Capital One Travel Rolls Out To All Cardholders With 5x/5% Rewards On Hotels & Car Rentals

Capital One Travel was initially only available on certain Capital One cards and, beginning today, is available for all Capital One Venture, Spark, Miles, Quicksilver, and Savor cardholders.

  • Savor, Quicksilver, Spark Cash, and Student cardholders will have access to Capital One Travel and now earn unlimited 5% cash back on hotels and rental cars booked through Capital One Travel. 

  • Venture, VentureOne, Spark Miles, and Spark Miles Select cardholders will continue to earn unlimited 5X miles on hotels and rental cars booked through Capital One Travel.
  • Venture X cardholders will continue to earn unlimited 10X miles on hotels and rental cars and unlimited 5X miles on flights booked through Capital One Travel.

Source: doctorofcredit.com

Capital One Partners With Turo Car Rental To Offer Bonus Rewards (10x With Venture X; 5x With Venture)

The Offer

Capital One announced today a new partnership with Turo car rental service.

  • Venture X and Venture cardholders will earn bonus points when booking through the Turo app or on Turo.com. Valid May 17 2022 through May 16, 2023.

    • Venture X cardholders will earn 10X miles
    • Venture cardholders will earn 5X miles

Our Verdict

Nice additional perk for the Venture cards, especially Venture X. Capital One often releases these kinds of bonus points partnership offers. Hopefully this one ends up staying around for the long haul.

Source: doctorofcredit.com

3 Instances When a Landlord Can Legally Break a Rental Lease

Read this to understand when you can legally break a lease agreement.

Even before the pandemic, landlords filed 3.6 million eviction cases on average in the U.S. each year. The process is emotional and difficult for everyone involved, but there are circumstances for which you as a landlord will have to break a lease agreement early.

If you’ve got a month-to-month lease agreement, either party can terminate at any time with proper notification, at a minimum of 30 days. But if you’ve got a fixed-term lease agreement with a tenant, such as a one-year lease, you can’t break the lease mid-way through on a whim.

When can you legally terminate a lease agreement early?

Breaking a lease agreement with cause

You’ve got a lease agreement that’s legally binding that the tenant signed before moving in. If that tenant violates the lease agreement by having an unapproved roommate, unauthorized pet, unpaid rent, has caused major damage or conducted illegal activities, you have every right to terminate their lease “with cause.”

In this instance, you would send your tenant a “cure or quit” notice. Either they “cure” the problem by paying rent owed, for example, or they “quit” the property. You can even send an “unconditional” quit notice if the issue at hand isn’t cured. For example, if the tenant alters or damages part of the property without your consent and there’s no way to fix the problem. Check your state laws on these types of lease terminations.

Eviction notice.

Eviction notice.

Can a landlord break a lease agreement without cause?

You can do so but you must include the reasons for this kind of early termination in the tenant’s lease agreement. If it’s not in the agreement, you can’t just force a tenant out on a whim.

Add a clause to your lease agreement that allows you to break a lease with 30- or 60-days’ notice so the tenant has time to find another place to live. Work with an attorney to make sure the language is accurate. Be upfront and clear in your language and point it out to the tenant at signing. There’s no reason to hide your intentions. If you know well in advance that you may have to break the lease, sign a month-to-month lease.

Reasons to break the lease early

There are certain circumstances under which you can break a lease, including:

1. You want to sell the property

You can sell whenever you want, but you must have a clause in the lease agreement in order to terminate the lease legally. Lease contracts will transfer along with the property and the new owner has to abide by them. Some buyers want properties that are already tenanted.

Decide if you want the tenants on the property during the sales process or if you want them out before putting the property on the market. Also, check whether your state requires you to offer existing tenants the first right of refusal.

You want to keep your tenants happy if they’re staying on the premises. And they do have some legal rights, including 24-hour notice of showings, the right to stay during a showing and the transfer of their security deposit to the new owner once the property sells.

Lay hardwood floors

Lay hardwood floors

2. You need to renovate the property

As a landlord, you must keep your property safe and habitable. If you need full access to the property in order to renovate and remodel to keep your property in good condition, you can terminate a lease. If the upgrades are going to cause health and safety issues, you can terminate a lease early. Again, you must have a clause in the lease agreement in order to terminate the lease legally.

3. You need to move into the rental space

If you’re renting out a house, for example, and you need to move back in, you can legally terminate the lease early.

How to terminate a lease

There are a few steps you must follow to legally end a lease to avoid a tenant possibly filing a claim in court.

Send a notice to the tenant letting them know that you’re terminating their lease. Check your state laws on how to write and deliver this termination notice. There are specific requirements for doing this.

Depending on the reasons you’re giving this notice, it may state the tenant’s transgression and warn them that they must vacate the property or face eviction. Or, you might give the tenant a few days to act on fixing whatever they did wrong, e.g., find a new home for their unauthorized pet or pay any rent owed. Again, check your state laws.

If the tenant doesn’t comply with the notice, you may have to file an eviction lawsuit.

Make sure it

Make sure it

When a landlord is not allowed to break the lease early

The bottom line is if you haven’t included a clause in your lease that you may terminate the lease early, you can’t just go ahead and do so. And your state may have a list of circumstances under which you’re restricted from ending a lease early. For example, there are usually rules around breaking the lease on a rent-controlled apartment.

You may just have to wait

Nobody likes the eviction process, and you don’t want to end up in court. But sometimes, you must remove a tenant. If it’s possible, your best bet is to wait until lease renewal time and not renew the lease. Depending on your state laws, you may need to give 30- to 60-days’ notice on non-renewal.

If you didn’t have an early termination clause in your lease agreement, but you need your tenant to move out, you can pay them, a.k.a., offering cash for keys. You give a tenant enough money to cover their moving costs and a deposit on another place they might rent.

Always be open and communicative with your tenants for the best outcome. In all cases, if you’re a property manager or landlord and you need to break a lease agreement, check your state laws and get an attorney’s input.

Source: rent.com

Credit Card Reviews: Best Credit Cards for Average Credit

From the Mint team: Mint may be compensated if you click on the links to our issuer partners’ offers that appear in this article, including Chase. Our partners do not endorse, review or approve the content. Any links to Mint Partners were added after the creation of the posting.  Mint Partners had no influence on the creation, direction or focus of this article unless otherwise specifically stated.

Save more, spend smarter, and make your money go further

Credit cards can be a great way to manage your cash flow and earn rewards for everyday purchases you already make. However, it only takes a few late or missed payments to drop your score from the top tiers down to the “average” or “fair” categories of credit scores.

Card issuers recognize that not everyone has stellar credit. Below, you can find a list of cards designed just for people with average credit. With one of these in your wallet and the right habits, including paying your card off in full every month by the due date, you could find yourself with an improved credit score! If you can commit to managing your cards well, consider one of these top cards.

QuicksilverOne from Capital One

Arguably the best card for people with average credit is the QuicksilverOne card from Capital One. This card offers unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase with a modest $39 annual fee. It takes just $2,600 in annual purchases to break-even on that fee, or $216.67 per month.

In addition to cash back, the card has some valuable benefits for purchases and travel. Those include an extended warranty on all eligible purchases, rental car damage coverage, and travel accident insurance. It also charges no foreign transaction fees.

Between the cash back and the benefits, this card offers big benefits over buying with cash or a debit card. Rewards are redeemable for a statement credit, gift cards, or by check.

USAA Rate Advantage Visa Platinum

USAA is one of the best financial institutions for military and veteran households. The USAA Rate Advantage Visa Platinum card is great for its low fees. It has no annual fee, no foreign transaction fee, and comes with the lowest interest rate available from USAA.

Active military families have unique needs and some special financial protections by law. USAA is an expert at dealing with those needs. For example, active duty customers get a special 4% SCRA rate. You can also pick a design that shows off your branch of the armed forces.

The card also features valuable purchase and travel benefits sometimes reserved for more premium cards. Those include rental car insurance, price protection, extended warranty protection, satisfaction guarantee coverage, travel accident insurance, baggage delay insurance, and more.

Capital One Platinum

The Platinum credit card from Capital One is a no-annual-fee card that automatically increases your credit line after making the first five monthly payments on time. It doesn’t offer cash back or travel rewards, but it does make for a low-cost credit card option.

Benefits include rental car coverage, travel accident insurance, and an automatic extended manufacturer’s warranty. These benefits are pretty good for a card with no annual fee.

Even without rewards, most people are better off buying with a credit card if they can pay it off in full each month. Like most cards, this one has $0 liability for fraud and can help you manage your cash flow by letting you choose when you pay it off, as long as it is before that monthly due date of course.

Credit One Bank Platinum Visa

CreditOne Bank offers two different versions of its Platinum card. Depending on your credit, you may qualify for the Rebuild Credit version or the standard Cash Back Rewards version. In either case, you have an opportunity to earn at least some cash back among other benefits.

If your credit fares on the better side of the average category, you may be approved for the version that offers 1% cash back on all purchases. If your credit qualifies you for the rebuilding credit version, you’ll earn 1% back on eligible purchases in categories like dining (1.1% back for some reason), gas, groceries, mobile phone, internet, and cable/satellite TV service. You find out which rewards you get when approved.

The card’s benefits are mostly around tracking and improving your credit score. While it leaves purchase and travel protections to be desired, it may be a good choice for people looking to improve their credit while earning rewards on eligible purchases

Save more, spend smarter, and make your money go further

Eric Rosenberg

Eric Rosenberg is a finance, travel, and technology writer in Ventura, California. He is a former bank manager and corporate finance and accounting professional who left his day job in 2016 to take his online side hustle full-time. He has in-depth experience writing about banking, credit cards, investing, and other financial topics. You can connect with him at Personal Profitability or EricRosenberg.com. More from Eric Rosenberg

Source: mint.intuit.com

3 Investment Ideas for Retirees Right Now

Ah, retirement. Picture long, blissful walks on the beach. Or you’re watching the sunset from the balcony of your cruise ship and thinking: This is it – the way life should be. Then you casually check your smartphone to see how your investment accounts are doing and, gasp! You might not be as rich as you thought were.

Retirees are facing major headwinds right now when it comes to investing: Troubles in Ukraine, higher inflation and stock market jitters to name a few. If you are in or near retirement and wondering what you can do with your portfolio, here are three ideas I share with some of my clients:

1. Consumer defensive stocks

I want clients to be as diversified as possible. However, I may tilt their portfolio to consumer defensive stocks for retired or more conservative clients. Defensive stocks generally include utility companies like natural gas and electricity providers, healthcare providers and companies whose products we use day-to-day, like toothpaste companies or food and grocery stores.

According to the Center for Corporate Finance, a leading finance educator to financial professionals, defensive stocks tend to be less volatile than other types of stocks. Less volatility can mean less upside potential, but it can also mean less downside risk, which I find is what many retirees want – less downside (and hopefully better sleep at night).

2. Bonds for retirees – but not just any bonds

I like municipal bonds for retirees. Municipal bonds are issued by states, cities or local municipalities. There are many types of municipal bonds. General Obligation municipal bonds are backed by the taxing authority of the issuer – meaning the state or municipality uses taxes to pay the interest to bondholders. Revenue bonds are municipal bonds backed by a specific project. A toll road uses tolls as the revenue to pay bondholders.

Interest from municipal bonds is usually exempt from federal taxes (though there may be alternative minimum tax (AMT) considerations for certain types of investors). If you live in the state where the bond is issued, the interest may be exempt from state taxes as well.

I like tax-free interest for retirees for several reasons. Retirees may have other sources of taxable income, such as pensions, annuities or rental income, whose income may push them into a higher-than-expected income tax bracket. Retirees may also take money out of 401(k)s and traditional IRAs in retirement for required minimum distributions, which are taxable as ordinary income. Having some tax-free interest may prevent the retiree’s income from creeping up into the next higher tax bracket in retirement.

Findings from the 2019 Municipal Finance Conference suggest there is less risk of default with general obligation bonds than revenue bonds. This is because revenue bonds typically depend on the vitality of a project, which is more uncertain than the state or municipality’s ability to raise taxes to pay for a general obligation bond. For this reason, I may tilt a portfolio more toward general obligation municipal bonds than revenue bonds for retirees.

Municipal bonds are not without risk. There is no guarantee of principal and market value will fluctuate so that an investment, if sold before maturity, may be worth more or less than its original cost. Like any bond, municipal bond prices may be negatively impacted by rising interest rates. Also, municipal bonds may be more sensitive to downturns in the economy – investors may fear a struggling state’s economy may be unable to repay the bond.

For these reasons, I like to be as diversified as possible. I may use short-term muni bonds for more principal stability and less interest rate risk. I might also blend in intermediate-term municipal bonds for additional yield. If the portfolio is larger than $250K I prefer to buy individual municipal bonds for greater customization and tax-loss harvesting opportunities.

3. Beyond stocks and bonds

I like to sprinkle in small amounts of other investments. I call these my “satellites.” Depending on the client’s financial situation and tolerance for risk, I may add in real estate or small amounts of commodities, including coal, gold, corn and natural gas. I generally use mutual funds or exchange-traded funds for the diversification and the relatively low cost. I usually only buy small amounts, maybe 2%-5% of a portfolio, to help diversify the portfolio and provide an inflation hedge.

Inflation is a significant real enemy for retirees. Rising prices erode the purchasing power of a portfolio. One nice thing about owning real estate is the owner often can raise rents, which is a hedge against rising prices. I may buy Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) which pool together various properties. I may also use Private REITs, which are not traded on the public market, so they are less liquid, for more sophisticated investors. Private REITs are not suitable for everyone, as they tend to carry higher fees, don’t have published daily prices, but they often provide higher yield than publicly traded REITs.

For more on fighting inflation see my blog post Could Inflation Affect Your Retirement Plans?

Parting thoughts

Investing in retirement is different than investing while working. In retirement, an investor’s time horizon shrinks – they need the money sooner to live off and there’s no paycheck coming in to replenish the account. There is also less time for a retiree’s portfolio to recover from a stock market correction. Because of this, I find retirees fear losses more than they enjoy their gains.

Understanding these differences is important for successful investing in retirement. Using these three approaches – shifting slightly more to consumer defensive stocks, using municipal bonds to help prevent further taxable income, and adding small amounts of inflation-fighting investments like real estate and possibly commodities – in my opinion can all help smooth out the ride for retirees.

The author provides investment and financial planning advice. For more information, or to discuss your investment needs, please click here to schedule a complimentary call.

Disclaimer: Summit Financial is not responsible for hyperlinks and any external referenced information found in this article. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Investors cannot directly purchase an  index. Individual investor portfolios must be constructed based on the individual’s financial resources, investment goals, risk tolerance, investment time horizon, tax situation and other relevant factors.  

CFP®, Summit Financial, LLC

Michael Aloi is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Practitioner and Accredited Wealth Management Advisor℠ with Summit Financial, LLC.  With 21 years of experience, Michael specializes in working with executives, professionals and retirees. Since he joined Summit Financial, LLC, Michael has built a process that emphasizes the integration of various facets of financial planning. Supported by a team of in-house estate and income tax specialists, Michael offers his clients coordinated solutions to scattered problems.

Investment advisory and financial planning services are offered through Summit Financial LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Adviser, 4 Campus Drive, Parsippany, NJ 07054. Tel. 973-285-3600 Fax. 973-285-3666. This material is for your information and guidance and is not intended as legal or tax advice. Clients should make all decisions regarding the tax and legal implications of their investments and plans after consulting with their independent tax or legal advisers. Individual investor portfolios must be constructed based on the individual’s financial resources, investment goals, risk tolerance, investment time horizon, tax situation and other relevant factors. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. The views and opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author and should not be attributed to Summit Financial LLC. Links to third-party websites are provided for your convenience and informational purposes only. Summit is not responsible for the information contained on third-party websites. The Summit financial planning design team admitted attorneys and/or CPAs, who act exclusively in a non-representative capacity with respect to Summit’s clients. Neither they nor Summit provide tax or legal advice to clients.  Any tax statements contained herein were not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of avoiding U.S. federal, state or local taxes.

Source: kiplinger.com

How to Navigate an Apartment Lease Takeover Like a Pro

If you’ve got to leave your apartment mid-lease, finding a qualified person to step in and take over your lease goes a long way to making the process go smoothly.

You gone.

Or, at least you need or want to go. But you’ve got this lease on your apartment that’s not up yet. You don’t want to break your lease because that’s got some consequences that may linger. You’ve got some other options, such as a lease takeover or a sublet. Here’s how you go about getting out in the best way possible.

What’s the difference between a sublet and a lease takeover?

In a sublet, a new person comes in to finish up your lease. They pay you and you continue to pay rent to the landlord. Three things to remember: Make sure your lease agreement allows you to sublet your apartment, let your landlord know you’ll sublet and you’re on the hook if the subletter doesn’t pay the rent.

An apartment lease takeover (a.k.a. lease transfer or lease assignment) is when a new renter agrees to take over your lease and has a separate, formal agreement with the landlord. That person would then be the lessee (the person taking over the lease). You still have to find out of your lease allows this, but a lease takeover is more of a clean break than a sublet.

Lease agreement

Lease agreement

Getting started

Transferring your lease may seem like traffic has parted and you’re ready to hit the gas, but first, you’re going to adjust your mirrors and check that you’ve got a full tank. Full stop on the driving metaphors, but you’ve got work to do.

Read your lease agreement

The lease may state you can’t sublet or otherwise transfer your lease to anyone else. And, if you’re allowed to sublet or do a lease transfer, you may have to pay a processing or transfer fee. You might have to let go of your security deposit or your last month’s payment.

Contact your landlord

Get it in writing that your landlord or property manager is on board with a lease takeover. Find out what your responsibilities will be. For example, do you have to find the lessee? Will you still be on the hook for rent if the lessee doesn’t pay? You may have to get your landlord to specify in writing that unpaid rent is not your burden.

Ready to do the lease takeover

You’re not done yet. The easier you make life for your landlord or property manager, the smoother your lease takeover process will be.

Find someone to take over the lease

You may not have to do this, but it will help your case.

It should go without saying that the person should have good credit and be able to pay the rent on time. The potential lessee will have to fill out a rental application and provide all the documents and background information you had to do when you began renting the apartment. Be prepared for your landlord to say no to your candidate. Have a backup person. And then another one just in case.

If you’ve made your case for your lessee candidate and your landlord is being difficult or unreasonable, you may need to find a lawyer. Look for someone who specializes in your state’s landlord-tenant laws.

Start your lessee search early

Just because it seems like everyone you know is looking for a place to live doesn’t mean they’re actually ready to find a place or put down money on something. Remember the months of scrimping, saving and organizing you had to do before you rented your place?

Word of mouth is great, particularly among friends, family, co-workers and others that you may already know. But you can also use social media to find someone. If you’re having trouble, you might think about offering to cover the first month’s rent or paying the utility bill for a couple of months.

Take good photos of your apartment

Take good photos of your apartment

Create an apartment listing

Write a description and take some great photos of your apartment. (A picture is worth a thousand words, they say.) Three to five images (kitchen, living room, bathroom, bedroom, common space) are probably enough. You don’t need a fancy camera to take them. Make the rooms look cozy and inviting. Clear the clutter, let in as much natural light as possible and add some flowers.

Done deal

Once you’ve got your landlord’s approval, you’ll need to create an official document of the lease transfer outlining everything you all agreed to. (You can find a lease takeover template at wonder.legal.) You, your landlord and the new tenant will all have to sign the document.

You’re free to go now

Once you’ve found the perfect person to take over your lease, and they’ve signed on all the dotted lines, you are good to go.

Now, you can floor the gas and head into your new adventure.

Source: rent.com