30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rate Hits Yet Another Record Low, Falls Below 3.2 Percent for the First Time

As of May 5, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.72%.

Abstract illustration of houses and charts

As of May 5, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.72%.

Mortgage rates fall to lowest levels in months.

“Mortgage rates fell slightly again this week, pushing rates to their lowest level since mid-to-late February,” said Zillow Economist Matthew Speakman. “With few surprising economic data or pandemic-related developments this week, mortgage rates and the bond yields that tend to influence them saw little reason to move significantly over the past seven days. Unlike stocks, bonds and mortgage rates brushed aside comments made by Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, in which she suggested (but did not recommend) that interest rates will likely have to rise somewhat in order to ensure that the economy doesn’t overheat. But this period of relative calm will be put to the test in the coming days. April employment figures and inflation data, two key gauges of the economy’s path forward, are due this week, and stronger-than-expected readings of either – or both – reports will likely revert mortgage rates back upward.”

Additionally, the 15-year fixed mortgage rate was 2.09%, and for 5/1 ARMs, the rate was 2.38%.

Check Zillow for mortgage rate trends and up-to-the-minute mortgage rates for your state, or use the mortgage calculator to calculate monthly payments at the current rates.

The weekly mortgage rate chart above illustrates the average 30-year fixed interest rate for the past week. Here’s a comprehensive look at the current mortgage rates for all loan types:

Today’s Average Rates for Conventional Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed 2.77% 2.82% 0.11%
20-Year Fixed 2.63% 2.71% 0.06%
15-Year Fixed 2.09% 2.17% 0.03%
10-Year Fixed 2.03% 2.15% -0.08%
7/1 ARM 2.22% 2.92% 0.26%
5/1 ARM 2.19% 3.04% 0.21%
3/1 ARM 0% 0% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.77% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,227. A 20-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.63% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,609. A 15-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.09% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,942. A 10-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.03% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,764. A 7/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.22% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,141. A 5/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.19% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,137. A 3/1 ARM loan of $0 at 0% APR with a $0 down payment will have a monthly payment of $0. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Government Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed FHA 2.4% 3.07% 0.17%
30-Year Fixed VA 2.47% 2.73% 0.12%
15-Year Fixed FHA 2.23% 2.93% 0.09%
15-Year Fixed VA 2.42% 2.89% 0.17%
5/1 ARM FHA 2.59% 2.97% 0.02%
5/1 ARM VA 3.17% 2.83% -0.27%

A 30-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.4% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,170. A 30-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.47% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,180. A 15-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.23% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,962. A 15-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.42% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,988. A 5/1 ARM FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.59% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,200. A 5/1 ARM VA loan of $300,000 at 3.17% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,291. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Jumbo Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.2% 3.25% 0.09%
20-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.28% 3.32% 0.25%
15-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.81% 2.89% 0.11%
10-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.5% 2.6% 0.1%
7/1 ARM Jumbo 2.68% 3.17% -0.35%
5/1 ARM Jumbo 2.75% 3.21% -0.25%
3/1 ARM Jumbo 2.14% 2.74% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.2% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,595. A 20-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.28% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $3,411. A 15-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.81% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $4,089. A 10-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.5% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $5,656. A 7/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.68% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,428. A 5/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.75% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,449. A 3/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.14% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,259. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Source: zillow.com

30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rate Holds Steady

As of May 5, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.72%.

Abstract illustration of houses and charts

As of May 5, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.72%.

Mortgage rates fall to lowest levels in months.

“Mortgage rates fell slightly again this week, pushing rates to their lowest level since mid-to-late February,” said Zillow Economist Matthew Speakman. “With few surprising economic data or pandemic-related developments this week, mortgage rates and the bond yields that tend to influence them saw little reason to move significantly over the past seven days. Unlike stocks, bonds and mortgage rates brushed aside comments made by Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, in which she suggested (but did not recommend) that interest rates will likely have to rise somewhat in order to ensure that the economy doesn’t overheat. But this period of relative calm will be put to the test in the coming days. April employment figures and inflation data, two key gauges of the economy’s path forward, are due this week, and stronger-than-expected readings of either – or both – reports will likely revert mortgage rates back upward.”

Additionally, the 15-year fixed mortgage rate was 2.09%, and for 5/1 ARMs, the rate was 2.38%.

Check Zillow for mortgage rate trends and up-to-the-minute mortgage rates for your state, or use the mortgage calculator to calculate monthly payments at the current rates.

The weekly mortgage rate chart above illustrates the average 30-year fixed interest rate for the past week. Here’s a comprehensive look at the current mortgage rates for all loan types:

Today’s Average Rates for Conventional Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed 2.79% 2.84% 0.09%
20-Year Fixed 2.66% 2.73% 0.04%
15-Year Fixed 2.1% 2.19% 0.02%
10-Year Fixed 2.03% 2.15% -0.08%
7/1 ARM 2.24% 2.94% 0.24%
5/1 ARM 2.27% 3.08% 0.17%
3/1 ARM 0% 0% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.79% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,231. A 20-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.66% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,612. A 15-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.1% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,944. A 10-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.03% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,764. A 7/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.24% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,144. A 5/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.27% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,149. A 3/1 ARM loan of $0 at 0% APR with a $0 down payment will have a monthly payment of $0. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Government Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed FHA 2.41% 3.07% 0.16%
30-Year Fixed VA 2.49% 2.75% 0.1%
15-Year Fixed FHA 2.23% 2.94% 0.08%
15-Year Fixed VA 2.42% 2.89% 0.17%
5/1 ARM FHA 2.59% 2.97% 0.02%
5/1 ARM VA 3.09% 2.77% -0.22%

A 30-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.41% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,170. A 30-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.49% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,183. A 15-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.23% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,962. A 15-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.42% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,989. A 5/1 ARM FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.59% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,200. A 5/1 ARM VA loan of $300,000 at 3.09% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,279. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Jumbo Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.24% 3.28% 0.06%
20-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.3% 3.34% 0.23%
15-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.83% 2.9% 0.09%
10-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.5% 2.6% 0.1%
7/1 ARM Jumbo 2.65% 3.1% -0.28%
5/1 ARM Jumbo 2.66% 3.15% -0.18%
3/1 ARM Jumbo 2.14% 2.74% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.24% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,606. A 20-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.3% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $3,416. A 15-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.83% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $4,093. A 10-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.5% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $5,656. A 7/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.65% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,418. A 5/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.66% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,420. A 3/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.14% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,259. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Source: zillow.com

30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rate Hovers Above All-Time Low

As of April 28, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.78%.

Abstract illustration of houses and charts

As of April 28, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.78%.

Mortgage rates fall despite strong economic data reports.

“Mortgage rates fell again this week, continuing the downward trend they’ve exhibited for most of April,” said Zillow Economist Matthew Speakman. “In what was a relatively unremarkable week for mortgage rates, the modest movement was partially driven by discussions about a proposed increase in capital gains tax rates – which placed downward pressure on bond yields and thus rates – and anticipation of a key announcement by the Federal Reserve. Fed Chair Jerome Powell reiterated on Wednesday that the Central Bank has no immediate plans to increase interest rates or curb the purchases of mortgage-backed securities – a position that placed more downward pressure on bond yields and is likely to result in more mortgage decreases in the coming days. Looking ahead, with a slew of key economic reports on the horizon – including consumer spending and inflation data – the relatively muted mortgage rate activity from the past couple weeks may transition to more significant movements.”

Additionally, the 15-year fixed mortgage rate was 2.11%, and for 5/1 ARMs, the rate was 2.55%.

Check Zillow for mortgage rate trends and up-to-the-minute mortgage rates for your state, or use the mortgage calculator to calculate monthly payments at the current rates.

The weekly mortgage rate chart above illustrates the average 30-year fixed interest rate for the past week. Here’s a comprehensive look at the current mortgage rates for all loan types:

Today’s Average Rates for Conventional Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed 2.8% 2.85% 0.08%
20-Year Fixed 2.66% 2.73% 0.03%
15-Year Fixed 2.1% 2.19% 0.02%
10-Year Fixed 2.01% 2.15% -0.08%
7/1 ARM 2.28% 2.96% 0.22%
5/1 ARM 2.34% 3.1% 0.15%
3/1 ARM 0% 0% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.8% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,232. A 20-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.66% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,613. A 15-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.1% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,944. A 10-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.01% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,762. A 7/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.28% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,151. A 5/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.34% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,159. A 3/1 ARM loan of $0 at 0% APR with a $0 down payment will have a monthly payment of $0. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Government Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed FHA 2.33% 2.99% 0.24%
30-Year Fixed VA 2.54% 2.81% 0.05%
15-Year Fixed FHA 2.11% 2.85% 0.17%
15-Year Fixed VA 2.53% 3.02% 0.04%
5/1 ARM FHA 2.6% 2.97% 0.02%
5/1 ARM VA 3.06% 2.75% -0.19%

A 30-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.33% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,159. A 30-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.54% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,191. A 15-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.11% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,946. A 15-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.53% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,004. A 5/1 ARM FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.6% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,200. A 5/1 ARM VA loan of $300,000 at 3.06% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,273. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Jumbo Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.22% 3.27% 0.07%
20-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.29% 3.33% 0.24%
15-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.86% 2.94% 0.06%
10-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.52% 2.6% 0.1%
7/1 ARM Jumbo 2.68% 3.07% -0.25%
5/1 ARM Jumbo 2.61% 3.06% -0.09%
3/1 ARM Jumbo 2.14% 2.74% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.22% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,602. A 20-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.29% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $3,414. A 15-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.86% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $4,102. A 10-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.52% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $5,660. A 7/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.68% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,427. A 5/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.61% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,406. A 3/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.14% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,259. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Source: zillow.com

30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rate Rises

As of April 28, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.78%.

Abstract illustration of houses and charts

As of April 28, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.78%.

Mortgage rates fall despite strong economic data reports.

“Mortgage rates fell again this week, continuing the downward trend they’ve exhibited for most of April,” said Zillow Economist Matthew Speakman. “In what was a relatively unremarkable week for mortgage rates, the modest movement was partially driven by discussions about a proposed increase in capital gains tax rates – which placed downward pressure on bond yields and thus rates – and anticipation of a key announcement by the Federal Reserve. Fed Chair Jerome Powell reiterated on Wednesday that the Central Bank has no immediate plans to increase interest rates or curb the purchases of mortgage-backed securities – a position that placed more downward pressure on bond yields and is likely to result in more mortgage decreases in the coming days. Looking ahead, with a slew of key economic reports on the horizon – including consumer spending and inflation data – the relatively muted mortgage rate activity from the past couple weeks may transition to more significant movements.”

Additionally, the 15-year fixed mortgage rate was 2.11%, and for 5/1 ARMs, the rate was 2.55%.

Check Zillow for mortgage rate trends and up-to-the-minute mortgage rates for your state, or use the mortgage calculator to calculate monthly payments at the current rates.

The weekly mortgage rate chart above illustrates the average 30-year fixed interest rate for the past week. Here’s a comprehensive look at the current mortgage rates for all loan types:

Today’s Average Rates for Conventional Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed 2.8% 2.85% 0.08%
20-Year Fixed 2.66% 2.73% 0.03%
15-Year Fixed 2.1% 2.19% 0.02%
10-Year Fixed 2.01% 2.15% -0.08%
7/1 ARM 2.28% 2.96% 0.22%
5/1 ARM 2.34% 3.1% 0.15%
3/1 ARM 0% 0% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.8% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,232. A 20-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.66% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,613. A 15-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.1% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,944. A 10-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.01% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,762. A 7/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.28% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,151. A 5/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.34% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,159. A 3/1 ARM loan of $0 at 0% APR with a $0 down payment will have a monthly payment of $0. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Government Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed FHA 2.33% 2.99% 0.24%
30-Year Fixed VA 2.54% 2.81% 0.05%
15-Year Fixed FHA 2.11% 2.85% 0.17%
15-Year Fixed VA 2.53% 3.02% 0.04%
5/1 ARM FHA 2.6% 2.97% 0.02%
5/1 ARM VA 3.06% 2.75% -0.19%

A 30-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.33% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,159. A 30-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.54% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,191. A 15-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.11% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,946. A 15-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.53% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,004. A 5/1 ARM FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.6% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,200. A 5/1 ARM VA loan of $300,000 at 3.06% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,273. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Jumbo Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.22% 3.27% 0.07%
20-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.29% 3.33% 0.24%
15-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.86% 2.94% 0.06%
10-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.52% 2.6% 0.1%
7/1 ARM Jumbo 2.68% 3.07% -0.25%
5/1 ARM Jumbo 2.61% 3.06% -0.09%
3/1 ARM Jumbo 2.14% 2.74% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.22% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,602. A 20-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.29% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $3,414. A 15-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.86% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $4,102. A 10-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.52% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $5,660. A 7/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.68% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,427. A 5/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.61% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,406. A 3/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.14% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,259. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Source: zillow.com

The evolution of the good faith estimate

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

A good faith estimate (GFE) is a comparison of mortgage offers provided by lenders or brokers to a consumer. It was recently replaced by the loan estimate—a similar concept with a few small differences. 

What Is a Good Faith Estimate Designed to Do?

The GFE’s purpose was to present mortgage shoppers with all the details they need to know about their mortgage options to help them make well-informed decisions. This transparency ensures consumers are aware of all the costs associated with the mortgage—including fees, APR and other expenses.

Borrowers would receive a GFE three business days after submitting their mortgage application, and after thorough review, would then select which mortgage option they would like to move forward with. 

Are Good Faith Estimates Still Used?

The term “good faith estimate” is not used by lenders anymore, but the concept remains prevalent. In 2015, the GFE was replaced by the loan estimate. Anyone who purchased a home after October 3, 2015, received a loan estimate rather than a GFE. 

In October of 2015, the good faith estimate was replaced by the loan estimate.

If you applied for a reverse mortgage, HELOC, a mortgage through an assistance program or a manufactured loan not secured by real estate, you will not receive a loan estimate. Instead, you will receive a Truth-in-Lending disclosure. 

The purposes of a GFE, a loan estimate and a Truth-in-Lending disclosure are largely the same: providing transparency to borrowers. The main difference—and benefit—of a loan estimate is that there’s more regulation by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Since the GFE was not standardized through regulations, they were sometimes difficult to decipher, especially for first-time homebuyers. Conversely, each loan estimate must contain the exact same information in a standardized way, which we’ll cover below. 

What Appears on a Loan Estimate?

According to the CFPB, a complete, compliant loan estimate should include the length of the loan term, the purpose of the loan, the product (fixed versus adjustable interest rate, for example), the loan type (conventional, FHA, VA or other), the loan ID number and indication of an interest rate lock. Additionally, the loan estimate will include the following:

  • Loan terms: A summary of the total loan amount, interest rate, monthly principal and interest and penalties, and whether these amounts can increase after closing.
  • Projected payments: A summary of monthly principal, interest, mortgage insurance, taxes and insurance. Broken down by years 1–7 and 8–30 for a 30-year mortgage.
  • Costs at closing: Estimated closing costs and the total estimated cash needed to close, which includes the down payment and any credits.
  • Loan costs: Origination charges—which is broken down by 0.25% of the loan amount, application fees and underwriting fees—and other fees.
  • Other costs: Taxes, government fees, prepaid homeowners insurance, interest and prepaid property, escrow payment at closing and title policy.
  • Comparisons: Metrics you can use to compare your loan to others. Includes the total principal, interest, mortgage insurance and loan costs you will have paid after five years.
  • Other considerations: Information about appraisal, assumption, homeowner’s insurance, late payment fees, refinancing and servicing.
  • Confirmation of receipt: A line at the end of the statement that confirms you have received the form. This does not legally bind you to accept the loan.

Your loan estimate will also include your personal information, including your full name, income, address and Social Security number. Make sure to double-check all of this information for errors, as they could cause potential problems later in the process.

To better understand your loan estimate, explore the CFPB’s interactive guide.

Closing Disclosure

For first-time homebuyers in particular, it’s important to understand the timeline of events so that you can be prepared for your home buying process and have all the information and necessary documents at hand.

Closing Disclosure Timeline

Lenders are required to send you a loan estimate form no more than three business days after receiving your application. Finally, at least three business days prior to loan consummation—when you are contractually obligated to the loan—you will receive a closing disclosure.

Lenders are required to send you a loan estimate no more than three days after receiving your application and a closing disclosure at least three days prior to loan consummation.

What Is the Purpose of a Closing Disclosure?

The purpose of a closing disclosure is to assign “tolerance levels” to fees listed in the loan estimate form. This means that fees cannot increase over their tolerance level unless a specific triggering event occurs. There are three different tolerance levels:

  • Zero percent tolerance: Fees in this category cannot increase from what is listed on the loan estimate. These fees are typically those paid to a creditor, broker or affiliate, such as origination fees.
  • 10 percent cumulative tolerance: Fees in this category are added together, and the sum of these fees are not to increase by more than 10 percent of the amount listed in the loan estimate. Fees include recording fees and third-party service fees.
  • No tolerance or unlimited tolerance: Fees in this category have no limits at all, and can increase by any amount, as long as they are disclosed “in good faith,” using the best information available. These are usually fees lenders have little to no control over.

Remember not to confuse “zero percent tolerance” with “no tolerance,” as they are quite different. Zero percent tolerance fees cannot increase, while no tolerance fees can increase by any amount as long as it is considered “in good faith.”

Does a Loan Estimate Affect My Credit?

The act of applying for a mortgage may temporarily cause your credit score to dip, as it requires a hard inquiry by lenders. However, you may shop around for different mortgages from different lenders to get multiple preapprovals and loan estimates. As long as you do this all within a 45-day window, these separate credit checks will be recorded on your credit report as one single hard inquiry.

This is because lenders realize that you are only going to buy one home, so they categorize all of the actions you take under one umbrella of applying for a mortgage. Note that you may want to consider the 45-day rule loosely. Prioritize finding the best mortgage deal possible. Even if this means processing a hard inquiry outside of the 45-day window for a better deal, you’ll likely end up saving more money in the long run.

To learn more about what affects your credit and how to work toward improving your credit profile, contact our team at Lexington Law.


Reviewed by Kenton Arbon, an Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Kenton Arbon is an Associate Attorney in the Arizona office. Mr. Arbon was born in Bakersfield, California, and grew up in the Northwest. He earned his B.A. in Business Administration, Human Resources Management, while working as an Oregon State Trooper. His interest in the law lead him to relocate to Arizona, attend law school, and graduate from Arizona State College of Law in 2017. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Arbon has worked in multiple compliance domains including anti-money laundering, Medicare Part D, contracts, and debt negotiation. Mr. Arbon is licensed to practice law in Arizona. He is located in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rate Falls to New Record Low

As of April 28, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.78%.

Abstract illustration of houses and charts

As of April 28, the rate borrowers were quoted on Zillow for 30-year fixed mortgages was 2.78%.

Mortgage rates fall despite strong economic data reports.

“Mortgage rates fell again this week, continuing the downward trend they’ve exhibited for most of April,” said Zillow Economist Matthew Speakman. “In what was a relatively unremarkable week for mortgage rates, the modest movement was partially driven by discussions about a proposed increase in capital gains tax rates – which placed downward pressure on bond yields and thus rates – and anticipation of a key announcement by the Federal Reserve. Fed Chair Jerome Powell reiterated on Wednesday that the Central Bank has no immediate plans to increase interest rates or curb the purchases of mortgage-backed securities – a position that placed more downward pressure on bond yields and is likely to result in more mortgage decreases in the coming days. Looking ahead, with a slew of key economic reports on the horizon – including consumer spending and inflation data – the relatively muted mortgage rate activity from the past couple weeks may transition to more significant movements.”

Additionally, the 15-year fixed mortgage rate was 2.11%, and for 5/1 ARMs, the rate was 2.55%.

Check Zillow for mortgage rate trends and up-to-the-minute mortgage rates for your state, or use the mortgage calculator to calculate monthly payments at the current rates.

The weekly mortgage rate chart above illustrates the average 30-year fixed interest rate for the past week. Here’s a comprehensive look at the current mortgage rates for all loan types:

Today’s Average Rates for Conventional Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed 2.84% 2.9% -0.05%
20-Year Fixed 2.72% 2.79% -0.04%
15-Year Fixed 2.13% 2.21% -0.03%
10-Year Fixed 2.02% 2.14% -0.12%
7/1 ARM 2.65% 3.25% -0.1%
5/1 ARM 2.49% 3.19% 0.02%
3/1 ARM 0% 0% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.84% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,239. A 20-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.72% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,621. A 15-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.13% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,948. A 10-Year Fixed loan of $300,000 at 2.02% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,762. A 7/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.65% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,208. A 5/1 ARM loan of $300,000 at 2.49% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,183. A 3/1 ARM loan of $0 at 0% APR with a $0 down payment will have a monthly payment of $0. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Government Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed FHA 2.33% 2.99% 0.53%
30-Year Fixed VA 2.6% 2.89% -0.21%
15-Year Fixed FHA 2.06% 2.84% -0.06%
15-Year Fixed VA 2.62% 3.13% 0%
5/1 ARM FHA 2.69% 3% -0.14%
5/1 ARM VA 2.35% 2.45% 0.09%

A 30-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.33% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,158. A 30-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.6% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,200. A 15-Year Fixed FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.06% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,939. A 15-Year Fixed VA loan of $300,000 at 2.62% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,017. A 5/1 ARM FHA loan of $300,000 at 2.69% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,214. A 5/1 ARM VA loan of $300,000 at 2.35% APR with a $75,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $1,162. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Today’s Average Rates for Jumbo Loans

Program Interest Rate APR 1 Wk Change
30-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.27% 3.32% -0.03%
20-Year Fixed Jumbo 3.71% 3.76% -0.3%
15-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.86% 2.94% -0.06%
10-Year Fixed Jumbo 2.63% 2.7% 0%
7/1 ARM Jumbo 2.59% 2.81% 0.04%
5/1 ARM Jumbo 2.39% 2.73% 0.19%
3/1 ARM Jumbo 2.14% 2.74% 0%

A 30-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.27% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,618. A 20-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 3.71% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $3,545. A 15-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.86% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $4,101. A 10-Year Fixed Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.63% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $5,690. A 7/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.59% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,400. A 5/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.39% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,336. A 3/1 ARM Jumbo loan of $600,000 at 2.14% APR with a $150,000 down payment will have a monthly payment of $2,259. All monthly payments displayed assume a maximum Loan to Value (LTV) of 80% and 740 credit score, and do not include amount for taxes and insurance. The actual monthly payment may be greater.

Source: zillow.com

How to Refinance Your Home Mortgage – Step-by-Step Guide

Deciding to refinance your mortgage is only the beginning of the process. You’re far more likely to accomplish what you set out to achieve with your refinance — and to get a good deal in the meantime — when you understand what a mortgage refinance entails.

From decision to closing, mortgage refinancing applicants pass through four key stages on their journey to a new mortgage loan.

How to Refinance a Mortgage on Your Home

Getting a home loan of any kind is a highly involved and consequential process.

On the front end, it requires careful consideration on your part. In this case, that means weighing the pros and cons of refinancing in general and the purpose of your loan in particular.

For example, are you refinancing to get a lower rate loan (reducing borrowing costs relative to your current loan) or do you need a cash-out refinance to finance a home improvement project, which could actually entail a higher rate?

Next, you’ll need to gather all the documents and details you’ll need to apply for your loan, evaluate your loan options and calculate what your new home mortgage will cost, and then begin the process of actually shopping for and applying for your new loan — the longest step in the process.

Expect the whole endeavor to take several weeks.

1. Determining Your Loan’s Purpose & Objectives

The decision to refinance a mortgage is not one to make lightly. If you’ve decided to go through with it, you probably have a goal in mind already.

Still, before getting any deeper into the process, it’s worth reviewing your longer-term objectives and determining what you hope to get out of your refinance. You might uncover a secondary or tertiary goal or benefit that alters your approach to the process before it’s too late to change course.

Refinancing advances a whole host of goals, some of which are complementary. For example:

  • Accelerating Payoff. A shorter loan term means fewer monthly payments and quicker payoff. It also means lower borrowing costs over the life of the loan. The principal downside: Shortening a loan’s remaining term from, say, 25 years to 15 years is likely to raise the monthly payment, even as it cuts down total interest charges.
  • Lowering the Monthly Payment. A lower monthly payment means a more affordable loan from month to month — a key benefit for borrowers struggling to live within their means. If you plan to stay in your home for at least three to five years, accepting a prepayment penalty (which is usually a bad idea) can further reduce your interest rate and your monthly payment along with it. The most significant downsides here are the possibility of higher overall borrowing costs and taking longer to pay it off if, as is often the case, you reduce your monthly payment by lengthening your loan term.
  • Lowering the Interest Rate. Even with an identical term, a lower interest rate reduces total borrowing costs and lowers the monthly payment. That’s why refinancing activity spikes when interest rates are low. Choose a shorter term and you’ll see a more drastic reduction.
  • Avoiding the Downsides of Adjustable Rates. Life is good for borrowers during the first five to seven years of the typical adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) term when the 30-year loan rate is likely to be lower than prevailing rates on 30-year fixed-rate mortgages. The bill comes due, literally, when the time comes for the rate to adjust. If rates have risen since the loan’s origination, which is common, the monthly payment spikes. Borrowers can avoid this unwelcome development by refinancing to a fixed-rate mortgage ahead of the jump.
  • Getting Rid of FHA Mortgage Insurance. With relaxed approval standards and low down payment requirements, Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgage loans help lower-income, lower-asset first-time buyers afford starter homes. But they have some significant drawbacks, including pricey mortgage insurance that lasts for the life of the loan. Borrowers with sufficient equity (typically 20% or more) can put that behind them, reduce their monthly payment in the process by refinancing to a conventional mortgage, and avoid less expensive but still unwelcome private mortgage insurance (PMI).
  • Tapping Home Equity. Use a cash-out refinance loan to extract equity from your home. This type of loan allows you to borrow cash against the value of your home to fund things like home improvement projects or debt consolidation. Depending on the lender and jurisdiction, you can borrow up to 85% of your home equity (between rolled-over principal and cash proceeds) with this type of loan. But mind your other equity-tapping options: a home equity loan or home equity line of credit.

Confirming what you hope to get out of your refinance is an essential prerequisite to calculating its likely cost and choosing the optimal offer.


2. Confirm the Timing & Gather Everything You Need

With your loan’s purpose and your long-term financial objectives set, it’s time to confirm you’re ready to refinance. If yes, you must gather everything you need to apply, or at least begin thinking about how to do that.

Assessing Your Timing & Determining Whether to Wait

The purpose of your loan plays a substantial role in dictating the timing of your refinance.

For example, if your primary goal is to tap the equity in your home to finance a major home improvement project, such as a kitchen remodel or basement finish, wait until your loan-to-value ratio is low enough to produce the requisite windfall. That time might not arrive until you’ve been in your home for a decade or longer, depending on the property’s value (and change in value over time).

As a simplified example, if you accumulate an average of $5,000 in equity per year during your first decade of homeownership by making regular payments on your mortgage, you must pay your 30-year mortgage on time for 10 consecutive years to build the $50,000 needed for a major kitchen remodel (without accounting for a potential increase in equity due to a rise in market value).

By contrast, if your primary goal is to avoid a spike in your ARM payment, it’s in your interest to refinance before that happens — most often five or seven years into your original mortgage term.

But other factors can also influence the timing of your refinance or give you second thoughts about going through with it at all:

  • Your Credit Score. Because mortgage refinance loans are secured by the value of the properties they cover, their interest rates tend to be lower than riskier forms of unsecured debt, such as personal loans and credit cards. But borrower credit still plays a vital role in setting their rates. Borrowers with credit scores above 760 get the best rates, and borrowers with scores much below 680 can expect significantly higher rates. That’s not to say refinancing never makes sense for someone whose FICO score is in the mid-600s or below, only that those with the luxury to wait out the credit rebuilding or credit improvement process might want to consider it. If you’re unsure of your credit score, you can check it for free through Credit Karma.
  • Debt-to-Income Ratio. Mortgage lenders prefer borrowers with low debt-to-income ratios. Under 36% is ideal, and over 43% is likely a deal breaker for most lenders. If your debt-to-income ratio is uncomfortably high, consider putting off your refinance for six months to a year and using the time to pay down debt.
  • Work History. Fairly or not, lenders tend to be leery of borrowers who’ve recently changed jobs. If you’ve been with your current employer for two years or less, you must demonstrate that your income has been steady for longer and still might fail to qualify for the rate you expected. However, if you expect interest rates to rise in the near term, waiting out your new job could cancel out any benefits due to the higher future prevailing rates.
  • Prevailing Interest Rates. Given the considerable sums of money involved, even an incremental change to your refinance loan’s interest rate could translate to thousands or tens of thousands of dollars saved over the life of the loan. If you expect interest rates to fall in the near term, put off your refinance application. Conversely, if you believe rates will rise, don’t delay. And if the difference between your original mortgage rate and the rate you expect to receive on your refinance loan isn’t at least 1.5 percentage points, think twice about going ahead with the refinance at all. Under those circumstances, it takes longer to recoup your refinance loan’s closing costs.
  • Anticipated Time in the Home. It rarely makes sense to refinance your original mortgage if you plan to sell the home or pay off the mortgage within two years. Depending on your expected interest savings on the refinance, it can take much longer than that (upward of five years) to break even. Think carefully about how much effort you want to devote to refinancing a loan you’re going to pay off in a few years anyway.

Pro tip: If you need to give your credit score a bump, sign up for Experian Boost. It’s free and it’ll help you instantly increase your credit score.

Gathering Information & Application Materials

If and when you’re ready to go through with your refinance, you need a great deal of information and documentation before and during the application and closing processes, including:

  • Proof of Income. Depending on your employment status and sources of income, the lender will ask you to supply recent pay stubs, tax returns, or bank statements.
  • A Recent Home Appraisal. Your refinance lender will order a home appraisal before closing, so you don’t need to arrange one on your own. However, to avoid surprises, you can use open-source comparable local sales data to get an idea of your home’s likely market value.
  • Property Insurance Information. Your lender (and later, mortgage servicer) needs your homeowners insurance information to bundle your escrow payment. If it has been more than a year since you reviewed your property insurance policy, now’s the time to shop around for a better deal.

Be prepared to provide additional documentation if requested by your lender before closing. Any missing information or delays in producing documents can jeopardize the close.

Home Appraisal Blackboard Chalk Hand


3. Calculate Your Approximate Refinancing Costs

Next, use a free mortgage refinance calculator like Bank of America’s to calculate your approximate refinancing costs.

Above all else, this calculation must confirm you can afford the monthly mortgage payment on your refinance loan. If one of your aims in refinancing is to reduce the amount of interest paid over the life of your loan, this calculation can also confirm your chosen loan term and structure will achieve that.

For it to be worth it, you must at least break even on the loan after accounting for closing costs.

Calculating Your Breakeven Cost

Breakeven is a simple concept. When the total amount of interest you must pay over the life of your refinance loan matches the loan’s closing costs, you break even on the loan.

The point in time at which you reach parity is the breakeven point. Any interest saved after the breakeven point is effectively a bonus — money you would have forfeited had you chosen not to refinance.

Two factors determine if and when the breakeven point arrives. First, a longer loan term increases the likelihood you’ll break even at some point. More important still is the magnitude of change in your loan’s interest rate. The further your refinance rate falls from your original loan’s rate, the more you save each month and the faster you can recoup your closing costs.

A good mortgage refinance calculator should automatically calculate your breakeven point. Otherwise, calculate your breakeven point by dividing your refinance loan’s closing costs by the monthly savings relative to the original loan and round the result up to the next whole number.

Because you won’t have exact figures for your loan’s closing costs or monthly savings until you’ve applied and received loan disclosures, you’re calculating an estimated breakeven range at this point.

Refinance loan closing costs typically range from 2% to 6% of the refinanced loan’s principal, depending on the origination fee and other big-ticket expenses, so run one optimistic scenario (closing costs at 2% and a short time to breakeven) and one pessimistic scenario (closing costs at 6% and a long time to breakeven). The actual outcome will likely fall somewhere in the middle.

Note that the breakeven point is why it rarely makes sense to bother refinancing if you plan to sell or pay off the loan within two years or can’t reduce your interest rate by more than 1.5 to 2 percentage points.


4. Shop, Apply, & Close

You’re now in the home stretch — ready to shop, apply, and close the deal on your refinance loan.

Follow each of these steps in order, beginning with a multipronged effort to source accurate refinance quotes, continuing through an application and evaluation marathon, and finishing up with a closing that should seem breezier than your first.

Use a Quote Finder (Online Broker) to Get Multiple Quotes Quickly

Start by using an online broker like Credible* to source multiple refinance quotes from banks and mortgage lenders without contacting each party directly. Be prepared to provide basic information about your property and objectives, such as:

  • Property type, such as single-family home or townhouse
  • Property purpose, such as primary home or vacation home
  • Loan purpose, such as lowering the monthly payment
  • Property zip code
  • Estimated property value and remaining first mortgage loan balance
  • Cash-out needs, if any
  • Basic personal information, such as estimated credit score and date of birth

If your credit is decent or better, expect to receive multiple conditional refinance offers — with some coming immediately and others trickling in by email or phone in the subsequent hours and days. You’re under no obligation to act on any, sales pressure notwithstanding, but do make note of the most appealing.

Approach Banks & Lenders You’ve Worked With Before

Next, investigate whether any financial institutions with which you have a preexisting relationship offer refinance loans, including your current mortgage lender.

Most banks and credit unions do offer refinance loans. Though their rates tend to be less competitive at a baseline than direct lenders without expensive branch offices, many offer special pricing for longtime or high-asset customers. It’s certainly worth taking the time to make a few calls or website visits.

Apply for Multiple Loans Within 14 Days

You won’t know the exact cost of any refinance offer until you officially apply and receive the formal loan disclosure all lenders must provide to every prospective borrower.

But you can’t formally apply for a refinance loan without consenting to a hard credit pull, which can temporarily depress your credit score. And you definitely shouldn’t go through with your refinance until you’ve entertained multiple offers to ensure you’re getting the best deal.

Fortunately, the major consumer credit-reporting bureaus count all applications for a specific loan type (such as mortgage refinance loans) made within a two-week period as a single application, regardless of the final application count.

In other words, get in all the refinance applications you plan to make within two weeks, and your credit report will show just a single inquiry.

Evaluate Each Offer

Evaluate the loan disclosure for each accepted application with your objectives and general financial goals in mind. If your primary goal is reducing your monthly payment, look for the loan with the lowest monthly cost.

If your primary goal is reducing your lifetime homeownership costs, look for the loan offering the most substantial interest savings (the lowest mortgage interest rate).

Regardless of your loan’s purpose, make sure you understand what (if anything) you’re obligated to pay out of pocket for your loan. Many refinance loans simply roll closing costs into the principal, raising the monthly payment and increasing lifetime interest costs.

If your goal is to get the lowest possible monthly payment and you can afford to, try paying the closing costs out of pocket.

Choose an Offer & Consider Locking Your Rate

Choose the best offer from the pack — the one that best suits your objectives. If you expect rates to move up before closing, consider the lender’s offer (if extended) to lock your rate for a predetermined period, usually 45 to 90 days.

There’s likely a fee associated with this option, but the amount saved by even marginally reducing your final interest rate will probably offset it. Assuming everything goes smoothly during closing, you shouldn’t need more than 45 days — and certainly not more than 90 days — to finish the deal.

Proceed to Closing

Once you’ve closed on the loan, that’s it — you’ve refinanced your mortgage. Your refinance lender pays off your first mortgage and originates your new loan.

Moving forward, you send payments to your refinance lender, their servicer, or another company that purchases the loan.


Final Word

If you own a home, refinancing your mortgage loan is likely the easiest route to capitalize on low interest rates. It’s probably the most profitable too.

But low prevailing interest rates aren’t the only reason to refinance your mortgage loan. Other common refinancing goals include avoiding the first upward adjustment on an ARM, reducing the monthly payment to a level that doesn’t strain your growing family’s budget, tapping the equity you’ve built in your home, and banishing FHA mortgage insurance.

And a refinance loan doesn’t need to achieve only one goal. Some of these objectives are complementary, such as reducing your monthly payment while lowering your interest rate (and lifetime borrowing costs).

Provided you make out on the deal, whether by reducing your total homeownership costs or taking your monthly payment down a peg, it’s likely worth the effort.

*Advertisement from Credible Operations, Inc. NMLS 1681276.Address: 320 Blackwell St. Ste 200, Durham, NC, 27701

Source: moneycrashers.com

Pros & Cons of Refinancing Your Home Mortgage Loan

If you purchased your home when the federal funds rate was at least 150 basis points — 1.5% — higher than today, an opportunity to profit from low interest rates is staring you in the face. In fact, there’s a good chance it’s surrounding you as you read these words.

Like millions of other homeowners paying more than necessary each month, you can take advantage of current low interest rates by refinancing your mortgage loan.

Knowing whether you should refinance your mortgage is trickier. Before you can decide, you need to know more about its upsides and downsides, including the potentially negative consequences for your personal finances and housing security.

Pro tip: If you decide that refinancing is the best option for you, Credible* will allow you to compare prequalified rates from multiple lenders in just minutes.

Advantages of Refinancing Your Mortgage Loan

Refinancing your mortgage loan could give you a financial boost by reducing your overall borrowing costs or creating low-cost financial leverage for home improvement projects and other financial goals. Many refinancing applicants realize more than one of these benefits.

1. It Could Reduce Your Lifetime Interest Costs

Reducing lifetime interest costs — and your total borrowing costs along with them — is among the most compelling reasons to refinance a mortgage. Many homeowners refinance with this objective in mind. They want to save money, and who can blame them?

Depending on the structure, type, term, and rate of your original loan, refinancing your mortgage could reduce your total interest expense in one or more ways:

  • Lowering the Interest Rate. Getting a lower interest rate is much more likely to occur if rates have fallen since your original loan’s issue and critical elements of your borrower profile — such as your credit score, income, and debt-to-income ratio — remain constant or improve.
  • Shortening the Term. A shorter term means less time for interest to accrue. The downside is the potential for a higher monthly payment.
  • Converting From Adjustable Rate to Fixed Rate. Refinancing your adjustable-rate mortgage loan into a fixed-rate mortgage loan eliminates the risk your interest rate will spike if prevailing rates rise.
  • Converting From Jumbo to Conventional. Jumbo loans generally carry higher interest rates than conforming (conventional) loans. Once your remaining balance drops below the conforming loan limit (about $485,000 in most markets), refinancing could reduce your lifetime borrowing costs.

2. It Could Lower Your Monthly Payments

Simply refinancing a higher-rate loan into a lower-rate loan with an equivalent term is likely to lower your monthly payments.

If a lower rate isn’t in the cards, a less desirable alternative is to refinance into a longer-term loan and spread your payments over a longer timeframe. The downside of this move is a higher lifetime borrowing cost.

3. It Could Increase Your Loan’s Predictability

Predictability isn’t a concern if your original loan has a fixed rate. You experience year-to-year variation on the escrow side, as your property taxes and insurance fluctuate. But your principal and interest payment remain fixed for the life of the loan.

But if your original loan has an adjustable rate, predictability is a problem, and refinancing to a fixed-rate loan is a reasonable solution. If your new fixed-rate loan prevents a costly upward rate adjustment, all the better.

4. It Could Eliminate Mortgage Insurance

The FHA mortgage loan program has helped millions of first-time homebuyers afford places of their own. Maybe you’re among them.

If so, you know that your FHA loan carries a hefty cost: high annual mortgage insurance premiums that remain in force for at least 11 years from the issue date (on loans issued after June 2013) — and permanently, in some cases.

Refinancing your FHA loan into a conventional loan could eliminate its annual mortgage insurance premium years ahead of schedule. You need only wait to accumulate 20% equity in your home, which should happen much sooner than 11 years (and certainly sooner than 15 or 30 years) after your original loan’s issue.

And as long as you have at least 20% equity when you refinance, you’ll avoid private mortgage insurance (PMI) as well.

5. It’s a Low-Cost Way to Tap the Equity in Your Home

If you plan to refinance anyway to take advantage of low interest rates, a cash-out refinance loan is a fine alternative to a home equity loan or line of credit.

Like those home equity products, a cash-out refinance loan is secured by the home’s value itself, reducing risk for the lender and facilitating rates far lower than credit cards and unsecured personal loans.

You can use this low-cost capital for basically anything, including:

  • Consolidating higher-interest debt
  • Financing major home improvements or repairs
  • Paying your kids’ college bills
  • Paying off your student loans
  • Settling medical bills and other major expenses

Disadvantages of Refinancing Your Mortgage Loan

Refinancing your mortgage is not a risk- or hassle-free endeavor.

Potential drawbacks include an arduous application process, no guarantee of approval or cost savings, the potential for a higher monthly payment, and the risk — heightened in down markets — that the required lender appraisal could actually backfire.

1. The Application Process Is a Pain

Applying to refinance your mortgage isn’t quite as involved or time-consuming as applying for a purchase loan. But it’s not a walk in the park or something to do on a whim.

As you did before your purchase loan, you must provide reams of documentation verifying your employment, income, and identity. And the deal won’t be done until you close, leaving you on pins and needles for weeks. Don’t go through with it unless you’re serious about refinancing.

2. Approval Is Not Guaranteed

The fact that you own your home doesn’t entitle you to refinance its mortgage.

If your borrower profile has deteriorated due to a drop in your credit score or income, a recent job change, or a higher debt-to-income ratio, your application could be denied outright or accepted on less favorable terms than expected.

3. You’re Not Guaranteed to Break Even

Most refinancing applicants expect their new mortgage loans to cost less than their original loans.

But there are plenty of scenarios in which that doesn’t pan out — and not just because the borrower intentionally refinances into a longer term (going from a 15-year to a 30-year mortgage, for example) or can’t find a lower rate.

If fate intervenes and you must sell your house before you break even on your refinance loan, you’ll never recoup your loan’s upfront costs.

And because all refinance loans have closing costs that push breakeven time into the future, you’ll have to wait some time — usually several years — before you sell.

4. Your Monthly Payment Could Increase

If your objective is to cash out some of your home’s equity or shorten your loan term, your monthly payment will probably increase. Nevertheless, the jump might come as a shock and can put a severe strain on your monthly budget over time.

Before taking out a loan that costs more than your current mortgage payment, be as sure as you can that it will remain affordable.

5. It Could Backfire in a Down Market

If home values in your area have declined since you purchased or last ordered a professional appraisal on your home, you run the risk of a lowball appraisal that squelches your chance of qualifying for a refinance loan anytime soon.

This outcome is likelier in areas with high (or increasing) rates of foreclosures and short sales. If you suspect an appraisal would do more harm than good and don’t urgently need to refinance, wait until the market improves.


Final Word

Refinancing a mortgage is not something to be done on a whim. Even when interest rates are low and your borrower profile is strong, the undertaking is no sure thing.

A forced relocation could compel you to sell your house years before you planned, wiping out most of your loan’s expected savings and causing you to lose money on the deal.

An unexpected job loss could threaten your family’s financial stability and put you at risk of losing your home.

A market downturn could leave you with less equity than you expected, putting your home improvement plans on hold.

Then again, you could see your refinance application approved without a hitch, reap thousands upon thousands of dollars in savings after closing costs through a lower monthly mortgage payment, and avoid the downsides of the unconventional loan that had outlived its purpose the day you first closed on your home.

There’s simply no way to predict what will happen. But as is always the case when the stakes are high, fortune favors those who know what could go wrong — and what could go right.

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Source: moneycrashers.com

How to refinance a mortgage with bad credit

Refinancing your mortgage with a bad credit score is completely possible, but is a more complicated process than refinancing with a good score. Because your credit score is such a large aspect of any loan application and refinancing process, it is in your best interest to consider all of your options before moving forward.

Refinancing your mortgage could be a great opportunity to gain some payment flexibility or even take advantage of a lower interest rate. To avoid leaving money on the table, explore all of your options for refinancing with bad credit.

How Credit Scores Affect Refinancing

Lenders use your credit score and overall lending history to calculate the risk of lending you money. A lender will view a borrower with a low credit score caused by loan defaults and constant late payments as a high risk. Because the borrower has shown negative borrowing practices in the past the lender will be more reluctant to sign or refinance a loan.

30-Year Mortgage Rates Based on Credit Scores

FICO Score APR
760–850 4.6%
700–759 4.8%
680–699 5.0%
660–679 5.2%
640–659 5.6%
620–639 6.1%

Based on 2018 national averages for a $200,000 fixed loan.
Source: FICO

Putting together a mortgage refinancing package for a borrower with a bad financial history might cause the lender to increase the length of the loan term, increase the total interest rate or even increase the total monthly payments. Unfortunately, when a borrower has a pattern of falling behind on payments, a lender will offer more expensive refinancing packages to make up for the added risk.

Is Refinancing Right for You?

It is important to note that refinancing your mortgage may not always save you money. You might come out with the same financial deal or a worse option than you currently have, especially if you have a low credit score. In fact, looking at the average outcomes of Freddie Mac mortgages that were refinanced between 1994 and 2018 shows that only a small fraction of refinances actually resulted in the borrower saving money.

Graphic: Average Mortgage Refinancing Outcome

Source: Freddie Mac

While refinancing may not be right for everyone, it’s still important to consider the benefits of flexibility and length of terms. If you see yourself falling behind on payments or want to pay off your loan faster, refinancing your mortgage might still offer you some benefits.

Refinancing With Your Current Lender

When approaching your current lender about refinancing your mortgage it is first important to assess where you stand as a borrower. If you make payments on time and are in great financial health the lender will most likely want to continue doing business with you. However, if you have been late on payments and are struggling to cover other financial responsibilities the lender might be more reluctant to refinance your mortgage.

1. Shop Around for Low Rates

Before approaching your current lender for refinancing options, it is important to check for other options. To aid with any negotiations you should first check with other banks to see what interests rates are the best. Coming to your current lender after already shopping around for prices will give you more bargaining power to get a lower rate.

2. Show Proof of Savings

If your credit score is low but you have money in the bank a lender may still offer you a competitive rate. Showing proof of income and savings is a good option for new borrowers with short lending historys. For lenders, any proof that a borrower will be able to make payments toward a mortgage or loan will lower the overall lending risk and make a positive impact on the terms of the refinancing agreement.

3. Get a Loan Cosigner

If you have a low credit score and do not have sufficient money in the bank to lower your overall risk, you can use a loan cosigner. A cosigner shows the validity of an agreement and essentially promises to pay any debts that are outstanding if the borrower cannot pay. Depending on your financial situation, it can be difficult to get someone to agree to be your loan cosigner. As such, you should only approach people you’re close with.

4. Show Proof of Income

Even if you do not have a large amount of savings in the bank you can still demonstrate you will make payments on time and carry through with your mortgage agreement by showing proof of income. If you have a well-paying job or have sufficient income coming in, a lender will be more likely to offer a good refinancing option to you. Even without money in the bank or a good credit score, showing proof of income demonstrates that you are financially stable enough to make payments on the loan.

5. Improve Your Credit Score

Before visiting your lender to inquire about mortgage refinancing options you should first look at your credit report for points of action around how you can build your credit score. If your credit report is full of negative items like late payments, hard inquiries and delinquent accounts there could be some places to make up some extra points. Through a series of disputes, letters and phone calls with the major credit agencies you can work toward getting a higher score. There are also companies that offer credit repair solutions that can get your credit removal cases rolling to help improve your score.

Consider Cash-Out Refinancing

Cash-out refinancing is a mortgage refinancing option ideal for people who owe less than their house is worth. It is important to note that a cash-out refinancing option trades your current loan for a cash payment and a larger loan. Lenders can typically refinance a loan for up to 80 percent of the current market value.

Equity is earned on a home when its market value price increases over the price in which you paid for it. Earned equity is normally cashed out with the sale of a home, but it can also be tapped into with cash-out refinancing.

Graphic: 80% have tappable equity on their home

The largest disadvantage to a cash-out refinance is the equity loss of your investment. Although the amount of money between what you currently owe and what your house is valued can be a sizable help for short-term debts, you will still be accountable to pay back the new and larger loan in the long term.

Apply for the Home Affordable Refinance Program

The Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) is an initiative created by the Federal Housing Finance Agency following the 2008 economic recession, which caused large mortgage defaults in America. With the sudden drop in housing prices, many Americans were overpaying for their mortgages. HARP has helped refinance over 3 million mortgages so far and represents over 20 percent of all refinances. It is important to note that HARP is not the best solution for everyone, and has five main requirements for eligibility.

  • Your loan is currently owned by the mortgage-backed securities companies Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae.
  • Your mortgage/loan was signed before May 31, 2009.
  • Your current loan-to-value ratio is over 80 percent.
  • You are up to date with your mortgage payments and have not missed a payment in the last six months nor missed more than one payment in the past year.
  • The mortgage was either for your current residence, a second home or a four-unit investment property.

Seek FHA Refinancing

The Federal Housing Administration has a number of refinancing options built to help homeowners with existing FHA secured loans. Unfortunately, the streamlined refinancing is not available for loans that originated outside of any Federal Housing Administration secured lenders. One benefit of refinancing through the FHA is credit or income checks are not part of the process. If your mortgage is secured with the FHA, there are some prerequisites for the refinancing program.

  • You are current on payments and have not missed or been late on a payment for the past year.
  • You have owned the house for over six months.
  • You use an FHA approved lender or an FHA approved bank when refinancing.

If you are still unsure if you qualify the FHA mortgage portal includes a step-by-step guide that can give you an estimate of your best refinancing options available.

Mortgage Refinancing During the Coronavirus Outbreak

Graphic: Coronavirus Impact on Refinancing Your Mortgage

The coronavirus outbreak has impacted our lives on every front. Loss of jobs and income has lead to uncertainty and has made it difficult for many Americans to make their mortgage payments. Many homeowners have been taking advantage of the mortgage relief that was part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), legislation that was signed in on March 27, 2020. This allows eligible homeowners with FHA-insured mortgages to have their payments due dates pushed back, also known as forbearance.  

Other homeowners are taking this opportunity to refinance their mortgage. According to the Mortgage Bankers Association, refinancing applications are being filed at a rate that’s 168% higher than during the same period in 2019. Though re-financing sounds like an attractive plan-of-action, it may not be right for everyone — there are additional considerations to make if your credit score is less than ideal.

To better understand your options, see some refinancing factors, considerations, challenges and resources below.

Is Refinancing Worth It?

It is worth looking into refinancing but this may not be the right move for you depending on a variety of factors. In a broader sense, this is a great opportunity to save money if the determining factors are on your side — in that case, yes, it could be worth refinancing your mortgage.

Refinancing Factors To Consider

Before you jump on the phone with your mortgage lender, there are some factors that you should consider that can help you determine if you are a good candidate.

  • Your credit score: As mentioned before, a lower score will typically equate to a higher APR. See the table above for an idea of how your FICO credit score correlates with your APR. Refinancing typically doesn’t negatively affect your credit but there are instances where it could, like refinancing too often.
  • Your recent payment record: If you have a recent history of late or missed payments (not tied to the coronavirus pandemic) that could have a negative impact on your results.
  • Occupancy length: How long you’re planning on living at your house is another huge factor that can affect your savings.
  • How old your mortgage is: The amount of years that you have left on your mortgage is a huge factor. If you are close to paying off your mortgage, it’s likely not worth it.
  • Many of the same rules apply: Regardless of coronavirus, there are certain actions that can improve or hurt your chances when refinancing. To recap, those best practices are: 
    • Shopping around for low rates
    • Showing proof of your savings
    • Getting someone to cosign your loan
    • Showing proof of your income
    • Improving your credit score

Current Mortgage Rates

Mortgage rates are historically low right now, the lowest being 3.13% on March 2, 2020. As of April 16, 2020, the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate was 3.780%, according to Bankrate and 3.341% according to NerdWallet. These rates are changing rapidly so it’s important to keep tabs on their movements if you’re considering refinancing. Check out daily rate updates on Mortgage News Daily to stay up-to-date on mortgage rate information.

Challenges and Risks of Refinancing Your Home

There are always risks that come with refinancing your home. One of the biggest challenges that the current climate has created is the time it may take to get your refinancing request through due to the high demand right now. See that challenge and additional ones below:

  • Longer to acquire: Requests are backed up because lenders don’t have the capacity to process all of the requests that are coming in due to demand coupled with staffing shortages.
  • Closing costs: Most refinancing processes require some sort of fee for processing the request. Depending on your situation, that’s something to consider.
  • Savings loss: Just like refinancing at any other time, there is no guarantee of savings and many people end up in the same spot or with a loss in savings due to increased rates or loss of certain benefits.

Questions To Ask Your Mortgage Lender

Before calling or making an appointment with your lender it’s a great idea to use a mortgage refinancing calculator to get a preliminary idea of how refinancing could work out for you. If you see a positive result and decide to call your lender, make sure you have your proper documents handy and have questions ready to ask them. Some of those could include:

  • What is the estimated turnaround time for this process? 
  • What are the new interest rate and APR?
  • Will I be able to lock in my loan rate?
  • What additional costs would I incur (title policies, inspections, credit reports, etc.)?
  • Will the new agreement include prepayment penalties?

H3: COVID-19 Mortgage Resources

Below is a collection of helpful resources to make sure you understand your options and keep up with the ever-changing rates and information that’s being distributed.

Coronavirus-Specific Resources

Additional Mortgage Information

In the end, there is no ‘one size fits all’ answer to whether or not you should attempt to refinance your home. We recommend reaching out to an advisor who can evaluate your individual situation. If you’re worried about your credit score hurting your chances of refinancing, try a free credit consultation to learn more about your score and how credit repair could help your financial situation. 

Source: lexingtonlaw.com