Cook Fish In Your Dishwasher: Alternative Uses for Common Appliances

Ever wondered what else you could do with your toaster oven or rice cooker when you weren’t using them to cook with? The common household appliances you can find in your apartment’s kitchen come with their intended use, but with a little imagination and some know-how, you can find clever and alternative uses for the most basic of appliances. Here’s our list of everyday appliances and unique ways you can use them.

Dishwasher

The steam and heat produced by your dishwasher is perfect for steaming up fresh fish or vegetables. Season the fish with a little olive oil and lemon juice, and wrap the raw fish liberally with foil (salmon particularly holds up well in the dishwasher). Place the fish on the top rack of the dishwasher, set it for a hot pots and pans cycle and let the dishwasher run through a cycle. In no time at all you’ll have a perfectly poached piece of fish. Just make sure not to add any dish soap to the washer!

Microwave

We all know that your microwave’s powerful heating capabilities are perfect for warming up your favorite foods, but that technology also makes the microwave great for disinfecting and deodorizing common household items. Instead of reaching for antibacterial soap, soak your kitchen sponge or dish rag in water mixed with white vinegar or lemon juice, then throw it into the microwave and heat on high for 30 seconds to disinfect and deodorize. You can also disinfect plastic cutting boards this way – wash the board well, rub it with the cut side of a lemon and microwave on high for one minute.

Rice Cooker

Give your guests the spa treatment by steaming towels to offer them before dinner. Wet and wring out several small washcloths, fold in thirds horizontally and roll and place inside the steamer. Steam for five minutes, or until hot. Remove with tongs and place on a tray or plate for each dinner guest.

Coffee Maker

If you’re short on time and low on clean dishes, but still need to eat lunch or dinner, you can use your coffee maker to prepare soup. Start off simple by using your coffee maker to cook your favorite canned soup, like tomato or chicken noodle. The coffee pot not only heats up the soup, but the convenient handle makes it easy to pour the soup into various cups and bowls. Or, take it one step further by preparing ramen noodle soup in the coffee maker. Open the packet of uncooked noodles and put them into the carafe. Fill the water tank with just enough water to cover the noodles, never filling more than halfway. Put the seasoning packet in the drip station and push the button to start the pot. Within minutes you’ll have a steaming, hot bowl of ramen noodle soup. Make sure to clean your pot thoroughly before making a pot of coffee.

Blender

Blenders can be used for more than just making smoothies or milkshakes. A decent quality blender can be used much like a food processor, crushing ice or chopping nuts to make peanut butter. You can also make salsa in the blender. Combine four ripe roma tomatoes, one jalapeno with the seeds removed, ½ chopped sweet onion, lime juice and olive oil in the blender on the pulse setting. If you prefer a chunkier salsa, just pulse a few times. Add chili powder, cumin, salt and pepper and pulse a few more times. Remove salsa from the blender and chill in the refrigerator for at least an hour before serving.

Toaster Oven

A counter-top toaster oven is the perfect appliance for cooking in small spaces. And, it’s a great alternative for energy-conscious consumers, since you don’t need to heat up a big gas or electric oven to cook something small, like a baked potato or small pizza. But in addition to cooking, a toaster oven can also warm your plates before serving good. Many standard ovens only go down to 200°F, which may be too warm, but a toaster oven can be set at a lower temperature. Try warming a set of plates for five minutes at 170°F.

Coffee Grinder

Avid coffee drinkers know that the freshest, best-tasting cup of coffee is brewed from coffee beans that have been ground in small batches. But a coffee grinder can also grind spices like cloves, cardamom pods or peppercorns. You can make your own homemade bread crumbs by tearing up a piece of bread into small pieces and grinding according to how large or fine you want the crumbs. Create your own potpourri by grinding up dried flowers, orange or lemon peel and cinnamon sticks. Or, turn recycled white or colored paper into confetti with a few pulses of the coffee grinder.

Photo credit: iStockphoto/ZargonDesign

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Pretend Your Apartment is a Car: Cleaning Tips for Guys

Are you a man? Is your apartment appalling? Why not consider joining the cult of men who clean?

You owe it to yourself to investigate the mysteries of the livable apartment. A new year requires new ways of doing things, so read on for a few quick cleaning tips that will help keep your apartment presentable. (You may discover it’s not as bad as you expect.)

Pretend your apartment is a car
Many a woman has lamented the fact that her man could spend hours detailing his car, but seem blind to household grime. Why not tackle your apartment cleaning in the same way you would your car? Vacuum under all the furniture, dust every corner and surface, and scrub away every bit of mildew in the shower — all with the same single-mindedness and dedication you reserve for keeping your car clean! Once you’ve done a thorough apartment cleaning initially, the gleam will be much easier to maintain and in even less time.

More on cleaning your apartment:
Declutter Your Apartment: What’s OK to Throw Away?Prioritize Your Apartment Cleaning EffortsHow to Clean Your Space in a HurryHow to Keep Your Apartment Cleaning Earth-Friendly

Assemble your tool kit
What man doesn’t like assembling tools for a project? Apartment cleaning is no different than a workbench scheme. Get the right tools for the job, and clean-up will be a breeze.

Here are a few things you may already have on hand to gather together in your cleaning tool box.

• A squeegee for windows, mirrors, shower doors and tile.
• A wet/dry vac. Attach a soft brush attachment and you can spin away cobwebs and dust.
• Car polish. Wipe down your shower stall and door to keep soap-scum from sticking.
• Tennis ball. Spray with a general cleaner and buff away scuff marks on floors and walls.
• Steel wool (fine, synthetic). Good for scrubbing pots and counter gunk.
• Sponges, scrub brushes.
• All-purpose cleaner.
• Mop or Swiffer WetJet.
• Electromagnetic duster.

Create a plan
Guys like solutions to problems, right? So look around. Even the worst mire can be cleaned up with a bit of smart planning. Come up with your own system on your own time. If you’re a night owl who gets inspired at 3 a.m., work your cleaning magic then. Or maybe you’re self-employed and want to get your clean on first thing in the morning. Don’t fight it; go with your particular flow, grabbing any time you can get.

Multitask for success
You likely value multitasking in your work endeavors, so try double duty to clean your apartment, as well.

• Start your bathroom cleaning while you’re getting clean yourself. Scrub the shower while you’re taking one, wipe the sink right after you brush your teeth, and quickly wipe down the toilet with a flushable cloth, after giving it a scrub with a little cleanser.

• Throw on a load of wash while you’re getting dressed or undressed, and start the dishwasher as soon as you’ve finished your last bite of breakfast or dinner.

• Sweep or vacuum your kitchen floor every morning or evening, and never leave a mess in the sink or on counters overnight.

• Vacuum, dust and straighten your living room during the commercial breaks of your favorite show.

A man can take good care of his living space without giving up the image that he just doesn’t care about those things! Implement these cleaning steps, adapting them to your own schedule and needs. Remember that some effort is required – preferably, a little each day – to maintain an apartment space that’s comfortable, livable… and sharable. Your buddies will be impressed — and you can even bring home a friend without wondering where you tossed your boxers!

Photo Credit: Shutterstock / Yuri Arcurs

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Stock Market Today: Dow Leads in a Mixed May Start for Stocks

The Dow Jones Industrial Average kicked off the month with a 0.7% gain to 34,113 on Monday that came despite a weaker-than-expected Institute of Supply Management manufacturing report.

Supply bottlenecks resulted in an April reading of 60.7 – a slower rate of expansion than March’s 64.7 reading indicated, but expansion nonetheless.

“Although the composite was a fair bit below expectations (Barclays 64.5; consensus 65.0), the decline comes off of a robust March reading that was the highest since 1983,” says Barclays economist Jonathan Millar. “Indeed, components of the composite continue to point to very strong growth, which comes as no surprise, given highly favorable demand conditions amid fiscal stimulus, easing of social distancing restrictions, and ongoing progress in vaccinations.”

We’re glad to see that at least some investors heeded our advice to ignore the urge to “sell in May and go away.” But stocks weren’t exactly up across the board. The Nasdaq Composite (-0.5% to 13,895) struggled, thanks to weakness in mega-cap tech and tech-esque names such as Tesla (TSLA, -3.5%), Amazon.com (AMZN, -2.3%) and Salesforce.com (CRM, -2.9%).

“For the first time in a while there is a clear value/cyclical bias while growth/tech is under pressure,” says Michael Reinking, senior market strategist for the New York Stock Exchange. “Tech wobbled last week despite blowout numbers from the mega-cap stocks. This is especially concerning as the rate environment remains in check.”

Sign up for Kiplinger’s FREE Closing Bell e-letter: Our daily look at the stock market’s moves, and what moves investors should make

Other action in the stock market today:

  • The S&P 500 gained 0.3% to 4,192.
  • The small-cap Russell 2000 also finished in the black, up 0.5% to 2,277.
  • Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B, +1.7%) held its 2021 annual shareholder meeting this weekend. Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett and Executive Vice Chairman Charlie Munger addressed a number of topics, including trimming Berkshire’s stake in Apple (AAPL) in Q4 2020. “It was probably a mistake,” said Buffett, adding that AAPL’s stock price is a “huge, huge bargain” given how “indispensable” the company’s products are to people. Also of note: Berkshire grew fourth-quarter operating income by 20%, to $5.9 billion, while cash grew 5% to $145.4 billion.
  • Domino’s Pizza (DPZ, +2.6%) was a notable winner today. The pizza chain revealed an accelerated stock buyback program, saying in a regulatory filing that it will pay Barclays $1 billion in cash for roughly 2 million DPZ shares.
  • U.S. crude oil futures jumped 1.4% to end at $64.49 per barrel.
  • Gold futures snapped a four-day losing streak, adding 1.4% to settle at $1,791.80 an ounce.
  • The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) declined 2.3% to 18.18.
  • Bitcoin prices improved by 1.1% to $57,530.32. More impressive was the 18.6% improvement in Ethereum, to $3,300.64 (Bitcoin trades 24 hours a day; prices reported here are as of 4 p.m. each trading day.)
stock chart for 050321stock chart for 050321

Another Big Week of Reports … And Dividends

What should investors be looking forward to this week?

On Thursday and Friday, we’ll get the latest weekly unemployment filings and April jobs data, respectively, but throughout the week, another heaping helping of earnings reports, anchored by the likes of General Motors (GM), Pfizer (PFE), Under Armour (UAA) and PayPal (PYPL).

And given that many companies tend to synchronize their dividend and buyback actions with their earnings reports, you also can expect plenty of news on the dividend-growth front.

In some cases, those raises might be token upticks meant to secure current or future membership in the Dividend Aristocrats. But others are bound to compete with this year’s most explosive payout hikes – improvements of 15%, 20% or even 30% that drastically change the income aspect of current shareholders’ investments. Ideally, of course, investors want the best of both worlds: income longevity and generosity.

These 10 dividend stocks just might fit the bill. This group of mostly blue-chip household names offer a strong history of payout increases, a sharp level of recent hikes compared to their peers, and the operational quality to continue affording these annual raises.

Kyle Woodley was long AMZN, CRM, PYPL and Ethereum as of this writing.

Source: kiplinger.com

Apple Card Review – Does It Live Up to the Hype?

Advertiser Disclosure: This post includes references to offers from our partners. We receive compensation when you click on links to those products. However, the opinions expressed here are ours alone and at no time has the editorial content been provided, reviewed, or approved by any issuer.

Apple Card immodestly claims to “completely [rethink] everything about the credit card.” Is it correct? Maybe.

Backed by the Mastercard network, Apple Card certainly has a host of innovative features that old-fashioned credit cards don’t, such as daily cash-back and numberless physical cards. And it’s a harbinger of the cashless, contactless payments landscape to come. No serious observer can dispute that Apple Card is ahead of its time.

But any product that’s truly ahead of its time must also be competitive in the present. And beyond its novel features, Apple Card works pretty much like any other credit card. Indeed, in spite – or perhaps because – of its novel additions, it lacks some consumer-friendly features common to other popular cash-back cards and general-purpose rewards cards.

Here’s a closer look at what sets Apple Card apart, and how it stacks up against other credit cards.

Things to Keep in Mind About Apple Card

Before we dive into Apple Card’s details, two points bear mentioning.

First, though cardholders who don’t pay their statement balances in full each month are subject to interest charges that vary with their creditworthiness and prevailing benchmark rates, Apple Card charges none of the fees typically levied by credit card companies: no annual fee, no late fee, and no over-limit fee.

Second, Apple Card is designed to work with Apple Pay, which runs on Apple (Mac) hardware only. If you’re one of the many millions of iPhone users in the United States, this card is for you. If you’re an Android loyalist, you’re out of luck.

Key Features

Here’s a closer look at Apple Card’s most notable features.

Earning Cash Back

Apple Card has a three-tiered cash-back program:

  • 3% Cash Back. All purchases from Apple earn unlimited 3% cash back. These include, but are not limited to, purchases from Apple.com, physical Apple Stores, the iTunes Store, the App Store, and in-app purchases. Certain non-Apple purchases made using Apple Pay earn 3% cash-back rewards as well.
  • 2% Cash Back. All other purchases made using Apple Pay (including through your Apple phone or Apple Watch) earn unlimited 2% cash back. Hundreds of major retailer chains and brands, encompassing more than 2 million individual merchant locations online and off, accept Apple Pay. These include but aren’t limited to Walgreens, Nike, Uber Eats, Duane Reade, Amazon, and thousands of gas stations. If you’re not familiar with how Apple Pay works, see its site for details.
  • 1% Cash Back. Purchases made with merchants – online, offline, and in-app – that don’t accept Apple Pay earn an unlimited 1% cash back.

Redeeming Cash Back

Cash back earned through Apple Card purchases accrues daily. Each day a purchase posts to your account, you’ll receive the requisite cash back on your Apple Pay Cash card in the Apple Wallet app.

From there, you can use it to pay for purchases within or without the Apple ecosystem or to make payments on your Apple Card balance.

If you don’t have an Apple Pay Cash card and aren’t interested in getting one, you must accept cash back earned to your Apple Card via statement credits, which may not be much of a sacrifice.

Apple Pay Integration

Apple Card is essentially an offshoot of Apple Wallet. It’s designed for use in conjunction with Apple Pay – or, more specifically, as the user’s default Apple Pay payment method. Apple clearly expects most Apple Card transactions to be contactless, executed through a Web portal or with the tap of an iPhone.

Beyond Apple Card’s novelty as the first truly “contactless first” credit card, users benefit from Apple Pay’s stringent security features. These include:

  • Unique Device Number. Your Apple Card is issued with a unique number that’s stored in your iPhone’s Secure Element, the secure microchip that hosts the phone’s most sensitive functions.
  • Two-Factor Purchasing. Every purchase requires your unique device number, plus a unique one-time code generated on the spot.
  • Purchase Authorization Via Face ID or Touch ID. This renders stolen phones all but useless for making purchases.

Apple Card also takes data security seriously. Apple and Goldman Sachs, the card’s issuer, vow never to share customer data with third parties. Only Goldman Sachs has access to users’ transaction histories and personal information.

Physical Credit Card

Apple Card isn’t 100% virtual. The physical Apple Card is a titanium card that looks and feels just like any other premium credit card, except that it’s much sleeker. The card face is a minimalist triumph, with no cardholder name, card number, or CVV and virtually no marks to mar its metallic hue.

Apple and Goldman Sachs tout the security benefits of Apple Card’s featurelessness. Without any information to identify the card, it’s useless in the wrong hands.

Real-Time Fraud Protection

Apple Card’s real-time fraud protection feature notifies you every time your card is used to make a purchase. If something doesn’t seem right about a transaction, or you know for a fact that you didn’t make it, you can immediately initiate the dispute process by tapping the notification.

Purchase Organization and Mapping

Apple Card automatically organizes purchases by purchase category – entertainment, food and drinks, and so on – and merchant. Categories are color-coded for easy visualization and totaled monthly for easy budgeting. With features like that, who needs a paid budgeting app?

Apple Card also automatically maps purchases, showing you where you’ve spent money recently, literally. If a real-time fraud protection notification slips your notice, perhaps seeing a purchase in a city you’ve never visited will jog your memory.

Spending Summaries

Apple Card’s spending summaries, visible in the Wallet app, reveal how much you’re spending, and on what, in any given week or month. You can view spending trends over time here too, which comes in handy for the periodic budget reviews you should be doing.

Payment Due Dates & Frequency

By default, Apple Card statements are due at the end of the month. If you prefer to pay balances more frequently – and reduce interest charges when you can’t pay off your balance in full before the statement due date – you can set weekly or biweekly payments too.

Interest Calculator

Apple Card’s built-in interest calculator automatically tallies expected interest charges when you pay less than the full balance due on your card before the end of the grace period.

Credit card issuers are required to reveal on each statement the true cost of making only the minimum payment due in comparison with at least one larger monthly payment.

However, this is a far more robust and interactive interest calculator that’s significantly more likely to nudge you to boost your monthly payment.

Interest-Reduction Suggestions

If the interest calculator isn’t enough, Apple Card also provides “smart payment suggestions” that encourage cardholders to increase their monthly payments, thereby decreasing their total interest liability.

It’s not clear how Apple Card arrives at these suggestions, but they appear to be based on cardholders’ spending patterns and payment history.

Interest-Free Installment Payments

Apple Card offers interest-free monthly installment payments for select Apple products purchased through the company’s sales channels. You can easily see the size of your installments and how much you have left to pay in the app.

Text-Based Support

Apple Card has a text-based support system that’s available 24/7. If you run into an issue with the card or have a question that doesn’t concern a disputed charge, which you can handle through the real-time fraud protection interface, this is your ticket to a resolution.

Important Fees

Apple Card charges no fees to cardholders: no foreign transaction fees, balance transfer fees, or annual fees.

Advantages

These are among Apple Card’s principal advantages.

1. No Fees

Apple Card doesn’t charge any fees to cardholders. This makes it all but unique, as even avowedly low-fee cards assess fees for less common occurrences such as late and returned payments.

2. Cash Back Accrues Daily

Apple Card is among the only widely available credit cards to accrue cash back on a daily basis, rather than at the end of the statement cycle.

Although the accrual frequency doesn’t affect net cash-back earnings or cash back earning rates, it’s certainly nice to see your spending subsidized in near-real-time.

3. Solid Cash Back Rates on Apple & Apple Pay Purchases

This card earns 3% cash back on virtually all purchases within the Apple ecosystem, excluding purchases with Apple Pay merchants. This 3% category covers, but isn’t limited to, the following:

  • Apple.com purchases
  • Purchases at physical Apple Stores
  • iTunes Store purchases
  • App Store purchases
  • In-app purchases

Apple Card also earns 2% cash back on purchases made with Apple Pay merchants. So if you’re able to limit your spending to the Apple and Apple Pay ecosystems, you’ll net somewhere north of 2% cash back on this no-annual-fee card, depending on your exact spending mix.

4. Above-Average Security Features

Apple Card is more secure than your average credit card. The physical card doesn’t have a card number or CVV, so you won’t have to worry about what could happen between the moment you lose your card and the moment you freeze your account.

The virtual card is denoted by a unique device number locked away in your iPhone’s Secure Element, far from prying eyes.

Perhaps most consequentially, Apple has a strict privacy policy that forbids data sharing with third parties. There’s no need to opt out, which is often easier said than done, and only Goldman Sachs has access to your transaction history.

5. Real-Time Fraud Protection

Apple Card has another security feature worth touting: real-time fraud protection that alerts you whenever your card is used to make a purchase and lets you flag potentially fraudulent transactions with a single tap.

Compared with the traditional dispute resolution process, this is a snap, even when flagged charges turn out to be legitimate.

6. Easy, Flexible Payments

Apple Card’s default payment due date – the last day of the month – is easy to remember, even without the helpful reminders.

If you’re trying to budget on an irregular income and prefer not to wait until the end of the month to pay off your entire balance, Apple Card’s customized weekly and biweekly payment intervals have you covered.

Other credit cards let you pay off balances throughout the month, but few make it as easy as Apple Card.

7. Interest-Reduction Features

Apple Card’s interest calculator and interest-reduction suggestions are classic examples of “nudge” theory in action. By revealing just how much you’ll save over time by paying a little more upfront, these features nudge you to make smart financial decisions.

Of course, it’s always best to pay off your balance in full by the statement due date, but when unexpected expenses make that impossible, it’s nice to feel like your credit card issuer is on your side.

8. Useful Budgeting and Spending Control Features

With so many budgeting and spending control features, Apple Card feels like a personal budgeting suite with a spending aid built in.

Maybe that’s the point. Though most small-business credit cards have basic expense tracking and reporting features, Apple Card’s package is unusually robust for a consumer credit card.

If what’s keeping you from building and sticking to a household budget is the inconvenience inherent in standalone budgeting software, this is a potential game-changer.

9. Text-Based Customer Support

Apple Card’s text-based customer support is a low-friction alternative to menu-laden, over-automated phone support and unpredictable email support.

Whether this feature is as efficient as Apple and Goldman Sachs promise remains to be seen, but it’s difficult to see it being worse than the status quo – for relatively simple issues, at least.

10. No Penalty Interest Charges

Apple Card doesn’t charge penalty interest. While it’s best never to find yourself in a position where penalty interest would apply, the assurance that you won’t be unduly penalized for a lapse beyond your control is certainly welcome.

Disadvantages

Consider these potential disadvantages before applying for Apple Card.

1. Requires Apple Pay and Apple Hardware

Apple Card’s biggest drawback is its exclusivity. The card requires Apple Pay, which runs exclusively on Apple hardware, meaning it’s not appropriate for Android or Windows device users.

If you’re set on applying for Apple Card but don’t have an iPhone or other compatible Apple device, Apple Watch is your most cost-effective option. Apple Pay runs on Apple Watch just fine, and you can pick up refurbished older versions – Series 1, 2, and 3 – for less than $100.

That’s still a significant outlay, though, and no other credit card on the market requires compatible hardware.

2. Only 1% Cash Back on Non-Apple Pay Purchases

Apple Card earns just 1% cash back on non-Apple Pay purchases. If your daily, weekly, and monthly consumption habits involve merchants that mostly accept Apple Pay, you shouldn’t have trouble earning the higher 2% cash-back rate, but not all merchants do.

Square has a non-exhaustive list of major merchants that do accept Apple Pay. Do yourself a favor and review it before applying for this card.

3. Goldman Sachs’ First Credit Card

Apple Card is the first consumer credit card issued by Goldman Sachs Bank. Apple touts this as an advantage, arguing that Goldman Sachs isn’t bound by the constraints of legacy credit card issuers such as Chase and Barclays.

And it’s not as if Goldman Sachs is entirely new to the consumer finance realm. Its Marcus by Goldman Sachs loan and savings products are innovative and well-liked.

That said, it’s not hard to imagine a first-time credit card issuer experiencing some growing pains, especially given Apple Card’s novelty. At a minimum, don’t be surprised to see iterative changes to Apple Card as Goldman Sachs figures out what works and what doesn’t.

Final Word

If you’re a committed Apple Pay user with the hardware to back it up – an iPhone, Apple Watch, or maybe an iPad – then it might make sense for you to ditch your traditional credit cards and going all-in on Apple Card.

Users who restrict their spending to Apple Pay merchants only stand to earn 2% cash back across the board, about as good as it gets on a consistent basis for premium cash-back credit cards. To do better than that, you’ll need to upgrade to a premium travel rewards credit card with a hefty annual fee.

Source: moneycrashers.com

Tips to Troubleshoot Slow Internet Speed

For apartment dwellers who depend on their connection to the Web, it’s a drag when a slow one seems to stop time online.

With a little bit of know-how, you can troubleshoot a solution when the information superhighway leaves you on the side of the road. Keep these details in mind.

Consider the time of day

Time of day is a typical culprit – one that you might be able to avoid. Joining a lot of people online at once can tax servers and slow down overall response time. If you happen to be connecting at a peak hour – say, in the early evening – you can expect slower loading. Consider what you are doing online, as well. Streaming video or music is more of a burden for the connection than sending an email.

Consider your computer

Maybe your own machine is contributing to the frustration. An older machine, especially one with less memory or a slower chipset, might not play well with the Web. Or perhaps your computer is not optimally set to connect with the Net. Too many open programs, large active downloads, or even virus activity could slow you up significantly.

Wireless woes

For all its convenience, connecting wirelessly can pose its own set of challenges. For one, many devices in the typical household operate on wireless frequencies, and these devices compete with each other over airwaves. (When you live in an apartment community, you may even see several of your neighbors’ networks listed on your device. The walls aren’t keeping all these wireless signals from intermingling!) One simple thing you might try is moving your router to sniff out a better signal.

More tips regarding your apartment utilities:
Ready to Ditch the Landline and Go Cell Phone Only?How to Transfer Utility Services When You MoveTune In with These Budget-Friendly Alternatives to Cable

Consider your hardware set-up

If you find you cannot connect at all, ask yourself the basic questions: Is everything plugged in and turned on? Are your electrical outlets in working order? A bad modem or out-of-date router software or firmware all might contribute to connection problems. If you suspect one of these culprits, contact your service provider for specific advice regarding your particular set-up.

Possible solutions for a crawling Web

Before you give up and read a book, there are a few fairly straightforward things you might try to stoke your time online.

  • Try another browser. If the particular browser you’re using seems slow, try a different one. Firefox and Google Chrome are good choices.
  • Simplify what you’re doing online. Close extra, unneeded programs or tabs, or avoid streaming or downloading if these activities are especially slow.
  • Start a virus check. It never hurts to run your virus protection program to search for any unwanted virus visitors which may be clogging up your connection.
  • But don’t be afraid of harmless cookies! Set your browser preferences to enable cookies. The computer kind won’t add to your waistline, and they just might speed up your computing experience by helping your machine remember your personal preferences on various websites.  (You should, however, be wary about the sites you visit!)
  • Check your browser toolbar. An unexpected change in the look of your browser might mean you have inadvertently downloaded a piece of software which has changed your interface, like a new toolbar. While the change may not be malicious, tracking still might slow your computer’s performance.

Photo credit: Shutterstock / Zurijeta

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Source: apartmentguide.com

Cities with Worst and Best Credit Scores

Having a high credit score is extremely important in today’s financial world and is used by dozens of industries to determine whether you’re a risk to them or not. Credit scores are checked for hiring, renting, buying, and even when dating. We all understand how important credit scores are and, while where you live isn’t necessarily going to affect your credit score, we’ve decided to put together a list of top 20 cities with the best credit scores and the worst credit scores below.

While it’s unlikely that any location will have a direct impact on your credit score, you may want to consider that in some cities the average household is more financially stable than in other cities. If we look at the city with the highest average credit score, for instance, Minneapolis-St. Paul has an average median income of almost $70,000/year where as a city like Shreveport with a much lower average credit score, has a median income of only $42,157. So, it’s very possible that the higher incomes directly affected the credit scores as card holders were more financial stable.

Cities with the best credit

Rank Metropolitan area State Average
VantageScore 3.0
Average number
of open credit cards
1 MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL MN 702 3.48
2 SIOUX FALLS (MITCHELL) SD 700 3.05
3 DULUTH-SUPERIOR MN, WI 697 3.19
4 FARGO-VALLEY CITY ND, MN 697 3.31
5 GREEN BAY-APPLETON WI 697 3.26
6 CEDAR RAPIDS-WTRLO-IWC-DUB IA 697 3.23
7 MADISON WI 694 3.23
8 BOSTON (MANCHESTER) MA, NH 694 3.60
9 LA CROSSE-EAU CLAIRE WI 692 3.13
10 BURLINGTON-PLATTSBURGH VT, NY, NH 691 3.06
11 LINCOLN – HASTINGS-KRNY NE 690 3.25
12 JOHNSTOWN-ALTOONA PA 689 3.30
13 SAN FRANCISCO-OAK-SAN JOSE CA 689 3.40
14 PEORIA-BLOOMINGTON IL 689 3.49
15 PITTSBURGH PA 688 3.65
16 PORTLAND-AUBURN ME, NH 687 3.08
17 HONOLULU HI 687 3.24
18 HARRISBURG-LNCSTR-LEB-YORK PA 685 3.50
19 ALBANY-SCHENECTADY-TROY NY 685 3.46
20 HARTFORD – NEW HAVEN CT 683 3.59

Cities with the worst credit

Rank Metropolitan area State Average
VantageScore 3.0
Average number
of open credit cards
1 HARLINGEN-WSLCO-BRNSVL-MCA TX 628 2.81
2 LAS VEGAS NV 628 3.03
3 JACKSON, MS MS 629 2.29
4 FLORENCE-MYRTLE BEACH SC 633 2.72
5 BAKERSFIELD CA 634 2.87
6 AUGUSTA GA, SC 635 2.66
7 COLUMBUS-TUPELO-WEST POINT MS, AL 635 2.38
8 SHREVEPORT LA, TX, AR, OK 635 2.34
9 SAVANNAH GA, SC 637 2.77
10 MEMPHIS TN 637 2.64
11 FRESNO-VISALIA CA 639 2.82
12 COLUMBUS, GA GA 639 2.67
13 MONROE-EL DORADO LA, AR 639 2.39
14 MACON GA 640 2.68
15 TYLER-LONGVIEW(LFKN-NCGD) TX 641 2.78
16 MONTGOMERY (SELMA) AL 641 2.70
17 TALLAHASSEE-THOMASVILLE FL, GA 642 2.54
18 CORPUS CHRISTI TX 642 2.75
19 EL PASO TX 644 2.99
20 AMARILLO TX 644 2.75

Credit score and open credit card data are from Experian. We analyzed 143 of the largest U.S. metropolitan areas.

Source: creditabsolute.com

Couponing Do’s & Don’ts — How to Save Money Shopping With Coupons

You’ve probably already used coupons at some point in your life. According to a 2020 survey by Statista, almost 90% of respondents reported having used coupons for shopping. Considering that coupons provide a fast, free way to reduce spending on groceries and essentials, it’s clear why coupons are so popular.

But to make your couponing efforts more successful, it’s crucial to familiarize yourself with the tips and tricks successful couponers use. The last thing you want to do is waste time collecting coupons only to realize none of them is valid when you’re checking out.

If you’re relatively new to couponing, start slowly by bringing a few paper coupons to your next shopping trip. Over time, you can incorporate more of these couponing do’s and don’ts to save more.

Couponing Do’s

Couponing doesn’t have to feel like a marathon or take up hours of your week. By following one or more of these couponing do’s, you can start to trim your monthly spending — and ultimately save more money.

1. Do Know Where to Find Coupons

The most basic step in starting to coupon is to collect them. Ideally, you can gradually build a stash of coupons for the stores and brands you frequently shop so you can always find some savings at the register.

To begin your coupon hunt, plan your weekly meals around sale products if possible. That helps you find discounts without even having to coupon. To find in-store sales, look for digital flyers on grocery store websites.

Another resource is Flipp, a free app that provides weekly flyers, deals, and online coupons for over 2,000 stores. Flipp has weekly flyers for stores like Aldi, Kroger, and Walmart. You can clip deals you find to the in-app shopping list to help you keep track.

Once your virtual or paper shopping list has all the food you need for the week, finish the list with any household essentials you need to restock, like toilet paper or cleaning supplies. You’re now ready to track down coupons for everything on your shopping list.

There are several free websites you can use to print paper coupons. These websites include coupon databases and brand websites like:

Coupons.com, Coupon Sherpa, RetailMeNot, and Valpak also have mobile apps that let you find and redeem digital coupons at the register. If you don’t want to spend time and money printing coupons, apps are your best resource. You can also try other mobile coupon apps like Grocery Pal and The Coupons App, which have digital coupons for grocery stores like Aldi, Albertsons, Kroger, Food Lion, Safeway, and Publix.

Between paper and digital coupons, you should find savings on some of the products on your weekly shopping list. If you can’t track down a specific coupon, searching online for the product name plus “coupon” is another tactic to try.

Finally, if you subscribe to a Sunday paper or get coupons and ad flyers in the mail, take a few minutes to scan for coupons you need. If you spot an incredible coupon for a product you buy regularly, you can scoop up a few extra newspapers on discount at a dollar store the following day or look online for the same coupon.

Also, don’t forget to check out those coupons they print out at the register after checkout (sometimes called Catalina coupons). Those are typically based on your specific purchases, so there may be something in there you can use. Others may be percent-off discounts on your total sale price if you spend over a certain amount.

You don’t have to go overboard and find duplicates of every coupon for your shopping list. Find as many as you can, and remember to check expiration dates so you shop in time to save.

2. Do Combine Coupons With Cash-Back Rewards Apps

Coupons usually provide a percent discount or certain dollar-off amount to let you save. But if you want to save even more on your weekly grocery haul, you can use cash-back rewards apps to earn rebates for buying certain products.

Just like searching for coupons, you can research rebate opportunities before heading to the store to earn cash back for products you were going to buy anyway. Popular rewards apps you can use include:

  • Ibotta. Earn cash back for buying specific products from Ibotta partners and uploading your receipt to the app for proof of purchase. Ibotta works with over 1,000 brands, and there are always offers on groceries and everyday essentials. You can redeem cash back through PayPal, Venmo, or free gift cards when you reach $20. Read our Ibotta review for more information.
  • Fetch Rewards. If you like Ibotta, Fetch Rewards is another must-download app. With Fetch Rewards, you earn points for buying products from dozens of popular brands. An advantage of Fetch Rewards is that you can redeem many free gift cards once you reach $3, which is possible in a single shopping trip. Read our Fetch Rewards review for more information.
  • Checkout 51. Checkout 51 is similar to Ibotta. Download Checkout 51, select offers to shop for, and upload your receipt to earn rewards. Checkout 51 works at stores like Aldi, Albertsons, Costco, Kroger, Meijer, and Walmart. You get a check when you earn $20 in cash back. Read our Checkout 51 review for more information.

There’s still nothing wrong with using paper coupons or mobile coupon apps if that’s all you have time for. But to save even more, it’s worth trying cash-back rewards apps alongside your couponing efforts.

3. Do Sign Up for Store Savings Cards

Sign up for rewards cards at the stores where you shop. Store rewards cards typically provide shoppers with additional savings in the form of reward points or discounts. Plus, some loyalty programs also send additional coupons in the mail.

Reward cards also help you earn more with Ibotta since you can connect cards from retailers like Meijer, Kroger, and Wegmans to your account. Once you connect a card, Ibotta automatically detects whether your purchase qualifies for cash back and pays you.

4. Do Stay Organized to Maximize Savings

Organize coupons to keep them easily accessible when you shop. The last thing you want is to miss a coupon when checking out or — even worse— forget your coupons at home.

Your organizational system doesn’t have to be complex or expensive. For casual couponers, a coupon wallet on Amazon costs around $10 and comes with dividers to group coupons into different sections, like meat or produce.

If you prefer managing everything from your smartphone, you can also use the free SnipSnap app to transform paper coupons into digital ones. Once you snap a picture of a paper coupon, Snip Snap uploads it to its database so you can use it while on the go. The app also tracks expiration dates and sends reminders about expiring coupons.

5. Do Know Your Store’s Coupon Policy

Does your grocer double coupons, price-match, accept competitor coupons, or give rain checks if sale goods are out of stock? If you don’t know, research coupon policies online. Grocery stores and general retailers like Walmart and Target outline coupon rules on their websites. To find a policy, use a browser to search for the name of your store of choice plus “coupon policy” (for example, “Kroger coupon policy”) or look for a frequently asked questions section on the website. These policies help you save even more money, and they aren’t always prominently advertised. Things to stay informed about include:

  • Price Matching. Stores don’t like losing a potential sale because a competitor has a slightly lower price tag, so many are willing to price match. Price matching is when a store adjusts its price to match a sale at another local store.
  • Competitor Coupons. Your store may accept competitors’ coupons, but you should clarify who their competitors are. For example, Publix accepts coupons for competitors’ private-label products, whereas Meijer doesn’t take competitor coupons at all. But some stores are more specific than Publix. Lowes Foods accepts competitor coupons only from select competitors, like Aldi, Food Lion, Target, and Walmart.
  • Rain Checks. When you want to buy an out-of-stock product, some stores issue rain checks, which guarantee the current price when it’s back in stock. But many stores have specific rules for rain checks. For example, Publix only issues one rain check per household per day (in addition to other, sometimes product-specific restrictions).

6. Do Know Local Stores’ Best Deals & Sale Patterns

You can get the most out of any coupon when you shop at the stores with the best deals for that product type, such as canned goods or toiletries.

That requires paying attention as you shop around. Over time, you learn each local store’s pricing quirks and sale patterns. For example, perhaps your local Walmart’s bakery section regularly puts bread and bagels on sale during certain days of the week. Or maybe your town’s Kroger has better prices and more frequent discounts on frozen meals than your local Publix.

As you learn this type of information, you can be more selective about where you shop for individual products. You don’t have to waste time and gas shopping at multiple stores for a single grocery trip, but for specific products, it can make sense to coupon at stores that are more likely to have deals or just better prices on that product category.

7. Do Start Slowly

When you first start couponing, it feels intimidating if you’re redeeming dozens of coupons and have a lot of numbers to crunch.

For your first few shopping trips, focus on the highest-value coupons, the ones you know are worth using. That might look like bringing three 50%-off coupons or your highest-dollar-value-off coupons.

You can even try using coupons on sale products, but don’t get too creative until you’re comfortable calculating whether things are good deals and handing over coupons at the register.

8. Do Try Stacking Coupons

Combining a coupon with a store sale is a simple way to stack savings. But you don’t have to limit yourself to just stacking coupons with sale prices. Stores like Dollar General, Meijer, and Target let you stack a manufacturer’s coupon and store coupons to save even more.

For example, if Target has Planters peanuts on sale for $2, you can use a $1 Target coupon for Planters products and a $1 Planters manufacturer’s coupon to score a free can of peanuts. You can find store coupons online or in your favorite store’s weekly flyers.

If you can’t get something for free, try stacking coupons with store sales and apps like Ibotta to maximize savings.

For example, there’s a 50%-off clearance sale on a $3.99 Red Baron pepperoni pizza, bringing the price down to $2. If you have a $1 manufacturer coupon, the price is just $1. But since Ibotta has a $0.75 rebate on Red Baron pepperoni pizza, you just scored an entire pizza for only $0.25.

To top it all off, shop with a cash-back credit card to earn even more. The goal of couponing is to find deals whenever possible and get creative to stretch the value of every dollar you spend.

9. Do Use the Overage

When your coupons exceed the sale price of a product, it produces an overage. While that doesn’t invalidate the coupons, most often, that means you get the product for $0.

However, certain retailers apply overages toward other products in your shopping cart. For example, say you get an overage of $0.50 on a box of Betty Crocker chocolate cake mix by using a manufacturer coupon and sale price. Overage-allowing retailers apply the $0.50 overage to another product in your cart.

Walmart and Kroger are two major retailers that apply overages to your cart. And Walmart is one of the few retailers that pays cash back for overages (except on purchases made using government benefits, so save coupons for purchases you make when you’re not using your SNAP and WIC benefits). Kroger issues overages on a merchandise return card (essentially, a Kroger gift card). If you’re in doubt, look up your store’s coupon policy online to learn about overage rules.

10. Do Present Coupons in the Right Order

You can maximize your savings by handing the cashier your coupons in a specific order. For example, if you have a store coupon for $5 off a $20 purchase, use that coupon first. Otherwise, your other coupons might negate the $5 coupon by discounting the total amount of the sale to less than $20.

Some stores automatically apply your coupons correctly, so the order doesn’t always matter. But to be safe, give the cashier the price-minimum coupon before you use any other coupons.

11. Do Get in & Get Out

Know what you plan to buy before you go to the store, and stick to your shopping list.

If you stay in the store too long, you become susceptible to their marketing ploys, and you may end up spending more money. Get in, get the deals, and then get out.

If you shop during less busy grocery shopping hours, like during the week or at night, your trips will also be faster than battling weekend shopping crowds.

12. Do Stock Up

If you spot an incredible couponing opportunity on nonperishable goods or products you use frequently, it’s generally a smart move to stock up. It ensures you benefit from the deal as much as possible and lets you use more coupons before they expire. It’s an excellent way to set up long-term emergency food and supply storage.

Stacking coupons and store sales lets you score the lowest price possible when stocking up. For example, if Green Giant canned corn is on sale for $0.99 per can and you have several BOGO coupons or manufacturer coupons for $0.50 off per can, you can stock up on as many cans as possible to build your food storage for less than half the regular price.

Some stores limit the number of sale products you can purchase at once. If a store puts a limit on something and you need more of it, visit other store locations to create your stockpile.

Stocking up also lets you be pickier about when you use coupons. For example, if you run out of toilet paper, shop your emergency pantry first. You can replace your emergency supplies when you’re able to stack a sale and a coupon rather than buying full-price TP without a coupon.

That’s especially important for edible pantry goods. Canned and dried foods last a long time, but even they eventually go bad. This method ensures your emergency supplies are always safe to eat. If you have to throw them away, you won’t save any money (and may be in trouble if you need them during a bona fide emergency).

But before you come home with 30 cans of creamed corn, make sure you have a place to store it. You can convert a small area of your home, like a guest room closet or second bathroom linen closet, into your emergency pantry.

13. Do Donate the Excess

When couponing, you sometimes encounter scenarios where you can get so much of a free or cheap product that you can’t even use it all before it expires. It’s still a better deal than purchasing without a coupon, but the thought of letting all that product go bad doesn’t sit well with most people.

Instead of turning down an incredible deal, look into ways to donate excess couponing successes to people in need. Charities like homeless shelters, food banks, and women’s shelters make excellent candidates for donations. You can also reach out to local churches and community outreach programs to see if they need certain supplies.

You may even be able to take a charitable contribution tax deduction.


Couponing Don’ts

If you ever watched shows like TLC’s “Extreme Couponing,” successful couponing looks like hours of dumpster diving for coupon flyers, endless clipping, and (in some cases) being way too frugal.

But couponing doesn’t have to become your full-time job. You don’t need to make things overly complex either. As long as you follow couponing best practices and avoid some common couponing mistakes, your savings can benefit without transforming your living room into a coupon-clipping factory.

1. Don’t Shop Without a Meal Plan

Shopping with a meal plan is an often overlooked couponing tip, but it’s crucial to saving money. If you don’t have a plan to use the products you’re buying each week, you’re more likely to waste food.

Additionally, shopping without a menu makes you more likely to buy convenience food: frozen pizzas, hot dogs, and other fast meals. While these are delicious, they’re not conducive to eating healthy on a budget.

When building your shopping list, plan dishes that line up with products you have coupons for. For example, you find a $1-off coupon for two bags of Sargento cheese, a $0.25 coupon for Classico pasta sauce, and a coupon for $1 off two boxes of Mueller’s pasta. You can plan to make lasagna for dinner one night that week and macaroni and cheese as a side for another meal.

Or perhaps you find a coupon for an ingredient that’s central to many dishes, like chicken or ground beef, that also happens to be on sale. You can plan to make several recipes that use that ingredient, then stack the sale and coupon for even more savings.

If that sounds intimidating, affordable meal-planning services like $5 Meal Plan provide a month’s worth of dinner recipes and various breakfast and lunch ideas for only $5 per month.

2. Don’t Use a Coupon on a Full-Price Product

If you use a $1-off coupon on a full-price two-pack of SlimFast protein drinks for $5.68, you still pay $2.34 per beverage. But if you wait until SlimFast is on sale, you can save even more money. For example, if SlimFast goes on sale for 20% off, you can buy two drinks for $4.54, use your coupon, and pay $3.54, or $1.77 each, saving nearly 40% on your purchase.

That’s why operating with an emergency pantry is such a good idea. If you need to restock on an ingredient or product that day, you have to use coupons even if you miss a sale (or worse, pay full price without a coupon). But if you can afford to wait, you can save money in the long run by shopping during sale periods and with coupons more often.

3. Don’t Buy Something Just Because It’s on Sale

Don’t let sale prices trick you into buying something you don’t typically use just because it looks like a deal. If you use coupons without thinking, you inevitably buy things that are a waste of money or products that expire before you have a chance to use them.

Jumping on every great deal out there significantly lightens your wallet and defeats the whole purpose of couponing. That said, if you find a fantastic deal on something you can donate, there’s nothing wrong with couponing for charity.

4. Don’t Be Brand-Loyal

Prego or Ragu spaghetti sauce? Skippy peanut butter or Jif? Which brand should you buy? The answer: whichever one you can get the cheapest using your coupons.

Many people start couponing because of a major life event, like job loss, pregnancy, or too much debt. Those aren’t the times to be brand-loyal. You need to save money, and you can’t do that if you pass on deals because you prefer specific brands.

And sometimes, the cheapest bet is to go with the store brand, even if it means passing up on a coupon or sale for another brand.

For example, at Walmart, the Great Value line is extensive, covering a range of affordable grocery products and everyday essentials. If your coupons can’t beat Great Value, it’s probably best to save them for another time.

Plus, many retailers give coupons for their own brands through register coupons and coupon mailers, so you can still find ways to save on already affordable store brands.

5. Don’t Use Every Coupon

Some coupons don’t represent real savings. For example, a coupon for $0.50 off two boxes of brand-name cereal doesn’t result in much savings. That’s only $0.25 off each box. Even during a good sale, the coupon may not take the total price down to a better deal than the store brand. Wait for a better coupon and another sale.

Sometimes, you also have good coupons nearing their expiration dates but no sales on the goods you need. Let them expire. You don’t have to use the coupons, especially if you have to buy a brand name at full price to do so.

Couponing is about saving money, not getting good deals on brand-name products.

If you really need something, buy one or two of them now and wait for a sale to buy in bulk.

6. Don’t Waste Time

It’s easy to fall into the couponing trap of spending so much time searching for deals and preparing to shop that you’re turning couponing into a part-time job (there are better side gigs to make extra money).

Start by asking yourself how much time you want to dedicate to couponing. The answer could be 15 minutes on Sunday to look through coupon apps or a couple of hours every week to do more thorough research.

With a time commitment in mind, you should also work efficiently. Some tips to save time when couponing include:

  • Only clipping paper coupons you know you’re going to use
  • Turning clipping into a family activity (don’t forget safety scissors for the younger ones)
  • Linking store loyalty cards with apps like Ibotta to avoid preselecting rebates before shopping

You can also order groceries online and use coupons to save both time and money. Online grocery shopping gives you plenty of time to scout deals and coupons and do the math without feeling pressured. It also saves you from clever marketing tactics that induce impulse buys. They try to do the same things online, but you have more time to talk yourself out of it. And you can typically use the same or similar coupons online you do in stores.

For example, at Kroger, you can load digital coupons onto your Kroger Plus card and have them automatically apply to your online grocery order. And if you pick up the order, you can also use paper coupons (Kroger only accepts their own digital coupons for delivery). Just make sure you hit any free pickup minimums to ensure you’re really saving.

As long as couponing is enjoyable and effective, you’re on the right track. Plus, as you gain experience, you’ll find certain coupon apps or websites work best for your shopping habits and become even more efficient at growing your coupon supply.

7. Don’t Print Coupons You Don’t Use

Online printable coupons from websites like Coupons.com can save money. But you still use computer paper and ink to print the coupons, which costs money and wastes paper.

Many people print every online coupon available and then throw most of them away. Print online coupons as you need them. Save any you’re interested in but don’t need as a PDF or browser bookmark.


Final Word

In many ways, learning to coupon is a series of stages. At first, you use a few tips that are convenient to save, like buying products you have coupons for. As you become more comfortable, you start to mix in tricks like coupon stacking and simply using more coupons per shopping trip. If you start loving the process, you eventually graduate to extreme couponing, where it’s possible to score entire grocery hauls for almost pennies on the dollar if you get it right.

Whatever stage you’re in, the goal of couponing is to save more of your money. How much time you spend on it is up to you.

Source: moneycrashers.com

Spring Cleaning: 6 Tips to Keep Your Apartment Allergen-Free

Indoor allergies caused by dust mites, pet dander and mold trigger allergy and even asthma symptoms in millions of indoor allergy sufferers each year. Spring cleaning is on the horizon!

While it is impossible to make your home completely allergen-free, below are a few tips to clear most of the bothersome allergens from your apartment.

Dust your surfaces

dusting surfacesdusting surfaces

Dust is the most common cause of indoor allergies, but be careful how you dust, because you can actually make your allergies worse by kicking up dirt and debris while you’re cleaning.

Use a wet or treated cloth that attracts dust, minimize dust-catching clutter and clean dusty surfaces, such as ceiling fan blades, regularly so that dust doesn’t have a chance to accumulate.

Vacuum

vacuumingvacuuming

To really ensure your space stays allergen-free, any carpet or rugs should be replaced with hard flooring, but that might not be an option in your apartment. Instead, use a vacuum that has a HEPA filter that traps dust mites, pet dander and other allergens, and try to vacuum at least once or twice a week.

Wash your bedclothes

washing bed sheetswashing bed sheets

Dust mites thrive in bedding, so wash your sheets, blankets and pillowcases once a week in hot water, then dry them in a hot dryer, to kill all the dust mites. Also, encase mattresses, comforters, pillows and other non-washable items in allergen-proof covers.

Go green

eco cleaning productseco cleaning products

Many cleaning products have harsh chemicals that can trigger allergic reactions in people. Opt for environmentally-friendly cleaning products instead. These contain plant-based, natural ingredients. You can also make many common household cleaners using things like baking soda, vinegar and lemon juice.

Reduce pet dander

dog on floordog on floor

A protein found in the saliva and dead skin of dogs and cats is a common indoor allergen. If you have pets, vacuum frequently and wash your pet once a week. You can also keep them off your bed and furniture and even designate certain areas of your apartment as pet-free areas. And if know there’s a certain pet that you know sets off your allergies, don’t get that type of animal. Unfortunately, a short-haired dog or cat will still cause an allergic reaction.

Go on mold patrol

bathroom moldbathroom mold

Spores from mold and mildew can get into the air and cause allergies and even sickness. Run an exhaust fan after you take a shower, and replace any bathroom wallpaper with tile or mold-resistant paint. Replace moldy or mildewed curtains and moldy carpeting.

Following these guidelines should keep your apartment relatively allergen-free, and you’ll be much more happy and healthy.

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Source: apartmentguide.com

18 Simple Storage Tips for Small Apartments

The average U.S. household has 300,000 things in it.

From the tiniest thumbtack to each book on your shelf and every piece of clothing hanging in your closet, there’s a lot of stuff to keep organized. It’s even more daunting if you’re bringing it all into a smaller apartment.

Many people tend to look at a smaller home and see what’s missing — space. Yet, fewer closets and less built-in storage doesn’t mean you’re missing out on somewhere to put your stuff.

If you’re smart with your furniture choices, color picks and organizational tactics, every corner of a small space can become a “beloved spot.”

Cut the clutter

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When working with a smaller living space, your goal, according to Michelle Crouch writing for Reader’s Digest, should be to remove clutter not create more storage space. Clutter can manifest as items you want to keep, but not display, as well as things that you no longer need.

Certain keepsakes you want to hold onto can spend some time in a storage unit until you have a larger home. Paper records, greeting cards, mementos from special events (that aren’t that special anymore) and old letters from past relationships are all things that no longer need to follow you from place to place.

In fact, having a smaller apartment can help you triage what you really want to keep with you. What’s left can either go into storage or head to the round file (a.k.a. the trash.)

Rearrange what’s left

After narrowing down your necessities, take a look at your apartment for hidden storage opportunities. Each room can yield more space than you may think upon the first inspection. Taking a close and thoughtful look can help you find the right place for all your belongings, even in a small apartment.

Bedroom

bedroombedroom

There are two areas in your bedroom that can be great for storage — your closet and under your bed. Maximizing space in your closet is possible with a variety of storage ideas. From special hangers to repurposing household items, your closet can hold twice as much stuff as you think.

  • Use vertical space: Stack shirts or pants on shelves
  • Shower curtain hangers: Install these in your closet to hold scarves, belts or even tank tops freeing up drawer space in your bedroom for bulkier items
  • Over-the-door shoe organizer: Less stuff on the ground helps your small space feel less cluttered
  • Under-bed storage: Even if you have a bed that’s lower to the ground, special storage bins exist that will slide under. Store your off-season clothing here to free up more space for the items you need.

Bathroom

bathroombathroom

Tips for organizing small spaces are handiest in the bathroom. It’s most likely the tightest space in a small apartment, but there’s room to spare in there, too. Overlooked areas ideal for extra storage include above the toilet and inside cabinets.

  • Over-the-toilet shelf: Since it slides in around the toilet, you’re not adding to the footprint within the bathroom. This is a great place to hold toiletries that don’t fit on the sink.
  • Over-the-door hooks: Perfect for wet towels or bathrobes
  • Shower caddies: Hang these over your shower head to hold soap and shampoo
  • Small storage containers on the inside of your bathroom cabinets: A great place for your hairdryer and straightener
  • A wine rack or special shelf for fresh towels: Putting them up on the wall makes sure they aren’t taking up valuable closet or cabinet space. It also looks decorative if you incorporate towels in vibrant colors.

Kitchen

kitchenkitchen

The best way to increase storage space in your kitchen is to add more counter space.

  • Make use of all free space: Large bowls have a lot of space in them. Condense your Tupperware or dishes by putting smaller objects inside of larger ones.
  • Appliances for storage: No cabinets, no problem! Your oven or microwave is a great place to keep dishes, pots and pans out of sight.
  • Portable chef’s cart: Put cutlery or even small kitchen appliances under it, then wheel the cart near an outlet when you have to plug in something. It gives you an extra surface to prep food, and you can move it out of the way when you’re done.
  • Wall hooks and over-the-door storage: Hang large utensils, pots and pans, cleaning supplies and even pantry staples

Living room

living roomliving room

Most likely the largest room in your apartment, the living room can serve as a catch-all for the stuff you need to store that won’t naturally go somewhere else.

  • Decorative boxes: They can fit under coffee tables or desks, and can hold almost anything. Store magazines, board games and puzzles, along with any personal items you want to keep but don’t need to display.
  • Book cart: If your couch is set up against a wall, consider moving it forward a little bit to create even more storage space. Slide in a cart to hold all your books in a way that’s easy to access.
  • Portable desk: Living rooms in small apartments often double as an office. Make the space less cluttered with the convenience of wheeling your small, portable workstation back into a corner when it’s not in use.

Hallways

hallwayhallway

While not technically a room, don’t dismiss the potential for storage in seemingly useless spaces. Your hallways are the perfect location for things like coats, shoes or umbrellas.

  • Coat rack: Give your guests a spot to hang their coats when they visit, rather than tossing them on a chair or your couch
  • Shoe cubby: Clear some space off the floor and keep your shoes organized

A word about shelving

Small storage shelves can go in almost any space in your home. They’re a universal space-saving device because they turn wall space into storage space. Especially in corners, which can feel like unusable areas of your apartment, shelves can save the day.

Trade in the cute, framed pictures you’ve put up on one wall and install shelves for instant storage. Deeper shelves can hold small bins, masking the appearance of anything that’s not so cute, and special corner shelving units nestle in nicely. There are so many shelving ideas out there, it’ll be easy to incorporate a few in your apartment.

After everything gets put away

Now that you’ve found a spot in your apartment for all your stuff, it’s time to decorate. Just because you have a small space doesn’t mean every nook and cranny has to go to holding stuff.

Leave a little room to make things pretty and transform your small space into the perfect home.

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Source: apartmentguide.com