18 Simple Storage Tips for Small Apartments

The average U.S. household has 300,000 things in it.

From the tiniest thumbtack to each book on your shelf and every piece of clothing hanging in your closet, there’s a lot of stuff to keep organized. It’s even more daunting if you’re bringing it all into a smaller apartment.

Many people tend to look at a smaller home and see what’s missing — space. Yet, fewer closets and less built-in storage doesn’t mean you’re missing out on somewhere to put your stuff.

If you’re smart with your furniture choices, color picks and organizational tactics, every corner of a small space can become a “beloved spot.”

Cut the clutter

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When working with a smaller living space, your goal, according to Michelle Crouch writing for Reader’s Digest, should be to remove clutter not create more storage space. Clutter can manifest as items you want to keep, but not display, as well as things that you no longer need.

Certain keepsakes you want to hold onto can spend some time in a storage unit until you have a larger home. Paper records, greeting cards, mementos from special events (that aren’t that special anymore) and old letters from past relationships are all things that no longer need to follow you from place to place.

In fact, having a smaller apartment can help you triage what you really want to keep with you. What’s left can either go into storage or head to the round file (a.k.a. the trash.)

Rearrange what’s left

After narrowing down your necessities, take a look at your apartment for hidden storage opportunities. Each room can yield more space than you may think upon the first inspection. Taking a close and thoughtful look can help you find the right place for all your belongings, even in a small apartment.

Bedroom

bedroombedroom

There are two areas in your bedroom that can be great for storage — your closet and under your bed. Maximizing space in your closet is possible with a variety of storage ideas. From special hangers to repurposing household items, your closet can hold twice as much stuff as you think.

  • Use vertical space: Stack shirts or pants on shelves
  • Shower curtain hangers: Install these in your closet to hold scarves, belts or even tank tops freeing up drawer space in your bedroom for bulkier items
  • Over-the-door shoe organizer: Less stuff on the ground helps your small space feel less cluttered
  • Under-bed storage: Even if you have a bed that’s lower to the ground, special storage bins exist that will slide under. Store your off-season clothing here to free up more space for the items you need.

Bathroom

bathroombathroom

Tips for organizing small spaces are handiest in the bathroom. It’s most likely the tightest space in a small apartment, but there’s room to spare in there, too. Overlooked areas ideal for extra storage include above the toilet and inside cabinets.

  • Over-the-toilet shelf: Since it slides in around the toilet, you’re not adding to the footprint within the bathroom. This is a great place to hold toiletries that don’t fit on the sink.
  • Over-the-door hooks: Perfect for wet towels or bathrobes
  • Shower caddies: Hang these over your shower head to hold soap and shampoo
  • Small storage containers on the inside of your bathroom cabinets: A great place for your hairdryer and straightener
  • A wine rack or special shelf for fresh towels: Putting them up on the wall makes sure they aren’t taking up valuable closet or cabinet space. It also looks decorative if you incorporate towels in vibrant colors.

Kitchen

kitchenkitchen

The best way to increase storage space in your kitchen is to add more counter space.

  • Make use of all free space: Large bowls have a lot of space in them. Condense your Tupperware or dishes by putting smaller objects inside of larger ones.
  • Appliances for storage: No cabinets, no problem! Your oven or microwave is a great place to keep dishes, pots and pans out of sight.
  • Portable chef’s cart: Put cutlery or even small kitchen appliances under it, then wheel the cart near an outlet when you have to plug in something. It gives you an extra surface to prep food, and you can move it out of the way when you’re done.
  • Wall hooks and over-the-door storage: Hang large utensils, pots and pans, cleaning supplies and even pantry staples

Living room

living roomliving room

Most likely the largest room in your apartment, the living room can serve as a catch-all for the stuff you need to store that won’t naturally go somewhere else.

  • Decorative boxes: They can fit under coffee tables or desks, and can hold almost anything. Store magazines, board games and puzzles, along with any personal items you want to keep but don’t need to display.
  • Book cart: If your couch is set up against a wall, consider moving it forward a little bit to create even more storage space. Slide in a cart to hold all your books in a way that’s easy to access.
  • Portable desk: Living rooms in small apartments often double as an office. Make the space less cluttered with the convenience of wheeling your small, portable workstation back into a corner when it’s not in use.

Hallways

hallwayhallway

While not technically a room, don’t dismiss the potential for storage in seemingly useless spaces. Your hallways are the perfect location for things like coats, shoes or umbrellas.

  • Coat rack: Give your guests a spot to hang their coats when they visit, rather than tossing them on a chair or your couch
  • Shoe cubby: Clear some space off the floor and keep your shoes organized

A word about shelving

Small storage shelves can go in almost any space in your home. They’re a universal space-saving device because they turn wall space into storage space. Especially in corners, which can feel like unusable areas of your apartment, shelves can save the day.

Trade in the cute, framed pictures you’ve put up on one wall and install shelves for instant storage. Deeper shelves can hold small bins, masking the appearance of anything that’s not so cute, and special corner shelving units nestle in nicely. There are so many shelving ideas out there, it’ll be easy to incorporate a few in your apartment.

After everything gets put away

Now that you’ve found a spot in your apartment for all your stuff, it’s time to decorate. Just because you have a small space doesn’t mean every nook and cranny has to go to holding stuff.

Leave a little room to make things pretty and transform your small space into the perfect home.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

15 Words That Could Add Value to Your Listing

When it comes to writing an effective listing description, don’t hold back. If you’ve got it, flaunt it!

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Why do some homes sell for a premium? Timing, for starters. An analysis of 24,000 home sales in “Zillow Talk: Rewriting the Rules of Real Estate” also reveals listings with certain keywords tend to sell for more than expected.

“Bottom-tier homes described as luxurious tend to beat their expected sale price by a whopping 8.2 percent,” write co-authors Spencer Rascoff and Stan Humphries. “Top-tier homes described as captivating tend to beat theirs by 6.5 percent. That means, if your home’s estimated home value is $110,000, but your listing includes the key word ‘luxurious,’ you could pocket an extra $8,965.”

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If one of the following words accurately describes your home, you might want to consider adding it to your listing.

1. Luxurious

As mentioned above, lower-priced listings with the word “luxurious” sold for 8.2 percent more on average than expected. “Luxurious” signals that a home’s finishes and amenities are high-end. This is a huge selling point, particularly in this price range.

2. Captivating

Top-tier listings described as “captivating” sold for 6.5 percent more on average than expected. Unlike the word “nice,” “captivating” provides a richer, more enticing description for buyers. Plus, it’s less open to interpretation. Anything can be seen as “nice,” but “captivating” sets a high bar.

3. Impeccable

On average, listings in the bottom tier with the word “impeccable” sold for 5.9 percent more than expected. Like “captivating,” “impeccable” is a rich adjective. It also implies something about the quality of a home: The features are desirable and the home is move-in ready.

4. Stainless

“Stainless” is typically used to describe kitchens with “stainless steel appliances.” It’s in your favor to talk up these features in your listing — especially if your home is in the bottom price tier. In our analysis, lower-priced homes with the word “stainless” sold for 5 percent more on average than expected.

5. Basketball

On average, lower-priced homes with the word “basketball” sold for 4.5 percent more than expected. This may seem like an odd word to include in this list, but when you consider the context it makes sense. Among lower-priced homes, a basketball court — or even better, an indoor basketball court — is a huge selling point. While it may not stand out as much among higher-priced homes, it’s definitely worth mentioning in this price range.

6. Landscaped

It’s just as valuable to describe your yard as your house. In all price tiers, listings with the word “landscaped” sold for more than expected on average. The biggest premium was seen among lower-priced listings, which on average sold for 4.2 percent more than expected.

7. Granite

In the same vein as “stainless,” “granite” is typically used to describe countertops or another high-end home feature. Listings with the word “granite” sold, on average, for 1 to 4 percent more than expected across all price tiers.

8. Pergola

Not only should you include high-end home features in your listing description, you should also mention features not found in every home. They’ll help your listing stand out, especially if buyers are searching for homes online by keyword. The data shows mid-priced listings with the word “pergola” sold for 4 percent more on average than expected.

9. Remodel

Was your home recently remodeled? It may be worth mentioning. On average, bottom-tier listings with the word “remodel” sold for 2.9 percent more, middle-tier homes for 1.8 percent more and top-tier homes for 1.7 percent more than expected.

10. Beautiful

While beauty is in the eye of the beholder, a beautiful feature like a view may be worth noting. Lower-priced listings with the word “beautiful” sold for 2.3 percent more on average than expected.

11. Gentle

“Gentle” may seem like a weird adjective to have in a listing description. It’s typically used to describe “gentle rolling hills” or something about a home’s location. Top-tier listings with the word “gentle” sold for 2.3 percent more, on average, than expected.

12. Spotless

You may think all homes are spotless when a buyer moves in, so it’s not worth mentioning in a listing. But when it comes to lower-priced homes, cleanliness isn’t always a given. In this price range, listings described as “spotless” sold for 2 percent more on average than expected.

13. Tile

Much like “stainless” and “granite,” “tile” is a great word when it comes to describing the features of your home. A newly tiled backsplash or updated bathroom tile not only indicates a home’s aesthetic value but also sends a message to buyers that the home’s been well cared for by the current owners. Bottom-tier homes with the word “tile” in the listing sold for 2 percent more on average than expected.

14. Upgraded

On average, lower-priced listings with the word “upgraded” sold for 1.8 percent more than expected. Most buyers will agree that upgrades are a selling point. They indicate a home not only looks nice but also functions well. Spelling out which features have been updated is a good approach, so buyers have the right expectations when they see your home.

15. Updated

“Updated” sends a similar message to “upgraded.” But in addition to speaking to the quality of a home, it signals that something old has been replaced with something new. This is a great fact to communicate to potential buyers, as evidenced by the data. Mid-priced homes with “updated” in the listing sold for 0.8 percent more on average than expected.

Related:

Source: zillow.com

What is Rent Control?

Did you ever wonder how Monica and Rachel in “Friends” could afford rent in a two-bedroom New York City apartment on a waitress and chef’s salary? Well, the answer is rent control.

Rent control is a rare policy that fixes the price of rent indefinitely and falls under the umbrella term “rent regulations.”

It sounds great, right? Before you get too excited, you need to understand exactly what is rent control.

We’ll talk about the difference between rent control vs. rent stabilization, explain how it really works and give you a few advantages and disadvantages of living in a rent-controlled apartment.

Rent control vs. rent stabilization

Both rent control and rent stabilization are concepts centered around the idea of protecting tenants from major increases in the price of rent. The goal is to keep housing affordable while also enabling landlords to increase rent.

While people often confuse the two, there is a big difference between them.

Rent stabilization

Rent stabilization is the more common practice and means that landlords or property owners can only increase rent by a specific percentage year-over-year. In areas that have rent stabilization in place, the state sets the rate at which landlords can increase rent. Because this is a state issue, not a federal issue, it can vary drastically state-by-state. For example, Oregon limits yearly rent increases to 9.2 percent while Los Angeles County in California limits yearly rent increases to a mere 3 percent.

This is a more common practice and you’ll likely have an easier time finding a rent-stabilized apartment than a rent-controlled apartment.

Rent control

Rent control is a policy that means landlords cannot increase a tenant’s rent. Effectively, rental rates remain set and won’t increase. Rent-controlled apartments have a set price for rent that will not increase whereas rent-stabilized apartments will see price increases but there is a cap on how much the rate can increase each year.

Rent-controlled apartments are incredibly rare, so if you live in or can find a rent-controlled apartment, you’re very lucky.

Friends apartment in NYC.

In fact, there are only 22,000 rent-controlled apartments out there. Even if you can find a rent-controlled apartment on the market, you have to meet a specific set of criteria to qualify for one. This includes:

  • You cannot make more than $200,000 for two years in a row
  • The building must have been built before 1947
  • The apartment must have been lived in by the same family since at least 1971
  • The apartment must be passed from family member to family member
  • The person who inherits the rent-controlled apartment must have lived in it for two years straight before officially inheriting it

Now, it makes sense how Monica had such a great apartment in New York — she lived in the apartment with her grandmother for two years prior to inheriting it from her. This allowed her to take over the rent-controlled apartment and keep it in the family.

Where is rent control most common?

Out of the 50 states, only five have specific rent control policies in place. The other 45 exempt rent control or have no active policies in place.

The five states that have some rent-controlled apartments are California, Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Oregon.

Map of rent control.

Photo source: National Multifamily Housing Council

Pros and cons of rent control

As with everything, there are pros and cons to rent control depending on your perspective and situation.

Pro: Cheaper for tenants

Because rent-controlled apartments have a fixed price for rent, they are very affordable. You will pay the same price for rent year after year, even as your neighbors experience price increases. Rent-controlled apartments are cheap.

Pro: Affordable even when wages don’t increase

It’s common knowledge that rent prices are rising faster than wages are. So, you can live in the same apartment at the same price and still afford it, even if you don’t see a pay bump on your paycheck very often.

Pro: Foster safe neighborhoods

Rent-controlled apartments offer renters financial stability because they know that they can live on a fixed income. When there is financial stability, people will stay in the same location, develop relationships with neighbors and decrease renter turnover. All of these factors contribute to a safer neighborhood and environment.

Pro: Automatic lease renewals

When you live in a rent-controlled apartment, you automatically get the first right of renewal on your lease. Basically, you always have a place to live and can always re-sign your lease at the same rate.

Con: Not always well-maintained

Because of the fixed rent price in a rent-controlled apartment, landlords don’t maintain, update or refurbish them as often because it isn’t profitable for them. At times, rent-controlled apartments have outdated appliances because no one invests in them.

Con: Hard to come by

As we mentioned earlier, there are roughly 22,000 rent-controlled apartments in the wild, so they are incredibly rare and hard to come by. As such, you’ll be frustrated looking for one as the supply is so low.

Con: Landlords often lose money on rent-controlled apartments

If you’re a landlord of a rent-controlled apartment, you’re likely losing money compared to other landlords who can increase the price of rent each year. If you’re a tenant, this is great. But, it’s a con for the property owner.

Reviewing and signing a lease.

How to find a rent-controlled apartment

Rent-controlled apartments are a unicorn in the real estate world. When you have one, hold onto it as they are very rare and you likely won’t have a better deal anywhere, especially in an expensive metro like New York City.

If you want a rent-controlled apartment, you have two ways to find one.

  1. You can inherit a rent-controlled apartment
  2. Research the city or state’s database of rent-controlled apartments

If you can’t find or qualify for a rent-controlled apartment, don’t fret. Rent.com has thousands of affordable apartments all across the country that would be perfect for you. Start your search today!

The information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and does not, and is not intended to, constitute legal or financial advice. Readers are encouraged to seek professional legal or financial advice as they may deem it necessary.

Source: rent.com

Cheap Green Cleaning: The Only 5 Products You Need

When it comes to spring cleaning, the only way to do it right is to go green. Not only are non-toxic cleaning products better for your health, there’s another bonus: This is one of those times when going green also saves you money! Not only are the following five green cleaning products good for your health and your home’s cleanliness, but they also cost way less to keep on hand than commercial cleaners.

Ready to start scrubbing? Read on to learn about the only five weapons you’ll need in your cleaning arsenal:

1. Baking soda

This simple white powder is as versatile as it is cheap – a 16-oz. box costs only about a dollar, and you can use it in all sorts of ways around the home. For example:

  • On your carpet: If your pet or kid had an accident on the rug, sprinkle baking soda over the area and let it absorb the moisture. Vacuum the carpet when it’s dry. If a spot remains, gently brush a baking soda and water mixture into the carpet, let it dry, then vacuum.
  • On your walls: Remove marks from walls by wiping with a damp sponge dipped in baking soda.
  • On your stainless steel appliances: Sprinkle baking soda onto a damp sponge and wipe down your appliances. Then rinse the sponge and wipe again to get rid of the residue.

Read more: 17 Cleaning Essentials for Your Apartment

2. Vinegar

When it comes to green cleaning, vinegar is your go-to wonder product. Here are just a few ways you can use vinegar to clean:

  • For your windows: Mix vinegar and water in a 1:1 ratio in a spray bottle. To get extra shine with no streaks –  plus cut down on waste – wipe with a microfiber cloth instead of paper towels.
  • For your floors: Mix one cup of vinegar, one cup of hot water, and a couple drops of dish soap in a spray bottle. Just spray it on the floor – hardwood, tile, linoleum or any other non-carpeted surface will do – and mop. No rinsing needed!
  • For your sink drains: If you have a clogged drain, remove the stopper and pour half a cup of baking soda into it, followed by a cup of vinegar. Let it bubble away for about half an hour, then flush the drain with boiling water.

A gallon of vinegar will cost you less than $10.

Read more: How to Keep Your Apartment Cleaning Earth-Friendly

3. Castile soap

When you’re cleaning hard surfaces, sometimes you need some suds. Paired with some water and a stiff-bristled brush, castile soap will be your best friend for bathroom cleaning.

  • In your tub: Combine water and castile soap in a 2:1 ratio in a spray bottle. Spray liberally in your tub, then scrub with the brush to get rid of mildew and soap scum. Rinse with warm water.
  • In your sink: Spray the same mixture all over the surface of your sink, then scrub with the brush until the sink shines.

A 16-oz. bottle of Dr. Bronner’s castile soap costs about $10.

Read more: Clean Green: Eco-Friendly Cleaning Products

4. Hydrogen peroxide

A brown bottle of 3% hydrogen peroxide is a green alternative to bleach – it has all the whitening power without harming the environment. And, at less than a buck for a 16-oz. bottle, it’s ultra-cheap as well.

  • In your toilet: Pour about half a cup of hydrogen peroxide into your toilet bowl and let it sit for about 20 minutes, then scrub clean with a brush.
  • On your grout: If you’ve got moldy or discolored grout, first dry the surface thoroughly, then spray with hydrogen peroxide. Let it sit for about half an hour and then scrub with an old toothbrush. If you have a lot of mildew, you might have to repeat the process several times to get white grout again.
  • In your kitchen: Because it’s non-toxic, you can use hydrogen peroxide to clean surfaces around your food. Use it to wipe out your refrigerator and dishwasher, disinfect cutting boards, and clean your sponges.

Tip: If you’re pouring hydrogen peroxide into a spray bottle, make sure the bottle is opaque – exposure to light will kill the solution’s effectiveness.

Read more: How to Clean Your Kitchen Appliances

Wood cleaners are difficult to make yourself, so buy an eco-friendly furniture cleaning product.Wood cleaners are difficult to make yourself, so buy an eco-friendly furniture cleaning product.
Wood cleaners are difficult to make yourself, so buy an eco-friendly furniture cleaning product.

5. Wood cleaner

Your furniture needs cleaning, too, but not all cleaners are easy to DIY. To avoid damaging or leaving a residue on your wood pieces, we recommend buying an eco-friendly wood cleaner.

  • Method’s Wood for Good cleaner costs about $7 for a 28-oz. spray bottle.
  • Seventh Generation’s Wood Cleaner costs about $5 for an 18-oz. spray bottle.

Read more: Go Green in Your Apartment Month-by-Month (Infographic)

Your turn! What are your favorite green cleaning products?

Photo credits: Shutterstock / Gita Kulinitch Studio, Daleen Loest

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Source: apartmentguide.com

DC Studio Apartments Offering One or Two Months Free

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If you are in the market for a new apartment, this is the absolute best time to secure a new place. Apartments and neighborhoods where you never were able to get concessions are now giving away up to two months free. This is of course due to the fact that while many people were able to work from home, they took that opportunity to leave their Washington, D.C. apartments and move out to the suburbs or home with mom and dad or become digital nomads. That left many apartment buildings with vacancies to fill and that’s where your luck begins!

Last month we highlighted apartments with move-in specials. This week, we are highlighting DC Studio Apartments offering two months free. You’ll see there is a wide range of offerings from rent control apartments in Northwest DC to brand new luxury apartments in SE neighborhoods like Capitol Riverfront.

Act quickly, as soon as the summer heats up and there are more signs of movement in the District, you will see prices start to rise and rent specials dry up.


Hilltop-House-kitchen

Hilltop House

1475 Euclid Street NW Washington, DC.

844-259-7670

Studios starting at $1350

Get TWO MONTHS FREE

Hilltop House is in the Adams Morgan neighborhood in NW Washington, D.C. The building has mostly studios, but on occasion, a one or two-bedroom apartment comes available. The building is within walking distance of Safeway and Harris Teeter and many restaurants. All utilities are included in your rent price.


The Shawmut

2200 19th Street NW, Washington DC

844-300-2186

Studios starting at $1350

Get TWO MONTHS FREE on Studios

The Shawmut is a pet-friendly community in the Adams-Morgan | Kalorama Neighborhod. The building is in walking distance of many restaurants, grocery stores, and shops.

Apartments-with-one-month-free-2800-woodley

2800 Woodley

2800 Woodley NW, Washington DC

833-623-4036

Get One and a Half Months Free

Studios starting at $1495

2800 Woodley is a gorgeous building set back in a tree-lined residential neighborhood just four blocks from the Woodley Park Metro. The apartments have shining parquet floors, energy efficient appliances, and all utilities are included with your rent.

apartments-with-two-months-free-brunswick-house

Brunswick House

1414 17th Street NW, Washington DC

844-287-1930

Get Two Months Free on Studios

Studios starting at $1395

Brunswick House is conveniently located near the Dupont Circle Metro. It is also within a few blocks of Whole Foods Market and a number of restaurants. Brunswick House Apartments have hardwood floors and all utilities are included with the rent.

apartments-with one-month-free-DC-Meridian-Park-Apartments

Meridian Park

2445 15th Street NW, Washington DC

833-233-2513

Get Two Months Free on Studios

Studios starting at $1390

Meridian Park Apartments have a fantastic location between Adams Morgan and Columbia Heights. The apartment community is located right next to Meridian Park, walking distance to multiple metro stops and just blocks from two grocery stores.

Avec-on-H-1-Bedroom-AV1adBMx-Kitchen(1)

Avec on H

901 H Street NE, Washington DC

833-715-2382

Get Two Months Free on Studios

Studios starting at $1541

Avec on H is a brand new apartment community on H Street. The building has a two-block long rooftop with a pool, grilling areas, community garden, dog park and outdoor living rooms. The community also has a fitness center and clubroom. Right now they are offering two months free on studio apartments.

That’s our round-up of studio apartments in DC offering up to two months free. Want to see more options? Do a free search at apartminty.com and sign up for the mailing list to get notified as more specials come available!

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Source: blog.apartminty.com

How to Make Your Apartment More Eco-Friendly | Apartminty

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

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There are a lot of perks to apartment living. They’re generally easier to maintain, can be more affordable than a house, and are great short-term commitments for those always on the go. However, one of the drawbacks to apartment-dwelling, particularly if you’re an environmentalist, is often the limited green actions available. Whether you rent or own your apartment, it can be difficult knowing how to get involved in sustainability efforts. However, eco-friendly changes can be applied everywhere, including apartments.

It’s important for the sake of our future here on Earth to begin taking green actions to help minimize the negative impacts on the environment. For those living in apartments, getting started on making your living space more eco-friendly is easier than you think:  

Construct with Mother Nature in Mind

The best place to start is at the beginning, right? If you’re an apartment owner or landlord, it’s important to prioritize constructing any new apartments with the right materials. Some of the best sustainable building materials to use include:

  • Reclaimed Wood: Reusing materials like reclaimed wood is a perfect way to cut down on waste and reduce production costs. Reclaimed wood also typically has a lot of character which only helps make each of your apartments more unique while also being sustainable.
  • Bamboo: The thing that makes bamboo a great sustainable material choice is its rapid growth rate. Bamboo is ready to be used in just six years and when it’s of high quality and sold by reputable dealers, it’s extremely durable and long-lasting. It’s also one of the more affordable options to pick from. 
  • Green Insulation: Unlike traditional insulation that’s made from synthetic materials, which can be damaging to the environment, green insulation is made from recycled materials. From old denim to sheep’s wool, green insulation is a great substitute for fiberglass insulation and more.

Making the initial decision to build with sustainable materials benefits the environment long-term by reducing the overall negative impacts. It also can help save future tenants money on utilities thanks to sustainable building materials like green insulation helping to reduce energy use. It may be more expensive at times to pick the sustainable option over the non-sustainable counterpart, but it’s worth the cost.  

Don’t Shy Away from Pre-Owned Appliances

Appliances breaking down or not working properly is a common issue for tenants and owners alike. Moreover, many apartments still have the same appliances they were built with decades ago. While certain types of appliances were definitely built to last regardless of age, for the most part, many are now inefficient and that can be costly. As pointed out by General Contractors License Guide, “Not only do inefficient appliances waste energy, but they can also cost you extra money. A 21-cubic foot refrigerator using 750 watts of power costs an average of $27 each month to run, which can add up fast when you factor in additional energy use each month.” With that being said though, don’t be temped quite yet to toss out your old appliances. 

While it may depend on where you live, there is likely a used appliance business you can and should utilize. Organizations such as Habitat for Humanity have numerous stores you can contact. They will not only replace broken appliances with functioning ones but will also take your old ones away and repurpose them. The appliances these types of businesses have are typically lightly used and worked on to be good as new. This reduces the overall impact on the environment by increasing better energy usage functions, minimizing waste, and providing more materials to be re-used.

Small Changes Have Big Impacts

Wanting to make some green changes to your apartment is understandable as we begin learning more and more about serious environmental threats and problems. However, it’s worth keeping in mind that it’s easy to overload yourself when taking on major eco-friendly projects and renovations. Furthermore, it’s not always possible to make those apartment-altering changes. While big green actions are certainly important, small, everyday green actions are just as essential in regards to the planet’s health. Try incorporating some of the simple green actions found in things like eco-friendly apartment guides if you’re unsure where to start. It may feel perhaps ineffectual, but changing your habits to be more conscious of the environment is a great way to make a difference, regardless of where you live. 

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Source: blog.apartminty.com

How to DIY a Citrus Vinegar Cleaning Spray

If you’ve made the switch to green cleaners, you’ve made a smart, healthy choice for yourself and your household. And if you choose to DIY your own cleaning solutions, even better! Making your own cleaners is cheaper, healthier and better for the environment than buying toxic commercial cleaners.

Even if you’re not crafty, don’t be daunted by the DIY process. In fact, there’s only one ingredient you really need to make most DIY cleaners: Vinegar. It’s a wonder solution for killing germs and removing odors. But let’s be honest: It doesn’t smell great. Fortunately, you can take advantage of vinegar’s cleaning power without that pickled smell. Here’s how to make your own citrus vinegar cleaning spray.

What you’ll need

  • Vinegar
  • Empty jar with a tight-fitting lid
  • Orange

1. Peel the orange, but don’t throw the peel out. Do whatever you like with the inside of the orange; I recommend eating it.

2. Place the orange peels in the jar.

citrus vinegar cleaning spraycitrus vinegar cleaning spray

3. Pour the vinegar into the jar until the jar is full. Screw the lid on tightly.

citrus vinegar cleaning spraycitrus vinegar cleaning spray

4. Give the jar a good shake, then place it in a pantry for two weeks, shaking it every other day or so.

At the end of two weeks, your citrus-infused vinegar will be ready. Just pour it through a strainer into a spray bottle in a 1:1 ratio with tap water, then use it to clean everything from your bathroom to your kitchen countertop. Enjoy the refreshing orange scent as you clean. If you’ve got any left over, store it in the fridge.

sprayingspraying

More expert advice on green cleaning from the AG Blog:

Other ways to use vinegar in your home

  • Place an open dish of vinegar (whether it’s citrus-infused or not; either way will work) in a room to remove the smell of fresh paint or stinky cooking smells, such as fish.
  • Remember how you made a volcano for your second-grade science fair? That same chemical reaction — combining vinegar with baking soda — produces a bubbly substance that’s great for cleaning drains. Just let it fizz for half an hour or so, then flush the drain with boiling water.
  • Clean your stainless steel appliances with a light misting of undiluted vinegar. Wipe with a soft, clean cloth to remove fingerprints and bring out the shine in your appliances again.
  • If you’ve got carpet stains, dissolve two tablespoons of salt in half a cup of white vinegar. Pour it on the stain, lightly rub it in, let it dry for a few hours, then vacuum. For darker stains, add 2 tablespoons of borax to the mix, then use it the same way.

An orange, some vinegar, an empty Mason jar and an empty spray bottle are all you need to make your own citrus vinegar cleaning spray.An orange, some vinegar, an empty Mason jar and an empty spray bottle are all you need to make your own citrus vinegar cleaning spray.

For serious cleanup, skip the vinegar

Vinegar is a mild disinfectant that’s perfectly effective for most household messes, but if you’ve got something that needs serious disinfecting – such as meat juice on your countertop – don’t turn to vinegar.

You don’t need to buy toxic cleaners even for these messes; hot, soapy water will do the trick. First, wipe up the mess with a paper towel and immediately throw it in the trash. Put a few drops of castile soap in a bottle of hot water, spray the area where the juice was, then rub vigorously with a different rag or paper towel. Finally, wash your hands thoroughly.

How do you use vinegar in your home?

Photo by Jessica Lewis on Unsplash

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Is It Worth Doing a Laundry Room Remodel?

Laundry rooms are the workhorses of the home. They’re also often sandwiched into small spaces, or in areas of the home that aren’t all that convenient, causing some homeowners to consider a remodel.

Whether you should undertake a laundry room remodel depends on what you plan to use it for, its size, the kinds of appliances you need, and any special décor touches you’d like to add.

A remodel might be worth it if it creates a perky and efficient space or creates a room that has a dual function.

Before Starting Your Laundry Room Remodel

If you’ve been thinking about giving your laundry room a clean start, you’ve probably got a lot of ideas and inspiration swimming in your head.

Before embarking on your project, you want to really think through what you’re hoping to accomplish by asking yourself the following questions.

What’s the Scope of the Project?

Some remodels involve small improvements like new paint and cabinetry, while others call for tearing through walls, moving plumbing, or even relocating your laundry room to another area of the home.

Appliances should also be addressed. Will you need a new washer and dryer, or do you plan on using the ones you currently have?

What Do You Plan to Use Your Laundry Room For?

While most laundry rooms are used solely for handling laundry, others also act as mudrooms and storage for cleaning supplies, sports gear, and bulk shopping items like bottled water, paper products, and even pet food.

What your laundry room is used for will affect the laundry room remodel ideas available to you.

How Often and When Do You Do Laundry?

If you have a large family and do frequent washing and drying, that will influence the design of your new laundry room. You may need ample counter space for folding, for example, a fold-down ironing board, or bins to hold each person’s clean clothing.

If you tend to do the laundry during the day, you may consider adding a window. Are you more of a nighttime launderer? Under-cabinet lighting may help weary eyes.

What Are Your Must-Haves?

Some homeowners struggle with disorganization and need bins and baskets to keep things tidy. Others are looking to add features like a sink, or build out their laundry room to accommodate more counter space.

Whatever your desire, it’s a good idea to list what you can’t live without so you can build them into your budget.

How Much Can You Spend?

The scope of your project will dictate your budget and how you plan to pay for your remodel.

Some homeowners, seeing a laundry room remodel as a way to increase their home’s value, may opt to borrow to pay for the project. Others may choose to keep things scaled down so they don’t spend beyond what they have on hand.

Recommended: Home Improvement Cost Calculator

Laundry Room Remodel Ideas

Now that you’ve got the foundation of your project mapped out, it’s time to envision how your laundry room remodel will take shape. That will depend on the following factors.

If You Have Limited Space

Small laundry rooms can still pack a punch, thanks to creative ways to maximize your available space. You can do that by tucking laundry baskets under counters, adding a rod under cabinets to hang clothes, and using wall space for hooks to hang laundry bags or baskets that can hold clothespins, detergent, and dryer sheets.

Don’t forget that laundry rooms don’t need to be true rooms; if you’re short on space, consider tucking your washer and dryer into an unused closet and installing a farmhouse door for easy access.

Depending on its size, you can then use the prior laundry room as a guest room, home office, nursery, or kids’ playroom.

Recommended: Closet Remodel Guide

If You’ll Be Using the Room for More Than Cleaning Clothes

The list of ways to use a laundry room is endless, and will largely depend on each household’s needs.

•   Got a large dog? You might consider installing a pet-washing station, especially if you are already planning on undertaking plumbing work.
•   Need a quiet place to conduct conference calls at home? A fold-down workstation meets both needs.
•   Larger families may tuck an additional fridge in the laundry room.
•   People who love to entertain may find storage for plates and glassware in the laundry room.

Your Budget

A laundry room remodel can quickly add up if new plumbing, cabinetry, and construction work are involved.

If you find yourself running beyond what you’re willing to spend, think of creative ways to get the laundry room you want without breaking the bank.

That might entail painting cabinets instead of replacing them, using open shelving instead of custom built-ins, and opting for durable paint in place of tiled backsplashes.

Recommended: Easy Home Improvement Projects for Beginners

DIY vs. Calling In an Expert

Many homeowners are comfortable with do-it-yourself projects. In a laundry room remodel, these might include painting, replacing cabinetry, and installing shelving and hanging rods.

Other projects—moving water lines, installing new sinks or drywall, and demolition— require hiring a professional. Mapping out which projects you will need to outsource will affect your budget and may also affect the scope of your project.

Paying for It

Smaller laundry room remodels, or those that require just a new coat of paint, a new washer, and dryer, or a retrofitting of shelving to maximize storage space can be done with fairly little outlay, especially if you do it yourself or have a friend or family member lend a hand.

Larger ones, or those that call for extensive demolition, architecture work, or the services of a general contractor, will be more expensive, of course.

The size of the project—and therefore how much money you’ll need—matters, as does your timeline for paying back any loan.

Here are some options:

•   Cash
•   A home improvement loan, aka personal loan. Your home isn’t used as collateral to secure the loan.
•   A home equity loan or a revolving home equity line of credit, which do use your home as collateral.
•   Cash-out refinance, which replaces your mortgage with a new loan for more than you owe. The difference goes to you in cash, for home improvements or anything else.

The Takeaway

Laundry room ideas range from DIY tweaks to soap-operatic overhauls. A laundry room remodel may increase the value of your home or simply make life a little easier. Start by listing what you want to achieve and how you’re going to pay for it.

SoFi offers a range of ways to pay for home improvements like a more inviting space in which to do laundry or a room that does double duty.

If you need a home loan (with as little as 5% down), an investment property loan, a cash-out refi, or an unsecured personal loan, SoFi offers all of them at competitive rates.

Plus you become a SoFi member, which comes with a laundry list of perks.



SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp (dba SoFi), a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law, license # 6054612; NMLS # 1121636 . For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal.

SoFi Home Loans
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. SoFi Home Loans are not available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Source: sofi.com