Average Student Loan Debt by State in 2021

Student loan debt nationwide increased by 8.28% in 2020, the largest increase since 2013, according to the latest report from EducationData.org. That spike was most likely fueled by rising unemployment and 3.2 million new federal student loan borrowers.

Student loan debt is now the second highest consumer debt category in the country behind only housing debt . Nationwide, nearly 40% of college attendees report some type of educational debt, and 65% graduate with student debt, the report showed.

A recent report from EducationData.org details the average student loan debt per borrower (based on all student loan debt, not just that owed by undergraduate borrowers) in each state. Overall, residents of Washington, D.C., have the nation’s highest federal student loan debt at more than $55,000 per borrower when looking at the total student loan debt owed by individuals in the state. Of every state, North Dakota has the lowest average federal student loan debt, with residents there owing an average of just $29,446.

Student Loan Debt in Each State

Read on for an overview of what student loan debt looks like across the country according to EducationData.org . This data is reflective of all borrowers, not just undergraduate students.

Alabama

Average borrower debt: $37,348
Total student loan debt: $23.1 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Alabama

Alaska

Average borrower debt: $34,431
Total student loan debt: $2.3 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Alaska

Arizona

Average borrower debt: $35,454
Total student loan debt: $30.7 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Arizona

Arkansas

Average borrower debt: $33,525
Total student loan debt: $12.8 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Arkansas

California

Average borrower debt: $36,937
Total student loan debt: $142.7 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in California

Colorado

Average borrower debt: $37,120
Total student loan debt: $28.2 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Colorado

Connecticut

Average borrower debt: $35,448
Total student loan debt: $17.1 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Connecticut

Delaware

Average borrower debt: $37,338
Total student loan debt: $4.6 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Delaware

District of Columbia

Average borrower debt: $55,077
Total student loan debt: $6.4 Billion

Florida

Average borrower debt: $38,481
Total student loan debt: $98.2 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Florida

Georgia

Average borrower debt: $41,843
Total student loan debt: $67.2 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Georgia

Hawaii

Average borrower debt: $36,575
Total student loan debt: $4.4 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Hawaii

Idaho

Average borrower debt: $33,100
Total student loan debt: $7.1 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Idaho

Illinois

Average borrower debt: $38,071
Total student loan debt: $61.1 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Illinois

Indiana

Average borrower debt: $33,106
Total student loan debt: $29.6 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Indiana

Iowa

Average borrower debt: $30,848
Total student loan debt: $13.2 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Iowa

Kansas

Average borrower debt: $33,130
Total student loan debt: $12.5 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Kansas

Kentucky

Average borrower debt: $33,023
Total student loan debt: $19.5 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Kentucky

Louisiana

Average borrower debt: $34,683
Total student loan debt: $22.1 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Louisiana

Maine

Average borrower debt: $33,352
Total student loan debt: $6.1 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Maine

Maryland

Average borrower debt: $43,219
Total student loan debt: $35.5 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Maryland

Massachusetts

Average borrower debt: $34,549
Total student loan debt: $30.4 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Massachusetts

Michigan

Average borrower debt: $36,295
Total student loan debt: $50.7 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Michigan

Minnesota

Average borrower debt: $33,822
Total student loan debt: $26.3 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Minnesota

Mississippi

Average borrower debt: $37,080
Total student loan debt: $16.0 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Mississippi

Missouri

Average borrower debt: $35,706
Total student loan debt: $29.3 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Missouri

Montana

Average borrower debt: $33,953
Total student loan debt: $4.2 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Montana

Nebraska

Average borrower debt: $32,138
Total student loan debt: $7.8 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Nebraska

Nevada

Average borrower debt: $33,863
Total student loan debt: $26.3 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Nevada

New Hampshire

Average borrower debt: $34,353
Total student loan debt: $6.4 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in New Hampshire

New Jersey

Average borrower debt: $35,730
Total student loan debt: $41.7 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in New Jersey

New Mexico

Average borrower debt: $34,237
Total student loan debt: $7.7 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in New Mexico

New York

Average borrower debt: $38,107
Total student loan debt: $91.9 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in New York

North Carolina

Average borrower debt: $37,861
Total student loan debt: $48.0 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in North Carolina

North Dakota

Average borrower debt: $29,446
Total student loan debt: $2.5 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in North Dakota

Ohio

Average borrower debt: $34,923
Total student loan debt: $61.8 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Ohio

Oklahoma

Average borrower debt: $31,832
Total student loan debt: $15.2 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Oklahoma

Oregon

Average borrower debt: $37,251
Total student loan debt: $20.0 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Oregon

Pennsylvania

Average borrower debt: $35,804
Total student loan debt: $63.9 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

Average borrower debt: $32,212
Total student loan debt: $4.5 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Rhode Island

South Carolina

Average borrower debt: $38,662
Total student loan debt: $27.5 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in South Carolina

South Dakota

Average borrower debt: $31,858
Total student loan debt: $3.6 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in South Dakota

Tennessee

Average borrower debt: $36,549
Total student loan debt: $30.8 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Tennessee

Texas

Average borrower debt: $33,123
Total student loan debt: $116.8 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Texas

Utah

Average borrower debt: $32,781
Total student loan debt: $9.9 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Utah

Vermont

Average borrower debt: $38,411
Total student loan debt: $2.9 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Vermont

Virginia

Average borrower debt: $39,472
Total student loan debt: $41.9 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Virginia

Washington

Average borrower debt: $35,521
Total student loan debt: $27.6 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Washington

West Virginia

Average borrower debt: $32,258
Total student loan debt: $7.2 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in West Virginia

Wisconsin

Average borrower debt: $32,272
Total student loan debt: $23.1 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Wisconsin

Wyoming

Average borrower debt: $30,246
Total student loan debt: $1.6 Billion
Everything you need to know about student loans & scholarships in Wyoming

The Takeaway

The average amount of debt held by borrowers varies from state to state. The five states with the highest average amount of student loan debt per borrower are; Washington D.C., Maryland, Georgia, Virginia, and South Carolina. The five states with the lowest average of student loans per borrower are; South Dakota, Oklahoma, Iowa, Wyoming, and North Dakota. North Dakota is the only state where the average borrower owes less than $30,000.

For millions, student loans are a necessary part of paying for college. When federal aid and savings aren’t enough to pay for school, some borrowers turn to private student loans. While private lenders are not required to offer the same benefits or protections as federal student loans, they can be helpful for borrowers who have exhausted all other options and are looking to fill in gaps in funding. Student loans with SoFi have no hidden fees and borrowers are able to choose from four repayment plans.

Find out more about private student loans available from SoFi.

Photo credit: iStock/FangXiaNuo


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SoFi Private Student Loans
Please borrow responsibly. SoFi Private Student Loans are not a substitute for federal loans, grants, and work-study programs. You should exhaust all your federal student aid options before you consider any private loans, including ours. Read our FAQs.
SoFi Private Student Loans are subject to program terms and restrictions, and applicants must meet SoFi’s eligibility and underwriting requirements. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information. To view payment examples, click here. SoFi reserves the right to modify eligibility criteria at any time. This information is subject to change.

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Source: sofi.com

Dow Jones vs. Nasdaq vs. S&P 500 – What Are the Differences?

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Dig Deeper

Additional Resources

Wondering how “the market” did today?

When American investors refer to “the market” or “the stock market,” they’re usually referring to one of the three major U.S. stock exchanges: the Dow Jones, the Nasdaq, and the S&P 500. Or all three. 

But these indexes represent different stocks and market segments, so you should understand the differences before investing in stocks. 

The Dow Jones Industrial Average

The oldest U.S. stock exchange, the Dow Jones Industrial Average — or the DJIA, Dow, or Dow Jones for short — began in 1896 as a way to track the 12 largest industrial companies of the era. 

Today the Dow includes 30 blue-chip companies ranging from Microsoft to Coca Cola to Disney, and the index features all industries except for utilities and transportation. These market sectors have their own separate Dow Jones indexes. 

The DJIA doesn’t swap in or out companies often, and the criteria remains vague. Aside from being some of the largest companies in the country, the companies are expected to be leaders in their industry. A committee meets periodically to vote on keeping or replacing members of the index. 

Stocks in the Dow Jones are weighted by price, so stocks with higher prices make up a greater percentage of the total index. If a $100 stock rises by $10, and a $5 stock also rises by $10, both changes are weighted equally, even though that jump in price represents a much larger leap in value for the $5 stock. 

The Dow offers some insight into how the nation’s largest companies are performing. But with only 30 companies, it hardly represents the U.S. stock market as a whole. The price weighting also distorts the index’s performance, as a company’s share price tells you less than its market capitalization (market cap). 

Take the index’s movements with a grain of salt, and consider it more of an ultra-high cap bellwether rather than a definitive statement about U.S. stock trends.


The S&P 500

The S&P 500 index includes 500 U.S. companies rather than only 30, making it a broader indicator of U.S. large cap stocks. These companies include Alphabet (Google), 3M, Allstate, Amazon, and Microsoft. Note that companies can appear in multiple stock indexes, as Microsoft does. 

The number of companies included in the S&P has changed over time. Going back to 1927, the S&P has returned around 10% per year on average. That includes an era when the index only included 90 companies, before expanding to 500 in 1957. 

Like the Dow, the stocks making up the S&P 500 are determined by a committee. As of 2021, companies must have a market cap of at least $13.1 billion, have positive earnings for at least the last four quarters, maintain adequate liquidity based on price and trading volume, and at least 50% of shares must be owned by the public (known as public float).

Unlike the Dow, the S&P 500 is weighted by market cap rather than price. Market capitalization includes the total value of all a company’s shares: the share price multiplied by the number of outstanding shares. 

Imagine a company with shares priced at $1,000, but which only has 100 shares in circulation, for a total market cap of $100,000. In contrast, another company has 1 million shares in circulation, but each share is worth only $10, for a total market cap of $10 million. Which company has a higher market value? The one with a market cap of $10 million of course, which is why the S&P 500 weights by market cap rather than stock price.  

The S&P 500 offers a broader picture of how U.S. stocks are trending. Even so, the index represents the largest U.S. companies, and tells you nothing of how smaller companies have performed.


The Nasdaq Composite

First and foremost, understand that the Nasdaq is a stock exchange, and was in fact the first completely electronic stock exchange. The Nasdaq Composite is the stock index, which includes over 3,000 of the companies traded on the Nasdaq. The index includes all companies with common stock trading on the Nasdaq, but excludes preferred stock, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and other types of securities. 

While investors tend to think of the Nasdaq as an exchange for technology stocks, stocks from all market sectors trade on the Nasdaq. Even so, the Nasdaq Composite index does disproportionately feature tech stocks. 

Example companies listed on the Nasdaq include Apple, Microsoft, Netflix, Tesla, and Intel. Many investors and pundits use the Nasdaq Composite as a barometer for the technology sector as a whole, even though it includes many non-tech companies (such as PepsiCo). 

Like the S&P 500, the Nasdaq Composite is weighted by market capitalization. 

Don’t confuse the Nasdaq Composite — which includes nearly every stock that trades on the Nasdaq — with the Nasdaq 100. The latter includes just 100 of the largest non-financial stocks that trade on the Nasdaq, such as Starbucks, Adobe, and Amazon. 


Which Index Should You Follow?

As a broad measure of the U.S. stock market, the S&P 500 serves as the most representative index. It includes companies in every industry, and is weighted by market cap. Even so, it includes only large-cap companies. 

For a more tech-oriented weathervane, follow the Nasdaq Composite’s movements. If you want a glimpse into small-cap stocks, check the Russell 2000. 

The Dow Jones may get the most attention from reporters, but it actually represents the U.S. market least well of the three major indexes. The sample size is too small, and being price-weighted further distorts its value.


Final Word

The three major stock indexes above only represent U.S. stocks, not international companies. 

For more global exposure, you can explore foreign stock market indexes such as the S&P Europe 350 Index or the Dow Jones Asian Titans 50 Index. 

Better yet, save yourself the stress and don’t bother following the stock market’s movements at all. Instead, automate your stock investments with a robo-advisor, and simply dollar-cost average your investments in index funds. Avoid emotional investing by ignoring the daily volatility of the market. 

While day traders need to stay glued to their stock tickers, you don’t. The stock market rises and falls, and over the long term it averages a strong upward trend. I sleep easily at night knowing that when it goes up, I enjoy a higher net worth. When it goes down, I get to buy stocks at a discount. No matter what happens, I win — because I participate in the market on autopilot, without letting emotions affect my investment decisions.

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Source: moneycrashers.com

Wasatch Emerging Markets Small Cap Goes Its Own Way

The MSCI Emerging Markets index includes 27 countries and more than 1,400 stocks – a broad assortment, to be sure. Finding the most promising investments among those stocks and thousands of other candidates can’t be easy. But the four managers at Wasatch Emerging Markets Small Cap (WAEMX) have a disciplined approach.

They start with a quantitative screen that “tees up good ideas,” says Ajay Krishnan, a comanager. The screen helps them zero in on high-quality companies with healthy profits (measured by return on capital) and cash flow. Then they research each prospective firm from bottom to top and top to bottom.

The process results in a portfolio of roughly 50 to 80 stocks. It’s a diversified list, but in some ways not as diversified as other emerging-markets stock funds. Not every sector finds a place in Emerging Markets Small Cap, for instance. The profitability screen makes sure of that. And only nine emerging-markets countries are represented.

That’s because the managers invest where their research takes them, even if it strays from what other emerging-markets funds are doing. India stocks make up 34% of the portfolio, three times the average exposure of peer funds. And Chinese companies – the top country in most emerging-markets stock funds – account for just 5% of Emerging Markets Small Cap’s assets. “India’s firms have been focused on profits,” says Krishnan, while Chinese companies have been more focused on being “the biggest and the baddest.”

The fund’s hefty tilt toward India has been a plus. Over the past 12 months, the MSCI India index climbed 49%. But Chinese stocks declined 16%, amid a crackdown on some of its big tech firms. “The best way to invest in China is to focus on small companies,” says Krishnan. “Stay under the radar, but buy good businesses.” Among the fund’s biggest winners over the past year are MindTree, an Indian tech consulting firm (up 253%), and Momo.com, a Taiwan-based social networking and messaging app firm (up 224%).

Over the past three years, the fund’s 47.9% annualized return beat 99% of its peers. The trade-off was slightly higher volatility than its peers.

emerging markets stock funds table emerging markets stock funds table

Source: kiplinger.com

23 Ideas for Cheap Christmas Decorations

If you’re dreaming of a white Christmas, but you live in an area that doesn’t get any snow, you can use spray snow to make your winter wonderland dreams come true. You can spray artificial snow on your windows to create a frosted look or spray your front door wreath to make it appear to be covered with snowflakes. A can of spray snow costs less than on Amazon.
Dress up your dining table to bring out the joy of the holiday season. Drape your table with a red, green or white tablecloth and fill a vase or tray with seasonal elements, such as pine cones, holly leaves, cranberries, sprigs of pine needles, jingle bells, candy canes or candles.
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23 Ideas for Cheap Christmas Decorations

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

1. Wall Christmas Trees

Turn empty flower pots into outdoor Christmas decor with just a little paint. You’ll need at least three pots of varying sizes. Paint them white if you want to create a snowman out of your flower pots or green to make a flower pot Christmas tree. Once dried, stack the pots on top of each other upside down and paint additional embellishments, like a face and buttons on your snowman or ornaments and tinsel on your Christmas tree.

2. Get an Artificial Christmas Tree

You can buy boxes of candy canes for cheap at grocery stores or dollar stores around this time of the year. Fill candy dishes full of these red and white striped treats to go on your tablescape, coffee table or end tables. Or hang one or two candy canes on your Christmas tree in place of buying more pricy ornaments.

A woman decorates a tiny Christmas tree.
Getty Images

3. Get a Tiny Tree

The weather’s getting colder. The days are getting shorter. Before you know it, Christmas will be here.

4. Garland

Transform your doors into the biggest presents ever by covering them in wrapping paper. You can use wrapping paper to decorate your interior doors as well as your front door. Add ribbon or a big bow for extra embellishment.

5. DIY Ornaments

Talk about easy Christmas decorations that make your home merry. You can also stack your wrapped present props in an empty corner, by the base of your staircase or on your front porch.

6. Twinkling Lights

Rather than buying an advent calendar this year, make your own. This post from Country Living has several ideas. Come up with whatever little treat, token or message you want to open each day.

7. Window Stickers

Whether you use a kit or make your own gingerbread from scratch, a gingerbread house is a fun holiday project that can double as Christmas decor. Just know it probably won’t last long — so consider this a temporary decoration!

8. Candles

Bundling up on a snowy day to go to the Christmas tree farm and chop down the perfect tree may be a sweet holiday outing, but you’ll get more bang for your buck by opting for an artificial Christmas tree. Now, artificial trees can get pricy themselves, depending on what size and type you choose. However, you can reuse the tree for years to come, rather than having to put it out to the curb when the new year rolls around.

A front door is wrapped in wrapping paper.
Getty Images

9. Decorate Your Doors

Candles are a simple and low-cost way to add a bit of Christmas spirit to a room. You can create a tablescape with red, green, white or gold candles — or set them on the mantle or a wide window ledge. Set battery-operated votive candles inside Mason jars painted in holiday colors for a flame-free decor option.

10. Bells Around Door Knobs

This winter craft doubles as a cheap Christmas decoration. You may be able to make it with items you already have at home: white tube socks, rice, buttons, pins and a scrap of fabric. This post from Darkroom and Dearly tells you exactly how to create them.

11. Decorate With Ribbon

Instead of buying an expensive 7-foot tree, you can save money by getting a much smaller tree that’ll fit on your tabletop. In addition to spending less on the tree, you’ll save on the amount of lights and ornaments you’ll need to decorate it.

12. Wrap Empty Boxes

Dress up your windows with seasonal decals. You can find window stickers of snowflakes, ornaments, gingerbread men and more at the dollar store, craft store and major retailers like Walmart or Amazon. If stored properly, you can even reuse them for next year.

13. Holiday Cards Display

An easy way to light up the outside of your house without needing yards of string lights and a ladder is to use a light projector. You can buy one on Amazon, Home Depot, Walmart and similar retailers for under .

14. Make your Own Advent Calendar

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A boy eats a gingerbread house he made.
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15. Gingerbread House

Deck the halls without wrecking your finances. Here are 23 festive ideas for cheap Christmas decorations.

16. Display Your Kids’ Holiday Artwork

A flat Christmas tree hung on the wall is a great space saver and money saver. You can make wall Christmas trees out of a string of lights, garland, a large piece of felt or even Washi tape. Check out this article from Apartment Therapy for ideas. It looks festive with or without a tree topper!

17. Create a Holiday Tablescape

Make your home not only look but sound festive by tying jingle bells to some red or green ribbon and then wrapping them around your door knobs. Whenever someone opens a door, the kiddos in the house will be looking over their shoulders to see if Santa’s coming.

18. Sock Snowmen

While you’re out shopping for gifts, it can be very tempting to add a bunch of holiday decorations to your cart to help get your home looking merry and bright. But the cost of Christmas decorations often gets overlooked when making your holiday budget — and you end up spending way more than you thought you would.

A person decorates their Christmas tree with candy canes.
Getty Images

19. Candy Canes

To avoid that post-holiday regret, consider these low-budget suggestions for decorating for Christmas.

21. Fake Snow in Windows

Forget the store-bought ornaments, and pick up your hot glue gun. Create wonderful holiday memories while crafting ornaments you can hang on your tree or use as decor around the house. See this Good Housekeeping post for over 75 ideas for DIY Christmas ornaments.

22. Flower Pot Decorations

Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder.

23. Light Projector

A string of lights can really spread holiday cheer. To save money, opt for shorter strings of light to cover smaller areas — such as a window or mantle piece, rather than along your gutters or around a 7 foot tree. You can also use a string of lights on a blank stretch of wall in the shape of a star or to spell out “Merry Christmas” in cursive.
You can use ribbon for more than just wrapping presents. Take some thick ribbon in Christmas colors like red, green or gold and use it to make bows to hang on your Christmas tree, your mantle and even on door knobs or drawer pulls. Tie them around a glass vase with a candle inside for a simple Christmas centerpiece. <!–

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Garland is a low-budget Christmas decoration that instantly adds holiday spirit to a room. In addition to stringing garland around your Christmas tree, you can hang strings of garland above your mantle, over your doorways, around your window frames or wrapped around the banister of your staircase. Instead of buying your garland, you can make your own using natural elements like dried citrus and pine cones, construction paper, popcorn or cheap ball ornaments.

10 States With the Highest Credit Scores

Smiling man with credit card
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For years, we’ve heard that Americans are hopelessly mired in debt, leaving many to struggle with poor credit scores. But in fact, those scores are now on the upswing, according to data analytics company FICO.

In August 2021, the average U.S. FICO Score 8 — the company’s most widely used credit score — was eight points higher than at the same point in 2020. Scores are rising in all 50 states and in the 33 metropolitan areas evaluated by FICO.

FICO says a number of positive behavioral trends have sent scores higher, including:

  • Fewer delinquent accounts
  • Lower levels of consumer debt
  • Fewer consumers heavily using their credit cards

Consumers in a handful of states are leading the way, according to a recently released FICO analysis. Following are the states where average credit scores are the highest.

10. Nebraska (tie)

Omaha Nebraska
Aspects and Angles / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 733

Nebraskans quietly go about their business without fanfare. But don’t mistake this lack of boasting for financial passivity.

In fact, Nebraska’s economy is chugging along, with a microscopic 1.9% unemployment rate in October 2021 — the lowest in the nation.

Apparently, the state’s residents are working too hard to get into credit trouble, earning them a spot on this list.

10. Hawaii (tie)

Honolulu, Hawaii
MNStudio / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 733

Despite a high cost of living and elevated debt levels, residents of Hawaii keep their credit scores healthier than those of many consumers on the mainland.

A couple of years ago, the state’s government reported that while Hawaiians carry more credit card debt than other Americans, they manage it better and have a significantly lower delinquency rate than consumers in other parts of the country.

8. Washington

Marina at Grays Harbor, Washington
Bill Perry / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 734

For the second straight year, U.S. News & World Report named Washington the best state in the nation. The publication praised Washington for having the country’s fastest-growing economy.

A booming economy keeps a lid on credit troubles, helping Washington to land on this list.

7. Massachusetts (tie)

Provincetown, Massachusetts
Lewis Stock Photography / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 735

Massachusetts just recorded its sixth straight quarter of economic growth. That beats the nation as a whole, which has seen four straight quarters of positive movement.

A plethora of good-paying jobs keeps people out of credit trouble, resulting in the Bay State’s appearance on this list.

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7. New Hampshire (tie)

Walter Liff sculpture
James Kirkikis / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 735

New Hampshire’s motto of “Live Free or Die” apparently extends to living free of credit woes. The state has a low credit card delinquency rate and the lowest poverty rate in the nation, says 24/7 Wall St.

7. South Dakota (tie)

Wall drugstore in South Dakota
robert cicchetti / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 735

Like Nebraska, South Dakota’s under-the-radar reputation masks a lot of financial moxie. In fact, the Washington Post recently dubbed the state “the new Cayman Islands for banks and finance,” thanks to tax-friendly — and controversial — laws that attract hordes of money from global elites.

The state’s residents are pretty financially savvy too, with credit scores that rank among the nation’s very best.

4. North Dakota (tie)

Fargo, North Dakota
David Harmantas / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 736

North Dakota just edges out its neighbor to the south when it comes to average credit scores.

Nearly 90% of North Dakota’s land and one-fifth of its workforce are devoted to agriculture. Perhaps all that hard work on the farm keeps the state’s residents out of credit trouble.

4. Wisconsin (tie)

Madison, Wisconsin
MarynaG / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 736

Folks in the Midwest have a reputation for being sensible, which might account for Wisconsin’s place on this list.

Late last year, CreditCards.com reported that Wisconsin had the third-lowest credit card burden among all U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

2. Vermont

Vermont couple walking in park in Autumn
Sergii Kovalov / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 738

Vermont is famous for its foods — maple syrup, cheddar cheese and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. It also has a solid reputation as a place where people know how to manage their spending.

The credit card delinquency rate here is a scanty 2.65%, according to 24/7 Wall St.

1. Minnesota

Minneapolis, Minnesota
Pinkcandy / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 742

Minnesotans are a hearty bunch. With average high temperatures barely topping 20 degrees Fahrenheit in January, perhaps it’s too cold to live high off the hog.

Whatever the case may be, the state’s residents clearly are doing something right. Minnesota — which typically ranks high in terms of the economy and education — is No. 1 in the nation with an average credit score of 742. You betcha!

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

The Best Cities for Public Transportation

If you’re looking to have an easy commute or just want to spend less time in your car, these cities are great options for using public transportation.

According to the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), Americans board public transportation 34 million times. Every. Single. Weekday.

That adds up to a whopping 9.9 billion trips per year. And why not? Beyond the obvious savings of traveling by bus, train, trolley or metro — both financial and environmental — leaving the driving to someone else allows you to kick back and text, read, work, or snooze to your heart’s content. And let’s be honest, road rage is for suckers.

If you’re one of us in-the-know commuters, you’re going to want to check out our list of the best cities in America for public transportation.

Takeaways about the best cities for public transportation

You’re used to looking at route maps, right? Yeah, we know. This is why we created this interactive map to highlight the top 150 cities for public transportation. Can you guess which cities made our top 10? You’re probably not too far off.

Dashboard 1
  • The Northeast region has the strongest representation among our top 10.
  • The No. 1 city boasts a whopping 1,148 stations across the city.
  • Providence, RI has the lowest price for a monthly unlimited pass.

These are the 10 best cities for public transportation

The best cities for public transportation are mostly urban centers with fantastic infrastructure. So, don’t expect to see a “city” like Des Moines make the cut.

And while the East Coast may have the slightest overall edge, you’ll find at least a couple of cities in every major region of the country represented here. Read on to find out which U.S. cities are the best for public transportation.

10. Minneapolis, MN

minneapolis mn

minneapolis mn

Minneapolis is serious about keeping its citizens warm and comfortable. Take, for example, the Minneapolis Skyway, a 9.5-mile network of enclosed heated walkways. And while that makes traveling on foot a breeze — even in the dead of winter — sometimes, you need to travel farther than your own two feet will take you.

And for those trips, there’s the METRO light-rail, along with 18 bus lines to choose from, including fare-free “Free Ride” buses you can hop on along Nicollet Mall.

Even for the rides that aren’t free, your public transportation budget will go far in Minneapolis — the second cheapest city in our top 10 for transport (monthly unlimited).

Think living in this half of the Twin Cities is your speed? Get the scoop on the best neighborhoods in Minneapolis, find an apartment and stock up on some serious winter wear.

9. Miami, FL

miami fl

miami fl

Is Minneapolis too chilly (OK, frigid) for your taste? Perhaps you should consider the opposite tip of the country. Down in Miami, the vibe is endless sunshine and permanent vacation mode. And while traffic is no joke (understatement), public transportation is a stress-free way to get around the city.

First, you’ve got the charming free trolleys, which come every 15 minutes. If no-charge sounds pretty good, you’ll also love the Metromover, which you can pick up in Brickell or Downtown. Trying to get down to Coral Gables, Coconut Grove or South Miami? Hop on the Metrorail. And for getting around Miami Beach, the bus is your best option. Get up to speed on everything you need to know about living in Miami and start searching for your South Florida apartment.

8. Philadelphia, PA

philadelphia pa

philadelphia pa

Living in Philly gives you all the East Coast arts, culture, education and sports you can handle — without the N.Y.C. price tag. You get a lot more bang for your buck in Philadelphia, and you’ll still find a public transportation system that rivals that of the Big Apple.

The Southeast Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) is the country’s sixth-largest public transit system. More than 1.3 million people ride SEPTA’s train, subway, trolley and bus lines every day. The extensive system makes it simple and convenient to explore all that both Philadelphia and the surrounding areas have to offer.

7. Providence, RI

providence rhode island

providence rhode island

If you live in Providence, you’ll enjoy the cheapest price for a monthly unlimited travel pass among our top 10. The capital of our nation’s smallest state is home to Brown University and the Rhode Island School of Design. Getting around town is a breeze for co-eds, commuters and everyone in-between.

The Rhode Island Public Transit Authority (RIPTA) provides low-cost bus and trolley services around the city. In the summer, there are even routes to the beach. Better yet, all of the buses have bike racks so you can explore Rhode Island on two wheels. And if you want to really soak up the scenery, take the hour-long ferry ride from Providence to Newport.

Plus, Providence is a stop on one of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s (MBTA) commuter rail lines, so you can get to Boston in just over an hour.

6. Seattle, WA

seattle wa

seattle wa

Have you ever gazed out over the Puget Sound at the majestic Cascade Mountains on one of those magical sunny days in Seattle? It’s the kind of scene you don’t soon forget. And while those sunny days are somewhat rare, there’s a lot to love about living in Seattle, from the coffee culture to the ease of getting around on the fantastic public transportation system.

Grab an ORCA card and hop on the city’s easy-to-navigate streetcars, light rail and busses. Not only are there ferries from which to soak up those amazing views, but Seattle also boasts a monorail. Considering a move to Emerald City? Scope out the best neighborhoods in Seattle, then start searching for a place to live.

5. Chicago, IL

chicago il

chicago il

Even if you’ve never ridden it before, you’ve probably heard of “the L.” Short for “elevated train,” locals and visitors alike love the L because it’s both cheap and easy to use. And here in a city with two airports, easy public transportation is key.

Take the L’s Blue Line to O’Hare International Airport (ORD) or the Orange Line to get to Chicago Midway International Airport (MDW). The Chicago Transit Authority also has an extensive bus system, while the Metra regional train system will take you through downtown Chicago and to the suburbs and cities beyond. Whether you’re looking to live large in a luxury apartment building, or you’re looking for a budget-conscious ‘hood, you’ll find a wide range of apartments in Chicago.

4. San Francisco, CA

san francisco ca

san francisco ca

Here’s the thing about living in San Francisco. As far as cities go, it’s fairly compact, so nothing is too far away. Which makes it seem like you’ll probably be fine on foot. But there’s one huge consideration — the hills. Depending on how big your calf muscles are, and how hard you want them to work, you’re going to need to lean on public transportation at some point to cruise you up those inclines.

Fortunately, you can travel in style on the city’s iconic trolleys. Or, take the BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit), a rail system that will take you all around the Bay Area. If you’re staying in the city, MUNI has you covered with an extensive network of trains, buses and cable cars. If there’s one place you don’t need a car, it’s San Francisco. Plus, the city is expensive enough without paying for your own set of wheels.

3. Washington, D.C.

washington dc

washington dc

OK, let’s start with the bad news: Washington, D.C. is the third-most congested city in the country. Boo. But that’s exactly why you don’t want a car here, or really need one for that matter. The best way to escape road rage? On the subway. The Metrorail is the most efficient way to get around Washington, D.C. There’s also the Metrobus and the D.C. Circulator if you want to brave the roads — and prefer your public transportation with a bit of natural sunlight.

And since there are so many sights to see, even locals can appreciate the more tourist-oriented modes of transportation. Spend a sunny day on a boat ride across the Potomac, or hop on one of D.C.’s trolley tours to soak up the sights without stress. Fancy living in the nation’s capital? Take a quiz to find out which Washington, D.C., neighborhood is best for you.

2. Boston, MA

boston ma

boston ma

Beantown is an excellent city to traverse on foot. And when you’re not walking, you’re going to want to hop on the “T.” More formally known as the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), the five-line system has subways, trains, buses and trolleys that connect you to all of downtown Boston’s neighborhoods.

And who doesn’t love water taxis? Cruise across Boston Harbor on a boat and pat yourself on the back for avoiding some of the country’s worst traffic. Warming up to the idea of an East Coast move? Get up to speed on the cost of living in Boston, then find your perfect Boston apartment.

1. New York, NY

new york ny

new york ny

No surprise here, right? New York has long been the best city for public transportation in America. Of course, there are the iconic yellow taxis, but you simply can’t get much more connected than New York’s subway system. This impressive 24-hour network goes well beyond the city to shuttle commuters to both Long Island and New Jersey. With 1,148 train stations and 1,224 station lines, New York is untouchable when it comes to public transportation.

Having a car in N.Y.C. is not only near impossible (financially and otherwise), it’s simply not necessary. Put all of the energy you save in navigating the roads into your New York apartment search. It’s no secret that the Big Apple requires a big budget, and finding an affordable apartment is going to take some research. Start by figuring out which New York neighborhood is best for your lifestyle.

Methodology

To find the best cities for public transportation, we looked at metrics related to public transportation usage, accessibility and cost.

Features were normalized and then weighted based on the following scale:

Usage: 25 points

  • Percentage of public transportation users: 25 points

Accessibility: 50 points

  • Bus Lines per density: 10 points
  • Public transit stations per density: 10 points
  • Number of tracks: 10 points
  • Transit lines per density: 10 points
  • Number of transit systems: 10 points

Cost: 25 points

  • Price for a 30-day pass: 12.5 points
  • Percentage of pass cost related to local mean income: 12.5 points

Transit system info was from citylines.co. Transit cost was from ValuePenguin. Bus lines were from a database of 8 million commercially available business listings. These listings may not reflect recent changes to bus line availability. Usage is from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory as of October 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.

The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

Source: rent.com

4 States Where Mortgage Balances Are Rising Fastest

Woman shocked by her mortgage balance
kudla / Shutterstock.com

As housing values soar into the stratosphere, mortgage balances also are growing fatter in many parts of the country, according to a new report from data analytics company FICO.

Homebuyers who have to dig deep to pay ever-climbing prices are seeing their mortgage balances balloon as a result. And that is especially true in four states and the District of Columbia.

The places that appear on this list should be no surprise, as they have seen their housing markets turn red-hot in recent years. They are:

  • District of Columbia: $467,522 average mortgage balance, up $23,397 from 2020
  • Hawaii: $391,924 average mortgage balance, up $17,884 from 2020
  • California: $387,637 average mortgage balance, up $14,106 from 2020
  • Washington: $300,591 average mortgage balance, up $20,010 from 2020
  • Colorado: $291,257 average mortgage balance, up $18,381 from 2020

The trend nationally is also up, albeit more modestly. The average mortgage balance in the U.S. now stands at $224,477, up $8,939 from 2020.

FICO notes that as a general rule, housing markets on the West Coast tend to have the highest average mortgage balances. For example, average total real estate balances in both the San Francisco Bay Area ($502,826) and Orange County, California, ($454,576) are more than twice the national average.

By contrast, Arkansas ($135,897), Mississippi ($130,022) and West Virginia ($123,785) have the lowest average mortgage balances. Even in these states, though, balances are rising.

One way to significantly lower your mortgage balance is to snag a great mortgage rate. Stop by the Money Talks News Solutions Center and search for a great rate whether you are looking for a new home loan or a refinance.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

The Best Places to Live in South Carolina in 2022

With its variety of beach towns and laid-back atmosphere throughout the state, there are a lot of cities considered the best places to live in South Carolina.

There are big plantation homes and tons of American history throughout the state, not to mention the unique culture of the Lowcountry. All combined, South Carolina is really like no other place in the U.S.

From outdoor fun to delicious, local eats and all the activities in between, living in South Carolina is an experience worth having. Here are 13 of the best places to live in South Carolina.

Charleston, SC

Charleston, SC

  • Population: 137,566
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,479
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,224
  • Median home price: $280,000
  • Median household income: $68, 438
  • Walk score: 63/100

With so much history packed into one town, Charleston is a great place to call home. As the starting point for the Civil War, you can explore Fort Sumter and take in a major turning point in our country’s own story.

When you’re ready to dip into the modern amenities of the city, there’s no shortage of enticing eats, preserved architecture and culture to enjoy. It’s the perfect mix of a city and a coastal town with so much to do right outside your door and so many beaches just minutes away.

Clemson, SC

Clemson, SC

  • Population: 17,501
  • 1-BR median rent: n/a
  • 2-BR median rent: $590
  • Median home price: $257,500
  • Median household income: $43,568
  • Walk score: 34/100

Of course, the biggest draw to this particular city is Clemson University. There’s plenty of student housing around this prestigious school. And, although Clemson gets billed as a college town, the city and school have a positive, intertwined community.

Leaving the draw of campus and all that football, introduces you to all the rest Clemson has to offer, including the Bob Campbell Geology Museum, the Brooks Center for Performing Arts and even the South Carolina Botanical Gardens.

Columbia, SC

Columbia, SC

  • Population: 131,674
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,067
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,103
  • Median home price: $200,000
  • Median household income: $47,286
  • Walk score: 35/100

Another college town, Columbia is home to the University of South Carolina. The campus stretches across the city, and tailgate culture is huge, everywhere. You’re most likely a football fan, to some degree, if you call this city home.

In addition to being Gamecock central, Columbia is also the state capital, bringing in a diverse population — that’s not all college students — to make the city run. It’s one of the best places to live in South Carolina because of its varied population and professional opportunities. There’s also plenty of fun things to do.

Fort Mill, SC

Fort Mill, SC

  • Population: 22,284
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,425
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,692
  • Median home price: $410,000
  • Median household income: $91,061
  • Walk score: 19/100

A charming historic district and proximity to Charlotte, NC make Fort Mill an appealing way to stay close to the city without actually living in it. Fort Mill offers miles of hiking and biking trails along its own greenway, plenty of golf and all the dining and shopping you could want.

One of the fastest-growing communities in the area, Fort Mill is drawing in families and young professionals alike — anyone who wants the combination of activity and natural beauty wrapped up in a carefully laid out town.

Greenville, SC

Greenville, SC

  • Population: 70,635
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,284
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,445
  • Median home price: $280,000
  • Median household income: $56,609
  • Walk score: 39/100

Known as an artsy city, neighborhoods in Greenville provide an eclectic mix of locations. Combining small-town charm and more urban amenities, you’ll find plenty of galleries, public festivals and events to satisfy your creative side.

Greenville is also perfectly placed for nature lovers to get a dose of outdoor beauty. Situated right in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, scenic hikes are less than an hour away. For a closer touch of nature, Falls Park lures residents in with its waterfalls and suspension bridge.

Hilton Head, SC

Hilton Head, SC

  • Population: 39,861
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,162
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,600
  • Median home price: $395,000
  • Median household income: $84,575
  • Walk score: 16/100

While you may consider Hilton Head more of a vacation spot than a living destination, the island offers something for everyone. Beautiful beaches, world-class golf, shopping, restaurants and even nightlife are all here. But, it’s not all resorts in this slice of the Lowcountry. There are plenty of communities that provide that homey feel.

Another draw of Hilton Head is its location. The island is one of the best places to live in South Carolina because of its proximity to both Savannah, GA, and Charleston. You can set yourself up for a more picturesque home life while taking advantage of big-city opportunities.

Lexington, SC

Lexington, SC

  • Population: 22,157
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,255
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,420
  • Median home price: $208,000
  • Median household income: $72,996
  • Walk score: 16/100

The historic and modern mix perfectly together in Lexington. Its historical claim to fame is the home to one of the first battles in the Revolutionary War. Another part of the city’s history revolves around commerce, and Lexington’s Old Mill stands as a symbol of the area’s commitment to small businesses.

Shopping around here means supporting locals and long-standing, family-owned shops. Its history and commerce are all in one, packaged in a quaint, suburban environment that continues to draw in young professionals and families.

Mauldin, SC

Mauldin, SC

  • Population: 25,409
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,378
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,333
  • Median home price: $249,200
  • Median household income: $67,860
  • Walk score: 28/100

A suburb of Greenville, Mauldin provides that safe, suburban feel without taking you too far away from a bustling city center. With access to everything the big city has to offer, staying close to home also provides ample opportunities for natural beauty and activity.

The 400-acre Lake Conestee Nature Park is not only a natural habitat for lots of local wildlife, but it’s also a perfect place for outdoor enthusiasts. And, it’s only five minutes from the center of town. You also can’t skip over the food in Mauldin when talking about the amenities of the town. You’ll find delicious Lowcountry cooking and plenty of great local restaurants.

Mount Pleasant, SC

Mount Pleasant, SC

  • Population: 91,684
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,525
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,783
  • Median home price: $555,500
  • Median household income: $103,232
  • Walk score: 29/100

As a South Carolina town with literally everything you could ever want, Mount Pleasant is a popular choice to call home. It’s quiet and picturesque, with strong community vibes and a variety of residents. It’s a town that caters to its population with great restaurants, shops and thriving nightlife.

Another laid-back coastal town that has it all, you’re also close to so much that makes South Carolina great. Sullivan’s Island is only a short car ride away, and Isle of Palms isn’t too far, either. On top of that, you’re less than three miles from Charleston. It’s the perfect, middle spot to enjoy everything the entire area offers.

Myrtle Beach, SC

Myrtle Beach, SC

  • Population: 34,695
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,314
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,400
  • Median home price: $250,000
  • Median household income: $43,200
  • Walk score: 23/100

Known primarily as a vacation destination that can get a little rowdy, Myrtle Beach has a lot to offer once you step away from the tourist traps and move past the amusement parks and high-rise hotels.

Taking up 60 miles of coastline, Myrtle Beach is a resort town, with all the typical amenities, and that presents a lot of opportunity both for job-seekers and entrepreneurs. There’s also the climate to consider when thinking of Myrtle as one of the best places to live in South Carolina — it’s fantastic. Mild weather and the lulling sounds of the ocean attract families, young professionals and empty-nesters to call this place home.

Rock Hill, SC

Rock Hill, SC

  • Population: 75,048
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,132
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,320
  • Median home price: $277,000
  • Median household income: $50,444
  • Walk score: 32/100

A thriving art scene gives the downtown area of Rock Hill its own signature. Named the state’s first cultural district, this area is full of galleries, museums, theaters and art studios. Not only that, but you’ll find the streets peppered with murals and sculptures from local artists.

Not an arts town alone, Rock Hill also has 31 parks, including Cherry Park and its 68 acres of hiking trails and landscaped walkways. Boyd Hill is another option with a disc golf course, picnic areas and even an outdoor swimming pool.

Spartanburg, SC

Spartanburg, SC

  • Population: 37,399
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,140
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,217
  • Median home price: $205,000
  • Median household income: $40,053
  • Walk score: 29/100

If South Carolina is calling to you for its mountain views, you’ll want to check out Spartanburg. With its small-town feel and neighborly vibe, living here still reminds you that you’re in the south but without the beach-front scenery the majority of the state provides.

A revitalized downtown is representative of the quick pace at which the city has grown over the last few years, and you’ll find diversity in job opportunities and living options as a result.

Tega Cay, SC

Tega Cay, SC

Source: Facebook.com/TegaCayCity
  • Population: 11,335
  • 1-BR median rent: $1,330
  • 2-BR median rent: $1,600
  • Median home price: $460,000
  • Median household income: $130,918
  • Walk score: 16/100

Another suburb of Charlotte, Tega Cay is a close-knit, lakeside community that fits most people’s ideal of small-town living. A family-friendly place, you’ll find plenty of restaurants and shops, as well as water sports on the lake.

Residents of Tega Cay also value the safety of the city. It’s the kind of place where kids are always out riding bikes and the community pool fills up with eager swimmers each summer. It’s almost like the suburban town you’d find in a movie.

Find an apartment for rent in South Carolina

Whether you want city living, ocean waves or even mountain tops, apartments for rent in South Carolina can provide the perfect view. With locations that accommodate any pace of life, alongside some delicious, fresh seafood, you’ll quickly see why there are so many places in the state people call the best.

The rent information included in this summary is based on a median calculation of multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com as of October 2021.
Median home prices are from Redfin as of October 2021.
Population and median household income are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
The information in this article is for illustrative purposes only. This data herein does not constitute a pricing guarantee or financial advice related to the rental market.

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Source: apartmentguide.com