5 Home Services You Should Not Pay For

Man holding up his hand to stop a home purchase
Asier Romero / Shutterstock.com

Homeownership certainly comes with a lot of unavoidable if sometimes unexpected expenses, from property taxes to insurance and repairs.

But there are many home-related costs we don’t necessarily need to pay for — and other things we’re not sure are worth it.

Following are some costs you might be on the fence about, and why we think you should avoid them.

1. Air duct cleaning

duct cleaning
Rob Crandall / Shutterstock.com

Some companies advertise duct cleaning services to supposedly improve your home’s air quality.

Does it work? The Environmental Protection Agency is unconvinced.

It says, “Duct cleaning has never been shown to actually prevent health problems,” and suggests only having ducts cleaned in a few specific situations, such as if mold is visible inside your heating and cooling system or if there are vermin.

2. Custom framing

Selection of custom picture frames
Eric Glenn / Shutterstock.com

Simply hanging artwork in your home shouldn’t be an expensive proposition, but it can be if you rely on custom framing jobs. In some cases, a frame can cost more than what it protects.

The reason custom framing gets so expensive, Vox explains, is the number of options available — a dizzying array of hundreds of frames and mats of all sizes, plus options for moldings and glazings.

For standard-sized images, a ready-made frame may suffice at a fraction of the cost. You can buy them new at a home goods store, or if you want a more “distressed” look and even greater savings, bring a tape measure to your local thrift store and size up some gently-used frames. So-called “floater frames” can provide style and flexibility for displaying art of unusual dimensions.

And then there are a growing number of specialty companies online, happy to provide custom-size frames at a lower cost than local frame shops. The New York Times’ Wirecutter recommends Framebridge, which has a flat fee, high-quality builds and the simplest ordering process among the tested companies.

3. Extended product warranties

Excited salesman
Billion Photos / Shutterstock.com

It’s natural to want to get your money’s worth out of every purchase, and therefore to consider extending a warranty. But many experts suggest they’re usually just not worth it, including Money Talks News founder Stacy Johnson.

This is doubly true if you use a credit card that automatically extends warranties or have another way to get a warranty. For instance, if you’re a Costco member, you can get a free two-year warranty on items such as TVs, computers and major appliances that you purchase there.

4. Self-storage rentals

storage units
sunlover / Shutterstock.com

Buying more stuff than you need is expensive enough. But what’s even worse is when you run out of space for all that stuff in your home and start paying somebody else to hold on to it for you.

Consider self-storage a temporary solution, for situations like moving a household. Otherwise, you’re paying potentially thousands to hide many things you’re probably going to forget about because they’re not important enough to keep handy or remember in your day-to-day life. All that money wasted because you can’t bear the thought of decluttering.

If you really must maintain a unit, check out “10 Ways to Cut the Cost of Self-Storage.”

5. Junk hauling

Upset woman in a cluttered garage
northallertonman / Shutterstock.com

So you’ve decided to declutter: Great! But don’t pay someone to get rid of your stuff.

Instead, turn to free ways to rid yourself of things you no longer need.

Search for local charities that are willing to pick up your donations. Post listings on websites such as Facebook, Freecycle or the Buy Nothing Project.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

‘The Hangover’ Actor Justin Bartha Lists Canyon Hideaway

Justin Bartha of “The Hangover,” has put his home in the Laurel Canyon area of Los Angeles on the market for $1.375 million.

The 1,416-square-foot Spanish bungalow may be small but it has plenty of space for relaxing, with a hot tub, swimming pool and open patio.

The two-bedroom, two-bathroom canyon retreat has vaulted ceilings, a dining room, living room and family room, with floors of hardwood and Spanish tile throughout. It comes complete with central heat and air conditioning, a covered porch and garage.

Built in 1934, the home sits on a 7,500-square-foot lot with lush landscaping, fruit trees and gardens.

Bartha added new cedar closets and a built-out master closet, but kept true to the original character.

Originally from West Bloomfield, MI, Bartha played the character Doug in the three “Hangover” movies. He is also known for roles in “National Treasure” and “The New Normal.”

Listing agent is Jackie Smith of Hilton & Hyland.

Source: realtor.com

What Can You Use Student Loans For?

To attend college these days, many students take out student loans. Otherwise, they wouldn’t be able to afford the hefty price tag of tuition and other expenses.

According to U.S. News & World Report, among the college graduates from the class of 2020 who took out student loans, the average amount borrowed was $29,927. In 2010, that number was $24,937 — a difference of about $5,000.

Student loans are meant to be used to pay for your education and related expenses so that you can earn a college degree. Even if you have access to student loan money, it doesn’t mean you should use it on general living expenses. By learning the answer to, “What can you use a student loan for?” you will make better use of your money and ensure you’re in a more stable financial situation post-graduation.

Recommended: I Didn’t Get Enough Financial Aid: Now What?

5 Things You Can Use Your Student Loans to Pay For

Here are five things you can spend your student loan funds on.

1. Your Tuition and Fees

Of course, the first thing your student loans are intended to cover is your college tuition and fees. The average college tuition and fees for a private institution in 2021-2022 is $38,185, while the average for a public, out-of-state school is $22,698 and $10,338 for a public, in-state institution.

2. Books and Supplies

Beyond tuition and fees, student loans can be used to purchase your textbooks and supplies, such as a laptop, notebooks and pens, and a backpack. Keep in mind that you may be able to save money by purchasing used textbooks online or at your campus bookstore. Hard copy textbooks cost, on average, between $80 and $150; you may be able to find used ones for a fraction of the price. Some students may find that renting textbooks may also be a cost-saving option.

Recommended: How to Pay for College Textbooks

3. Housing Costs

Your student loans can be used to pay for your housing costs, whether you live in a dormitory or off-campus. If you do live off-campus, you can also put your loans towards paying for related expenses like your utilities bill. Compare the costs of on-campus vs. off-campus housing, and consider getting a roommate to help you cover the costs of living off-campus.

4. Transportation

If you have a car on campus or you need to take public transportation to get to school, work, or your internships, then you can use your student loans to pay for those costs. Even if you have a car, you may want to consider leaving it at home when you go away to school, because gas, maintenance, and a parking pass could end up costing much more than using public transportation and your school’s shuttle, which should be free.

5. Food

What else can you use student loans for? Food would qualify as a valid expense, whether you’re cooking meals at home or you’ve signed up for a meal plan. This doesn’t mean you should eat out at fancy restaurants all the time just because the money is there. Instead, you could save by cooking at home, splitting food costs with a roommate, and asking if local establishments have discounts for college students.

Recommended: How to Get Out of Student Loan Debt: 6 Options

5 Things Your Student Loans Should Not Cover

Now that you know what student loans can be used for, you’re likely wondering what they should not be used for as well. Here are five expenses that cannot be covered with funds from your student loans.

1. Entertainment

While you love to do things like go to the movies and concerts and bowling, you should not use your student loans to pay for your entertainment. Your campus likely offers plenty of free and low-cost entertainment like sports games and movie nights, so pursue those opportunities instead.

2. A Vacation

College is draining, and you deserve a vacation from the stress every once in a while. However, if you can’t afford to go on spring break or another type of trip, then you should put it off at this time. It’s never a good idea to use your student loans to cover these expenses.

3. Gym Membership

You may have belonged to a gym at home before you went to college, and you still want to keep up your membership there. You can, as long as you don’t use your student loans to cover it. Many colleges and universities have a gym or fitness center on campus that is available to students and included in the cost of tuition.

4. A New Car

Even if you need a new car, student loans cannot be used to buy a new set of wheels. Consider taking public transportation instead of buying a modest used car when you save up enough money.

5. Extra Food Costs

While you and your roommates may love pizza, it’s not a good idea to use your student loan money to cover that cost. You also shouldn’t take your family out to eat or dine out too much with that borrowed money. Stick to eating at home or in the dining hall, and only going out to eat every once in a while with your own money.

Student Loan Spending Rules

The federal code that applies to the misuse of student loan money is clear. Any person who “knowingly and willfully” misapplied funds could face a fine or imprisonment.

Your student loan refund — what’s left after your scholarships, grants, and loans are applied toward tuition, campus housing, fees, and other direct charges — isn’t money that’s meant to be spent willy-nilly. It’s meant for education-related expenses.

The amount of financial aid a student receives is based largely on each academic institution’s calculated “cost of attendance,” which may include factors like your financial need and your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Your cost of attendance minus your EFC generally helps determine how much need-based aid you’re eligible for. Eligibility for non-need-based financial aid is determined by subtracting all of the aid you’ve already received from your cost of attendance.

Starting for the 2024-2025 school year, the EFC will be replaced with the Student Aid Index (SAI). The SAI will work similarly to the EFC though there will be some important changes such as adjustments in Pell Grant eligibility.

Additionally, when you took out a student loan, you probably signed a promissory note that outlined what you’re supposed to be spending your loan money on. Those restrictions may vary depending on what kind of loan you received — federal or private, subsidized or unsubsidized. If the restrictions weren’t clear, it’s not a bad idea to ask your lender, “What can I use my student loan for?”

If you’re interested in adjusting loan terms or securing a new interest rate, you could consider refinancing your student loans with SoFi. Refinancing can allow qualifying borrowers to secure a lower interest rate or preferable terms, which could potentially save them money over the long run. Refinancing federal loans eliminates them from all federal borrower benefits and protections, inducing deferment options and the ability to pursue public service loan forgiveness, so it’s not the right choice for all borrowers.

The Takeaway

Student loans can be used to pay for qualifying educational expenses like tuition and fees, room and board, and supplies like books, pens, a laptop, and a backpack. Expenses like entertainment, vacations, cars, and fancy dinners cannot generally be paid for using student loans.

If you have student loans and are interested in securing a new — potentially lower — interest rate, consider refinancing.

There are no fees to refinance a student loan with SoFi and potential borrowers can find out if they pre-qualify, and at what rates, in just a few minutes.

Learn more about student loan refinancing with SoFi.


SoFi Student Loan Refinance
IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO REFINANCE FEDERAL STUDENT LOANS PLEASE BE AWARE OF RECENT LEGISLATIVE CHANGES THAT HAVE SUSPENDED ALL FEDERAL STUDENT LOAN PAYMENTS AND WAIVED INTEREST CHARGES ON FEDERALLY HELD LOANS UNTIL THE END OF JANUARY 2022 DUE TO COVID-19. PLEASE CAREFULLY CONSIDER THESE CHANGES BEFORE REFINANCING FEDERALLY HELD LOANS WITH SOFI, SINCE IN DOING SO YOU WILL NO LONGER QUALIFY FOR THE FEDERAL LOAN PAYMENT SUSPENSION, INTEREST WAIVER, OR ANY OTHER CURRENT OR FUTURE BENEFITS APPLICABLE TO FEDERAL LOANS. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Notice: SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers such as Income-Driven Repayment plans, including Income-Contingent Repayment or PAYE. SoFi always recommends that you consult a qualified financial advisor to discuss what is best for your unique situation.

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp. or an affiliate (dba SoFi), a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law, license # 6054612; NMLS # 1121636 . For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal.

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
SOSL18266

Source: sofi.com

Stock Market Today: Stocks End Mixed After Data Dump

Investors had plenty to think about ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, chewing through a huge helping of economic data.

Kicking things off were weekly jobless claims – released a day early due to tomorrow’s holiday – which plunged to 199,000 in the week ended Nov. 20, well below last week’s 270,000 and economists’ forecast for 260,000 claims. What’s more, this was the lowest level for initial unemployment applications since 1969.

Also in focus were October’s personal income and spending data, which came in above estimates (up 0.5% and 1.3%, respectively, from September), and an upwardly revised reading on third-quarter gross domestic product (to 2.1% versus an initial estimate of 2.0%).

However, it wasn’t all roses. The University of Michigan’s consumer sentiment index arrived at its lowest level in 10 years in November and the core personal consumption expenditures (PCE) index – a key inflation measure used by the Federal Reserve – rose 4.1% year-over-year in October, the quickest annual pace since 1991.

Plus, the release of the minutes from the latest Fed meeting showed several members of the committee said the central bank “should be prepared to adjust the pace of asset purchases” and/or raise interest rates sooner than anticipated if inflation continues to run hot.

“In terms of the Fed’s economic outlook, it’s clear that inflation has accelerated more than anyone expected it to, and the breadth of rising prices has increased substantially,” writes Bob Miller, BlackRock’s Head of Americas Fundamental Fixed Income.

“While the bar for an acceleration in the tapering of asset purchases is high, it is not insurmountable and looks reasonably likely to be cleared should we see another solid payroll report and inflation data release in December,” he adds. “Accelerating the asset purchase tapering would potentially end purchases in March 2022 and would then open the door for the Committee to consider lift off from the zero policy rate sometime in the second quarter of the year.”

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At the close, the S&P 500 Index was up 0.2% at 4,701 and the Nasdaq Composite had gained 0.4% at 15,845. The Dow Jones Industrial Average wasn’t as resilient, falling 0.03% to 35,804.

As a reminder, the U.S. stock market will be closed tomorrow for Thanksgiving and trading will end early on Black Friday.

stock price chart 112421stock price chart 112421

Other news in the stock market today:

  • The small-cap Russell 2000 gained 0.2% to 2,331.
  • U.S. crude futures slipped 0.1% to end at $78.39 per barrel.
  • Gold futures eked out a marginal gain to settle at $1,784.30 an ounce.
  • Bitcoin retreated 0.7% to $57,453.50. (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 4 p.m. each trading day.)
  • Gap (GPS) took it in the chin after earnings, with shares sliding 24.1%. In its third quarter, the clothing retailer reported adjusted earnings of 27 cents per share on $3.94 billion in revenue, well below the 50 cents a share and $4.43 billion in sales analysts were expecting. GPS also lowered its full-year forecast, citing rising freight costs and supply-chain disruptions due to factory closures in Vietnam. “In the third quarter, the Athleta and Gap brands continued to be the bright spots for GPS, as the brands have grown 48% and 8%, respectfully, compared to fiscal 2020,” says CFRA Research analyst Zachary Warring, who maintained his Hold rating on the stock while lowering his price target by $8 to $22. “The company reiterated its plan to open between 30 and 40 Old Navy stores and 20-30 Athleta stores in 2021 while closing 75 Gap and Banana Republic stores. We need to see how sales and margins hold up in fiscal 2023 to get more bullish on shares of GPS.”
  • Supply-chain issues were also a noted in Nordstrom’s (JWN) quarterly update. “While many retailers are dealing with macro-related supply chain disruptions, Rack [the retailer’s off-price chain] faces a unique challenge as off-price procurement of the same top brands we carry at Nordstrom is particularly difficult in an environment with production constraints and lower levels of clearance product,” said CEO Erik Nordstrom in the earnings call. While Rack contributed to roughly 50% of total sales in 2019, he added, it’s only brought in 42% of sales for the year-to-date. Overall, the company reported earnings of 39 cents a share and revenue of $3.6 billion in its third quarter, missing analysts’ estimates for earnings of 57 cents per share and revenue of $3.5 billion. The stock plunged 29% today.

The Pricing Power Advantage

Some of the best stocks to buy now are those that are able to navigate higher inflation.

Pricing power should be an important theme for investors when assessing relative returns of stocks, says a group of analysts at global research firm UBS, especially given the current environment of “surging shipping costs, rising raw materials, supply chain issues and accelerating wage growth.”

The team has been studying the share performance of companies with pricing power for some time. They found that shares of firms that can raise prices without consumers balking and taking their business elsewhere and that have solid margin momentum tend to outperform those without by around 20%, on average, over 12 months once inflation rises above 3% on an annualized basis.

So, if you’re looking for ways to protect your portfolio against rising inflation, consider this list of the stocks with a pricing power advantage, according to UBS. Each of these names has a high-conviction Buy rating from the research firm and ranks in the top third of its sector for pricing power, margin momentum and input cost exposure.

Source: kiplinger.com

Stock Market Today: New COVID Strain Sinks Stocks in Short Session

Thought you were in for a quiet day of post-Thanksgiving trading?

Sorry, just the opposite as stocks spiraled downward in today’s abbreviated session.

The reason? A new strain of COVID-19 – B.1.1.529, which was assigned the Greek letter “Omicron” by the World Health Organization (WHO) – that possesses several mutations and was identified recently in Africa, with cases detected in Hong Kong and Europe as well.

“The new COVID variant has dominated attention and led to a sharp selloff among risk assets this morning, and will be closely followed just as a number of countries have moved to tighten up restrictions and even enter lockdowns once again,” says Jonathan Jayarajan, research analyst at Deutsche Bank.

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Not much is known about this new strain, but several countries have already restricted travel to and from South Africa, including the U.K., France, Germany and Singapore, and the WHO scheduled an emergency meeting Friday where they labeled it a “variant of concern.”

When the closing bell mercifully rang during this sell-first, ask-questions-later session, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 2.5% at 34,899 – its worst day of the year – the S&P 500 Index was off 2.3% at 4,594 and the Nasdaq Composite was 2.2% lower at 15,491.

But it wasn’t just stocks that got hit. Oil prices were down 13.1% to $68.15 per barrel – their lowest settlement since mid-September.

stock price chart 112621stock price chart 112621

Other news in the stock market today:

  • The small-cap Russell 2000 plummeted 3.7% to 2,245.
  • Gold futures eked out a marginal gain to settle at $1,785.50 an ounce.
  • Bitcoin wasn’t spared from the selling, sinking 5.6% to $54,256.53. (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 1 p.m.)
  • Amid today’s COVID-induced broad-market plunge, traditional reopening plays sold off. Airlines and cruise stocks were among the hardest hit, with names like American Airlines (AAL, -8.8%), Delta Air Lines (DAL, -8.3%), Carnival (CCL, -11.0%) and Norwegian Cruise Lines (NCLH, -11.4%) all ending sharply in the red.
  • On the flip side, several vaccine makers and stay-at home stocks got a bid. Pfizer (PFE, +6.1%), BioNTech (BNTX, +14.2%), Peloton Interactive (PTON, +5.7%) and Zoom Video Communications (ZM, +5.7%) were some of the day’s biggest gainers.

Don’t Panic

Yes, uncertainty around the new strain is spooking global investors and comes “on the heels of markets beginning to price in a faster pace of policy tightening [from the U.S. Federal Reserve],” say analysts at the Wells Fargo Investment Institute (WFII).

And both of these events occur ahead of a debt-ceiling debate that is about to ramp up again on Capitol Hill (the stopgap bill passed by Congress in late September only runs through Dec. 3) – which could exacerbate volatility.

Still, WFII’s analysts note that “the global economy continues to be on solid ground, and fiscal and monetary policy remain supportive, despite some deceleration.” As such, they recommend looking past these short-term concerns and taking advantage of the pullback in stocks by buying equities.

While they highlight financials and technology as two of their preferred sectors, we also recommend dividend-paying stocks, which can help investors ride out market volatility with a bit less stress.

Dividend stocks come in a range of flavors, whether it be with those that pay shareholders on a monthly basis or with those that are boosting their dividends by a substantial amount. Here, we’ve compiled a list of companies that appear to be in their prime dividend-growth days and have announced income increases of between 100% and 650% this year.

Source: kiplinger.com

Bad news: You still don’t earn hotel points on stays booked with the new Chase portal – The Points Guy


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Is the Stock Market Open on Thanksgiving and Black Friday 2021?

The good news is, investors will indeed get a Turkey Day break from their brokerage accounts. The stock market is indeed closed on Thanksgiving Day.

But don’t call it a four-day weekend: Investors still need to show up on Black Friday.

At least for a few hours.

In 2021, the stock market is closed all day on Thursday, Nov. 25, as America celebrates Thanksgiving Day. That said, stocks will begin trading on Black Friday at the normal market time, but it will be a shortened trading day. On Friday, Nov. 26, the market will close at 1 p.m.

The bond market has a similar holiday schedule, closing on Thanksgiving Day and opening for a partial session (closing at 2 p.m.) on Black Friday.

2021 Market Holidays

Date Holiday NYSE Nasdaq Bond Markets*
Friday, Jan. 1 New Year’s Day Closed Closed Closed
Monday, Jan. 18 Martin Luther King Jr. Day Closed Closed Closed
Monday, Feb. 15 Presidents’ Day/Washington’s Birthday Closed Closed Closed
Friday, April 2 Good Friday Closed Closed Early close
(Noon)
Friday, May 28 Friday Before Memorial Day Open Open Early close
(2 p.m.)
Monday, May 31 Memorial Day Closed Closed Closed
Friday, July 2 Friday Before Independence Day Open Open Early close
(2 p.m.)
Monday, July 5 Independence Day (Observed) Closed Closed Closed
Monday, Sept. 6 Labor Day Closed Closed Closed
Monday, Oct. 11 Columbus Day Open Open Closed
Thursday, Nov. 11 Veterans Day Open Open Closed
Thursday, Nov. 25 Thanksgiving Day Closed Closed Closed
Friday, Nov. 26 Day After Thanksgiving Early close
(1 p.m.)
Early close
(1 p.m.)
Early close
(2 p.m.)
Thursday, Dec. 23 Day Before Christmas Eve Open Open Early close
(2 p.m.)
Friday, Dec. 24 Christmas Eve (Christmas Day Observed) Closed Closed Closed
Friday, Dec. 31 New Year’s Eve Open Open Early close
(2 p.m.)

* This is the recommended bond market holiday schedule from the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA). This schedule is subject to change.

Stock Market Holiday Observations

When it comes to the stock and bond markets alike, if a holiday falls on a weekend, market closures are dictated by two rules:

  • If the holiday falls on a Saturday, the market will close on the preceding Friday.
  • If the holiday falls on a Sunday, the market will close on the subsequent Monday.

Stock and Bond Market Hours

The “core trading” stock market hours for the NYSE and Nasdaq are 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays. However, both exchanges offer premarket trading hours between 4 and 9:30 a.m., as well as late trading hours between 4 and 8 p.m.

Bond markets typically trade between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

The stock markets close at 1 p.m. on early-closure days; bond markets close early at 2 p.m.

Source: kiplinger.com

10 States With the Highest Credit Scores

Smiling man with credit card
ViDI Studio / Shutterstock.com

For years, we’ve heard that Americans are hopelessly mired in debt, leaving many to struggle with poor credit scores. But in fact, those scores are now on the upswing, according to data analytics company FICO.

In August 2021, the average U.S. FICO Score 8 — the company’s most widely used credit score — was eight points higher than at the same point in 2020. Scores are rising in all 50 states and in the 33 metropolitan areas evaluated by FICO.

FICO says a number of positive behavioral trends have sent scores higher, including:

  • Fewer delinquent accounts
  • Lower levels of consumer debt
  • Fewer consumers heavily using their credit cards

Consumers in a handful of states are leading the way, according to a recently released FICO analysis. Following are the states where average credit scores are the highest.

10. Nebraska (tie)

Omaha Nebraska
Aspects and Angles / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 733

Nebraskans quietly go about their business without fanfare. But don’t mistake this lack of boasting for financial passivity.

In fact, Nebraska’s economy is chugging along, with a microscopic 1.9% unemployment rate in October 2021 — the lowest in the nation.

Apparently, the state’s residents are working too hard to get into credit trouble, earning them a spot on this list.

10. Hawaii (tie)

Honolulu, Hawaii
MNStudio / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 733

Despite a high cost of living and elevated debt levels, residents of Hawaii keep their credit scores healthier than those of many consumers on the mainland.

A couple of years ago, the state’s government reported that while Hawaiians carry more credit card debt than other Americans, they manage it better and have a significantly lower delinquency rate than consumers in other parts of the country.

8. Washington

Marina at Grays Harbor, Washington
Bill Perry / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 734

For the second straight year, U.S. News & World Report named Washington the best state in the nation. The publication praised Washington for having the country’s fastest-growing economy.

A booming economy keeps a lid on credit troubles, helping Washington to land on this list.

7. Massachusetts (tie)

Provincetown, Massachusetts
Lewis Stock Photography / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 735

Massachusetts just recorded its sixth straight quarter of economic growth. That beats the nation as a whole, which has seen four straight quarters of positive movement.

A plethora of good-paying jobs keeps people out of credit trouble, resulting in the Bay State’s appearance on this list.

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7. New Hampshire (tie)

Walter Liff sculpture
James Kirkikis / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 735

New Hampshire’s motto of “Live Free or Die” apparently extends to living free of credit woes. The state has a low credit card delinquency rate and the lowest poverty rate in the nation, says 24/7 Wall St.

7. South Dakota (tie)

Wall drugstore in South Dakota
robert cicchetti / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 735

Like Nebraska, South Dakota’s under-the-radar reputation masks a lot of financial moxie. In fact, the Washington Post recently dubbed the state “the new Cayman Islands for banks and finance,” thanks to tax-friendly — and controversial — laws that attract hordes of money from global elites.

The state’s residents are pretty financially savvy too, with credit scores that rank among the nation’s very best.

4. North Dakota (tie)

Fargo, North Dakota
David Harmantas / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 736

North Dakota just edges out its neighbor to the south when it comes to average credit scores.

Nearly 90% of North Dakota’s land and one-fifth of its workforce are devoted to agriculture. Perhaps all that hard work on the farm keeps the state’s residents out of credit trouble.

4. Wisconsin (tie)

Madison, Wisconsin
MarynaG / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 736

Folks in the Midwest have a reputation for being sensible, which might account for Wisconsin’s place on this list.

Late last year, CreditCards.com reported that Wisconsin had the third-lowest credit card burden among all U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

2. Vermont

Vermont couple walking in park in Autumn
Sergii Kovalov / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 738

Vermont is famous for its foods — maple syrup, cheddar cheese and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. It also has a solid reputation as a place where people know how to manage their spending.

The credit card delinquency rate here is a scanty 2.65%, according to 24/7 Wall St.

1. Minnesota

Minneapolis, Minnesota
Pinkcandy / Shutterstock.com

Average FICO score: 742

Minnesotans are a hearty bunch. With average high temperatures barely topping 20 degrees Fahrenheit in January, perhaps it’s too cold to live high off the hog.

Whatever the case may be, the state’s residents clearly are doing something right. Minnesota — which typically ranks high in terms of the economy and education — is No. 1 in the nation with an average credit score of 742. You betcha!

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Cardless Existing Cardholders $100 Bonus With $1,000 Spend

The Offer

Direct Link to offer (holiday footer)

  • Cardless is offering their existing cardholders a bonus 10,000 points when they spend $1,000 between November 24 and December 31, 2021.

The Fine Print

  • * HOLIDAY BONUS POINTS OFFER: To be eligible to receive 10,000 bonus points, you must be an existing cardholder as of 12:00pm PT November 24, 2021 with no other open Cardless credit card accounts and you must complete $1,000 in Eligible Purchases between 12:00pm PT on November 24, 2021 and 11:59pm PT on December 31, 2021.
  • Allow up to 2 statement cycles for the bonus to appear in your rewards account.
  • To receive the bonus, your account must remain current and in good standing for the duration of this offer.
  • Eligible Purchases do not include transactions that are returned, disputed, unauthorized, fraudulent, exceed your credit limit, are made while your account is in default, or any other transaction that First Electronic Bank or Cardless may determine in their discretion is not eligible to earn points. Any bonus points earned through this offer will not be doubled per the Double Points Promotion if a cardholder is simultaneously enrolled in that promotion. This offer is not valid if you violate the terms of this offer, your Cardholder Agreement, or the Rewards Terms.
  • Still working towards your Cardless sign-up offer? We have great news: eligible purchases will count towards your currently enrolled spend bonus offers.

Our Verdict

I’m not positive if this promotion is for all Cardless members, but it seems to be showing on the footer of many/all Cardless cards. Hopefully you got an email about this as well or else you can try contacting customer support to confirm that it applies to you.

Sounds like any $1,000 of spend will count, as stated in the email: “Eligible airfare, hotel stays, restaurant meals, gas, grocery transactions and other eligible purchases will count toward the 10,000-point bonus, which you’ll automatically earn after spending $1,000.”

Hat tip to FearTheZ

Source: doctorofcredit.com

Earn 5x Bilt Rewards points on all purchases this Black Friday – The Points Guy


Earn 5x Bilt Rewards points on all purchases this Black Friday


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Source: thepointsguy.com