How Moving to a New City Can Give You a Fresh Financial Start

Save more, spend smarter, and make your money go further

Summer is a common time for many people to change up their living situations by moving either across town or across the country. And whether you are moving for a new job, a recent graduation, or just a change of scenery, moving to a new city can help give you a fresh financial start. Here are a few things to keep in mind as you plan your move.

Changing (lowering) your cost of living

The biggest thing to make sure that you’re aware of when moving to a new city is that your overall cost of living is going to change. This may be obvious to many people, but goods and services cost different amounts in different areas of the country and world. From very expensive places like New York and San Francisco to less expensive places like Tulsa or Boise and everywhere in between. 

Before you move to a new city, make sure to understand the difference in the cost of living between your current city and your new city. There are many online calculators that can compare the cost of living between two different cities. Make sure to dig deeper than just the overall cost of living. The cost of living accounts for lots of different areas of spending like housing, food, transportation, and more. Understanding how different things might change in price from what you’re used to can help you plan a budget for your new city.

Hopefully, you are moving to an area with a lower cost of living. That’s a great opportunity to take your extra money and start saving or investing it. If you are moving to a higher-cost area, you can take the chance to really get serious about budgeting

New friends and family

Your new city will also give you the chance to change who you interact with and how much. You may be moving closer to family, or have the chance to meet new friends. Changes in your family or friend’s situation can also impact your finances. If you are moving closer to extended family, you may have an opportunity to collaborate on child care and save some money that way. 

If you’re moving to a new city where you don’t know anyone, consider how that might affect your budget and your social life. Will you be spending more money at bars, events, and other places to meet new people? Work those expenses into your new budget!

Updating your recurring subscriptions

Recurring subscriptions can be an easy way to lose your money if you’re not careful. Without tracking them with a budgeting tool like Mint, it’s easy to find yourself paying for monthly subscriptions that you don’t actually use. Moving to a new city can be a great way to update your recurring subscriptions and be proactive about which ones you want to pay for.

While some monthly subscriptions like streaming services are easy to transfer with you when you move, others won’t make as much sense. It probably isn’t a good idea to continue paying for your local gym membership if you move halfway across the country. Take the time as part of your move to really take a look at which monthly payments you are making and which are still providing value.

Budgeting for your move

A budget is one of the most important tools you have to achieve a positive financial future. Budgeting for your move is important in two different ways. We’ve talked a bit already about how to adjust your budget for your new situation, but it’s also important to make a budget for the move itself.

Without a budget, it can be easy to spend much more than you intended to on your move. Moving is always stressful, so before you notice it, you can find yourself spending hundreds or thousands of extra dollars. Make sure to do your research on moving options, and don’t forget to give yourself some grace in the budget to account for unexpected things to come up while moving.

The Bottom Line

Moving to a new city is an exciting time, and can be a great opportunity to get a fresh financial start. Make sure to compare the cost of living in your new city, and how it compares to the prices that you’re used to. Adjust your budget for your new living situation and don’t forget to budget for the move itself. One great way to update your budget is to take a look at some of your recurring monthly subscriptions and have an honest conversation with yourself and others in your household about which subscriptions are worth it for you. Following these tips can get you off to a great start in your new city and with your new life.

Save more, spend smarter, and make your money go further

Dan Miller

Dan Miller is a freelance writer and founder of PointsWithACrew.com, a site that helps families to travel for free / cheap. His home base is in Cincinnati, but he tries to travel the world as much as possible with his wife and 6 kids. More from Dan Miller

Source: mint.intuit.com

Joe Rogan’s Real Estate Experience: Living a Luxurious Lake Life in Austin, Texas

Podcasting has its privileges. After sealing a deal for over $100 million with Spotify, Joe Rogan has become the most popular — and best paid — podcaster on earth. 

The Joe Rogan Experience host first rose to fame in the 1990s sitcom NewsRadio and went on to host stunt/dare game show Fear Factor, followed by forays into martial arts, where he is a renowned commentator for the UFC.

And while nowadays his name is tied to his immensely popular podcast (which was the most popular podcast in the U.S. for much of 2020 and 2021, reaching an estimate 11 million people per episode), the former Fear Factor host has had an extensive stand-up comedy career, which he started in back 1988 and continues to the present day.

Cashing in his podcasting pennies, Joe and his family recently took up residence in a multi-million dollar mansion. Below you’ll find all the details we could find about the Rogans’ $14.4 million property in Austin, Texas.

Joe Rogan’s house upgrade from California to Texas

The Joe Rogan Experience host, 54, and his family-of-five became part of the “mass exodus out of California” due to the Golden State’s lockdown rates and COVID-19 responses, lack of rain, homelessness epidemic, overpopulation and increased taxes.

According to the father-of-three, the Lone Star State — and the multi-million dollar dream house he found there — is a far more appealing alternative and the perfect place to call home.

While his 7,500 square foot home in California was cozy, the comedian recently moved his family into a much larger estate in Austin, Texas. 

path leading to Joe Rogan's house
Joe Rogan’s new house in Austin, Texas. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood

Rogan’s house in Austin, Texas is one of the most exclusive properties in the area, and puts the podcaster in proximity to some other well-known celebrities that reside in the state’s capital — including Supernatural actor Jensen Ackles, who also lives in a lovely lake house in Austin.

Reportedly worth four times more than his home in California, Joe purchased the Texas estate for $14.4 million.

Nestled in the outskirts of Austin, the massive spread is outside the chaos of the city, but close enough for the everyday conveniences.

With A-list neighbors such as billionaire John Paul DeJoria and Academy Award-winning actress Sandra Bullock, the podcast king created his castle in this southern slice of heaven.

Inside Joe Rogan’s Austin home, a million-dollar home fit for the world’s leading podcaster

Purchased in an off-the-market deal, Joe and his family-of-five recently moved into their lakeside home in the second half of 2020.

Although not many details have been leaked online about their sprawling new digs, it seems that Joe and his wife Jessica have plenty of room for their three daughters: Lola, 12, Rosy, 11, and 24-year-old Kayja Rose. 

According to Dirt, the massive lakeside mansion boasts 10,980 square feet and features 8 bedrooms and 10 bathrooms. 

the entrance to Joe Rogan's house in Austin, TX
Stepping inside Joe Rogan’s Austin house. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood
Joe Rogan’s new house comes with floor-to-ceiling glass walls that open up to mesmerizing lake views. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood

Located on Lake Austin, the Tuscan-style estate was built in 2006 and listed for $7.25 in 2015. 

According to Work and Money, designer Benjamin Wood and his philanthropist wife Theresa Castellano Wood are the former owners of the elegant abode.

They’re also the ones who added the Asian-inspired and modern upgrades, which add a wow factor to the already-impressive home.

Rogan’s house includes an open floorplan with the dining room, living room and library all sharing one space. Painted deep blue, this shared living space is accented by rustic wooden pillars and light wood feature walls. 

living room with floor-to-ceiling walls of glass inside Joe Rogan's house in Austin, TX
The main living area has an open floorplan that combines the dining room, living room and library. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood
The living area is accented by dark blue walls and dramatic furnishings. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood
The statement piece in Joe Rogan’s house in Texas is a floor-to-ceiling built-in library. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood

With rustic farmhouse vibes, the beautifully open kitchen includes two islands, antique cabinets and plenty of room for Joe’s favorite wild meat meals. 

With floor-to-ceiling glass walls, the family-of-five can couch-it while glancing out at the four acres of spectacular views on their private property.

The kitchen inside Joe Rogan’s Austin house comes with antique cabinetry and two kitchen islands. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood
The inviting kitchen boasts a rustic farmhouse vibe, complemented by stylish finishes and large windows. Image credit: Peter Vitale via Benjamin Wood

Of course, the UFC commentator has a customized home gym with all the bells and whistles. And did we mention his fully-equipped podcast room?

The lakeside mansion features a large back porch and deck, alongside an impressive mezzanine featuring a large Buddha statue. With over 300 feet of water frontage, the Rogans are sure to enjoy the property’s party deck on Lake Austin.

After their lake adventures, Joe and his family can jump in the outdoor pool which includes a stonework patio and plenty of shade for those hot Texas summers. 

The house Joe Rogan left behind

In 2003, Joe and wife Jessica purchased their Bell Canyon, Calif. home for $2.33 million. After living there for 17 years, the Rogans made a handsome $1.12 million profit when they sold it for $3.45 million in March 2021.

Joe Rogan’s former home in Bell Canyon, California, which he sold for $3.45 million. Image credit: Realtor.com

With 7,500 square feet and 5 bedrooms, the family home included 5 bathrooms and 2.14 acres of outdoor space. Their former California home featured a pool and backyard deck, but nothing in comparison to their palatial Austin estate.

For now, Joe Rogan’s experience seems to be fit for a king. From the overpopulation of the Golden State to the laid back vibes of the Lone Star State, it seems like Joe’s choices in terms of real estate went from lovely to luxurious.

More celebrity homes you’ll enjoy

Tour Andrew Rea’s (Binging with Babish) House in Brooklyn
Impact Theory’s Tom Bylieu Bought the Striking $40 Million Mansion from ‘Selling Sunset’Where Does Trevor Noah Live? A Closer Look at the Daily Show Host’s Penthouse in ManhattanFrom a Prince to a King: A Look at Will Smith & Jada Pinkett Smith’s Real Estate Dynasty

Source: fancypantshomes.com

These 14 Major Employers Offer Part-Time Jobs With Benefits

Think you need to work long hours to qualify for company-backed retirement plans, tuition reimbursements and affordable health insurance?

Actually, you don’t have to have to be a full-time employee to get those perks. There are many companies that offer generous benefit packages for their hourly part-time employees.

These 14 companies lead the way in offering part-time jobs with benefits. You could land a flexible role that also allows you to attend school, take care of family or do whatever you please.

14 Companies That Offer Part-Time Jobs With Benefits

If you’re looking for part-time work, start your job hunt with these employers.

1. Costco

Hourly part-time employees can receive benefits from Costco once they’ve accumulated 450 hours. Healthcare coverage includes medical, vision, prescription drugs and core dental coverage.

All hourly employees working at least 10 hours per week can enroll in voluntary short-term disability insurance, which provides tax-free income replacement in the event of a non-work related accident or illness that prevents work.

2. Lowe’s

Part-time employees at Lowe’s are immediately eligible for medical benefits, including prescription drugs, short-term disability, life insurance and dental and vision coverage..

After one year, Lowe’s offers an employee stock purchase option to its part-time workers, as well as a 401(k) after 180 days. Eligible family members can also opt-in for group medical, dental and vision coverage and dependent life insurance.

3. REI

Part-time employees at REI become eligible for a benefits package if they work an average of 20 hours per week over a 12-month evaluation period.

The company pays the majority of employees’ medical and dental coverage and the full cost for basic life and accidental death and dismemberment (AD&D), employee assistance program, business travel accident insurance and long-term disability insurance.

REI also provides a generous PTO package, a wide variety of leave options, and “Yay Days” twice a year – a program that allows employees to take part in their favorite outdoor activity,  take on something new or participate in a stewardship project.

They also offer a public transit benefit which provides a 50% pre-tax subsidy on public transit expenses up to the current IRS limit through payroll deduction.

4. Staples

Staples offers its part-time associates access to dental and vision coverage, life, dependent life, accidental death and short-term disability insurance coverage. They’re also eligible for the company’s 401(k) plan after one year and 1,000 hours of service.

Stick with the company for a year and average 30 hours per week, and you’ll be eligible to enroll in a full-time medical plan. Staples also offers 10% employee discounts on online or retail items, adoption assistance and its own confidential employee counseling program.

A Starbucks employee holds a drink up while working the drive through counter at Starbucks.
Photo courtesy of Starbucks

5. Starbucks

Starbucks is well-known for its benefits program for part-time employees. All you have to do to be eligible is work at least 240 hours over three consecutive months, then continue to average 20 hours per week.

Health coverage offered by Starbucks includes routine visits, hospitalization and more, along with dental,vision and life insurance coverage. Alternative care options, like acupuncture or chiropractic treatment, are covered too. After 90 days, employees can opt-in to Starbucks’ 401(k) plan.

Other employee benefits include up to a $10,000 reimbursement for adoption expenses, confidential counseling, full tuition reimbursement, and one pound of Starbucks coffee or Teavana tea every week!

6. UPS

Part-time employees who work between 225 and 400 hours at UPS within a three month period are eligible for medical and dental coverage, vision insurance, hearing, prescription drugs and an employee assistance program.

Part-time employees who exceed 400 hours over three months are eligible for the same benefits as full-time employees.

Part-time employees can also take advantage of the Earn and Learn tuition assistance program  that provides up to $5,250 in assistance per calendar year (with a lifetime maximum of $25,000). Eligibility begins on the day of hire.

7. Trader Joe’s

After three months and working an average of 30 hours per week, Trader Joe’s “crew members” are eligible for medical, dental and vision coverage at a cost as low as $25 per month.

The company also offers a matching 401(k) plan and contributes 10% of a crew member’s salary annually to the plan, according to an employee.

Other employee benefits include a 20% store discount, scholarship programs, store tastings, employee assistance programs and paid relocation and transfers.

8. Aerotek

Aerotek is one of the world’s leading staffing agencies. Part-time employees who work a minimum of 20 hours per week are eligible for contributory medical, dental and vision insurance.

The company also offers a 401(k) and 529 plan, a tuition reimbursement after six months, dependent care flex spending accounts, a free counseling service and an employee discount program with Aerotek’s many retail partners.

9. Chipotle

All hourly crew members at Chipotle are eligible for its robust benefits package that includes medical, vision and dental insurance, as well as a 401(k) match after one year of employment.

Part-time employees also receive a salary percentage-based annual bonus, mental health assistance, education assistance up to $5,250 annually, stock purchase plan, gym membership discounts and one free meal per shift. Free burritos on Chipotle!

10. JPMorgan Chase

The global banking institution offers benefits to its part-time employees, after 90 days, who work between 20 and 40 hours per week.

Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life and accident, disability, before-tax flexible spending accounts and group legal services. JPMorgan Chase also offers a 401(k) match starting at 3% annually and increasing by 1% every year up to a maximum of 10%.

Other offered benefits are an employee stock purchase plan, a comprehensive health and wellness program, parental leave, backup child care options and discounts on banking services.

A postal office workers loads a cart around with letters to post office trucks.
Letter carriers load mail trucks for deliveries at a U.S. Postal Service facility in McLean, Va., Friday, July 31, 2020. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

11. USPS

The United States Postal Service hires career and non-career (temporary/seasonal) workers. Part-time career workers are eligible for its benefits package which includes the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program – a plan in which the federal government pays two-thirds of the health insurance premiums for employees and retirees.

They also offer federal group life insurance (FGLI), and federally-backed long-term care, dental and vision and a flex spending account.

The USPS retirement system, also available for part-time career workers, offers a fixed annuity based on years of service, a defined contribution 401(k) THRIFT Savings Plan with a 5% employer match and Social Security.

12. Wal-Mart

Part-time and temporary associates at Wal-Mart who work an average of at least 30 hours per week over a 60-day period are eligible for benefits.

After the initial 60 days, associates must wait another 60 days to enroll. Once you enroll you’re eligible for the remainder of the calendar year as well as the year after. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, AD&D, critical illness insurance and accident insurance, as well as a 6% 401(k) match after one year and a 10% in-store discount.

Wal-Mart also offers Resources for Living – a free counseling service that offers unlimited phone support anytime and up to 10 no-cost counseling sessions or 10 free weeks of no-cost, chat-based therapy.

13. American Red Cross

Employees at this major nonprofit are eligible for part-time health benefits if they work 20 hours per week Those who work 30 or more hours per week are eligible for full-time benefits.

The American Red Cross also offers a 401(k) plan with a match up to 4%.

14. Kaplan

The American educational training company offers eligible part-time employees access to a third-party company that helps enroll in a range of health insurance policies from multiple insurance carriers. Options include a supplemental hospital plan, life insurance, a dental and vision option, disability insurance and a free prescription discount card.

Part-time employees and their families also have access to free or significantly discounted educational courses offered by Kaplan.

Robert Bruce is a senior writer for The Penny Hoarder. Lisa Rowan is a former staff writer.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

25 Must-Follow Tips When Moving To a Different State

This moving checklist will make crossing state lines a breeze.

Moving is always annoying but much easier when you’re moving just a few blocks away. But moving out of state? That’s a whole different ballgame. There are many details and things to check off your list before hopping on a plane to your new city.

It can get overwhelming quickly, from professional movers and having a job lined up to making new friends and leaving family members behind.

These 25 must-follow tips for moving out of state will help with the heavy lifting that comes with moving out of state.

What to consider before moving to another state?

Moving out of state is scary, but if you’re armed with a good checklist, everything can seem a little more approachable. Sure, there are a lot of details to take care of before moving, but the most important thing you should focus on is finding the right city for you.

1. Finding your next city

Make a shortlist of your dream cities and book a long weekend at each, if possible. Forgo a hotel room in favor of living like a local and research neighborhoods before you go. Book an Airbnb listing in the one that fits your lifestyle the most.

Gather intel from friends, make a list of your favorite things to do (think movie theaters, preferred stores, etc.) and check your social network to see if you know anyone in the area. Do groceries and take public transportation to get a true feel of your potential everyday life.

2. Visit a few places before deciding on your new state

Go to several cities.

Go to several cities.

After a few visits to your top 3 cities out of state, think about what’s important to you. Do you want to ditch your car in favor of public transportation? How’s the dining scene in these cities? Is the job market in your career path of choice thriving there? How are the local schools? Are you moving alone, or are you moving in with your partner? Can you afford to live in this prospective city with your current salary?

This is when pro/con lists come in handy. Be sure to sit down and think it through before deciding on your new state.

3. Compare the cost of living before moving out of state

When picking a new city to live in, you have to consider more than moving expenses. Whether you’re relocating for a new job or moving while keeping your current one, you need to consider the new cost of living expenses. Is rent more expensive in the new city? Do you have nature or a local park nearby? What about groceries and transportation?

The cost of living in Washington, D.C., versus Charlotte, NC, is very different, for example. In Florida, the state has no income tax. Make sure that wherever you’re relocating to, you compare both your budget and current salary to the new city’s cost of living differences so you can adjust accordingly and save money where you can.

4. Set a moving budget

So, you’ve picked your new city. Now, it’s time to start thinking about your moving budget. You’ll need to decide whether you’ll hire professional movers and a long-distance moving company to handle your move. Or, if you’ll just get your friends to help you load a moving truck, and you’ll unload it on your own once you arrive at your new address.

You’ll also need to consider deposits for your new apartment, plane tickets, security deposits for utility companies, any new food and house items you’ll need and possibly a storage unit if you have to stay in temporary housing for a bit.

A spreadsheet outlining every money detail will help keep you within budget.

5. Find an apartment in your new city

apartment hunting

apartment hunting

Pick your dream neighborhood and start researching apartments. It’s always good to secure housing before moving out of state. Hunting long-distance for an apartment is challenging, so seeing it in person or sending a friend will make the easiest move.

Read reviews, set up tours for various apartments and always confirm that an apartment is legitimate before wiring any money. Ask for move-in specials and current amenities like an in-unit washer and dryer or stainless appliances.

Bring a blank check and any required documents for the application so you can apply on the spot if you love it. This may include:

  • State-ID or driver’s license
  • Proof of income (latest paystub)
  • At least one reference from a previous landlord
  • Employment details
  • Co-signer information, if needed
  • Unfrozen credit for the landlord to run it for application

Check with your job to see if they reimburse employees for relocation expenses or have any moving services available. Also, check your lease terms and let your landlord know with enough time that you’re leaving your current apartment soon. Make sure to schedule a walkthrough date to get your security deposit back.

6. Update your work about your move

In this pandemic era, working remotely is the new normal. If your job allows you to work remotely and you’re staying, for now, update HR with your new address. This will help your company remain updated with payroll and update your healthcare information.

Follow up with them to make sure they have all they need before your move date. Inquire if, due to your relocation, you now have access to any remote working stipend.

7. Find a new job, if needed

Maybe you’re ready for a whole new life? A new state, new job. Start applying to new jobs as soon as you can since landlords in a new city may require a certain income before renting you a place.

Head to job boards online for opportunities in your chosen city and start sharing that you’re looking for a new opportunity with your network. If you can, schedule upcoming job interviews via Zoom or by phone before you move.

8. Go over your belongings and make donation piles

Don

Don

Things are getting real, and it’s time to see how much stuff you really have. You can start calculating how many boxes you need or if you’re hiring movers or just a moving truck.

Go over your furniture, clothes and even kitchen utensils and start donating and selling piles. Start listing items on social media and put every cent you make toward moving costs.

Leave only what you need in the last 30 days, including medical records and important documents like birth certificates and what’s making a move out of state in the apartment. Everything else needs to go to make sure that you only pay the moving company precisely for what you want to keep.

9. Pick a move-in date and start packing

The moving out of state timeline starts getting faster once you pick an apartment and your job situation is all settled. Check your lease and choose a move date. Pick up boxes, packing tape and bubble wrap, and start streamlining all your belongings.

Spend your weekends patching up holes in your current apartment, repainting any walls, confirming your move-in date with your new landlord and picking up your keys.

10. Book the moving company

After purging your belongings, you’ll have a better idea of the number of boxes and furniture you need to hire movers for. Research moving companies that specialize in out-of-state moves. This is an excellent time to ask for recommendations on social media for moving companies.

Get a few quotes to compare them, confirm that there are no add-ons or surprise charges with the quote, how they go about hiring professionals and vetting them and, of course, read reviews.

Once you pick a reputable moving company, confirm the delivery address of your new house, ask about day-of protocol so you’re ready for the movers and ask for an estimate of when they will deliver your belongings. Some moving companies allow you to track your belongings for peace of mind.

11. Schedule a going away party

Send an invite to all of your friends and family before you move out of state. If you can, ask a close friend to take on planning details for the party so you can focus on your long-distance move. Book a venue or go down to your favorite restaurant (that you will miss very much!) and have a casual night with everyone you know.

12. Make travel arrangements

Decide if you

Decide if you

Now that you have a date for moving out of state, you have to decide how to get there. If you hire movers, you have the choice of hopping on a plane or driving there.

This is the time to book your plane ticket if that’s the best choice. Make sure that you plan which bags you’re taking with you and that they all meet the weight requirements. Have a small pet? Don’t forget to buy them a ticket, too.

If you’re driving, make sure to budget for gas and have your route planned out. Making long-distance moves via car is more exhausting, but you do get to bring a few more of your things with you, see new things on the way and go at your own pace. Be sure to pack a first aid kit for the road, just in case.

This is a good option if you have temporary housing and will have stuff in a storage unit for a while at first.

13. Arrange cleaners at your old place

Schedule cleaners for the day after the movers come by and double-check that you covered every nail hole, there are no stains on the carpet and you packed up all of your things.

Once the cleaners leave the place sparkling clean, let your landlord know the apartment is ready for a walkthrough. Return the keys and finalize how you’ll receive your security deposit before you head out of state.

14. Clean and sell your car

If you don

If you don

If you chose a place with stellar public transportation, you’re probably thinking of leaving your car behind. You don’t have to sell it until a week before you move to make sure that you get all of your errands done.

Start the process early by looking at online vendors like Carmax, Carvana and Blue Book to see how much you’ll get for your car. Get it clean and in tip-top shape, so it sells for the maximum amount possible. Schedule a pick-up at your apartment for convenience and sell it to the best offer.

15. Time to move

Almost there! You’ve prepared, and the moment is here. It’s time to move. You’re more prepared than most for your move out of state. You’ve said your goodbyes, you’re checked into your flight and the movers have your couch.

16. Update your pet’s microchip and registration

Before getting too settled into your new place, update your pet’s microchip and registration in the new state. If they were to go missing, they would have an old address and make it hard to find you. Check if this new place has additional requirements beyond rabies shot and registration with the county.

It’s also an excellent time to find a 24-hour vet that’s close by for any emergencies while you unpack in the short term.

17. Get a new driver’s license and registration

Keep all documents up to date.

Keep all documents up to date.

Most states have a 30-day grace period for new residents to update their driver’s license and vehicle registration. Along with your pet’s registration, add this one to the top of your to-do list once you land in your new apartment. Visit the local DMV to get a new license and registration for your car.

Check if you need specific documents like a birth certificate or social security card. If you can’t find either (and who can blame you mid-move), you can go to the local social security administration branch and ask for a new one.

18. Register to vote in your new state

Don’t forget about doing your part for your country. Switch your voter registration as soon as you have your new address to allow time to update. Check where your voting precinct is, so you’re ready for election day. You can easily switch your voter registration online or at your local library.

Start reading about issues in your new state and get familiar with your representatives. Now that you have a new home, you have new things to fight for and worry about, no matter your political leaning.

19. Connect your utilities

Once you sign your lease, cancel your utilities at your current place and start calling local utility companies to create accounts for electricity, gas and internet access in your new apartment. Depending on your internet provider, you can just transfer service.

Get ready to set up an account and pay deposit fees. You should start this process at least two weeks before your move since utility companies often move slowly.

Check with your landlord to see if your lease includes any utilities, like water or trash.

20. Reach out to friends for local connections

Making new friends is hard! But if you reach out to your network and social media to share your news about moving out of state, be sure to ask if they can connect you with any pals in your new state, either via email or group text.

Schedule friend dates for your first month after your move to get to know your new neighborhood.

21. Change your mailing address

Mail slot

Mail slot

About a week before you move out of state, begin forwarding your mail with the U.S. Postal Service. Get ahead of any lost mail by changing your address in your streaming accounts, Amazon.com account and any magazine subscriptions you already get.

You don’t want to have a random package go to your old apartment because you didn’t forward mail after moving out of state.

22. Transfer your gym membership

If you’re lucky, your gym will have various locations around the country, and you can just transfer your membership. Let your gym, meal planning service and anything else within your routine know that you’re moving out of state. Make sure to cancel and get confirmation of any services that don’t transfer to your new place.

23. Find new doctors in your area

Don’t let your moving out of state keep you from your medical and dental routine. Ask colleagues in your new place if they have any recommendations for dentists, general practitioners and any other doctor you may need.

Your health insurance may also have a helpful directory of in-network providers so you can start finding your favorites.

24. Update the bank of your new location

It’s important to update your financial institutions that you’re moving out of state and are now residents of your new state. This isn’t just your primary bank. You need to update every financial institution, including your financial advisor, accountant, any investments and those that hold any retirement accounts.

25. Get settled in your new state

Settle in with new friends.

Settle in with new friends.

There’s no greater feeling than the one of relief when you have unpacked every box in your new apartment. Start a good routine for the first month of exploring a new restaurant, coffee shop or neighborhood near you. Getting to know your new town and making friend dates will help you feel settled in no time.

Ready to move to another state?

The moving process is stressful, with unexpected expenses, finding the right moving company and launching yourself into a new life. This moving out of state checklist will make your relocation a lot easier.

The weeks ahead will be uncomfortable as you settle into your new job and new neighborhood after the long-distance move. But slowly, you’ll meet new friends and find yourself as a regular in the corner coffee shop.

Source: rent.com

10 Things You’ll Spend More on in Retirement

Even if your real retirement is years away, you’ve already had some practice.

That came during the pandemic lockdown and into its aftermath, when many of us were tucked away at home, working remotely. Except for the part where you’re actually working and getting a full paycheck, this is similar to what life is like for many retirees.

So ask yourself: How did your spending fare on that retirement test drive?

Before you can determine how much you will need to save for a fulfilling retirement, you first need to know how much you will spend in retirement. You’ll also need to factor in soaring prices on everything from gas to groceries. Sure, inflation affects everyone, but it could hurt more in retirement when your income will probably be lower.

Financial planners have estimated that retirees need 80% or more of preretirement income to maintain their standard of living, though individual situations vary greatly. Another data point that correlates: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ annual survey on consumer spending, the average retired household spends 25% less than the average working household each year.

That said, some items to do stand out in a retired household, including big-ticket expenses such as health care and travel. Here’s a look at 10 budget categories where retirees are likely to spend more and some tips on keeping costs in check.

1 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Travel in Retirement

A senior man and his wife holding hands walking up a hill on a footpath looking away from the camera at the view. The fishing village of Polperro is behind them.A senior man and his wife holding hands walking up a hill on a footpath looking away from the camera at the view. The fishing village of Polperro is behind them.

Most retirees put “travel” at the top of the list of things to do more of in their post-work years.

Maybe you plan to set off on a cruise or two. Or perhaps you simply want to pack up your car for weekend getaways with your grandkids. Either way, you may find yourself spending more on travel in retirement than you bargained for. The customer-starved travel industry is eager to get retirees back on the boat, bus, train – or into an RV.

While overall transportation expenses decline throughout retirement, many retirees take the kind of trips they could only dream about while working full time. For instance, compared with their working peers, retirees were choosing (at least, before the pandemic) longer cruises and cruises that visit more destinations, according to travel experts.

Deborah L. Meyer, a Certified Financial Planner and founder of fiduciary advisory firm WorthyNest, recommends a five-step plan for pre-retirees looking to turn these dreams into reality, :

  1. Assign specific cost estimates to travel goals
  2. Break the big savings goal into monthly or quarterly allocations to savings
  3. Adjust income and expenses to make room for the regular savings
  4. Don’t compromise on future goals (that is, beyond the trip)
  5. Act on achieved goals

2 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Health Care in Retirement

Close-up of senior woman sorting weekly medication. Close-up of senior woman sorting weekly medication.

It’s a blast to kick back and make big travel plans in retirement. Less fun: The reality that we spend more on medical care after we retire –  and that those costs keep increasing as we age.

The Employee Benefit Research Institute found that the percentage of a household’s total spending on health care increases from 8% in preretirement households to up to 13% by the time a household is past the age of 85. A similar finding turns up in a survey by the Employee Benefit Research Council.

Unpredictable and costly new diagnoses and hospitalizations drive much of the increase inhealth care spending for the average retired household, but overall spending rises for general health needs, health insurance, prescription medication, medical supplies and medical services as well. As the National Council on Aging reports, 84% of people 65 and plus have at least one chronic condition.

3 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Utilities in Retirement

Mature Man Using App On Phone To Control Digital Central Heating Thermostat At HomeMature Man Using App On Phone To Control Digital Central Heating Thermostat At Home

If you noticed your utility bills spike while you were working remotely, welcome to another reality of retirement.

The average retired household spends more each year on utilities than the average working household, according to the Urban Institute. Why? If retirees are home more often, they’re simply using utilities more. If you’ve seen a bump in your bills – gas, electric, water and sewer, cable and streaming services – think of it as a precursor. On the plus side, chances are you’ll have finished paying off your mortgage (or come pretty close) when you reach retirement age. That means you’ll be saving thousands each year.

4 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Moving and Relocating in Retirement

Senior couple having a break surrounded by cardboard boxes in an empty room Senior couple having a break surrounded by cardboard boxes in an empty room

Empty-nesters tend to take flight in retirement. Downsizing that multi-bedroom home for smaller living quarters, and ones that may be more elderly friendly, is an obvious strategy that could save money in the long run. For the most part, that’s true. But the move-out process can set you back thousands of dollars.

Take it from experience. My wife and I recently moved into our “retirement” home and community. I put retirement is in quotes because we haven’t actually left our jobs. But the right house in the right city popped up on our radar at the right time and we went for it. Fortunately, we’re still working and were able to cover the thousands of dollars in related expenses:

  • Getting one home ready to sell
  • Listing our existing house
  • Buying a new home
  • Settlement and moving costs

Not to mention upgrading appliances, new lighting, window treatments, and all the other tweaks you’ll do to a new living space.

According to Mike Palmer, a certified financial planner with Ark Royal Wealth Management in North Carolina, downsizing in full retirement can present huge unexpected costs for some of his clients, particularly when they want to stay within urban areas. “I see a lot of folks thinking they’re going to walk away with $200,000 [by downsizing], but that’s rare. In most cases, it will be lateral,” he says. To avoid this, he recommends trying to move from an urban area to a more rural one.

It can be nearly impossible to predict every moving expense as it comes, but Squared Away can help: It offers a calculator that estimates what you’ll spend.

5 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Fitness in Retirement

A multi-ethnic group of seniors is attending a fitness class. They are indoors. The group is doing yoga. A multi-ethnic group of seniors is attending a fitness class. They are indoors. The group is doing yoga.

Research indicates that retirement itself is a motivator to get fit. With a flexible schedule free of commuting and the stress of a busy work week, many retirees drop unhealthy habits and pick up healthier ones, raising their spending on gym memberships and fitness classes and equipment (a new bicycle, perhaps?)

Approximately 53% of retired Americans participate in physical activity and allocate about 13% of their annual spending to fitness and leisure activities. Because of this, Fung Global Retail & Technology says that the fitness industry is starting to cater to seniors as well, offering more specific (and pricey) gym options for aging populations. (See Gyms for Older Exercisers.)

Marguerita Cheng, the chief executive officer of Blue Ocean Global Wealth, says that fitness is one of the biggest new expenses she sees her retired clients take on. For her clients, she says, it is often the fear of declining health as they age that motivates them to take fitness seriously. Some of her clients put so much time and money into fitness that they schedule meetings with her around their yoga or spinning classes.

You may have a workaround to gym costs: Some Medicare Advantage plans have a free gym membership as part of their benefits.

6 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Day-to-Day Expenses in Retirement

Close up of a group of seniors enjoying food in a restaurantClose up of a group of seniors enjoying food in a restaurant

As they transition into retirement, many people’s lives aren’t radically altered. They may still drive to meet with friends or associates, grab coffee from around the corner, or use their laptop do work from the comfort of their couch. What often does change after leaving the workforce, however, is who picks up the bill for a lot of the small stuff — lunches, parking, dinners, concert tickets. In short, so long, expensing!

“Small-business owners and professionals who retire are often surprised at how many of their expenses were picked up by their company,” says Bert Whitehead, president of Cambridge Connection, in Franklin, Mich. “It is a jolt when they discover how much it adds up to.”

7 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Debt in Retirement

Hispanic man paying bills on laptop in kitchen Hispanic man paying bills on laptop in kitchen

Retirees are especially vulnerable to accumulating debt and subsequent interest. Although the average debt ballooned across all age groups between 1989 and today, older retirees were by far the hardest hit. According to a study from the National Council on Aging, the average debt held by people 65 and older keeps climbing. The total median debt for those 65 and up in 2016 (the latest year available) was $31,300. That’s 2½ times more than what it was in 2001.

Credit cards with high interest rates carry the greatest risk to retirement security. According to the research and advocacy group Demos, roughly half of those older than 50 reported using credit cards to pay medical expenses, as well as groceries, utilities and even rent.

If bills are beginning to pile up, don’t hesitate to ask for help. Focus on paying off the cards with the highest rates first, and consider consolidating your balances on a card offering a 0% interest rate if it will take more than a few months to pay off each card.

The National Council on Aging also offers tips for seniors to manage debt.

8 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Charitable Giving in Retirement

Photo illustration of two hands cupping a heart symbolizing charityPhoto illustration of two hands cupping a heart symbolizing charity

Americans age 65 and up, even with their reduced income, contribute almost 11% more to religious, educational, charitable and political organizations than people from 55 to 64. Retirees age 75 and older donate even more, on average.

Part of this phenomenon is psychological. Researchers have found that older adults take more pleasure in charitable donations than their younger counterparts. On the other hand, older retirees may have less control over their finances than they realize. A diminished capacity for financial decision-making in retirement is “extremely common,” says Daniel Marson, a neurology professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “In fact, I might say it’s inevitable.”

While many retirees have no problem managing their money into old age, it never hurts to have a trusted family member keep an eye on things. Services such as EverSafe, for example, allow a designated family member to monitor a retiree’s finances and get alerts in case of excessive withdrawals, changes in spending patterns and other unusual activity—all without the retiree losing control of their money.

9 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Reading in Retirement

Woman Reading and Relaxing in RowboatWoman Reading and Relaxing in Rowboat

Before retirement, the average household spends $101 each year on reading. Yes, it’s a category tracked by the Bureau of Labor Statistics that includes the cost of books and audiobooks, as well as devices such as a Kindle. In retirement, the average household spends $173 each year, a 73% increase.

A greater number of subscriptions to newspapers, magazines and audiobook services—the result of a more flexible schedule—accounts for some of the increase.

How do you cut those expenses? Try your local library for free hardcover books, audiobooks, magazines and, increasingly, online access to streaming services.

10 of 10

You’ll Spend More on Financial Planning in Retirement

Shot of a senior couple meeting with a consultant to discuss finances at homeShot of a senior couple meeting with a consultant to discuss finances at home

If you’re entering retirement with accumulated wealth, that’s great. You may have done so with guidance from a financial planner, but then again, maybe you’ve had good luck along with regular 401(k) contributions using some sort of robo-adviser service. 

But remember, the more wealth you’ve collected, however, the more elbow grease it’ll take to manage that money and make it work for you. That’s where financial planners come in. Their services can be invaluable, but they’re not free. Depending on the management style you prefer, figuring out what to do with your money can become an expense in its own right.

Fee-only planners may charge a flat annual retainer (which could run a few thousand dollars or more), or they may charge on an hourly basis (often from $100 to $250 per hour), by the project (from $1,000 up to $10,000 for a comprehensive plan) or, if they’re managing your investments, as a percentage of assets (from about 0.5% to 1.25% of your investable assets). Or they may use some combination of those billing models.

In a recent survey of financial planning firms, Fidelity found that 23% of all clients were older than 70, and they held as much as 28% of total assets. According to AARP, retirees should continue to use financial planners to assist with relocating, with managing new medical expenses and to address changing financial needs.

Source: kiplinger.com

This is Your Reminder to Do an Annual Subscriptions Audit

Save more, spend smarter, and make your money go further

Checking on all of your regular expenses is an important part of keeping your finances healthy. Too often, people sign up for a monthly subscription for a gym membership, subscription box, or premium membership and then stop using it. Without regularly keeping track of what you’re spending money on, you can easily find yourself spending hundreds of dollars a month on things you’re no longer using.

What is a Subscriptions Audit?

A subscription audit refers to the process of going through all of your monthly subscriptions. Sometimes the hardest part of a subscription audit is figuring out what all of the different monthly subscriptions even are. Once you have a list of your monthly subscriptions and how much they cost each month, you can decide which are still providing you value. Finally, you can cancel any that you’re no longer using.

Using Mint’s Automatic Subscription Tracking

It can be hard to even figure out what all of your monthly subscriptions are. That’s where Mint’s Automatic Subscription Tracking service comes in. As long as you have connected the bank or credit card that you use to pay your subscription to Mint, the automatic subscription tracker will keep track of it. You can see all of your subscriptions in one place so you have better control of your spending. And if prices change, you’ll automatically get a notification — then you can decide if the higher price is still worth it for you.

Check your other recurring bills as well

While you’re doing your subscription audit, you’ll want to check on your other recurring bills as well. You might not think of things like your insurance, cell phone or utilities as subscriptions, but anything that you pay on a regular basis can be considered a subscription. And while you might not ever cancel your Internet or cell phone bill, it is still a good idea to regularly review these types of recurring expenses.

How you check on your recurring bills will depend on what kind of bill or recurring payment it is. In some cases your only decision will be to decide to cancel or not. For utilities or insurance, you may be able to choose another supplier or renegotiate your bill.

If renegotiating your bill sounds like too much of a chore, you’re in luck, the Mint app has a new bill negotiation feature with BillShark. They’ll negotiate for you and if they don’t save you money, you won’t give them a thing.

Being aware of all of your finances can help you keep your expenses low and put you on the road to a solid financial footing.

Save more, spend smarter, and make your money go further

Dan Miller

Dan Miller is a freelance writer and founder of PointsWithACrew.com, a site that helps families to travel for free / cheap. His home base is in Cincinnati, but he tries to travel the world as much as possible with his wife and 6 kids. More from Dan Miller

Source: mint.intuit.com