5 Tips for Approaching the Open House

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For decades, sellers and their agents have been using open houses to help generate interest in their listings. Open houses give the general public the chance to view a home without scheduling a private showing. While open houses do get a lot of curious neighbors and casual browsers, they can be a good opportunity for serious buyers to decide if a home is worth pursuing further, or a way to get a better grasp on neighborhood home values. 

In fact, 59% of home buyers attended an open house during their shopping process last year and 43% of buyers said attending the open house was very or extremely important to determining if the home was right for them.* On average, home buyers attended 2.6 open houses before buying.

Whether you’re a sincere buyer or simply curious about the inside of a home, you should know how open houses work and understand how you can be a good open house attendee. 

Note: If open houses are restricted or unavailable due to public health concerns, work with your agent to arrange a private tour or video tour. All Zillow-owned homes include a self-tour option — just use our app to unlock the door and tour at your convenience.

What is an open house?

An open house is an event during which potential buyers can tour a home that’s on the market. It’s usually hosted by the seller’s listing agent, or by the seller themselves, in case of a for-sale-by-owner (FSBO) listing. Open houses usually take place on weekends, during a set range of hours typically midday.

Open house benefits for buyers

No scheduling required: Unlike a private showing, you don’t need to set up a specific appointment to see a home. Simply show up during the open house hours and view the home at your own pace. 

Scope out the competition: If you’re interested in a home, attending the open house can help you gauge interest from other buyers. This can be helpful when determining how quickly you need to submit an offer and how much you should offer. 

Understand current home values: Seeing what homes are selling for in your area and what you can buy at a particular price point can be helpful if you’re just starting your search. 

Redefine your nonnegotiable home features: Checking out homes in person can help you redefine your list of must-haves: Do you really need that extra bedroom? What does a backyard of this size really look like?

How do open houses work?

Not every seller or listing agent will hold one, but here’s the typical process for sellers setting up an open house:

  1. The seller and their agent determine a day and time for the open house.
  2. The agent lists the open house on the local MLS.
  3. The agent advertises the open house on social media, online and with print ads or flyers. 
  4. The agent prepares for the open house — purchasing refreshments, printing flyers, setting up signs and adding little touches to make the home feel welcoming to buyers. (Yes, as a shopper, you can eat the cookies.)
  5. The agent hosts the event, greeting buyers and answering questions about the property and community.
  6. Buyers remove their shoes, tour the home, take pictures and video (if allowed) and jot down important notes. 
  7. Any buyer who liked the house will contact their own agent. They’ll then set up a private showing to see the home again or they’ll submit an offer right away — the latter is common in fast-moving real estate markets.

Who hosts an open house?

The person hosting an open house could be any one of the following: 

  • Listing agent: As the person hired to sell the home, the listing agent should be an expert on the property. 
  • Listing agent’s team member or associate: A busy listing agent may also send another agent in their place — either someone on their team or another agent in their office. They should be experts in the local market, but may not be as familiar with the individual home. 
  • Homeowner: If a home is for sale by owner (FSBO), the homeowner will be hosting their own open house. They’re undoubtedly the expert on the home, but their local market expertise may be limited. 

How to prepare for an open house

There are times when you might just stumble upon an open house while you’re on a walk or running errands. But if you’re intentionally looking for open houses as part of your home-buying strategy, try these tips.

Seek out relevant open houses

If you plan to visit multiple open houses in one day, make sure you’re focusing on listings that fit your criteria for budget and location. It’s not worth wasting time looking at homes outside your budget or those that are too far from your work or school. 

Tip: With Zillow’s home search tool, buyers can filter by homes with upcoming open houses (this filter can be applied in addition to other search filters like price, bedrooms, bathrooms, square footage and location). When you use the open houses filter in conjunction with filters for your other criteria, you can easily find the right open houses for your search.

A map of home listings on Zillow.

You can also tour most Zillow-owned homes any time between 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., any day of the week — just select the tour option on the listing. Although the listing agent will not be present, you can avoid a busy open house and rest assured the property is in move-in ready condition.

Do research on the market beforehand

With help from your agent or on your own, find out how each home you’re planning to visit stacks up against others nearby. Is the price in line with similar listings in the area? Are there any defects? Has it gone under contract recently and then returned to the market? Are there a lot of other interested buyers? Has it been sitting on the market for a long time? (“Days on market” is an indicator of a stale listing, but the standard number of days on market can vary based on where you live.)

Stay open-minded

If you’re searching on a tight budget in a hot neighborhood, there’s a good chance that the home that fits the bill will need some TLC. Fortunately, attending an open house can give you a better idea of the home’s condition and potential, while also giving you the opportunity to ask renovation-related questions — e.g., the location of load bearing walls and the details of local regulations. 

How to attend an open house

Now that you’ve done your research and are prepared to add some open houses to your home search, here’s what you should do once the day arrives. 

Ask questions

An open house is your best opportunity to ask the listing agent (or their associate) your questions — don’t be shy. Ask questions that you wouldn’t be able to answer just by reading a home’s listing description, such as:

  • What are the HOA restrictions?
  • Has the seller done a property tax appeal?
  • Have there been any recent renovations or repairs?

Tip: If you’re not currently working with an agent and you ultimately decide you aren’t interested in a particular home you tour, the open house could help you see if the listing agent might be the right person to represent you — many agents represent both buyers and sellers. 

Be honest

If anyone other than the listing agent or the homeowner is hosting the open house, they’re likely an agent hoping to find potential buyer clients. If you’re already working with an agent (or if you have no real interest in buying), be honest.

Check for damage and disrepair

Professional or edited photos can make a home look a lot better online than it is in person. At an open house, take the opportunity to closely evaluate a home’s condition and take note of any potential defects that would factor into your offer price. 

Assess the windows: Look for flaking paint, misaligned sashes and condensation due to air leaks. These could be signs of windows that need replacement. 

Check for water damage: Look for warped baseboards, ceiling stains and musty smells. 

Make note of cracks: Noticeable cracks in the ceiling or drywall could indicate foundation issues. 

Test functions: Open cabinets, doors and drawers. Run the faucets. Check the water pressure. An open house is a good opportunity to make sure every part of the home is in good working order. 

Gauge potential renovation needs: Home improvements can really add up. As you walk through a home, keep an eye out for urgent renovation needs like floors, fixtures or large repainting projects.

Open house tips for buyers

Whenever you attend an open house, put yourself in the seller’s shoes — you’re letting a bunch of strangers walk through your home while you’re not there. While every seller wants their open house to net a buyer, they also want to keep their home safe and their furnishings free of damage.

Do

  • Take off your shoes or wear booties if requested.
  • Greet the host and provide your name.
  • Sign in if necessary or requested (this is a safety issue for the seller and their agent).
  • Take notes on your phone about your likes, dislikes and follow-up questions.
  • Ask if you can capture a video (if the listing doesn’t already include a video).
  • Respect other buyers and guests. 
  • Wait for others to exit a room before you enter.
  • Provide feedback if requested.
  • Thank the person hosting the event.

Don’t

  • Refuse to comply with an agent or homeowner’s house rules.
  • Criticize the home or the owner’s style.
  • Listen in on other visitors’ conversations.
  • Touch the owner’s belongings.
  • Let kids run around without supervision.
  • Bring food or beverages in (except water).
  • Reveal information that would compromise your negotiating power, like your budget or level of interest in the home.
  • Bring pets.

*Zillow Group Consumer Housing Trends Report 2019 survey data

Source: zillow.com

Apple Card Review – Does It Live Up to the Hype?

Advertiser Disclosure: This post includes references to offers from our partners. We receive compensation when you click on links to those products. However, the opinions expressed here are ours alone and at no time has the editorial content been provided, reviewed, or approved by any issuer.

Apple Card immodestly claims to “completely [rethink] everything about the credit card.” Is it correct? Maybe.

Backed by the Mastercard network, Apple Card certainly has a host of innovative features that old-fashioned credit cards don’t, such as daily cash-back and numberless physical cards. And it’s a harbinger of the cashless, contactless payments landscape to come. No serious observer can dispute that Apple Card is ahead of its time.

But any product that’s truly ahead of its time must also be competitive in the present. And beyond its novel features, Apple Card works pretty much like any other credit card. Indeed, in spite – or perhaps because – of its novel additions, it lacks some consumer-friendly features common to other popular cash-back cards and general-purpose rewards cards.

Here’s a closer look at what sets Apple Card apart, and how it stacks up against other credit cards.

Things to Keep in Mind About Apple Card

Before we dive into Apple Card’s details, two points bear mentioning.

First, though cardholders who don’t pay their statement balances in full each month are subject to interest charges that vary with their creditworthiness and prevailing benchmark rates, Apple Card charges none of the fees typically levied by credit card companies: no annual fee, no late fee, and no over-limit fee.

Second, Apple Card is designed to work with Apple Pay, which runs on Apple (Mac) hardware only. If you’re one of the many millions of iPhone users in the United States, this card is for you. If you’re an Android loyalist, you’re out of luck.

Key Features

Here’s a closer look at Apple Card’s most notable features.

Earning Cash Back

Apple Card has a three-tiered cash-back program:

  • 3% Cash Back. All purchases from Apple earn unlimited 3% cash back. These include, but are not limited to, purchases from Apple.com, physical Apple Stores, the iTunes Store, the App Store, and in-app purchases. Certain non-Apple purchases made using Apple Pay earn 3% cash-back rewards as well.
  • 2% Cash Back. All other purchases made using Apple Pay (including through your Apple phone or Apple Watch) earn unlimited 2% cash back. Hundreds of major retailer chains and brands, encompassing more than 2 million individual merchant locations online and off, accept Apple Pay. These include but aren’t limited to Walgreens, Nike, Uber Eats, Duane Reade, Amazon, and thousands of gas stations. If you’re not familiar with how Apple Pay works, see its site for details.
  • 1% Cash Back. Purchases made with merchants – online, offline, and in-app – that don’t accept Apple Pay earn an unlimited 1% cash back.

Redeeming Cash Back

Cash back earned through Apple Card purchases accrues daily. Each day a purchase posts to your account, you’ll receive the requisite cash back on your Apple Pay Cash card in the Apple Wallet app.

From there, you can use it to pay for purchases within or without the Apple ecosystem or to make payments on your Apple Card balance.

If you don’t have an Apple Pay Cash card and aren’t interested in getting one, you must accept cash back earned to your Apple Card via statement credits, which may not be much of a sacrifice.

Apple Pay Integration

Apple Card is essentially an offshoot of Apple Wallet. It’s designed for use in conjunction with Apple Pay – or, more specifically, as the user’s default Apple Pay payment method. Apple clearly expects most Apple Card transactions to be contactless, executed through a Web portal or with the tap of an iPhone.

Beyond Apple Card’s novelty as the first truly “contactless first” credit card, users benefit from Apple Pay’s stringent security features. These include:

  • Unique Device Number. Your Apple Card is issued with a unique number that’s stored in your iPhone’s Secure Element, the secure microchip that hosts the phone’s most sensitive functions.
  • Two-Factor Purchasing. Every purchase requires your unique device number, plus a unique one-time code generated on the spot.
  • Purchase Authorization Via Face ID or Touch ID. This renders stolen phones all but useless for making purchases.

Apple Card also takes data security seriously. Apple and Goldman Sachs, the card’s issuer, vow never to share customer data with third parties. Only Goldman Sachs has access to users’ transaction histories and personal information.

Physical Credit Card

Apple Card isn’t 100% virtual. The physical Apple Card is a titanium card that looks and feels just like any other premium credit card, except that it’s much sleeker. The card face is a minimalist triumph, with no cardholder name, card number, or CVV and virtually no marks to mar its metallic hue.

Apple and Goldman Sachs tout the security benefits of Apple Card’s featurelessness. Without any information to identify the card, it’s useless in the wrong hands.

Real-Time Fraud Protection

Apple Card’s real-time fraud protection feature notifies you every time your card is used to make a purchase. If something doesn’t seem right about a transaction, or you know for a fact that you didn’t make it, you can immediately initiate the dispute process by tapping the notification.

Purchase Organization and Mapping

Apple Card automatically organizes purchases by purchase category – entertainment, food and drinks, and so on – and merchant. Categories are color-coded for easy visualization and totaled monthly for easy budgeting. With features like that, who needs a paid budgeting app?

Apple Card also automatically maps purchases, showing you where you’ve spent money recently, literally. If a real-time fraud protection notification slips your notice, perhaps seeing a purchase in a city you’ve never visited will jog your memory.

Spending Summaries

Apple Card’s spending summaries, visible in the Wallet app, reveal how much you’re spending, and on what, in any given week or month. You can view spending trends over time here too, which comes in handy for the periodic budget reviews you should be doing.

Payment Due Dates & Frequency

By default, Apple Card statements are due at the end of the month. If you prefer to pay balances more frequently – and reduce interest charges when you can’t pay off your balance in full before the statement due date – you can set weekly or biweekly payments too.

Interest Calculator

Apple Card’s built-in interest calculator automatically tallies expected interest charges when you pay less than the full balance due on your card before the end of the grace period.

Credit card issuers are required to reveal on each statement the true cost of making only the minimum payment due in comparison with at least one larger monthly payment.

However, this is a far more robust and interactive interest calculator that’s significantly more likely to nudge you to boost your monthly payment.

Interest-Reduction Suggestions

If the interest calculator isn’t enough, Apple Card also provides “smart payment suggestions” that encourage cardholders to increase their monthly payments, thereby decreasing their total interest liability.

It’s not clear how Apple Card arrives at these suggestions, but they appear to be based on cardholders’ spending patterns and payment history.

Interest-Free Installment Payments

Apple Card offers interest-free monthly installment payments for select Apple products purchased through the company’s sales channels. You can easily see the size of your installments and how much you have left to pay in the app.

Text-Based Support

Apple Card has a text-based support system that’s available 24/7. If you run into an issue with the card or have a question that doesn’t concern a disputed charge, which you can handle through the real-time fraud protection interface, this is your ticket to a resolution.

Important Fees

Apple Card charges no fees to cardholders: no foreign transaction fees, balance transfer fees, or annual fees.

Advantages

These are among Apple Card’s principal advantages.

1. No Fees

Apple Card doesn’t charge any fees to cardholders. This makes it all but unique, as even avowedly low-fee cards assess fees for less common occurrences such as late and returned payments.

2. Cash Back Accrues Daily

Apple Card is among the only widely available credit cards to accrue cash back on a daily basis, rather than at the end of the statement cycle.

Although the accrual frequency doesn’t affect net cash-back earnings or cash back earning rates, it’s certainly nice to see your spending subsidized in near-real-time.

3. Solid Cash Back Rates on Apple & Apple Pay Purchases

This card earns 3% cash back on virtually all purchases within the Apple ecosystem, excluding purchases with Apple Pay merchants. This 3% category covers, but isn’t limited to, the following:

  • Apple.com purchases
  • Purchases at physical Apple Stores
  • iTunes Store purchases
  • App Store purchases
  • In-app purchases

Apple Card also earns 2% cash back on purchases made with Apple Pay merchants. So if you’re able to limit your spending to the Apple and Apple Pay ecosystems, you’ll net somewhere north of 2% cash back on this no-annual-fee card, depending on your exact spending mix.

4. Above-Average Security Features

Apple Card is more secure than your average credit card. The physical card doesn’t have a card number or CVV, so you won’t have to worry about what could happen between the moment you lose your card and the moment you freeze your account.

The virtual card is denoted by a unique device number locked away in your iPhone’s Secure Element, far from prying eyes.

Perhaps most consequentially, Apple has a strict privacy policy that forbids data sharing with third parties. There’s no need to opt out, which is often easier said than done, and only Goldman Sachs has access to your transaction history.

5. Real-Time Fraud Protection

Apple Card has another security feature worth touting: real-time fraud protection that alerts you whenever your card is used to make a purchase and lets you flag potentially fraudulent transactions with a single tap.

Compared with the traditional dispute resolution process, this is a snap, even when flagged charges turn out to be legitimate.

6. Easy, Flexible Payments

Apple Card’s default payment due date – the last day of the month – is easy to remember, even without the helpful reminders.

If you’re trying to budget on an irregular income and prefer not to wait until the end of the month to pay off your entire balance, Apple Card’s customized weekly and biweekly payment intervals have you covered.

Other credit cards let you pay off balances throughout the month, but few make it as easy as Apple Card.

7. Interest-Reduction Features

Apple Card’s interest calculator and interest-reduction suggestions are classic examples of “nudge” theory in action. By revealing just how much you’ll save over time by paying a little more upfront, these features nudge you to make smart financial decisions.

Of course, it’s always best to pay off your balance in full by the statement due date, but when unexpected expenses make that impossible, it’s nice to feel like your credit card issuer is on your side.

8. Useful Budgeting and Spending Control Features

With so many budgeting and spending control features, Apple Card feels like a personal budgeting suite with a spending aid built in.

Maybe that’s the point. Though most small-business credit cards have basic expense tracking and reporting features, Apple Card’s package is unusually robust for a consumer credit card.

If what’s keeping you from building and sticking to a household budget is the inconvenience inherent in standalone budgeting software, this is a potential game-changer.

9. Text-Based Customer Support

Apple Card’s text-based customer support is a low-friction alternative to menu-laden, over-automated phone support and unpredictable email support.

Whether this feature is as efficient as Apple and Goldman Sachs promise remains to be seen, but it’s difficult to see it being worse than the status quo – for relatively simple issues, at least.

10. No Penalty Interest Charges

Apple Card doesn’t charge penalty interest. While it’s best never to find yourself in a position where penalty interest would apply, the assurance that you won’t be unduly penalized for a lapse beyond your control is certainly welcome.

Disadvantages

Consider these potential disadvantages before applying for Apple Card.

1. Requires Apple Pay and Apple Hardware

Apple Card’s biggest drawback is its exclusivity. The card requires Apple Pay, which runs exclusively on Apple hardware, meaning it’s not appropriate for Android or Windows device users.

If you’re set on applying for Apple Card but don’t have an iPhone or other compatible Apple device, Apple Watch is your most cost-effective option. Apple Pay runs on Apple Watch just fine, and you can pick up refurbished older versions – Series 1, 2, and 3 – for less than $100.

That’s still a significant outlay, though, and no other credit card on the market requires compatible hardware.

2. Only 1% Cash Back on Non-Apple Pay Purchases

Apple Card earns just 1% cash back on non-Apple Pay purchases. If your daily, weekly, and monthly consumption habits involve merchants that mostly accept Apple Pay, you shouldn’t have trouble earning the higher 2% cash-back rate, but not all merchants do.

Square has a non-exhaustive list of major merchants that do accept Apple Pay. Do yourself a favor and review it before applying for this card.

3. Goldman Sachs’ First Credit Card

Apple Card is the first consumer credit card issued by Goldman Sachs Bank. Apple touts this as an advantage, arguing that Goldman Sachs isn’t bound by the constraints of legacy credit card issuers such as Chase and Barclays.

And it’s not as if Goldman Sachs is entirely new to the consumer finance realm. Its Marcus by Goldman Sachs loan and savings products are innovative and well-liked.

That said, it’s not hard to imagine a first-time credit card issuer experiencing some growing pains, especially given Apple Card’s novelty. At a minimum, don’t be surprised to see iterative changes to Apple Card as Goldman Sachs figures out what works and what doesn’t.

Final Word

If you’re a committed Apple Pay user with the hardware to back it up – an iPhone, Apple Watch, or maybe an iPad – then it might make sense for you to ditch your traditional credit cards and going all-in on Apple Card.

Users who restrict their spending to Apple Pay merchants only stand to earn 2% cash back across the board, about as good as it gets on a consistent basis for premium cash-back credit cards. To do better than that, you’ll need to upgrade to a premium travel rewards credit card with a hefty annual fee.

Source: moneycrashers.com

3 Essential Window Treatment Options for Renters in 2021 | Apartminty

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This year, there’s going to be a more significant number of apartments rented than ever before. That means more renters will be adding their own unique touch. There will be more rooms customized and more apartments fitted to unique styles.

However, it’s crucial to focus on window treatments with any apartment. Natural light, room privacy, and overall customization are vital for any renter. Whether you’re looking for shades or touching up a window with internal blinds, here are three essential window treatment options for renters in 2021.

Magnetic Curtain Rods

If you’re looking to hang a curtain but are worried about the impact it might have on your apartment walls, then magnetic curtain rods may be an ideal choice. These curtain rods can be easily installed as a temporary window treatment.

By magnetically pressing these curtain rods against steel doors or windows, you can hang any lightweight curtain. We particularly recommend sheer curtains for a balance of soft lighting and privacy.

An added tip: curtains on magnetic rods can also be controlled remotely using a smart option in 2021. The SwitchBot Curtain takes 30 seconds to install and motorizes any curtains. You can control this from SwitchBot’s Hub Mini app on your smartphone. 

Command Hooks

Do you have a small curtain or a sports pennant that you want to hang over your window? If so, you might want to try command hooks. These convenient, cost-effective options are among the most popular selections that renters use for apartment window treatment.

Command hooks are made out of different materials such as nickel or plastic. These hooks attach to your walls with adhesive strips and can hang surfaces ranging from metal to tile to wood. However, these hooks cannot hang on vinyl, and it’s recommended that you don’t hang items on command hooks over your bed.

Simply wipe the surface beforehand with rubbing alcohol and attach the command hooks to the wall. After that, you’ll be able to hang lightweight window treatments quickly and easily.

Temporary Shades

If you prefer the functionality of shades, then temporary shades can be a great selection. These lightweight options come in a wide array of styles.

Some temporary shades come in paper shade form. These range in color and can last up to six years. Other temporary shade options can be hung on a tension rod. These types of shades add privacy to your apartment and reduce the amount of heat let in through excess light. This may help save on energy bills as well this year.

No matter your choice, temporary shades can be a wise option for renters.

Renters may not think about window treatment when they first move into their apartment. However, these can be vital choices when it comes to privacy, energy efficiency, and customization. With these tips, renters can find essential window treatment options to enhance their apartments in 2021.

About the Author

Jennifer Bell is a freelance writer, blogger, dog-enthusiast, and avid beachgoer operating out of Southern New Jersey.

Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc, or its affiliates.

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Source: blog.apartminty.com

7 Tips on How to Take Pictures of Items to Sell

To put it simply: knowing how to take pictures of items to sell online has almost as much of an impact on your success as the actual object. It’s the presentation, the first way a shopper sees your product.
Before Christine Soojung Han of Vintage Sooj even shoots a photograph, she asks herself some philosophical questions. What is she trying to achieve with this photograph? What is she hoping to emulate or what kind of mood does she want to evoke? In essence, what story is she telling with the photograph.
Lighting was the first piece of advice that Chen offered. Finding the right place in your home is a matter of finding south-facing windows and, ideally, more than one window. You want to have lots of natural light. How the light comes through your window will change by season and time of day.

Pro Advice on How to Take Pictures of Items to Sell Online

Han found natural light to be too fickle. She started out with simply soft sunlight, but that was too dependent on the weather. So she bought soft boxes for light and studio lighting for about 0 and that upgraded her lighting set-up.

1. Decide What Style Photography You Want

“Avoid a crazy wallpaper wall,” she said. “That’s not for everybody and it really becomes a distraction. You want to be able to look at your furniture and not your wallpaper.”
Privacy Policy
Chen would post as many photos as possible if she could, but social media sites limit how many photos a seller can post. Chen’s adage is: take as many photos as possible. More photos offer more details and more chances for someone to fall in love with your item.

2. Find the Right Background. Be Consistent.

Ready to stop worrying about money?
You don’t have to have fancy equipment to start: smartphone cameras work fine.
When Han first started, she used props in some of her photos, like pampas grass or a stool. She found the props to be distracting, so now she models the clothes in most of her photos and adds accessories to the outfits. She doesn’t want to take attention away from the product itself.
But don’t worry, we’re about to let you in on some tips to make bank on. We consulted with the pros so you don’t have to do all of that legwork. Instead, let two eCommerce gurus guide you through the art of putting your best foot forward — photographically speaking, that is.
For Chen, staging is pivotal to creating a lived-in scene with her furniture. The important thing with staging is to strike a balance between domestic beauty and distraction. Chen suggests simple objects like a round mirror or a couple of white or black-covered books. She always likes to have vases on hand to hold flowers cut from her garden.
With clothing, much of that comes down to style: do you want something moodier with shadow or do you want crisp and clean images? Is this a stylized portrait or is this simply about the clothes? Researching and having a style of image in mind that you want to achieve makes it easier from the outset.

3. Lighting Matters

Elizabeth Djinis is a contributor to The Penny Hoarder.
Source: thepennyhoarder.com
Chen takes photos to show how deep a dresser drawer is or what the top surface looks like. She shares photos of the furniture legs and hardware, because that can make a difference to a buyer and is often another aspect of her design. If she can add a video, she does. A video gives people the sense of the full scope of an item and what it looks like in natural daylight.

4. Stage Your Photograph

Chen echoes the same premise for furniture.
When it comes to furniture product photos, Chen says, capturing the details is key. What makes your piece special? Take a photo of that. Examples of Chen’s clean photo styling can be studied on Instagram.

5. Capture the Details of Your Items

Chen calls taking a good photo “50% of the work.” She recently bought a dresser online for . Although Chen usually sands, paints and refurbishes the furniture she sells, this piece was in such good shape that she did nothing to it. She took some well-lit and aesthetically appealing photos and sold it for 5. She made almost 0 off of the dresser with little additional work.
Both Han and Chen say photos have made a difference in attracting buyers. Han will often reshoot a piece that hasn’t sold after some time. She might try different lighting or a different background to highlight the piece. Once she posts that new photo, she can usually sell the item right away.

6. Edit Your Photos

Often, entrepreneurs who start an online business aren’t photographers. Sometimes, they don’t even have a background in a creative industry and it’s unlikely they will have camera equipment beyond their smartphones. They’re passionate about their businesses selling vintage clothing or refurbishing vintage furniture, but they’re self-taught. For many, the internet has been their teacher.

7. Use Multiple Photos

Chen doesn’t like to use artificial lighting, because she finds it changes the color of the furniture in photos.

Photos Make a Difference

The axiom “photo, photo, photo” may be to online selling what “location, location, location” is to real estate.
“You see people use printed backgrounds or landscapes, but I think, no matter what you decide to use, it shouldn’t be distracting, because you want the attention to be on the clothing,” Han said.
Both Han and Sara Chen of the upcycled furniture company Sara Chen Design suggest keeping the background clean and neutral. Chen uses white walls as her backdrop, but in the last year, she has spruced it up by adding board and batten wood paneling to her staging wall. Chen has a space in her house specifically designated for staging, a luxury not everyone has.
Han, who started her business in a tiny apartment, began taking photos with a bedsheet as her background. That got tedious because she had to steam the wrinkles out each time. Now, she uses color paper backdrops that she bought cheaply from a photographer who was looking to downsize equipment. Examples of Han’s backgrounds can be studied on Etsy. Scroll through the pages to see where she used bedsheets. <!–

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“Photos make such a big difference,” Chen said. “You need to take time to take better photos if you want to sell for more money.”

10 Tips to Detox Your Apartment

These days we’re all trying to live healthier, but you can’t concentrate your efforts merely on your fitness routine and diet. Your apartment might need a cleanse, too!

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Our cozy homes often trap allergens in carpets, linens and other sneaky spots. And to make matters worse, the cleansers we use can be just as toxic as the gunk we’re trying to get rid of.

Try cleaning up your apartment’s act with these tips!

1. Lose the shoes
A great way to start your detox is to prevent dirt and dust from getting into your home in the first place. Start a “no shoes on at home” rule, and make sure all residents and guests leave their footwear at the door. (Provide a cool shoe rack for storage!)

2. Get rid of clutter
The more knick-knacks and clutter you keep around, the more surfaces dust can settle on. One of the most important cleaning tips for keeping your home allergy-friendly is to dust and vacuum often.

3. Change air filters
Here’s a simple one. Change your air-conditioner filter every month or two. You might be lucky enough to live in an apartment community that does this for you. If not, take the extra time and do it yourself — your lungs will thank you.

4. Purify the water
Speaking of filters, your HVAC system isn’t the only place where pollutants hang out. Water sources can bring contaminants into your bathing and drinking water every day. Invest in a water filter for your sink faucets and your shower.

10 Tips to Detox Your Apartment10 Tips to Detox Your Apartment5. Change your cleansers
Many people are allergic to the chemicals in cleaners — the same cleaners that are supposed to remove allergens and dirt from your home. To help avoid irritants, switch to environmentally-friendly cleaning products like Mrs. Meyers and Seventh Generation, or try making your own cleansers from scratch.

More Cleaning and Organizing Tips

6. Open the windows and let fresh air in
Our insulated, comfy apartments are great, but a lack of air circulation can make for a stale, polluted environment. Try airing out your space by opening the windows for a few hours every now and then. It’s like giving your home a chance to take a deep breath. (This might not be the best idea at the height of the spring pollen season. Wait until the coast – achoo! – is clear.)

10 Tips to Detox Your Apartment10 Tips to Detox Your Apartment7. Monitor moisture
Mold isn’t always easy to see, but it’s the cause of many toxic reactions in the body. Keep an eye on the moisture levels in your home to combat mold growth. Make a visual check of areas that stay damp and dry out any areas that appear wet. You can also get a hygrometer to check the general humidity in your apartment. Invest in a dehumidifier if your humidity levels are above 50%.

8. Check for carbon monoxide leaks
Gas stoves, hot water heaters, furnaces and fireplaces should be checked regularly for leaks. You might invest in a carbon monoxide detector. This is especially important for apartment dwellers, as your neighbors could have a leak that you don’t know about.

9. Get expert advice
If all of these detox cleaning tips have overwhelmed you already, don’t worry – there are people who can help! Hiring a professional organizer is a great way to get your detox done quickly from someone who can teach you about the process. The National Association of Professional Organizers has a helpful database to search for “green organizers” in your area.

10. Give it time
Creating a delightfully detoxed apartment might involve many changes, but you don’t have to take them all at once. Just tweaking one thing you do, like switching cleansers, can make a big difference. Move at your own pace and, in time, your environment will be home to fewer irritants.

Like any life change, detoxing your apartment will be more fun if you enlist a buddy to help you. Find a friend to go green with, and you can celebrate your success together. To your health!

Photo credits: Shutterstock / sunsetman, Africa Studio, swinner

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Daylight Saving Fall 2013: 5 Things to Remember in Your Apartment

Don’t forget: Daylight Saving Time ends on the first Sunday in November. That’s this weekend! As we prepare to welcome earlier sunsets, take the opportunity to take care of a few things around your apartment:

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1. Set the clocks back an hour.

Obviously, this is the most important thing you have to do, or else you’ll be an hour early for everything. However, you don’t have to worry about it if you live in Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, or most of Arizona – these places don’t observe Daylight Saving Time.

Fun fact: Indiana used to be divided on the DST issue – half the state would observe it, the other half would not. But since 2006, the entire state has changed the clocks twice a year, just like most of the country.

2. Replace the batteries in your smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector.

When you change the clocks, the National Fire Protection Association recommends you also take precautions to guard your safety in case of a fire or carbon monoxide leak. These devices can save your life, so you want to make sure your batteries are functioning properly.

3. Make a few energy-efficiency improvements.

The end of Daylight Saving Time means winter isn’t far away, so take on a few DIY projects to keep your apartment cozy during the cold months without running up your energy bills. After all, Daylight Saving Time was invented to save energy!

  • Cover your windows with insulating curtains that keep cold drafts out.
  • Wrap your water heater in an insulated jacket so water stays warmer with less energy.
  • Replace the weather stripping under your exterior doors and windows.
    Keep candles and matches ready in case there's a power outage.Keep candles and matches ready in case there's a power outage.
    Keep candles and matches ready in case there’s a power outage.

4. Make an emergency kit for your apartment.

Snowstorms and other inclement weather in the wintertime can lead to power outages, and sometimes they last a while. Make sure you have everything you’ll need if you’re stuck inside with no power: Blankets, bottled water, flashlights, extra batteries, candles, and a good book.

5. Take care of yourself!

Even though it’s just one hour, a time shift can confuse your body. Those who are susceptible to erratic sleep patterns should be extra careful to give themselves enough time to rest.

Speaking of health, we have more tips to keep yourself healthy this winter:

See you on March 9, 2014, when we move the clocks forward again!

How do you feel about Daylight Saving Time? Love it or loathe it? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Photo credit: Shutterstock / karen roach, GoodMood Photo

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Here Are 8 Home Repairs You Can’t Afford to Ignore

During preparations for her nightly baths, Laura Starrett noticed the water pressure wasn’t as strong as it once was. She had also received an alert from her utility company that she had used more water that month than she had before.

“Then I realized I’d left my sprinklers on and they were running every day, so I thought that’s why I got an alert that I was using a lot of water,” said the recently retired homeowner in Jacksonville, Florida.

So she turned the sprinklers off.

Then Starrett got another alert saying her water bill was going to be $1,000. A plumber came out, listened to the pipes and heard water running. Turns out, a backyard pipe was leaking.

“You just hope it will go away,” Starrett said. “But I knew there had to be something because your water just doesn’t just disappear.”

According to a survey by Travelers insurance company, 42% of homeowners put off a needed repair during 2020. Much of it was the concern about having someone in their house during the pandemic. Of those, 19% said they tried to fix the problem themselves and failed, and 22% just left it broken.

That can lead to a bigger and often more expensive problem, says Angela Orbann, vice president of property and personal insurance at Travelers.

“I typically think of this as what’s cosmetic versus really critical, and sometimes that can be a fine line for a homeowner,” she said. “You shouldn’t delay things that can lead to bigger issues.”

8 Home Repairs You Can’t Afford to Put Off

1. Anything Involving Water

A water spot on the wall or ceiling can mean a leaky roof or a leaky pipe. If not fixed, the leak will just get bigger and can destroy floors, walls, furniture and more.

“Any time you notice a stain, those should be addressed immediately because that indicates you potentially have moisture entering your home. Moisture in small amounts will not turn into mold, but if left, mold and continued damage will occur so it is important to address these situations when they occur,” said home inspector John Wanninger. He and his INSPECTIX team in Nebraska have inspected more than 30,000 homes..

The same goes for a leaky faucet, running toilet or dripping water heater.

“The cost of allowing a running toilet to run will cost more over the course of a month or two than it would have cost to fix it up front,” he said.

Don’t ignore higher-than-normal water bills. As Starrett realized, they were a sign something was wrong somewhere.

2. Anything Involving Electricity

Do you have lights that flicker? Switches or outlets that stopped working? Breakers tripping? GFI outlets that won’t reset?

These can be signs of electrical problems.

“A flickering light can be something as easy as a loose light bulb or it could be something as severe as a loose wire,” Wanninger said. “Any of those things when it comes to electricity should be considered important and time sensitive.”

In houses built between 1965 and 1974, connections in some older aluminum wiring may be failing. Older houses built in the 1950s and before had knob and tube wiring. The connections could be going bad.

Circuits can be overloaded. Sometimes when people update their homes, they don’t update the wiring.

Electrical problems can lead to fires, and fires can lead to injury or property damage.

3. Pests

Bugs and rodents might be small, but they can cause big issues.

“Termites can do an extensive amount of damage over a period of time. If they go undetected for three or four years, minor damage becomes pretty heavy damage,” Wanninger said.

There’s no telling how long pests like termites and carpenter ants have been chewing before you noticed them, so taking immediate action is important.

Be on the lookout for signs of termites and carpenter ants and what they leave behind:

  • Sawdust or wood damage.
  • Mud tubes.
  • Discarded wings near closed windows, doors or other access points.
  • Large black ants.
  • Faint rustling noises in walls.
  • Holes in cardboard boxes, especially on the bottom.

As for furry pests, they can spread diseases with their droppings and can chew through insulation.

“When you hear noises in your attic, it’s often either mice, rats, squirrels, or raccoons. In any case, it’s something that should be addressed immediately because left unattended they can all cause an extensive amount of damage,” Wanninger said.

4. Peeling Caulk and Paint

See #1: Water.

If caulk comes loose and peels away, water gets in and you know what happens then and it isn’t good.

“We don’t think about cracked joints in your tile bathroom. It doesn’t look severe and it doesn’t look like a big issue, but as time goes on, moisture gets in there and deteriorates the shower board and the material behind the wall. Before you know it, you get yourself a $2,000 or $3,000 repair,” Wanninger said.

The same for paint. Paint is like skin for the house. It protects it from water and pests. Removing that protection can cause problems.

5. Broken or Malfunctioning HVAC

Having a lack of climate control isn’t just an uncomfortable inconvenience, it can lead to bigger issues.

“If the humidity is too high in the home, it will pass through the drywall and enter the attic area,” Wanninger said. “If you get moisture on your windows in the wintertime on the inside of the glass in your house, it is an indication your humidity level is too high.”

In the winter, that moisture can freeze and eventually melt, causing a leak. In the summer, excess moisture can lead to mold and mildew.

If you notice your HVAC isn’t working as it should, taking care of it before it breaks can reduce stress on the system and possibly prevent a bigger issue.

6. Cracks

Some cracks in walls and foundations are harmless, but they aren’t something to ignore.

“One thing concrete does is crack, it’s pretty standard,” Wanninger said. “If you get cracks in foundation walls or floors that are considered expansive or starting to displace at a greater level, that may be the indication that you are having structural issues or movements that need to be reviewed before they become a bigger issue.”

Keep an eye on the size of the cracks. Measure the length and width periodically and note any changes.

7. Smoke Alarms and Carbon Monoxide Detectors

It sounds simple, but replacing batteries in smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors should happen immediately after they begin chirping, even if it happens in the middle of the night.

“At two o’clock in the morning when the thing does start chirping, your mind says you’ll fix it tomorrow and tomorrow never comes,” Wanninger said.

Better yet, replace your batteries annually when you change your clocks for Daylight Saving Time.

8. Darkening Ceilings Near Fireplaces

If you notice darkening on your ceiling or a sooty smell in your house, it could mean your fireplace isn’t drafting properly. That could bring deadly gasses into the house.

“There’s no second-guessing that. It would cause carbon monoxide poisoning,” Wanninger warned.

Tiffani Sherman is a Florida-based freelance reporter with more than 25 years of experience writing about finance, health, travel and other topics.

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Source: thepennyhoarder.com

How to Make Money Renting Equipment and Doing Maintenance Jobs

Not everyone owns a power washer, paint sprayer, chainsaw, backpack leaf blower, multipurpose steam cleaner or cordless wet/dry vacuum for auto detailing. But those who do own these tools can use them to make extra money.

It can be well worth investing in certain small power tools that most people don’t own to develop a side gig.

For example, Popular Mechanics ranked its top three power washers, ranging in price from $159 to $529. HomeAdvisor, a website that helps homeowners find home improvement professionals, estimates the typical power washing job for a house with siding is $220 to $380 and $130 to $220 for a driveway. Thumbtack, another website that connects clients with service providers, suggests paying 16 cents to 22 cents per square foot of power washing.

So the money earned on just two power washing jobs would easily recoup the cost of buying even the more expensive power washer.

It’s easy to spread the word on social media or flyers on windshields about your services, whether chain saw cutting and debris removal after a big storm takes down trees or steam cleaning furniture and rugs before the holidays.

Each city or county has their own regulations on what services require a license, business registration fee or insurance. Even if it costs a couple hundred dollars to file the correct paperwork, that cost can be recouped within a few jobs.

Rob Littke, a contractor who does large and small projects for clients, offered a few tips for folks considering purchasing expensive tools. Here’s his advice.

How to Make Money Renting Equipment and Doing Small Maintenance Jobs

Rent Before You Buy

Littke suggests renting any tool before buying it so you can figure out which brands and designs work best for you. Home Depot has a wide selection of tools for rent. A cordless paint sprayer costs $27 for four hours or $38 for the day, while a pressure washer is $63 for four hours or $76 per day.

If you are doing a project for yourself or selling your services, Littke suggests renting tools instead of buying them unless you know you’ll use them regularly.

“When you rent a tool they are always in good shape, clean and ready to use. No hoses are broken, nothing needs to be replaced or refilled,” he said. “You never get to a job site and find out it doesn’t work.”

Also, some tools don’t perform well if they aren’t used frequently.

“There’s nothing worse for a paint sprayer than not using it,” he said, explaining there are pumps and rubber seals that can get stuck if they are left dormant.

“I sold my paint sprayer because I was never using it,” he added. (FYI: Littke prefers brushes and rollers because sprayers require so much preparation covering furniture, floors, doors and windows.)

Find Good Deals on Tools

Home Depot’s tool rental department is also a great place to buy tools. They sell them after being rented a few years.

“I bought a chainsaw there for about $100 that would have been more than $300 new. And since they use the same tools, they stock all the parts to fix them,” he said.

Facebook Marketplace is another good resource for used tools. “I can’t tell you how many people run out and buy a $700 tile saw to tile one bathroom, then they use it once and never again,” Littke said. After a couple years of that tile saw taking up room in the garage, it ends up on Facebook Marketplace for $300 or $400.

Harbor Freight is a chain of more than 1,100 stores across the country that sell 7,000 different tools and accessories for up to 80 percent less than the price of competing products. It buys direct from the factories that supply better-known brands and is able to pass savings along to customers, according to its website. Littke said he has saved hundreds of dollars there for tools that are the same high quality as name brand equipment. He buys the extended warranty for an extra $7, and if something breaks or simply wears out over time, they replace it with a new one.

Buy a Truck, Drive it for Money

If you need to buy a used vehicle for your own use, it makes sense to get a truck because it gives you the ability to use it to make extra money.

Many people need to move just one piece of furniture across town or throw an old mattress away at the town dump. It’s not worth hiring a moving company, and renting a truck from Home Depot is often more trouble and money than finding someone who owns a truck.

Weston Willingham, a senior at the University of Florida, made hundreds of dollars using his $6,000 2005 Dodge Ram 1500 throughout high school.

“My mom is a Realtor, so she always knew people who needed something moved,” he said. “Then I think people started saying: ‘Call Weston. He has a truck. He can help you.’ I was also an extra set of hands.”

Along with the space of a truck, Willingham showed up ready to lift and load as well.

He didn’t set prices, but asked customers to pay what they felt comfortable with. He made at least $40 per job and often more than $100.

“I was lucky because I was in high school and I could be flexible. Sometimes people would call me saying: “Hey I’m going to need you here right now and I will pay you well enough you will want to drop whatever you are doing and help out,” Willingham recalled.

Katherine Snow Smith is a senior writer for The Penny Hoarder.

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Source: thepennyhoarder.com

How to Air Out Your Apartment

Wet clothes … old cat litter … spoiled meat … these are all serious smells that might funk up your apartment for days. And few odors stick with – or stink up — a space, as powerfully as cigarette smoke. If you’ve moved into a formerly smoky spot, or have other smelly issues of your own, here are some tips that will help with the toughest odor removal.

When you need to remove a bad smell, your first step is to air out the room. The easiest way to do this is open all the windows and leave them open for 24 hours, if you can. You might also invest in an air purifier or plants to increase your efforts.

Veteran cleaners believe in the bowl method. Fill a bowl with vinegar or coffee grounds. (Inexpensive coffee will do just fine.) Place the magic bowl in your stinky room, and let it sit there for a few days, one bowl per room. This is an economical and earth-friendly cleaning option, plus you can use the vinegar to tackle other smelly areas. There’s also the obvious, getting a good air freshener. But if these aren’t enough, there’s more that you can do. 

Clean your carpet

Carpets are notorious for trapping odors, so cleaning your carpet is a must if you want to rid your apartment of cigarette smell. You can turn to another trusty friend in green cleaning, baking soda. Sprinkle it on the carpet and leave it on for at least 30 minutes or up to 72 hours; then, vacuum. This should lift away the stink and residue.

If the baking soda/vacuuming combination doesn’t work, you might try steam cleaning or a powerful cleaning product like Nature’s Miracle. Consumers rave about its ability to eradicate pet odors, and the word online is that it also works on cigarette smoke. Look for it at most pet stores.

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Clean your floors & doors

If you have wooden floors and doors, be sure to use a wood-friendly cleaner. Mop the floor first and make sure you change the water when needed. You might need to hand-scrub the corners, baseboards and door frames. If it’s really bad, you should consider replacing them.

Wash windows & mirrors

Here are two spots you may not have considered to be cigarette smell traps: windows and mirrors. Like walls, these surfaces can get covered with residue. Be sure to clean them thoroughly with — you guessed it — vinegar and warm water.

Clean your drapes & blinds

Take down all of the drapes and blinds. Wash them in hot water and add some vinegar to the wash – add this to the water before the drapes and use one cup per load. Vinegar is a great natural cleaner, however it is also a natural bleach and can fade colors, so never let fabrics sit in it for an extended period of time. If they need to be dry-cleaned, be sure to mention the smoke smell to your dry cleaner, they’ll know what to do.

Replace air filters & clean vents

If you’ve cleaned every surface and things still smell a little stale, try replacing your HVAC filter, as well as wiping down air vents. This is a quick tip that will help get cigarette smoke out of air circulation. Note that replacing filters may be a maintenance call, depending on your apartment community rules.

Clean the ceiling

This isn’t an easy task but it’s necessary when trying to eliminate cigarette odor. One trick is to clean with a soft cloth dipped in a blend of 1 part vinegar to 2 parts warm water and wring out any excess moisture before wiping down the ceiling.

Change out light bulbs

The final frontier. This might come to you as a surprise, but changing your light bulbs will definitely help remove the smell. Plus it prepares you for brighter and better-smelling days ahead as you settle into your apartment!

Now you know how to get cigarette smoke smell out of your apartment, so follow these simple steps to fresh, clean-smelling air.

Hot Tip: Before you attempt to remove a really bad smell, do check in with your landlord or apartment community manager. Your landlord may prefer to provide a cleaning service to help remove the offensive odor.

Photo by The Creative Exchange on Unsplash

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Full House? Maximize Your Space With These Tips

Make a call to 1-800-Got Junk? Their minimum fee is 9 to remove and dispose of about as much stuff as fits in a pickup truck. There are also local, independent junk removal companies that offer competitive pricing. Or haul it away yourself, donating the usable items to your favorite charity for resale.
“The VIGDA corner room divider can be easily assembled following the provided instructions,” an Ikea spokeswoman said. The VIGDA consists of a track that is attached to the ceiling, with curtains that hang to the floor. It costs while Ikea drapes start at .99 a set.
“He literally took a flat king sheet and drilled screws through it into one corner of the living room,” his mother, Alyssa Brown said. “He made this little triangular room of his own.”

A completes his work from an office set up in his closet at home as his kids spend time in his room beside him. This photo illustrates one way to maximize small spaces: put your office in your closet.
Getty Images

5 Tips for How to Maximize Your Space 

I considered adding air conditioning to the garage, which had two big windows, but that was way too expensive. I thought about converting the dining room to their room, but there would be no way to get to the kitchen without going through it.

1. A cleaned-out closet becomes an office nook 

When I got divorced several years ago, we sold our four-bedroom home and I rented a two-bedroom house in a great neighborhood with a lot of character and big yard. With two daughters away at college and a high-school-aged son rotating between his dad and me, I really didn’t need more than two bedrooms.

  • Remove all the shelving, except for perhaps the top shelf for storage.
  • Have your child pick out a color and paint the inside together.
  • Measure the width and depth of the closet then get a piece of scrap countertop or plywood cut at Lowe’s, Home Depot or an independent cabinet and kitchen shop. This could cost $50 to $100 depending on the size and material.
  • Nail wooden slats or 2-by-4s around the perimeter of your closet about 30 inches above the floor.
  • Place the desktop on the supports.
  • Add a bulletin board, plastic file holders, stapler and a cup for markers and pencils. Let your child decorate his or her “classroom” with a few photos or printouts of their favorite heroes and heroines.

2. Got Junk? Then you probably have space.

I put my dresser in the dining room, and my clothes in the hall closet. For a summer when the girls were home, I slept on the sofa in the living room or on a pull-out in the screened porch.

Pro Tip
If you are feeling crowded in your home and considering buying something bigger, it’s scary these days to see how much just a little more space will cost. The median sales price of a home was up 17% for the four weeks ending April 11 compared to the same period in 2020, according to Redfin, the nationwide real estate brokerage.

Katherine Snow Smith is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder.

3. A sheet and a drill can create a room

But disappointed would-be homebuyers feeling priced out of the market can make simple changes where they currently live to maximize space and feel less cramped.
“The BEKANT screen provides privacy and absorbs sound to create division within the room,” she added. It costs 9 and is 59 inches high and 32 inches wide.
Here are some ways to create new spaces in your existing house or condo and enjoy it more while waiting for prices to drop. Who knows, you may decide there’s no place like home.
Is it time to pare down your belongings? Use these tips on how to minimize your stuff.

IKEA has organizational devices for small spaces such as the VIDGA, which is a curtain-like room divider and a BEKANT, which is a narrow standing desk.
IKEA has organizational products for small spaces, such as the VIDGA, left, which is a curtain room divider and a BEKANT, right, which is a screen that divides a room, gives privacy and reduces sound. Photo courtesy of IKEA

4. Ikea to the rescue

If a closet or a spare bedroom is packed to the brim with a broken vacuum cleaner or rusty exercise bike covered in old clothes, getting rid of all that offers more space for humans.
The rest of the house was decorated with my stuff, but they still had a room of their own and a place they felt was theirs.
“The MICKE Corner Workstation can be placed anywhere in the room. With shelving and a magnetic board, you can organize this workstation in your own unique way,” the Ikea representative said. It costs 9, and can be placed so that it creates two walls against a corner with a small opening to “get in” to the desk-and-shelf unit.
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Ikea has several products from to 9 that can create partitions or turn a corner into an office or bedroom.

5. Rethink and Reconfigure 

Here are some ways to maximize space and carve out individual rooms for a lot less than adding on or leasing a bigger apartment.
Ultimately, I made the master bedroom their room. I slept in it 90% of the time since they weren’t home often, but it was filled with all their “stuff” and their clothes.
But I struggled with my daughters having to move out of the house where they grew up and all their “stuff” being packed away in boxes in the attic. (“Stuff” defined: photos, embroidered pillows, framed record albums, twinkling lights, artwork, music boxes, stuffed animals, an old bubble gum machine, etc. It’s the “stuff” that makes a room, your room.)
This “corner room” could also house a play space, Lego table or easel in a living room or kitchen, offering privacy to a child and keeping toys out of sight in the main room.
The sheet supplied one wall, and the existing walls completed the rest of his triangular space that had enough room for a comfy chair, end table and a fan. The fan helped drown out the noise of the rest of the three-bedroom apartment. He used earphones when playing his XBox to contain his noise.
A screened porch, sunroom or dining room may be put to better use as a bedroom or classroom when everyone is home. Eat in the kitchen or at a coffee table, and make that dining room into one or even two rooms for sleeping, schooling or working.
Ready to stop worrying about money?
When Beau Brown was a high school senior during the first year of the pandemic, he did school at home alongside his two siblings and his parents, who were working at home. Feeling cramped, he found a way to carve out a little space for himself.  But his easy fix could create a beloved hideaway for a kid for any age. <!–

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Shelving units can be secured on one end to a wall and stick out into a room to divide it into two spaces. One KALLAX shelving system is almost five feet high and three feet wide for . Two of these would make a good-sized wall down the middle of your kids’ shared bedroom, or section off a corner of the living room for an office.