Mortgage interest rates on the 15-year and 30-year mortgages are down from last week, Freddie Mac reported.

“The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage decreased again this week, with declines totaling almost a quarter of a percent in two weeks’ time,” Freddie Mac Chief Economist Sam Khater said.

For 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages, the average interest rate was 6.74% this week, a decent drop from last week when rates averaged 6.88%. Rates aren’t down quite as much as last year when they were 6.6%, on average.

Additionally, 15-year mortgages averaged 6.16%, down slightly from last week when they averaged 6.22%. These mortgages also aren’t as low as last year when they averaged 5.9%.

“Despite the recent dip, mortgage rates remain high as the market contends with the pressure of sticky inflation,” Khater said. “In this environment, there is a good possibility that rates will stay higher for a longer period of time.”

If you want to take advantage of lowering interest rates, consider using Credible to help you easily compare interest rates from multiple lenders in minutes.

HOMEBUYERS FEEL GOOD ABOUT WHERE MORTGAGE RATES ARE HEADED: FANNIE MAE

Spring likely to bring higher home prices

Warmer weather tends to bring a booming housing market as more homebuyers start looking for homes and inventory grows.

Sellers who list their homes in the spring and summer months often make more money when their home sells because the market is more competitive. A Zillow study found that June was the most profitable month for sellers. Homes listed in the first half of June sold for 2.3% more, on average, putting about $7,700 more in the pocket of sellers.

Location matters when it comes to selling power. In San Francisco, the best time to list is the second half of February, but the first half of July is the best time to sell in New York and Philadelphia.

Certain locations also boast even higher profits during warmer months. During the hottest time of the year, homes in San Jose sold for 5.5% more, boosting profits by $88,000 on an average home, according to Zillow. However, homes in San Antonio sold for just 1.9% more during the same time frame.

“Most sellers don’t have the luxury of timing the market,” Zillow Chief Economist Skylar Olsen said. “The best time to list is when it makes the most sense for their lives.” 

“Regardless of the month, sellers who list their home for sale this spring can expect plenty of interest if their home is marketed and priced right.,” she contined. “That’s why it’s more important than ever to hire a real estate agent with the experience to localize your strategy when comparable sales might be further afield.”

If you’re looking to compete with other buyers this spring, you can explore your mortgage options by visiting Credible to compare rates and lenders and get a mortgage preapproval letter in minutes.

HOMEBUYERS GAINED THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS AS MORTGAGE INTEREST RATES FALL: REDFIN

To afford homes, buyers need higher incomes than they did a few years ago

Buyers are facing a tougher market than they did a few years ago. To comfortably afford a home, buyers need to make more than $106,000 annually, another Zillow study showed. This income requirement is 80% higher than in 2020.

Monthly mortgage payments are higher than ever and have doubled since 2020. Payments average $2,188, assuming the buyer puts 10% down. With such high prices, affordability has become a major issue. In 2020, households earning $59,000 annually could afford the median-priced home without spending more than 30% of their income.

The $106,000 income needed today is well above the average household income in the U.S. The average household earns about $81,000.

Some areas are more affordable than others and require a much lower income to afford the average-priced home. Pittsburgh buyers need to earn just $58,232 to afford the average home. Memphis residents need $69,976 and Cleveland residents need $70,810.

Costlier cities like San Jose and San Francisco require much more in annual income to afford a home. San Jose requires an average annual income of $454,296 while San Francisco requires $339,864, according to Zillow.

To see if you qualify for a mortgage based on your current credit score and salary, consider using Credible, where you can compare multiple mortgage lenders at once.

15% OF AMERICANS HAVE CO-PURCHASED A HOME WITH A NON-ROMANTIC PARTNER, EVEN MORE WOULD CONSIDER IT

Have a finance-related question, but don’t know who to ask? Email The Credible Money Expert at [email protected] and your question might be answered by Credible in our Money Expert column.

Source: foxbusiness.com

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April 10, 2024 at 7:50 AM
Daily mortgage rates for Wednesday, April 10, 2024 (Virojt Changyencham via Getty Images)

As economists await the release of this morning’s key Consumer Price Index inflation data, mortgage rates are up, with the 30-year fixed purchase rate hovering above 7% as of Wednesday, April 10, 2024.

The current average rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is 7.02% for purchase and 6.97% for refinance — up 10 basis points from 6.92% for purchase and up 4 basis points from 6.93% for refinance last Wednesday. Rates on a 15-year mortgage stand at an average 6.44% for purchase and 6.48% for refinance. The average rate on a 30-year fixed jumbo mortgage is 7.20%, up 24 basis points from last week.

Purchase rates for Wednesday, April 10, 2024

  • 30-year fixed rate — 7.02%

  • 20-year fixed rate — 6.81%

  • 15-year fixed rate — 6.44%

  • 10-year fixed rate — 6.37%

  • 5/1 adjustable rate mortgage — 6.60%

  • 30-year fixed FHA rate — 6.77%

  • 30-year fixed VA rate — 7.09%

  • 30-year fixed jumbo rate — 7.20%

Refinance rates for Wednesday, April 10, 2024

  • 30-year fixed rate — 6.97%

  • 20-year fixed rate — 6.81%

  • 15-year fixed rate — 6.48%

  • 10-year fixed rate — 6.37%

  • 5/1 adjustable rate mortgage — 6.42%

  • 30-year fixed FHA rate — 6.93%

  • 30-year fixed VA rate — 7.81%

  • 30-year fixed jumbo rate — 7.12%

Freddie Mac weekly mortgage report

Freddie Mac reports an average 6.82% for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, up three basis points from last week, according to its weekly survey of nationwide lenders published on April 4, 2024. The fixed rate for a 15-year mortgage is 6.06%, down five basis points from last week.

Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist, says of the report, “While incoming economic signals indicate lower rates of inflation, we do not expect rates will decrease meaningfully in the near-term. On the plus side, inventory is improving somewhat, which should help temper home price growth.”

Current mortgage rates for April 10, 2024

The Fed rate does not determine mortgage rates, though it sets benchmarks that indirectly affect rates on financial products like mortgages, personal loans and deposit accounts. The Fed has a firm goal of a 2% inflation rate, and with favorable economic reports on the job market, it’s unlikely the reserve will cut rates until that goal is within reality’s reach.

Mortgage rates in the news

Mortgage lenders keep a close eye on the key interest rate set by the Federal Reserve, the U.S.’s central bank. Called the fed rate, it’s the benchmark that affects rates on deposit accounts, loans and other financial products. Typically, as the Fed rate rises, so do APYs on savings products like CDs, high-yield savings accounts and money market accounts. Mortgage and home loan rates don’t follow the fed rate as closely, but they do reflect the same elements the Fed evaluates when making decisions on the benchmark — especially inflation.

Key inflation report due today

The Federal Reserve increased the target interest rate 11 times from March 2022 to July 2023 in an effort to combat the highest inflation in four decades coming out of the pandemic.

Economists are awaiting the release of today’s Consumer Price Index data, which will answer whether inflation is continuing to cool. February’s Consumer Price Index data released on March 12 showed a month-over-month increase in consumer prices — a widely used indicator for inflation. The new data makes for an interesting week, what with the latest Producer Price Index due for release tomorrow.

Federal benchmark: Summer rate cut now in question

At the conclusion of its rate-setting policy meeting on March 20, 2024, the Fed left the federal funds target interest rate of 5.25% to 5.50% unchanged, marking the fifth consecutive time it’s held rates steady since July 2023. In its post-meeting statement, the Federal Reserve maintained it wouldn’t cut the key interest rate until it’s confident “that inflation is moving sustainably toward 2 percent.”

While bankers forecast three rate cuts by the end of the year, a growing group of economists now doubt whether the Fed will cut interest rates this year — including Minneapolis Fed president Neel Kashkari, who told Pensions & Investments last week, “If we continue to see inflation moving sideways, then that would make me question whether we need to do those rate cuts at all.”

Government agency Freddie Mac released its March 20 economic outlook on the housing and mortgage market that predicts mortgage rates to stay at 6.5% or higher through the summer.

NAR settlement could change homebuying

The summer homebuying season could bring with it a major change in the way Americans buy and sell homes. On March 15, the National Association of Realtors announced it had agreed to a settlement that, if approved by a federal judge, would bring an end to longstanding real estate broker commissions of up to 6% of a home’s purchase price. The settlement isn’t expected to affect mortgage rates, yet it paves the way for consumers to negotiate what they pay for an agent’s services, potentially saving homebuyers money in the long run — just in time for summer home sales.

4 top factors that affect your mortgage rate

The difference of even half a percentage point on your interest rate can save you hundreds of dollars a month and thousands of dollars over the life of your mortgage, but the mortgage rate you’re ultimately offered depends on the mortgage you’re interested in, payments you’re willing to pay up front and your overall financial health.

  • Your credit score. Knowing your credit score can help you shop around for lenders you’re likely to get approval through, as well as understand the type of mortgage for your lifestyle and income. The best mortgage rates go to borrowers with good to excellent credit — typically a FICO credit score of at least 670 — though even with fair credit, you may be able to find a mortgage offering decent rates.

  • Your down payment. The more money you can put down toward your home, the better it benefits your interest rate. Paying at least 20% of your home’s purchase price up front generally results in a lower interest rate — and you can avoid mortgage insurance, which increases your total cost.

  • Your loan term. While the 30-year mortgage remains a popular way for Americans to purchase homes, you can find terms of 20 years, 15 years and 10 years. Shorter loan terms usually come with lower interest rates, though with higher monthly payments. Longer mortgage terms can result in smaller monthly payments, though you’ll pay higher total interest over the life of your loan.

  • Interest rate type. Mortgage rates come with two basic types of rates — fixed and variable. Fixed-rate mortgages offer a consistent interest rate over the life of your loan, whereas adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) often start with a lower fixed rate for an agreed-on time and then adjust to a variable rate based on market conditions for the remainder of your term. Choosing between these two rates depends on your financial goals and tolerance for risk.

Frequently asked questions about mortgage rates

What are mortgage lenders?

Lenders are financial institutions that loan money to homebuyers. A lender is different from a loan servicer, which typically handles the operational tasks of your loan, like processing payments, talking directly with borrowers and sending monthly statements.

What does it mean to refinance a mortgage?

Refinancing is a process of trading in your current mortgage to another lender for lower rates and better terms than your current loan. With a refinance, the new lender pays off your old mortgage and you then pay your monthly statements from the new lender.

What factors influence mortgage rates?

Mortgage rates are determined by many factors that include inflation rates, economic conditions, housing market trends and the Federal Reserve’s target interest rate. Lenders also consider your personal credit score, the amount available for your down payment, the property you’re interested in and other terms of the loan you’re requesting, like 30-year or 15-year offers.

When is the best time to lock in a mortgage rate?

Mortgage rates can fluctuate daily, so it’s best to lock in a rate when you’re comfortable with the offered rate and conditions of the loan.

Can I negotiate my mortgage rate?

It’s not likely — lenders consider the market conditions and other financial factors when determining rates. You can, however, ask about how you can reduce costs in other ways when comparing mortgage lenders. For instance, many lenders offer lower rates in exchange for “mortgage points” — upfront fees you pay to your lender. A mortgage point could cost 1% of your mortgage amount, which means about $5,000 on a $500,000 home loan, with each point lowering your interest rate by about 0.25%, depending on your lender and loan.

Editor’s note: Annual percentage yields shown are as of Wednesday, April 10, 2024, at 7:45 a.m. ET. APYs and promotional rates for some products can vary by region and are subject to change.

Sources

Source: aol.com

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Looking for the most up-to-date mortgage rates to empower your purchasing or refinancing decisions? We’ve got you covered.

Here, you can view today’s mortgage interest rates, updated daily according to data from Bankrate, so you can have the most current data when purchasing or refinancing your home.

30-year fixed rate mortgages

The average mortgage interest rate for a standard 30-year fixed mortgage is 7.02%, an increase of 0.10 percentage points from last week’s 6.92%.

Thirty-year fixed mortgages are the most commonly sought out loan term. A 30-year fixed rate mortgage has a lower monthly payment than a 15-year one, but usually has a higher interest rate.

15-year fixed rate mortgages

The average mortgage interest rate for a standard 15-year fixed mortgage is 6.44%, an increase of 0.07 percentage points from last week’s 6.37%.

Fifteen-year fixed rate mortgages come with a higher monthly payment compared to its 30-year counterpart. However, usually interest rates are lower and you will pay less total interest because you are paying off your loan at a faster rate.

5/1 adjustable rate mortgages

The average rate on a 5/1 adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) is 6.60%, a decrease of 0.13 percentage points from last week’s 6.73%. With an ARM, you will most often get a lower interest rate than a fixed mortgage for say, the first five years.

But you could end up paying more or less after that time depending on your loan terms and how that rate follows the market.

What is the best term for a loan?

When picking a mortgage, it is important to pick out a loan term or payment schedule. Usually you will be offered a 15 or 30-year loan term, but it is not uncommon to see 10, 20, or 40-year mortgages, according to CNET.

Mortgages can be fixed-rate or adjustable-rate. Interest rates in fixed-rate mortgages are set in stone for the duration of the loan.

Adjustable-rate mortgages only have interest rates set for a certain period of time before the rate adjusts annually based on the market.

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Katherine Rodriguez can be reached at [email protected]. Have a tip? Tell us at nj.com/tips.

Source: nj.com

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Servicing, Non-QM DSCR, RON Products; Freddie and Fannie News; Rate Cut Outlook

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Tue, Apr 9 2024, 11:37 AM

Here in the Hill Country near Austin, Texas, there’s an active market of sellers and buyers of real estate. It is a safe bet that most use agents; around 90 percent of buyers use them, and Clever released data on average real estate commission rates in the U.S. as they stand now. Clever found that on the median-priced home of $431,000, the average U.S. home seller pays real estate commission fees of about $23,662. In a survey of 630 partner agents, the average real estate commission rate in the U.S. is 5.49 percent, divided between the listing agent (2.83 percent) and the buyer’s agent (2.66 percent). The average commission rate rose from 5.37 percent in 2023. Most real estate agents typically work within a range of 2.5 percent to 3 percent. Several key factors influence this, such as property value, client relationship & circumstances, sale complexity, services provided, and market conditions. Hawaii is home to the lowest average real estate commission rate (4.78 percent), while West Virginia has the highest (6.67 percent). (Found here after 8:30AM ET, this week’s podcasts are sponsored by PHH Mortgage. From subservicing to correspondent lending, MSR/co-issue transactions, portfolio retention, reverse mortgages, and commercial servicing, PHH has solutions for the entire mortgage lifecycle. Hear an interview with Cross Country Mortgage’s Nicole Perrone on ways lenders are expanding production and capturing market share.)

Lender and Broker Products, Software, and Services

ICE Mortgage Technology® customers are experiencing exciting benefits from the integration between Simplifile® and The Closing Exchange, a leading provider of notary services and order management technology. This integration supports settlement agents and lenders who wish to conduct remote online notary (RON) transactions but may not have the necessary staff or infrastructure in place to facilitate such closings. By leveraging The Closing Exchange’s extensive network of notaries, and their expertise in performing signings, customers can now drive a better borrower closing experience by seamlessly leveraging a RON notary who is already set up in Simplifile® eSign Events™. Click here to learn more.

Long-term Rental or Vacation Rental? Visio Lending is the nation’s leader in Non-QM Investor DSCR loans for buy and hold SFR rentals with nearly a decade of experience and over $2.7 billion in originations. No-DTI, 30-year terms, rate buy downs, free 45-day rate locks; I/O and Sub-1 DSCR options available. Now choose your own title company (including on refinances). Through our top-notch Broker Program, brokers are able to earn up to 2 points YSP, and 5 points total. Visio Brokers can count on a designated Account Executive and in-house processing.

Understanding what you’re up against in this economy is paramount for every originator. You need to find opportunity, and we want to help you do just that. Join us Thursday, April 25 at 2 p.m. Eastern for a roundtable discussion featuring MAXEX President, COO and Co-founder Bill Decker, South Street Securities Managing Director Buck Thompson and AmeriVet Securities Head of U.S. Rates Greg Faranello. We’ll dive into the current headwinds, where customers are finding success and how you can break away from the traditional business as usual to build a more resilient foundation for the future. Register today to join the discussion.

Servicing Products

How does Servbank maintain such low delinquency rates? Because Servbank identifies and addresses delinquency risk before it has a chance to grow. They utilize their leading-edge technology to drive precise customer outreach and combine it with caring specialists, who work in partnership with customers to achieve positive resolutions. Together, this combination of people and tech, allows Servbank to stay ahead of the DQ curve, not to mention the rest of the market. And when delinquencies are kept low, everybody wins: It’s good for homeowners, the communities they live in, and you, the lender, by reducing your servicing advances, resulting in more monthly cash flow for you. Servbank blends the best of human – and tech-powered service to create excellence with superior performance. Learn more here.

DOWN TO THE ROOTS OF DARA CLAIMS. Dara by Sagent is a unified platform that includes a complete suite of tools for default servicing, and this is where Dara Claims makes a positive impact. It’s the first-of-its-kind tool designed to improve recoverability while reducing risk and cost. Integrating automation and real-time data to simplify the claims process helps reduce manual data entry for servicers, opening up the opportunity to focus on nurturing stronger relationships with homeowners. For a deep dive into all things Dara Claims, read our blog here.

Fannie and Freddie Updates

Given that the lion’s share of mortgages is underwritten to Freddie & Fannie’s guidelines, or are processed to their guidelines, or are sold to them either directly or via a correspondent investor, the changes they make are closely followed.

Fannie Mae posted the March Appraiser Quality Monitoring (AQM) list.

Fannie Mae is taking a phased approach to Uniform Loan Delivery Dataset (ULDD) Phase 5 implementation to allow lenders time to begin providing new and updated values prior to the July 28, 2025, mandate. Refer to its new implementation guide for important transition information.

Freddie Mac Single-Family Seller/Servicer Guide Bulletin 2024-4 announced updates pertaining to Manufactured Home certification requirements as well as other updates that can impact your business and our borrowers.

On April 5, Fannie Mae updated its Selling & Servicing Guide pages to improve the user experience, with enhancements to content navigation and search functionality. These enhancements do not impact the Selling & Servicing Guide content or layout. While the Guide URLs and redirects will remain active until January 2025, bookmarks should be updated as soon as possible after April 5. View Fannie Mae’s Enhancements to Your Selling & Servicing Guide Experience.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (the GSEs) announced the timeline and scope for the Uniform Closing Dataset (UCD) v2.0 Specification updates, and postponed UCD critical edits Phase 4 and 3B requirements.

Capital Markets

Bond yields hit 2024 highs to open the week with inflation in focus as investors continue to walk back interest rate cut expectations in the wake of Friday’s robust March NFP data. As a reminder, March’s jobs report was yet another this year that exceeded economists’ expectations and saw the prior two months of data revised upward. Monthly job gains in the first quarter of 2024 averaged 276,333 compared to last year’s 251,083 monthly average. The continued strength in the labor markets means policy makers at the Federal Reserve have little incentive to lower the target for the fed funds rate.

The robust March payrolls report continues to weigh on bond markets as it means that any change to Fed policy will be likely pushed back to later in the year. The front-end of the yield curve was more reactive to changing rate cut expectations yesterday than the long-end, though rate cut expectations will be a moving target the next couple of days with the release of the March Consumer Price Index on Wednesday and March Producer Price Index on Thursday. CPI will be the most closely watched, and the headline number is expected to tick slightly higher to a 3.4 percent annualized rate compared to the previous report’s 3.2 percent. This would be the highest rate of inflation since December. The core is expected to come in at a 3.7 percent clip, down from 3.8 percent in February.

“Fed speak” lately has been hawkish, and the sentiment for rate cuts seems to be fading fast. Minneapolis Fed President Kashkari last week raised the possibility of rate hikes if inflation doesn’t continue to work its way lower, while Fed Governor Bowman declaring that progress on inflation “has stalled,” and Dallas president Logan added to the malaise when she declared it “much too soon” to think about rate cuts. Gasoline prices rose again in March as OPEC+ producers extended supply cuts, the Middle East conflict threatened to broaden, Ukraine attacked Russian refineries, and U.S. crude production leveled off near a record high. Nothing here points to a near-term rate cut, and investors have decreased their forecasts of Fed rate cuts this year to two as the most likely outcome, their most pessimistic outlook since late October. June fed funds futures now see slightly less than a 50-50 chance of a cut.

Today’s calendar began before the open with the NFIB Small Business Optimism Index for March. Later today brings Redbook same store sales for the week ending April 6, and Treasury auctions that will be headlined by $59 billion 3-year notes. We begin the day with Agency MBS prices better by about .125 and the 10-year yielding 4.39 after closing yesterday at 4.42 percent; the yield curve inversion continues with the 2-year at 4.77.

Employment

Be The Key at Movement! Movement Mortgage’s new Be the Key program empowers loan officers and realtors to serve the Black community. Collectively we are unlocking the doors to homeownership, equity, and generational wealth across the country. Be the Key is part of Movement’s over-arching Grab the Key program, which also includes Grab the Key, Jr. These programs offer consumers and young students educational classes, community events and practical mortgage resources. For more information on these programs and how Movement’s diversity lending initiatives equip loan officers in a unique way, contact Montell Watson or visit grabthekey.com. Be a part of the change. Be the key.

Banner Bank, a top performing and globally recognized financial institution, has a unique opportunity for a VP, Mortgage Servicing Director in Southeast Washington. This part of the country offers breathtaking views of the panoramic wine country, a temperate climate, and some of the best outdoor opportunities in the West. Banner is seeking a visionary expert in Mortgage Loan Servicing with superior knowledge of the technical landscape and outstanding leadership experience. The role is relocation approved. To apply visit, Banner Careers. Resumes should be submitted there, but any questions should be directed to Ken Larsen, EVP & Mortgage Banking Director.

Canopy Mortgage is making waves nationally, with a rapid influx of high-performing loan officers, averaging one every other day. What’s the draw? It’s their streamlined corporate structure, integrated proprietary technology, unique profit and loss model, and empowering ethos highlighted by Forbes. This growth is fueled by strong relationships and referrals, establishing Canopy as a leader in mortgage lending innovation. Haven’t heard of Canopy yet? Ask around or reach out to Josh Neumarker at 888-696-9076 for a Tech Demo or consultation.

NAN (Nationwide Appraisal Network) is pleased to announce the appointment of William “Bill” Waltenbaugh, SRA, AI-RRS, as its new Chief Appraiser. With a distinguished career spanning over three decades in the property valuation industry, Bill brings a wealth of expertise and leadership to his new role. Bill is eager to collaborate with the NAN team and like-minded professionals to drive innovation and elevate industry standards. His leadership will be invaluable as NAN continues to enhance their services and drive growth. Bill will leverage his extensive experience and deep industry knowledge to advance NAN’s commitment to technology, communication, and accountability. He is deeply passionate about the evolution of the valuation industry, with a keen focus on product development and modernization. His appointment as Chief Appraiser underscores NAN’s commitment to excellence and innovation in the property valuation industry. NAN looks forward to continued success and growth under his leadership.

 Download our mobile app to get alerts for Rob Chrisman’s Commentary.

Source: mortgagenewsdaily.com

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April 8, 2024 at 7:43 AM
Daily mortgage rates for Monday, April 8, 2024 (Dragon Claws via Getty Images)

Rates on popular 30-year and 15-year fixed mortgages start the week at under 7%, though with a week-over-week increase on most terms as of Monday, April 8, 2024.

The current average interest rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage is 6.97% for purchase and 6.99% for refinance — up 9 basis points for purchase and 11 basis points for refinance over the past week. Increases on a 15-year term were a more modest 4 basis points week over week for both purchase and refinance, bringing rates to 6.48% for purchase and 6.42% for refinance. The average rate for a 30-year fixed jumbo mortgage is 7.09%.

Purchase rates for Monday, April 8, 2024

  • 30-year fixed rate — 6.97%

  • 20-year fixed rate — 6.75%

  • 15-year fixed rate — 6.38%

  • 10-year fixed rate — 6.27%

  • 5/1 adjustable rate mortgage — 6.56%

  • 30-year fixed FHA rate — 6.85%

  • 30-year fixed VA rate — 7.05%

  • 30-year fixed jumbo rate — 7.09%

Refinance rates for Monday, April 8, 2024

  • 30-year fixed rate — 6.99%

  • 20-year fixed rate — 6.74%

  • 15-year fixed rate — 6.42%

  • 10-year fixed rate — 6.28%

  • 5/1 adjustable rate mortgage — 6.42%

  • 30-year fixed FHA rate — 6.94%

  • 30-year fixed VA rate — 7.69%

  • 30-year fixed jumbo rate — 7.08%

Freddie Mac weekly mortgage report

Freddie Mac reports an average 6.82% for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, up three basis points from last week, according to its weekly survey of nationwide lenders published on April 4, 2024. The fixed rate for a 15-year mortgage is 6.06%, down five basis points from last week.

Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist, says of the report, “While incoming economic signals indicate lower rates of inflation, we do not expect rates will decrease meaningfully in the near-term. On the plus side, inventory is improving somewhat, which should help temper home price growth.”

Current mortgage rates for April 8, 2024

The Fed rate does not determine mortgage rates, though it sets benchmarks that indirectly affect rates on financial products like mortgages, personal loans and deposit accounts. The Fed has a firm goal of a 2% inflation rate, and with favorable economic reports on the job market, it’s unlikely the reserve will cut rates until that goal is within reality’s reach.

Mortgage rates in the news

Mortgage lenders keep a close eye on the key interest rate set by the Federal Reserve, the U.S.’s central bank. Called the fed rate, it’s the benchmark that affects rates on deposit accounts, loans and other financial products. Typically, as the Fed rate rises, so do APYs on savings products like CDs, high-yield savings accounts and money market accounts. Mortgage and home loan rates don’t follow the fed rate as closely, but they do reflect the same elements the Fed evaluates when making decisions on the benchmark — especially inflation.

Federal benchmark: Summer rate cut expected

At the conclusion of its rate-setting policy meeting on March 20, 2024, the Fed left the federal funds target interest rate of 5.25% to 5.50% unchanged, marking the fifth consecutive time it’s held rates steady since July 2023. In its post-meeting statement, the Federal Reserve repeated earlier concerns about cutting its key interest rate until it’s confident “that inflation is moving sustainably toward 2 percent.” Bankers forecast three rate cuts by the end of the year, predicting the first to come not when the Fed meets again later this month, but instead at its summer meeting in June 2024.

The Federal Reserve increased the target interest rate 11 times from March 2022 to July 2023 in an effort to combat the highest inflation in four decades coming out of the pandemic. While inflation has cooled, Consumer Price Index data released on March 12 showed a month-over-month increase in consumer prices — a widely used indicator for inflation. The next CPI report is due for release next week on April 10, with inflation nowcasting from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland suggesting a welcome decrease in rates of inflation.

Government agency Freddie Mac released its March 20 economic outlook on the housing and mortgage market that predicts mortgage rates to stay at 6.5% or higher through the summer.

NAR settlement could change homebuying

The anticipated summer rate cut could coincide with a major change in the way Americans buy and sell homes. On March 15, the National Association of Realtors announced it had agreed to a settlement that, if approved by a federal judge, would bring an end to longstanding real estate broker commissions of up to 6% of a home’s purchase price. The settlement isn’t expected to affect mortgage rates, yet it paves the way for consumers to negotiate what they pay for an agent’s services, potentially saving homebuyers money in the long run — just in time for summer home sales.

4 top factors that affect your mortgage rate

The difference of even half a percentage point on your interest rate can save you hundreds of dollars a month and thousands of dollars over the life of your mortgage, but the mortgage rate you’re ultimately offered depends on the mortgage you’re interested in, payments you’re willing to pay up front and your overall financial health.

  • Your credit score. Knowing your credit score can help you shop around for lenders you’re likely to get approval through, as well as understand the type of mortgage for your lifestyle and income. The best mortgage rates go to borrowers with good to excellent credit — typically a FICO credit score of at least 670 — though even with fair credit, you may be able to find a mortgage offering decent rates.

  • Your down payment. The more money you can put down toward your home, the better it benefits your interest rate. Paying at least 20% of your home’s purchase price up front generally results in a lower interest rate — and you can avoid mortgage insurance, which increases your total cost.

  • Your loan term. While the 30-year mortgage remains a popular way for Americans to purchase homes, you can find terms of 20 years, 15 years and 10 years. Shorter loan terms usually come with lower interest rates, though with higher monthly payments. Longer mortgage terms can result in smaller monthly payments, though you’ll pay higher total interest over the life of your loan.

  • Interest rate type. Mortgage rates come with two basic types of rates — fixed and variable. Fixed-rate mortgages offer a consistent interest rate over the life of your loan, whereas adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) often start with a lower fixed rate for an agreed-on time and then adjust to a variable rate based on market conditions for the remainder of your term. Choosing between these two rates depends on your financial goals and tolerance for risk.

Frequently asked questions about mortgage rates

What are mortgage lenders?

Lenders are financial institutions that loan money to homebuyers. A lender is different from a loan servicer, which typically handles the operational tasks of your loan, like processing payments, talking directly with borrowers and sending monthly statements.

What does it mean to refinance a mortgage?

Refinancing is a process of trading in your current mortgage to another lender for lower rates and better terms than your current loan. With a refinance, the new lender pays off your old mortgage and you then pay your monthly statements from the new lender.

What factors influence mortgage rates?

Mortgage rates are determined by many factors that include inflation rates, economic conditions, housing market trends and the Federal Reserve’s target interest rate. Lenders also consider your personal credit score, the amount available for your down payment, the property you’re interested in and other terms of the loan you’re requesting, like 30-year or 15-year offers.

When is the best time to lock in a mortgage rate?

Mortgage rates can fluctuate daily, so it’s best to lock in a rate when you’re comfortable with the offered rate and conditions of the loan.

Can I negotiate my mortgage rate?

It’s not likely — lenders consider the market conditions and other financial factors when determining rates. You can, however, ask about how you can reduce costs in other ways when comparing mortgage lenders. For instance, many lenders offer lower rates in exchange for “mortgage points” — upfront fees you pay to your lender. A mortgage point could cost 1% of your mortgage amount, which means about $5,000 on a $500,000 home loan, with each point lowering your interest rate by about 0.25%, depending on your lender and loan.

Editor’s note: Annual percentage yields shown are as of Monday, April 8, 2024, at 7:45 a.m. ET. APYs and promotional rates for some products can vary by region and are subject to change.

Sources

Source: aol.com

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Last month, Northeast regional lender WSFS Mortgage released the results of a survey that measured reverse mortgage product sentiments. It found that more people seem to be aware of the potential value that a reverse mortgage could provide for older homeowners, including as a tool to age in place and to provide greater cash flow in retirement.

Despite the more regional focus of WSFS Mortgage’s reverse mortgage offerings — which offers the loans through its brokerage — the survey itself was conducted nationwide with a research company enlisting responses from 750 homeowners at or over the age of 60.

To get a better idea of what motivated the survey and its desire to learn more about reverse mortgages, RMD sat down with WSFS Mortgage President Jeffrey Ruben.

The education gap

The reverse mortgage industry has long made serious investments in educational programs, particularly when looking at the efforts of current and former major lenders in the space like Finance of America Reverse (FAR), American Advisors Group (AAG) and others. In terms of what motivated the company to conduct the survey, Ruben describes a perceived disconnect between the utility of the product category and its reputation.

“The ‘aha’ moment was really validating an assumption we had going into it, that there is this large education gap,” Ruben said. “Whenever there’s a chance to educate and let people know how this product works, [the industry] all about it, and that’s where we are as well. We feel that as a product, it suffers from a lack of information and a lot of misinformation. I think the survey bears that out.”

When asked if it is aiming to use the survey results to inform future plans with the reverse mortgage product, Ruben said that the company has a nearly 200-year old history and had been more involved in reverse mortgages in the past, but not since he joined the company roughly a decade ago.

WSFS did in fact have a national reverse mortgage-focused subsidiary, 1st Reverse Financial Services, but elected to wind it down and shutter it in 2009. Since Ruben joined the organization, reverse mortgages have not been a major focus of the company, he said.

<img decoding="async" width="451" height="673" data-attachment-id="455381" data-permalink="https://www.housingwire.com/articles/wsfs-president-talks-motivation-for-reverse-mortgage-survey-potential-future-action/jeffreben_wsfsmortgage/" data-orig-file="https://www.housingwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/jeffreben_wsfsmortgage.jpg" data-orig-size="451,673" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta=""aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"" data-image-title="jeffreben_wsfsmortgage" data-image-description="

Jeffrey Ruben, president of WSFS Mortgage.

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Jeffrey Ruben

” data-medium-file=”https://www.housingwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/jeffreben_wsfsmortgage.jpg?w=201″ data-large-file=”https://www.housingwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/jeffreben_wsfsmortgage.jpg?w=451″ src=”https://www.housingwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/jeffreben_wsfsmortgage.jpg” alt=”Jeffrey Ruben, president of WSFS Mortgage.” class=”wp-image-455381″ srcset=”https://www.housingwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/jeffreben_wsfsmortgage.jpg 451w, https://www.housingwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/jeffreben_wsfsmortgage.jpg?resize=101,150 101w, https://www.housingwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/jeffreben_wsfsmortgage.jpg?resize=201,300 201w” sizes=”(max-width: 451px) 100vw, 451px”>

Jeffrey Ruben

“Since I’ve been involved, I’ve stepped back and looked at our depositor base. We’re based in Wilmington, Delaware, we service the tri-state area of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and some of Maryland,” he said. “And if you look at that population group, it’s an older group of Americans and our deposit base reflects that as well.”

However, Ruben describes being surprised at a generally low level of reverse mortgage activity he has seen since becoming involved, and thought about engaging in an exercise that would allow for a clearer understanding of whether or not reverse remained a viable business path for the company.

“We thought we weren’t successful in getting the word out about this product and how it can be used,” he said. “It’s not for everyone, but it definitely should be something that is in the offering, and that people can make an informed and educated decision about. Our motivation was to look at our population base, and to look at the values of homes. We have an aging population, and it just seems so ripe to make sure that our older Americans are aware of this option and this program.”

Maintaining a regional focus, program changes

Despite the results of the survey indicating more understanding of the utility of reverse mortgages, Ruben said the company has no immediate ambitions to progress beyond its regional focus brokering reverse mortgages to investors. But he didn’t completely shut the door on the prospect for the future.

“It sounds cliché, but we do like to walk before we run,” Ruben said. “We want to be able to learn how this product is going to be received. It is a much safer and financially less impactful decision to broker initially, but as we get more and more knowledge we do feel that it is a product that we could bring in-house at some point if the conditions are correct and we are comfortable with the program.”

The company will also keep an eye on the regulatory environment, and any potential changes that the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) or the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) may choose to make to the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) program, he said.

But the involvement of the HECM program’s stewards likely helps what could be a delayed process of recognition for the HECM product due to its age restriction, he said.

“When the government came in and started setting a real good guideline foundation for this product, I believe it caught and continues to catch interest,” he said. “It’s not fully adopted, but more and more financial advisors who are working with individuals in retirement planning are starting to recognize the value and the potential opportunity for a reverse mortgage to help with that retirement cash flow, which is usually the main goal of a successful retirement plan.”

A lack of product awareness is giving way to people who are starting to think in longer terms about their financial futures, Ruben has observed.

“I see even in our own bank, younger people today are really focused on a 30-year and 40-year plan for when they retire someday,” he said. “So, I think it will become a tool and a financial instrument that people will learn about earlier in their life, today and in the future.”

Source: housingwire.com

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Our goal here at Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, referred to as “Credible” below, is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we do promote products from our partner lenders who compensate us for our services, all opinions are our own.

  Home equity loan Home equity line of credit (HELOC) Interest rate Fixed Variable Monthly payment amount Fixed Variable Closing costs and fees Yes  Yes, might be lower than other loan types  Repayment period Typically 5-30 years Typically 10-20 years

FAQ

What is a rate lock?

Interest rates on mortgages fluctuate all the time, but a rate lock allows you to lock in your current rate for a set amount of time. This ensures you get the rate you want as you complete the homebuying process.

What are mortgage points?

Mortgage points are a type of prepaid interest that you can pay upfront — often as part of your closing costs — for a lower overall interest rate. This can lower your APR and monthly payments. 

What are closing costs?

Closing costs are the fees you, as the buyer, need to pay before getting a loan. Common fees include attorney fees, home appraisal fees, origination fees, and application fees.

If you’re trying to find the right mortgage rate, consider using Credible. You can use Credible’s free online tool to easily compare multiple lenders and see prequalified rates in just a few minutes.

Source: foxbusiness.com