Guide to Dental Loans

Finding out you need dental work can be scary — and scary expensive. Still, the pain and the price could get even worse if you put off getting care. And sometimes delaying just isn’t an option.

If you don’t have enough money stashed away in your emergency fund, and your insurance won’t cover all your costs, you may want to chew on the pros and cons of taking out a dental loan.

What Are Dental Loans?

Medical financing loans are personal loans that are used to pay for a variety of medical expenses, including dental work and related expenses.

Whether you’re feeling overwhelmed by the upfront cost of a root canal or crown, or you expect to pay a substantial amount over time for braces, aligners, or implants, a dental loan can be a quick and convenient way to get the financing you need.

With a dental loan, you can borrow money to pay for your care, then make monthly payments until the loan balance is paid off.

How Do Dental Loans Work?

Dental loans are usually unsecured personal loans, which means you don’t have to put up collateral to secure the loan. Approval for a loan for dental work will be based on your creditworthiness.

If you qualify, you’ll receive a lump sum of money that’s to be repaid in monthly installments consisting of principal and interest. Since dental loans typically have fixed interest rates, your payments should be the same amount each month throughout the repayment period.

What Can Dental Loans Be Used For?

You typically can use a personal loan to pay for just about anything as long as it’s legal and within the terms of your loan agreement. For example, you can use a personal loan to pay for wedding expenses, home improvements, or legal fees.

Costs related to your dental care are included in common uses for personal loans. These might include treatment — even for expensive elective or cosmetic procedures that may not be covered completely or at all by dental insurance, over-the-counter or prescription medications you might require, transportation. You can even use the funds for the milkshake and soup you might need after your procedure.

Here are approximate costs for some common procedures that could be paid for with a dental loan:

Porcelain Crown

The cost of a crown can vary based on the materials used to make it, as well as the size, shape, and location of the tooth that’s being replaced. Costs for an all-porcelain crown can range from $800 to $3,000. Dental insurance may cover some of that expense, unless the crown is strictly for cosmetic purposes.

Whitening

A basic teeth cleaning may be covered by dental insurance as part of your annual exam. But an in-office teeth bleaching (which can cost $300 to $500 or more) or a laser whitening (which averages $1,000), likely won’t be covered by insurance.

Root Canal

The cost of a root canal could range from about $700 to $1,800 if you don’t have dental insurance. The cost can depend on several factors, including which tooth is being worked on and if the work is done by a specialist. Insurance may take the cost down to between $200 and $1,500.

Aligners

Teeth aligners can be pretty pricey no matter which type you buy, but if you go with an in-office treatment, you can expect to pay between $2,500 and $8,000. At-home brands range from about $1,200 to $3,300. Your insurance provider may pay for some of those costs, but you should check your coverage before ordering.

Veneers

Veneers can range from $470 to $2,000 per tooth, depending on the type and how much prep work is involved. The cost generally is not covered by dental insurance.

Typical Dental Loan Application Process

Your dentist may offer an in-house financing plan to help with costs — especially if he or she specializes in cosmetic procedures. Or the practice may partner with a lender who provides these types of loans. You aren’t obligated to use your dentist’s financing plan, but you may want to check out what the practice is offering. You also can go online to compare dental loan offers from traditional and online lenders.

Compare Offers: Choosing the Right Loan

When you start shopping for loans for dental work, you can go to individual lenders’ websites to see what they have to offer or use a comparison site to conveniently check out multiple lenders.

Getting prequalified with a few different lenders can help you get the clearest idea of what’s available and what’s best for your needs. Lenders typically use a soft credit pull during the prequalification process, so it won’t affect your credit score.

Here are a few things to watch for as you shop for financing:

Annual Percentage Rate

A loan’s annual percentage rate (APR) tells you the amount of interest you can expect to pay on your loan over the course of one year, including any fees or charges you might incur. Because it gives you a complete picture of the cost of the loan (as opposed to just looking at the interest rate), the APR can be a useful tool for comparing various loan offers.

Recommended: APR vs. Interest Rate

Fees

Fees can add up quickly, and they can add to the cost of your loan. Some common fees to look out for could include an application fee, origination fee, late payment fee, returned payment fee, and a prepayment penalty. Low-fee or fee-free loans may save you money over the life of the loan.

Loan Amounts

Some lenders may have loan minimums that require you to borrow more than you need. Before you go loan shopping, you may want to get dental procedure cost estimates to get an idea of how much you’ll have to borrow. Then you can look for lenders who are willing to lend that amount.

Loan Terms

Another important factor to consider is the loan term, or how long you’ll be given to repay the money you’ve borrowed. Of course, you’ll want to find a loan term that feels comfortable (a longer-term can equal lower payments). But a longer-term also could increase the amount you pay in interest over the life of the loan. You may want to think about how the loan length could affect your future financial goals.

Eligibility Requirements

Before you settle on a particular personal loan for dental work, you may want to check out the lender’s eligibility requirements. In the process of checking your personal loan rate, most sites will review your credit scores, credit history, income, and other personal financial information to determine whether you qualify for a particular interest rate or other loan terms.

Many lenders will accept a fair credit score (a FICO® Score of 580 to 669 is considered fair), but a good FICO Score (670 to 739) could qualify you for a more favorable interest rate and other terms. If you have a poor score (lower than 580), lenders may consider you to be a high lending risk, which could affect your eligibility. You may be able to find a loan, but the interest rate will likely be more expensive.

Approval and Funding Timeline

If you can’t get your treatment until you can pay for it — and you need it soon — a quick approval time and rapid funding also could be an important considerations. One of the major pluses of using an online lender can be the convenience and fast application time. If you have all your information ready, it can be easy to apply using an online form. And if you qualify, the money generally can be available within a few days.

Customer Service

Does the lender have a reputation for good customer service? You may want to check into how various lenders deal with consumer questions and problems. At the same time, you can see if there are any perks to building a relationship with a lender that might benefit you in the future.

Applying for a Dental Loan

If you find a lender and loan terms you like, and you’re ready to apply, your next step will be to complete a formal application. You can expect to be asked to verify your identity, income, and current address, and it can make things easier if you gather up the necessary documents ahead of time. You’ll probably need your driver’s license, Social Security number, recent pay stubs and/or bank statements, and a utility bill or some other proof of address.

Once you apply, most lenders will do a hard credit check, which may cause your credit score to drop by a few points temporarily. The lender will evaluate your ability to repay the loan and, if you qualify, your loan will be funded.

Pros and Cons of Dental Loans

Whether you need money for a one-time emergency procedure or for a series of treatments that could add up to a big expense, a dental loan may be an option worth considering. Here are some pros and cons that could help you decide if a personal loan makes sense for your situation:

Pros

Convenient Online Comparison

Applying for a personal loan online can be convenient and quick. Many lenders offer personal loans that can be used for dental treatment, so you can shop for the loan amount and terms that best suit your needs.You may be able to get your approval within a few hours (maybe even a few minutes) and you could receive your money within a few days.

Competitive Terms

If you have a solid credit history, a stable income, and fair or better credit scores, you may qualify for a competitive interest rate and a repayment period you feel comfortable with. (The interest rate on a dental loan is typically lower than the interest rate on a credit card.)

Fixed Payments

With a dental loan, borrowers typically receive a lump sum of money that is repaid in fixed monthly payments. This can make it easier to budget and manage your payments.

Cons

Fees and Penalties

Some dental treatment loans come with fees and penalties that can drive up the overall cost of borrowing. You may be able to keep your costs down, though, by finding a low- or no-fee loan.

Alternatives May Cost Less

If you can qualify for a credit card with a low or 0% promotional rate for purchases, it may be a less expensive way to borrow money — at least for a while. Zero-interest credit cards charge no interest during an introductory period, which typically lasts from six to 18 months. Paying the balance in full within the promotional period is essential to making the most of an offer like this.

Fixed Payments

Having a fixed monthly payment can make budgeting easier, but it doesn’t provide flexibility if you can’t make that payment for some reason. A different financing option, such as a credit card, might offer more adaptable minimum monthly payments.

Pros and Cons of Dental Loans

Pros Cons
Easy to compare lenders online. Some dental loans have fees and penalties that can increase the overall cost.
Terms are competitive and interest rates are generally lower than on credit cards. Alternatives like credit cards with a 0% interest introductory rate may be less expensive.
Fixed monthly payments can make it easy to budget for the expense. Fixed payments don’t allow for budget shortfalls.

Alternatives to Personal Loans

If you can’t afford the dental work you need, there are options besides dental loans that you might want to check out. A few to consider include:

Credit Cards

If you already have a low-interest credit card, you may want to compare the interest you’d pay if you used that card vs. the cost of a dental loan. Or you might want to consider the pros and cons of applying for a low or 0% introductory-rate credit card — if you think you can pay off the balance during the designated promotional period. If you end up using a high percentage of your available credit, however, your credit score could be negatively affected.

Dental Office Financing

Your dentist may offer some type of in-house financing to patients who can’t afford the treatments they want or need. The practice might partner with a lender that offers loans for dental procedures, for example, or the dental office might suggest a medical credit card with a low or 0% introductory rate. These offers may be worth reviewing and comparing to similar options, as long as you’re clear on all the repayment terms.

Grants

There are grant programs aimed at helping seniors, adults and children living in low-income households, and those who have special needs. The Dental Lifeline Network is a nonprofit organization that provides access to dental care for people who can’t afford it. Some dentists also may offer partial grants to attract new patients who need extensive and expensive treatment.

Explore Personal and Dental Loans with SoFi

A dental loan can be a quick and convenient solution if you need cash to pay for an unexpected dental procedure or an elective treatment you’ve been thinking about for a while (like braces, aligners or implants). Whether you’re considering an expensive cosmetic procedure or you need a crown or root canal ASAP, SoFi may offer a personal loan rate that works for your unique financial situation.

There are no fees with SoFi Personal Loans, and borrowers have access to customer support seven days a week. The application can be completed online, and you can check your rate in just one minute.

Take the pain out of dental costs and check your rates on a personal loan from SoFi

FAQ

What credit score do you need for dental implant loans?

Many lenders will offer a dental loan to a borrower with a fair credit score. (A FICO Score of 580 to 669 is considered fair). But a good FICO Score (670 to 739) could improve your interest rate and other terms. If you have a poor score (lower than 580), lenders may consider you to be a higher risk, which could affect your eligibility.

Can you get your teeth fixed with no money?

You may be able to find a research clinic or university dental program that provides free services to volunteer patients who need care. And some dental practices may occasionally offer free care to low-income patients. There are also grants that could help cover costs.

Can you put dental work on a credit card?

Yes, you can use a regular credit card or a medical credit card to pay for dental work. But if you come close to using up the balance on your card, it could affect your credit utilization ratio, which can have a negative impact on your credit scores.


SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC), and by SoFi Lending Corp. NMLS #1121636 , a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law (License # 6054612) and by other states. For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal.

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

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Guide to Cross-Collateralized Loans

One type of loan that isn’t often discussed is cross-collateralized, also known as cross-collateral loans, which is a type of secured loan. If someone is looking to take out multiple loans through the same financial institution, it’s important that they understand what cross-collateralization is and when it can happen.

So, what is a cross-collateralized loan? Keep reading to find out.

What Is Cross-Collateralization?

Cross-collateralization involves a borrower using an asset they already used as collateral on a loan as collateral again for a second loan. Collateral is an asset that acts as a loan guarantee. If the borrower fails to make their loan payments, the lender has the option to seize the collateral or to force the sale of the collateral to recoup its losses.

In short, cross-collateralization involves using the same collateral for one loan to serve as collateral for another loan at the same time.

Recommended: Using Collateral on a Personal Loan

How Does Cross-Collateralization Work?

The way that cross-collateralization works is that the same form of collateral is used to back more than one loan. The collateral used needs to guarantee the loan value. For example, if someone takes out an auto loan, the car (which equates to the value of the loan) is used as collateral. For cross-collateralization to work, that car also needs to be worth the same or more than the value of the second loan.

A common example of cross-collateralization is a second mortgage. If someone takes out a second mortgage on their home, the home is going to be used as collateral for both the primary mortgage used to purchase the home and the new second mortgage.

While cross-collateralization can involve using the same type of asset against one another, it doesn’t have to happen this way. For example, a lender can use a borrower’s car as collateral for a new loan that isn’t an auto loan, even though the car is already being used as collateral for the auto loan.

When Is Cross-Collateralization Used?

It’s more common to come across cross-collateralization in practice at credit unions and auto lenders. Unlike banks, credit unions are owned by the members of the credit union. To help protect this group against various losses, credit unions often use cross-collateralization to gain some extra security. Credit unions tend to have more favorable loan terms than larger financial institutions and banks, and members may secure those better terms by agreeing to cross-collateralization.

An example of this would be if a credit union member wants to finance their car through their credit union. Fast forward six months, and they want to take out an unsecured loan with a low-interest rate. The reason the credit union can offer an unsecured loan to the member at such a great rate is because they are actually securing the loan with the existing collateral from the member’s car loan.

The lender is legally obligated to disclose cross-collateralization, and the borrower must consent. It’s important to ask about cross-collateralization practices when taking out a new loan, however. A lender could include a clause in the loan agreement allowing it to cross-collateralize any collateral you used on any loan with that lender, and the wording in such a clause can vary by lender.

Once a form of collateral is being used to secure multiple loans, the borrower can’t sell that collateral. This means that a borrower who thinks their vehicle is securing only their auto loan may be unable to sell the vehicle if it is acting as collateral for another loan, whether or not the lender informed them verbally that cross-collateralization was happening.

How Can You Get Out of Cross-Collateral Loans?

Getting out of a cross-collateralized loan without paying it off in full can be very difficult. And it may not be as simple as transferring the loan to another lender. It’s usually quite challenging and expensive to move a cross-collateral loan to another lender, which can leave a borrower stuck with whatever rates and terms were offered to them when they took out the loan. That’s why it’s a really good idea to read the fine print of any loan agreements before signing and confirming whether a bank or credit union plans to start a cross-collateral loan.

Pros and Cons of Cross-Collateral Loan

Pros Cons
Typically easy to qualify for Larger risk of losing collateral
Potentially low cost Tied to just one lender
Allows borrowers to leverage existing assets Unfavorable terms may unchangeable without a change in lender

There are some major advantages and disadvantages associated with cross-collateral loans that are worth taking into consideration before signing any loan documents.

Benefits

Some of the benefits of a cross-collateral loan include:

•   Ease of qualification. Because cross-collateral loans are secured, they can be easier to qualify for than unsecured loans, for which the lender takes on more risk. Applicants with low credit scores may find it easier to qualify for this type of loan than some others.

•   Lower cost. General cross-collateral loans tend to be less expensive than unsecured loans. This type of loan tends to come with lower interest rates, which could equal savings over the life of the loan, and longer repayment terms, which could lower monthly payments but increase total interest cost.

•   Allows borrowers to leverage existing assets. Cross-collateral loans use an asset that is already trapped in an existing loan, and allows the borrower to get more value out of it by using it to ensure more loans.

Drawbacks

There are some serious downsides associated with cross-collateral loans that are worth thinking carefully about.

•   Larger risk. If the borrower isn’t able to repay their debts, the lender can seize the asset acting as collateral.

•   Tied to just one lender. With a cross-collateral loan, multiple of the borrower’s assets are being financed through one lender which can make it hard and expensive to ever switch to a lender offering more favorable terms.

•   Unfavorable terms. Collateralized loans, especially cross-collateral loans, can have stricter terms to meet in order to protect the lenders on subsequent loans.

Cross-Collateralization and Bankruptcy

Cross-collateralization can become particularly complex during bankruptcy. For example, a borrower of a cross-collateral loan (using their car as collateral) who files for Chapter 7 bankruptcy will be required to either reaffirm the debt or surrender their car. If they choose to reaffirm the debt and that loan is with a financial institution that has secured other sources of debt to the car, then they will need to pay off all of those debts in order to keep their car. Don’t forget, that borrower may not even be aware that some of their loans were cross-collateralized.

How cross-collateralization affects bankruptcy depends on the type of bankruptcy filed. Anyone dealing with cross-collateralization complications during bankruptcy may find that consulting a bankruptcy attorney will help them determine what their next steps should be.

Recommended: Getting Approved for a Personal Loan After Bankruptcy

Applying for SoFi’s Personal Loans

For someone looking for an alternative to a cross-collateralized loan with their existing bank or credit union, taking out an unsecured personal loan through a different financial institution may be one option to consider. Personal loans can be used to finance a variety of purchases, with the exception of higher education expenses and home purchases, typically.

SoFi Personal Loans offer fixed rates, no fees, and a variety of repayment terms.

Check your rate on a personal loan from SoFi

FAQ

Is cross-collateralization legal?

Yes, cross-collateralization is legal. Many banks and credit unions practice cross-collateralization.

Who can and can’t cross-collateralize?

Borrowers who already have a secured loan at a financial institution may qualify for cross-collateralization. Lenders don’t always inform borrowers verbally that they are participating in cross-collateralization, so it’s worth confirming whether or not this is happening before taking on a second loan through the same lender.

Can you get out of cross-collateralization?

A major downside of cross-collateralized loans is that once a borrower has multiple sources of debt through the same lender that are cross-collateral loans, it can be difficult to move them to another lender. Paying off the loan is usually the best option for getting out of this type of loan.


SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC), and by SoFi Lending Corp. NMLS #1121636 , a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law (License # 6054612) and by other states. For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal.

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Guide to Refinancing Your Student Loans After Marriage

After getting married, you’ll start to merge your life, your home, and possibly your finances with your partner. As you plan for the future, it’s helpful to consider the implications of student loans and marriage—which can affect your credit, your ability to get a home mortgage, and even the repayment of your student debt.

Consolidating your federal loans or refinancing student loans after marriage may be options to consider as you begin handling finances in your marriage and working together to reach your financial goals

Student Loans and Marriage

There are currently over 45 million borrowers in the U.S. and the total amount of student loan debt is $1.7 trillion. So the odds are high that either you or your partner may have student loans. As you begin planning for your financial future together, it’s helpful to look at how marriage can affect student loan payments.

Recommended: What is the Average Student Loan Debt?

What Happens to Student Loans When You Get Married?

If you haven’t already had a conversation about student loans and marriage before tying the knot, you and your partner should sit down and discuss your individual student loan debt: how much you have, whether you have federal or private student loans, as well as what your balances, payment status, and monthly payments are. It’s important to share this information since getting married may change your debt repayment plans.

If someone has federal student loans and is on an income-based repayment (IBR) plan when they get married, for example, their monthly payments may increase post-marriage as income-based repayment plans are determined by household income and size. Depending on how a couple chooses to file their taxes, the government may take a new spouse’s salary into account when determining what the borrower’s monthly payments should be.

Because federal student loan borrowers on an income-based repayment plan have to recertify each year, the current year’s income is taken into account which may be higher after marriage if both spouses work. If the borrower’s new spouse doesn’t earn income then they may actually see their monthly payment requirements drop as their household size went up, but their household income remained the same.

Household income also affects how much student loan interest a borrower can deduct on their federal taxes. It’s worth consulting an accountant if a newly married couple needs help figuring out where they stand financially post-marriage.

It’s also important to be aware of how marriage affects your credit score as how someone manages their student loan debt is a factor. Since spouses don’t share credit reports, marrying someone with bad credit won’t hurt your credit score. That said, when it comes time to apply for a loan together, a bad credit score can make getting approved harder—which is another reason it’s key to get on the same page about repaying any debt on time.

Recommended: Types of Federal Student Loans

Refinancing Student Loans After Marriage

Refinancing student loans gives borrowers the chance to take out a new student loan with ideally better interest rates and terms than their original student loan or loans. Some borrowers may choose to consolidate multiple student loans into one newly refinanced loan to streamline their debt repayment process.

The result? One convenient monthly payment to make with the same interest rate and the same loan servicer instead of multiple ones.

As tempting as it may be to combine debt with a spouse and work toward paying it off together, married couples typically cannot refinance their loans together and each spouse would need to refinance their student loans separately. But even though a couple can’t refinance their student loan debt together, they’ll still want to be aware of what’s going on with their partner’s student loans.

Recommended: Top 5 Tips for Refinancing Student Loans in 2022

How to Refinance Student Loans After Marriage

Refinancing student loans after marriage looks the same as it does before marriage and is pretty straightforward. The student loan borrower will take out a new loan, which is used to repay the original student loan.

Ideally, this results in a better interest rate which will help borrowers save money on interest payments, but this isn’t a guarantee. Before refinancing, it’s important that borrowers shop around to find the best rates possible as factors like their credit score and income can qualify them for different rates.

Borrowers have the option of refinancing both federal and private student loans, but it’s worth noting that refinancing a federal student loan into a private one removes access to valuable federal benefits like income-driven repayment plans and loan forgiveness for public service employees.

Refinancing vs. Consolidating Student Loans After Marriage

Borrowers can choose to refinance or consolidate their student loans before or after marriage.

If a borrower has multiple federal student loans, then they can choose to consolidate their different loans into one Direct Consolidation Loan. This type of loan only applies to federal student loans and is offered through the U.S. Department of Education.

This type of loan takes a weighted average of all of the loans consolidated to determine the new interest rate, so generally this is an option designed to simplify debt repayment, not to save money. If a borrower chooses to consolidate through a private lender, they will be issued new rates and terms, which may be more financially beneficial.

Consolidating through a private lender is a form of refinancing that allows borrowers to take out one new loan that covers all of their different sources of student loan debt. While some private lenders will only refinance private student loans, there are plenty of private lenders that refinance both private and federal loans. As mentioned earlier, refinancing a federal loan means losing access to federal protections and benefits.

Refinancing can be advantageous if the borrower is in a better financial place than they were when they originally took out private student loans. If they’ve improved their credit score, paid down debt, and taken other steps to improve their financial picture, they may qualify for a better interest rate that can save them a lot of money over the life of their loan.

Another option in refinancing student loans after marriage is co-signing a partner’s loan. Doing so may mean that you can leverage greater earning power and possibly better credit, but it also means both partners are responsible for the loan, and can put one partner at risk in the event of death or divorce.

Student Loan Refinancing With SoFi

SoFi refinances both federal and private student loans, which can help borrowers save because of our flexible terms and low fixed or variable rates. Borrowers won’t ever have to worry about any fees and can apply quickly online today.

Learn more about refinancing student loans with SoFi.

FAQ

What happens when you marry someone with student loan debt?

If someone’s new spouse has student loan debt, this indirectly affects them. While the debt won’t be under their name or affect their credit score when it comes time to apply for credit products with their spouse (such as a mortgage loan) their credit score and current sources of debt will likely be taken into account.

Is one spouse responsible for the other’s student loans?

No one spouse is directly responsible for their spouse’s student loans, but it’s important to work together to pay off student loan debt. Again, once it comes time to apply for a joint loan, any student loan debt can have an effect on eligibility.

Does getting married affect student loan repayment?

Getting married can affect student loan repayment if a borrower is on an income-based repayment plan for their federal student loans. This type of repayment plan takes household size and income into account when determining what the borrower’s monthly payment should be. If their spouse brings in an income they may find their monthly payments are higher, but if their spouse doesn’t have an income their payments may become smaller.


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SoFi Student Loan Refinance
IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO REFINANCE FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS PLEASE BE AWARE OF RECENT LEGISLATIVE CHANGES THAT HAVE SUSPENDED ALL FEDERAL STUDENT LOAN PAYMENTS AND WAIVED INTEREST CHARGES ON FEDERALLY HELD LOANS UNTIL SEPTEMBER 1, 2022 DUE TO COVID-19. PLEASE CAREFULLY CONSIDER THESE CHANGES BEFORE REFINANCING FEDERALLY HELD LOANS WITH SOFI, SINCE IN DOING SO YOU WILL NO LONGER QUALIFY FOR THE FEDERAL LOAN PAYMENT SUSPENSION, INTEREST WAIVER, OR ANY OTHER CURRENT OR FUTURE BENEFITS APPLICABLE TO FEDERAL LOANS. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Notice: SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers such as Income-Driven Repayment plans, including Income-Contingent Repayment or PAYE. SoFi always recommends that you consult a qualified financial advisor to discuss what is best for your unique situation.

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC), and by SoFi Lending Corp. NMLS #1121636 , a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law (License # 6054612) and by other states. For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.
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What Is Bond Valuation?

Bond valuation is a way of determining the fair value of a bond. Bond valuation involves calculating the present value of the bond’s future coupon payments, its cash flow, and the bond’s value at maturity (or par value), to determine its current fair value or price. The price of a bond is what investors are willing to pay for it on the secondary market.

When an investor buys a bond from the issuing company or institution, they typically buy it at its face value. But when an investor purchases a bond on the open market, they need to know its current value. Because a bond’s face value and interest payments are fixed, the valuation process helps investors decide what rate of return would make that bond worth the cost.

Here’s a step-by-step explanation of how bond valuation works, and why it’s important for investors to understand.

How Bond Valuation Works

First, it’s important to remember that bonds are generally long-term investments, where the par value or face value is fixed and so are the coupon payments (the bond’s rate of return over time) — but interest rates are not, and that impacts the present or fair value of a bond at any given moment.

To determine the present or fair value of a bond, the investor must calculate the current value of the bond’s future payments using a discount rate, as well as the bond’s value at maturity to make sure the bond you’re buying is worth it.

Some terms to know when calculating bond valuation:

•   Coupon rate/Cash flow: The coupon rate refers to the interest payments the investor receives; usually it’s a fixed percentage of the bond’s face value and typically investors get annual or semi-annual payments. For example, a $1,000 bond with a 10-year term and a 3% annual coupon would pay the investor $30 per year for 10 years ($1,000 x 0.03 = $30 per year).

•   Maturity: This is when the bond’s principal is scheduled to be repaid to the bondholder (i.e. in one year, five years, 10 years, and so on). When a bond reaches maturity, the corporation or government that issued the bond must repay the full amount of the face value (in this example, $1,000).

•   Current price: The current price is different from the bond’s face value or par value, which is fixed: i.e. a $1,000 bond is a $1,000 bond. The current price is what people mean when they talk about bond valuation: What is the bond currently worth, today?

The face value is not necessarily the amount you pay to purchase the bond, since you might buy a bond at a price above or below par value. A bond that trades at a price below its face value is called a discount bond. A bond price above par value is called a premium bond.

How to Calculate Bond Valuation

Bond valuation can seem like a daunting task to new investors, but it is not that onerous once you break it down into steps. This process helps investors know how to calculate bond valuation.

Bond Valuation Formula

The bond valuation formula uses a discounting process for all future cash flows to determine the present fair value of the bond, sometimes called the theoretical fair value of the bond (since it’s calculated using certain assumptions).

The following steps explain each part of the formula and how to calculate a bond’s price.

Step 1: Determine the cash flow and remaining payments.

A bond’s cash flow is determined by calculating the coupon rate multiplied by the face value. A $1,000 corporate bond with a 3.0% coupon has an annual cash flow of $30. If it’s a 10-year bond that has five years left until maturity, there would be five coupon payments remaining.

Payment 1 = $30; Payment 2 = $30; and so on.

The final payment would include the face value: $1,000 + $30 = $1,030.

This is important because the closer the bond is to maturity, the higher its value may be.

Step 2: Determine a realistic discount rate.

The coupon payments are based on future values and thus the bond’s cash flow must be discounted back to the present (thanks to the time value of money theory, a future dollar is worth less than a dollar in the present).

To determine a discount rate, you can check the current rates for 10-year corporate bonds. For this example, let’s go with 2.5% (or 0.025 as a decimal).

Step 3: Calculate the present value of the remaining payments.

Calculate the present value of future cash flows including the principal repayment at maturity. In other words, divide the yearly coupon payment by (1 + r)t, where r equals the discount rate and t is the remaining payment number.

$30 / (1 + .025)1 = $29.26

$30 / (1 + .025)2 = 28.55

$30 / (1 + .025)3 = 27.85

$30 / (1 + .025)4 = 27.17

$1030 / (1 + .025)5 = 1,004.87

Step 4: Sum all future cash flows.

Sum all future cash flows to arrive at the present market value of the bond : $1,117.70

Understanding Bond Pricing

In this example, the price of the bond is $1,117.70, or $117.70 above par. A bond’s face or par value will often differ from its market value — and in this case its current fair value (market value) is higher. There are a number of factors that come into play, including the company’s credit rating, the time to maturity (the closer the bond is to maturity the closer the price comes to its face value), and of course changes to interest rates.

Remember that a bond’s price tends to move in the opposite direction of interest rates. If prevailing interest rates are higher than when the bond was issued, its price will generally fall. That’s because, as interest rates rise, new bonds are likely to be issued with higher coupon rates, making the new bonds more attractive. So bonds with lower coupon payments would be less attractive, and likely sell for a lower price. So, higher rates generally mean lower prices for existing bonds.

The same logic applies when interest rates are lower; the price of existing bonds tends to increase, because their higher coupons are now more attractive and investors may be willing to pay a premium for bonds with those higher interest payments.

Is Investing in Bonds Right for You?

Investing in bonds can help diversify a stock portfolio since stocks and bonds trade differently. In general, bonds are seen as less risky than equities since they often provide a predictable stream of income. All investors should at least consider bonds as an investment, and those with a lower risk tolerance might be better served with a portfolio weighted highly in bonds.

Performing proper bond valuation can be part of a solid research and due diligence process when attempting to find securities for your portfolio. Moreover, different bonds have different risk and return profiles. Some bonds — such as junk bonds and fixed-income securities offered in emerging markets — feature higher potential rates of return with greater risk. “Junk” is a term used to describe high-yield bonds. You can take on higher risk with long-duration bonds and convertible bonds. Some of the safest bonds are short-term Treasury securities.

You can also purchase bond exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and bond mutual funds that own a diversified basket of fixed-income securities.

The Takeaway

Bond valuation is the process of determining the fair value of a bond after it’s been issued. In order to price a bond, you must calculate the present value of a bond’s future interest payments using a reasonable discount rate. By adding the discounted coupon payments, and the bond’s face value, you can arrive at the theoretical fair value of the bond. A bond can be priced at a discount to its par value or at a premium depending on market conditions and how traders view the issuing company’s prospects.

Owning bonds can help add diversification to your portfolio. Many investors also find bonds appealing because of their steady payments (one reason that bonds are considered fixed-income assets). When you open an online brokerage account with SoFi Invest, you can build a diversified portfolio of individual stocks as well as exchange-traded bond funds (bond ETFs). You can also invest in a range of other securities, including fractional shares, IPOs, crypto, and more. Also, SoFi members have access to complimentary professional advice. Get started today!


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.

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Source: sofi.com

How to Invest in Agriculture

Many people think of investing in agriculture as owning farmland and operating a farm. Many investors overlook this business area when deciding where to put their money because they don’t see themselves toiling the land. But there are various options to invest in agriculture without being a farmer.

Farmland investing is just one way to invest in agriculture. Additionally, investors can invest in farming-related exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and real estate investment trusts (REITs) or trade commodities to take advantage of the agricultural markets.

What Are Agriculture Investments?

Investing in agriculture is more than just owning some farmland and working the land. Agriculture can be an alternative investment that diversifies an investor’s portfolio. Investors can get exposure to agriculture and farming by investing in businesses involved in the whole farming process, from the seeds in the ground to the distribution of products to grocery stores.

4 Ways to Invest in Agriculture

1. Agriculture Stocks

Investors can put money into various publicly-traded companies that provide services in the farming industry. These agribusiness firms range from those involved in actual crop production — though many crop producers are privately held — to companies in the farming support businesses. The farming support businesses include companies that make fertilizer and seeds, manufacture farming equipment, and process and distribute crops.

Companies in the agriculture industry include, but are not limited to:

•   Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM): A large food processing and commodities trading firm

•   Deere & Company (DE): Known as John Deere, this company manufactures agricultural machinery and heavy equipment

•   Corteva, Inc. (CTVA): An agricultural chemical, fertilizer, and seed company

•   The Mosaic Company (MOS): A large company that produces fertilizer and seeds

•   AppHarvest Inc (APPH): A small-cap company involved in indoor farms and crop production

2. Agriculture ETFs and Mutual Funds

Investors who don’t want to pick individual stocks to invest in can always look to mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that provide exposure to the agricultural industry. Agriculture-focused mutual funds and ETFs invest in a basket of farming stocks, commodities, and related assets, allowing investors to diversify farming exposure.

3. Farm REITs

Farm and agricultural real estate investment trusts (REITs) own farmland and lease it to tenants who do the actual farming. REITs that invest in farmland can be a good option for investors who want exposure to farmland without actually owning a farm.

This type of investment can provide investors with various benefits. For example, a REIT is a type of liquid asset, meaning an investor can quickly sell the investment on the stock market. In contrast, if an investor were actually to own farmland, trying to sell the land could be a drawn-out and complex process. Other benefits include regular dividend payments and geographical and crop diversification.

Recommended: Pros and Cons of Investing in REITs

4. Commodities

Agricultural commodities are the products produced by farms, like corn, soybeans, and wheat.

Trading commodities can be a profitable, though risky, endeavor. Investors who trade commodities look to take advantage of the market’s volatility for short-term gains. Usually, this is done by trading futures contracts, though large investors may actually purchase and sell the physical commodities.

Commodity trading can be risky, especially for a novice investor. ETFs with exposure to commodities may be better for investors with lower risk tolerance.

Recommended: Why Is It Risky to Invest in Commodities?

Benefits and Risks of Investing in Agriculture

Benefits

One of the significant benefits of agriculture investments is that people always need to eat, so there will usually be some demand support for businesses in the industry. Because of this, some investors view the sector as somewhat recession-proof and a good way to diversify a portfolio.

Another benefit is that farmland REITs and certain agriculture stocks can provide passive income through regular dividend payouts. Additionally, farmland investments can provide a hedge against rising inflation.

Risks

The agricultural and farming sector can be fickle, as it’s subject to various risk factors that can impact investments. Uncertainties stemming from weather to government policies to the global commodities markets can cause volatile swings in prices and income that affect investments in the sector.

Here are some risks facing agricultural investments:

•   Production risk: Major weather events, crop diseases, and other factors can affect the quantity and quality of commodities produced.

•   Market risk: The global markets for commodities can affect farming and agricultural business as prices can swing wildly, making crop production and agribusiness demand uncertain.

•   Financial risk: Farms and related businesses often use debt to fund operations, so rising interest rates and credit tightening can hinder companies in the industry.

•   Regulatory risk: Changes in taxes, regulations, subsidies, and other government actions can impact agricultural businesses and investments.

Are Agriculture Investments Right for You?

It might seem like agriculture investments are risky, but with that risk comes reward. If an investor’s risk tolerance allows for it, agricultural investments can provide diversification in a portfolio.

The Takeaway

Fortunately for investors who want to put money into the agriculture sector, they don’t necessarily need to buy a farm. Several investment vehicles can fit their needs to get exposure to farming. Farmland REITs, agribusiness stocks, and farming and commodity ETFs can be options to build wealth in the farm business.

Investing in agriculture doesn’t have to be as hard as owning a farm and working the land. Investors can start investing in agriculture by trading stocks and ETFs for as little as $5 with SoFi Invest®.

Check out how to start investing with SoFi today.

FAQ

Is agriculture worth investing in?

Agricultural investments can help diversify a portfolio. Depending on what areas of the agriculture business you invest in, the assets can produce steady income and long-term capital gains.

How much should I invest in agriculture?

Determining how much you should invest in any asset class depends on your financial goals and personal risk tolerance. It would be best if you didn’t put too much of your money into the agriculture sector; you want a diversified portfolio.

How do I invest in a farm?

Buying a farm can be difficult; you would need a lot of capital for a down payment, just like any other piece of real estate. If you want exposure to farmland, agriculture and farm-related REITs can be a good option, especially for retail investors.


SoFi Invest®
The information provided is not meant to provide investment or financial advice. Investment decisions should be based on an individual’s specific financial needs, goals and risk profile. SoFi can’t guarantee future financial performance. Advisory services offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC. SoFi Securities, LLC, member FINRA / SIPC . SoFi Invest refers to the three investment and trading platforms operated by Social Finance, Inc. and its affiliates (described below). Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of the platforms below.
1) Automated Investing—The Automated Investing platform is owned by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor (“Sofi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC, an affiliated SEC registered broker dealer and member FINRA/SIPC, (“Sofi Securities).

2) Active Investing—The Active Investing platform is owned by SoFi Securities LLC. Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.

3) Cryptocurrency is offered by SoFi Digital Assets, LLC, a FinCEN registered Money Service Business.

For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above, including state licensure of Sofi Digital Assets, LLC, please visit www.sofi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform. Information related to lending products contained herein should not be construed as an offer or pre-qualification for any loan product offered by SoFi Lending Corp and/or its affiliates.

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Source: sofi.com