kb-table-of-content-list .kb-table-of-contents__entry:hovercolor:#16928d;.kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-table-of-content-list limargin-bottom:7px;.kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-table-of-content-list li .kb-table-of-contents-list-submargin-top:7px;.kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-toggle-icon-style-basiccircle .kb-table-of-contents-icon-trigger:after, .kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-toggle-icon-style-basiccircle .kb-table-of-contents-icon-trigger:before, .kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-toggle-icon-style-arrowcircle .kb-table-of-contents-icon-trigger:after, .kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-toggle-icon-style-arrowcircle .kb-table-of-contents-icon-trigger:before, .kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-toggle-icon-style-xclosecircle .kb-table-of-contents-icon-trigger:after, .kb-table-of-content-nav.kb-table-of-content-id_0d0fb5-39 .kb-toggle-icon-style-xclosecircle .kb-table-of-contents-icon-trigger:beforebackground-color:#f9fafa;

GME is so 2021. Fine art is forever. And its 5-year returns are a heck of a lot better than this week’s meme stock. Invest in something real. Invest with Masterworks.

G. Brian Davis is a real estate investor, personal finance writer, and travel addict mildly obsessed with FIRE. He spends nine months of the year in Abu Dhabi, and splits the rest of the year between his hometown of Baltimore and traveling the world.

Source: moneycrashers.com

Stock Market Today: Stocks Try to Find Their Legs Ahead of CPI Report

Wall Street searched for stability Tuesday, with a couple of the major indexes able to muster some gains ahead of a vital inflation reading tomorrow.

The 10-year Treasury note, after touching 3.2% yesterday, pulled back below the 3% threshold to as low as 2.94%. This retreat in interest rates removed some pressure from growthier stocks (which had been pummeled Monday), with technology (+1.5%) firms leading the session’s relief rally. Semiconductor stocks such as Nvidia (NVDA, +3.8%), Broadcom (AVGO, +3.3%) and NXP Semiconductor (NXPI, +3.2%) were among the day’s notable risers.

It wasn’t all roses, though. Investors continued to punish once-hot companies showing any signs of weakness.

For instance, artificial-intelligence lending-platform maker Upstart Holdings (UPST) plunged 56.4% to trade around all-time lows. While it beat Street estimates for first-quarter earnings, the company reduced full-year revenue forecasts to $1.25 billion from $1.4 billion previously.

Work-from-home darling Peloton Interactive (PTON, -8.7%) continued its fall from grace after reporting a 15% year-over-year decline in sales, a $757 million net loss and a dwindling cash pile that CEO Barry McCarthy said left the company “thinly capitalized.”

Even AMC Entertainment (AMC, -5.4%) was knocked lower despite a pretty encouraging report in which Batman and Spider-Man films helped the theater company to report a narrower-than-expected quarterly loss.

Still, the major indexes showed some strength. The Nasdaq Composite rebounded 1.0% to 11,737, while the S&P 500 improved 0.3% to 4,001. The Dow Jones Industrial Average brought up the rear, declining 0.3% to 32,160.

Sign up for Kiplinger’s FREE Investing Weekly e-letter for stock, ETF and mutual fund recommendations, and other investing advice.

“Markets are clearly confused about what the Fed will do this year and just how aggressive it will get. That can be seen in the volatility in expectations for where the Fed funds rate will be at the end of 2022, as seen in Fed funds futures,” says Invesco Chief Global Market Strategist Kristina Hooper. “And it is reflected in stock market volatility, with the VIX above 30.”

The big story to watch tomorrow is the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ consumer price index (CPI) report for April. BlackRock, for one, expects 8.1% headline CPI growth and 6.0% core growth following 8.5% and 6.5% increases in March.

“A weaker-than-expected CPI report later this week could help turn the tide and see investors embrace risk assets once again,” says Brian Price, head of investment management for independent broker-dealer Commonwealth Financial Network.

stock chart for 051022stock chart for 051022

Other news in the stock market today:

  • The small-cap Russell 2000 slipped marginally to 1,761.
  • U.S. crude futures slipped below the $100 per-barrel mark, ending the day down 3.2% at $99.76 per barrel. 
  • Gold futures fell 0.9% to settle at $1,841 an ounce.
  • Bitcoin clawed out a 0.5% gain to $31,315.54. (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 4 p.m.)
  • Groupon (GRPN) slid 12.5% after the e-commerce marketplace swung to an adjusted loss of 80 cents per share in its first quarter, compared to a per-share profit of 25 cents in Q1 2021. GRPN also said revenue slid 41% year-over-year to $153.3 million, while global units sold slumped 29% to 12.7 million. The company gave soft current-quarter and full-year revenue guidance, as well. “The underperformance was driven by a weaker rebound in local following omicron impacts in January and February,” says Credit Suisse analyst Stephen Ju, who maintained a Neutral (Hold) rating on GRPN. “As merchants found themselves in a high demand/low capacity environment, they were not incentivized to leverage discounting. Furthermore, April local billings continue to trend at Q1 2022 (as a percentage of 2019) levels and latest trends suggest an elongated recovery path.”
  • Vroom’s (VRM) narrower-than-expected first-quarter loss sent shares up 32.4% today. In its first quarter, the online used auto dealer reported a per-share loss of 71 cents per share vs. a consensus estimate for a loss of $1.07 per share. Revenue of $923.8 million also came in higher than analysts had expected. VRM also announced a new business realignment plan for long-term growth that it anticipates will result in up to $165 million in cost savings through the rest of 2022. “Vroom is shifting to survival mode, understandably, swapping out more aggressive growth plans for a leaner, and potentially more profitable business model,” says Baird Equity Research analyst Colin Sebastian (Outperform). “Given the current market environment, and challenges in scaling up an ‘asset light’ online sales platform, we think this pivot makes sense.”

Stick to (Most Of) Your Guns

“More than anything, volatility is a test of investor mettle.” So says Ross Mayfield, investment strategy analyst at research firm Baird, who notes that while we’re often told volatility is the price to pay in the stock market’s long-term gains, this glosses over the fact that volatility can take many forms.

“March 2020 featured a gut-wrenching drop, but also a relatively quick rebound. On the other end of the spectrum, markets are occasionally plagued by periods of high volatility that churn sideways relentlessly,” he says. “Each is challenging in its own way; holding through a big drop requires a steel stomach, but longer periods of frustrating volatility require real fortitude.”

While staying the course isn’t easy, you can at least make it less difficult on yourself by homing in on higher-quality investments with a longer-term focus. Stock investors might look to the Dow Jones’ top-rated components; fund investors should stick to well-managed products, such as these Vanguard funds commonly found in 401(k) plans.

But remember: Keeping a calm head doesn’t mean you shouldn’t ever sell in a downturn – on the contrary, the only thing worse than suffering losses in the first place is holding on to weak positions that will slather you in more red ink down the road. 

With that in mind, we’ve taken a look at some of Wall Street’s least favorite names at the moment. Remember: Sell calls are typically rare among the analyst community, so the fact that the pros are calling for more downside in these names, rather than saying to buy the dips, is noteworthy.

Check out Wall Street analysts’ list of stocks to sell right now.

Kyle Woodley was long NVDA as of this writing.

Source: kiplinger.com

Stock Market Today: Stocks, Bonds, Crypto and More Take a Dive

The S&P 500 fell to its lowest point in more than a year Monday as last week’s selloff retained all of its momentum and bled into just about anything that trades.

Interest-rate fears continued be the selloff’s primary driver. The 10-year Treasury briefly touched 3.2% today and, even after pulling back to 3.06%, sits around levels last seen in 2018.

“Interest rates are a hammer, not a scalpel – they are blunt tools designed to move slowly and with great force, rather than precisely,” says Andy Kapyrin, co-chief investment officer at registered investment advisory firm RegentAtlantic. “The Fed is swinging the interest rate hammer, and the financial markets are responding to the aftershocks.”

Technology (-3.9%) and consumer discretionary (-4.3%) were among the usual suspects in a trading day that saw each of the 11 S&P 500 stock sectors finish in the red. But this was a wide selloff that went well beyond just stocks and bonds.

U.S. crude oil futures, for instance, cratered by 6.1% to $103.09 per barrel, amid ongoing worries that China’s strict COVID-19 lockdowns will cramp oil prices. Indeed, energy (-8.3%) was Monday’s worst-performing sector, with even blue chips such as Exxon Mobil (XOM, -7.9%) and Chevron (CVX, -6.7%) taking it on the chin.

Gold futures? A bad day, too, off 1.3% to $1,858.60 per ounce as investors piled into the U.S. dollar. 

Sign up for Kiplinger’s FREE Investing Weekly e-letter for stock, ETF and mutual fund recommendations, and other investing advice.

Cryptocurrencies haven’t provided safety, either. Bitcoin, which fell as low as $30,375 and finished off 13.4% to $31,153, has now fallen by more than 50% from its November 2021 peak. (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 4 p.m.)

Edward Moya, senior market strategist at currency data provider OANDA, notes that institutional buyers are starting to pay close attention to Bitcoin, given that many who got in during 2021 are now losing money on their investment. “If the $30,000 level breaks, that could trigger a flash crash environment if several whales unload,” he says.

The Nasdaq Composite (-4.3% to 11,623) has re-entered bear-market territory, off nearly 28% from its January highs. The S&P 500 (-3.2% to 3,991 – its lowest close since March 31, 2021) needs to lose another 4% or so before entering a bear market, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average (-2.0% to 32,245) would have to retreat another 9%.

stock chart for 050922stock chart for 050922

Other news in the stock market today:

  • The small-cap Russell 2000 sank by 4.2% to 1,762.
  • Palantir Technologies (PLTR) stock surrendered 21.3% after the data analytics company reported lower-than-expected first-quarter earnings per share (2 cents actual vs. 4 cents estimated). The company also gave current-quarter guidance below Wall Street’s estimates, adding that there is “a wide range of potential upside to our guidance, including those driven by our role in responding to developing geopolitical events.” One high note of PLTR’s financial results was its Q1 revenue of $446.4  million, up 31% year-over-year and above the average estimate.
  • Rivian Automotive (RIVN) plummeted 20.9% after sources told CNBC that Ford Motor (F, -5.9%) will sell 8 million RIVN shares after the electric vehicle maker’s insider lockup period expired on Sunday. The news also dragged on Amazon.com (AMZN, -5.2%), which owns roughly 158.4 million RIVN shares, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. “The news is not surprising to us, especially after the two companies terminated a partnership to jointly develop an EV last November and as Ford begins deliveries of the F-150 Lightning, a direct competitor to Rivian’s R1T pickup truck,” says CFRA Research analyst Garrett Nelson, who maintained a Hold rating on the EV stock.

The Strongest Parts of a Weak Market

Green ink was in shockingly short supply Monday – but relative success was found among the usual suspects. 

“This collapse should continue the rotation into defensive dividend stocks,” says Jay Hatfield, chief investment officer of ETF manager Infrastructure Capital Management. 

Consumer staples, which was only marginally lower Monday, and utilities, second-best at a 0.8% decline, are among such beneficiaries, Hatfield says.

Among their greatest qualities right now is what’s sure to be a common refrain in near-term investment advice: pricing power. In short, as inflation continues to march unimpeded, those companies that are best able to push most of those prices on to consumers should fare best – and while your average American might go a few extra months without taking a vacation or buying a new pair of Nikes, they’re unable to pull back much on basic necessities such as food and electricity. 

Read on as we examine a number of stocks with exceptional pricing power – as well as highlight several names that, while good companies in their own right, will have an uphill battle as long as inflation remains white-hot.

Source: kiplinger.com

Stock Market Today: Stocks Sink After April Jobs Report

On the heels of their worst session of 2022, stocks initially struggled to find direction Friday following the release of the April jobs report – though in the end, they settled for selling, again. 

The Labor Department this morning said the U.S. added 428,000 jobs last month, while the unemployment rate held steady at 3.6%. This marked the 12th straight month U.S. employers have added at least 400,000 new jobs. At this pace, the economy could recover all of its pandemic-related job losses by mid-July, says Kiplinger economist David Payne. 

Also notable in the report was wage growth, which rose 0.3% month-over-month and 5.5% year-over-year, and the participation rate – or the percentage of the population that have jobs or are seeking them – which declined slightly to 62.2%.

“While there’s no shortage of concerns to take the wind out of investors’ sails right now, this jobs read likely won’t be one of them,” says Mike Loewengart, managing director of Investment Strategy at E*Trade. “With a relatively rosy jobs picture, despite slight misses on participation and wages, the Federal Reserve likely won’t be swayed from its rate hike campaign. And since numbers came in mostly in line with expectations, the market may have already priced in a robust jobs read.”

Sign up for Kiplinger’s FREE Investing Weekly e-letter for stock, ETF and mutual fund recommendations, and other investing advice.

Stocks initially opened lower before finding their way higher by lunchtime. These intraday gains were short-lived, however, with all three markets sinking back into negative territory in the afternoon.

At the close, the Nasdaq Composite was down 1.4% at 12,144, the S&P 500 Index was 0.6% lower at 4,123 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average was off 0.3% at 32,899.

stock price chart 050622stock price chart 050622

Other news in the stock market today:

  • The small-cap Russell 2000 plunged 1.7% to 1,839.
  • U.S. crude oil futures gained 1.4% to end at $109.88 per barrel.
  • Gold futures rose 0.4% to settle at $1,882.80 an ounce.
  • Bitcoin retreated 0.9% to $35,953.66. (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 4 p.m.)
  • DraftKings (DKNG) plunged 8.9% after the online sports gambling company reported a first-quarter net loss of $467.7 million, wider than the $346.3 million net loss it incurred in the year-ago period. On an adjusted basis, though, DKNG’s adjusted per-share loss of 74 cents was slimmer than the $1.09 per-share loss analysts were expecting. Revenue of $417 million came in above the $412 million consensus estimate. “DraftKings quarter was buoyed by strong numbers from March Madness and the Super Bowl, which set records for first-time bettors,” says Jonathan Dube, executive in residence at investment bank Progress Partners. “DraftKings and its competitors are all looking at ways to grow their businesses and increase their margins, and one of the ways they are doing so is aggressively moving into the iGaming online casino space. DraftKings announced it completed its purchase of Golden Nugget Online Gaming, which will help it compete with established brands like Caesars and BetMGM in the iGaming space, a strategically complementary business which has higher margins than sports betting.”
  • In its first quarter, global cloud services provider Cloudflare (NET) posted revenue of $212.2 million, up 54% year-over-year, and adjusted earnings of 1 cent per share compared to a per-share loss of 3 cents in the year-ago period. Still, NET stock plunged 12.4% post-earnings, possibly due to the company reporting cash flow from operations of -$35.5 million for the three month period vs. +$23.5 million in Q1 2021. “The company is beating best of breed point  solutions with its easier-to-use and cheaper bundled solutions, all on one developer platform—workers,” says Oppenheimer analyst Timothy Horan (Perform). “It had a major role in protecting Ukraine’s and other countries’ digital infrastructure from Russian attacks.” Horan also believes Cloudflare “should be able to deliver double-digit revenue growth rates over the next several years based on the strong demand for its offering and the rising economic importance of the internet across the globe.”

Wall Street’s Newest Dividend Payers

The Fed is unlikely to change course with its monetary-tightening plan any time soon. That seems to be the general consensus around Wall Street, especially on the heels of today’s solid jobs report. 

“We have been cautious all year given the unprecedented size of the Fed’s balance sheet, which they need to unwind due to the inflationary pressures we have been experiencing and a concern that valuations were too high as interest rates were poised to move higher,” says Chris Zaccarelli, chief investment officer for registered investment advisor Independent Advisor Alliance. Zacarelli believes the Fed will continue to “aggressively fight inflation,” no matter how much damage might be inflicted upon the stock market in the near term. 

With this in mind, he reminds investors that it’s prudent to be invested in quality stocks of companies that have the ability to power through a recessionary environment. This includes companies “with a competitive advantage, pricing power and a strong balance sheet (e.g. relatively low debt compared to operating earnings),” Zaccarelli adds. 

There are many ways investors can track down companies with high-quality fundamentals, including looking for those that are consistently increasing dividends or issuing special dividends – both signs of financial strength. 

There’s also money to be made with Wall Street’s newest dividend stocks. Despite a U.S. economy plagued by labor shortages, supply-chain woes and higher prices, these companies are flexing their financial muscle by initiating dividends.

Source: kiplinger.com